Students who declare a Liberal Arts Minor will be afforded opportunities for increasingly more challenging and sophisticated work in the chosen disciplinary or interdisciplinary field.

You will receive formal recognition for study in the minor on your transcript. Each Liberal Arts Minor consists of four to five courses (16–20 credits) and requires completion of core and elective courses from a list of specified options.

If you are interested in pursuing an interdisciplinary minor, consult with your advisor and the Dean of the Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies.

African American & Africana Studies Minor

Students will explore African American, African, and African Diasporic intellectual, cultural, and political thought and traditions in both historical and contemporary contexts. African American culture has a story worth telling: one that includes multiple narrative threads that span the communities, cultures, and ethnicities of Africa and the African Diaspora. Through interdisciplinary study of a range of topics related to the local and global histories of people of African descent, students will critically engage the intersecting dimensions of race, privilege, and oppression in their own lives and in their communities.

The minor consists of five courses (20 credits), all of which may be fulfilled simultaneously with any number of Perspectives requirements. At least one course must be at the 300 or 400 level.

Required Course

  • IN 211 - Africana Thought and Practice

Literature and the Arts

Select at least one:

  • IN 301 - Post-Colonial Cinema*
  • IN 304 - Encountering Africa on the Page and Screen
  • IN 327 - REEL Race: In and Out of Hollywood
  • LI 212 - Black Revolutionary Thought
  • LI 214 - U.S. Latinx Literature
  • LI 215 - Slavery and Freedom
  • LI 312 - Harlem Renaissance*
  • LI 382 - African American Literature*
  • LI 424 - Imagining the Caribbean*
  • LI 481 - Topics in African American Literature* **
  • TH 313 - African American Theatre and Culture
  • VM 216 - African and African Diaspora Arts
  • VM 301 - Post-Colonial Cinema*
  • VM 309 - REEL Race: In and Out of Hollywood*

Social Sciences and Humanities

Select at least one:

  • HI 211 - African American History
  • IN 208 - Rainbow Nation? Race, Class, and Culture in South Africa
  • IN 223 - Blacks, Whites, and Blues
  • IN 318 - Worldwide Underground: Hip Hop As Resistance Around the Globe 
  • IN 421 - Key Contemporary Thinkers: Fanon 
  • IN 423 - Key Contemporary Thinkers: Du Bois 
  • PL 332 - Civil Rights 

In Context: Ethnic and Racial Studies

Select at least one:

  • CC 344 - Rhetoric of Social Movements*
  • HI 203 - Social Movements in the U.S. 
  • IN 152 - Cultural Constructions of Identity 
  • IN 154 - Power and Privilege 
  • IN 155 - Post-racial America? 
  • IN 325 - Space, Race, and Power 
  • LI 208 - U.S. Multicultural Literatures 
  • LI 209 - Topics in U.S. Multicultural Literature 
  • LI 309 - Topics in U.S. Multicultural Literature*
  • PS 306 - Psychology of Prejudice*
  • SO 200 - Race and Ethnicity: The Key Concepts 

Art History Minor

This minor focuses on the study of art as part of the human experience, examining artistic cultures across time and within different social and political contexts. Students have opportunities to study the history, theory, and criticism of visual arts from around the world. Courses in the minor encompass art and architecture from diverse and varied eras, geographical regions, and cultures.

The minor consists of four courses (16 credits) chosen from the following courses. No more than 4 credits may also count toward the Liberal Arts requirement.

Required Course

Select one:

  • VM 409 - Seminar in Western Art
  • VM 410 - Seminar in Non-Western Art

Historical Surveys

Select at least two:

  • VM 210 - History of Renaissance and Baroque Art
  • VM 211 - History of 18th- and 19th-Century Art
  • VM 212 - History of Modern Art in Europe and America
  • VM 213 - History of Art After World War II
  • VM 214 - History of East Asian Arts
  • VM 215 - History of South Asian Arts
  • VM 216 - History of African and African Diaspora Arts
  • VM 217 - History of Arts of the Americas and the Pacific

Visual Arts

Students must also successfully complete at least one other course in the Visual Arts (excluding studio arts or production courses). This may include the courses listed above or VM 105, VM 203, VM 205, VM 315, or any pre-approved Interdisciplinary Studies course offered through the Institute.

Digital Media & Culture Minor 

This minor offers students the opportunity to acquire a deeper understanding of how digital technologies are transforming society and culture. Participatory cultures are emerging through games and social media, and whole new modes of interaction are being crafted online, whether it be a game, social media site, or mobile application. From the disruption of established industrial models to the creation of new social norms, this minor asks students to create and analyze digital media that directly engages in this transforming and transformative culture.

A minimum of four courses, 16 credits, is required for the minor. Students must complete at least one course at the 300 or 400 level.

Required Course

  • IN 206 - Introduction to Digital Media and Culture

Elective Courses

Select three (at least one of which must be at the 300 or 400 level):

  • IN 216 - Topics in Digital Media and Culture
  • IN 224 - Souls for Sale: The Sales Effort, from Snake Oil to Dividual Selves
  • IN 333 - Power and Public Spheres
  • IN 334 - Code: Culture and Practice
  • IN 336 - It's Not Paranoia If They're Really After You
  • IN 361 - Global Media Literacy: Information and Activism Across Boarders, Across Cultures, Across Divides
  • IN 410 - Digital Media and Culture Lab
  • IN 411 - Civic Media in Action
  • CC 304 - Strategic Digital Communication
  • CC 360 - Social Media and Politics
  • EC 310 - Internet Economics and Digital Media*
  • JR 324 - Data Visualization*
  • VM 260 - Introduction to Interactive Media*
  • VM 270 - Introduction to Game Design*
  • VM 303 - Studies in Digital Media and Culture*
  • VM 375 - Advanced Interactive Media*

*Note prerequisites

**Check current course listings for specific topics

Advisor: Russell Newman

Economics Minor

This minor examines a range of economic analyses and schools of thought, allowing students to develop a more in-depth understanding of what work economists do, what economists study, and how economists see the same phenomena in related and different ways. Students will attain a more careful understanding of the economy and their place within it through exploration of the relationships between people and the institutions involved with economic decision making, such as laws, practices, and political organizations. 

The minor consists of five courses (20 credits).The 16 elective credits are chosen from the following courses, with at least three courses from List A, including one course at the 300 or 400 level. Students may choose one course (4 credits) from List B to count toward the minor, but it is not required.

Required Course

  • EC 203 - Principles of Economics

Elective Courses

List A 

Select at least three:

  • IN 326 - Too Thick to Navigate: The Ecology and Economics of Rivers*
  • EC 204 - Cultural Economics
  • EC 210 - Topics in Economics
  • EC 310 - Internet Economics and Digital Media
  • EC 410 - Common Pool Resources
  • EC 412 - Behavioral Economics 

List B

Select one (optional):

  • IN 224 - Souls for Sale: The Sales Effort, from Snake Oil to Dividual Selves
  • IN 336 - It's Not Paranoia If They're Really After You
  • IN 422 - Key Contemporary Thinkers: Marx
  • MT 207 - Statistics

*Note Prerequisites

**Check current course listings for specific topics

Advisors: Nejem Raheem, Tylor Orme

Environmental Studies Minor

This interdisciplinary minor examines environmental processes, challenges, and solutions from a variety of perspectives, including science, policy, economics, history, ethics, media, literature, and the arts. Students will explore the relationships between people and the environment, focusing in particular on the sustainable use of natural resources and the causes, consequences, and communication of the complex environmental problems faced by human societies, including air and water pollution, habitat loss and restoration, and climate change.

A minimum of four courses, 16 credits, is required for the minor: Students complete at least one course from each of the following tracks and at least one course at the 300 or 400 level.

Environmental Sciences Track

Select at least one:

  • SC 220 -  Energy and Sustainability
  • SC 221 -  Meteorology
  • SC 222 -  Earth Science: Natural Disasters
  • SC 223 -  Climate Change
  • SC 224 -  Ecology and Conservation
  • SC 225 -  The Science and Politics of Water
  • SC 226 -  Plants and People
  • SC 292 -  Topics in Environmental Science**
  • SC 320 -  Science in Translation: Environmental Science*
  • SC 321 -  Environments, Ecosystems, and Cultures of the Past*
  • SC 392 -  Advanced Topics in Environmental Science*

Social Sciences, Humanities, and the Arts Track

Select at least one:

  • EC 203 - Principles of Economics
  • EC 410 - Common Pool Resources: Traditional Irrigation in Northern New Mexico*
  • IN 234 - Topics in Environmental Studies**
  • IN 326 - Too Thick to Navigate: The Ecology and Economics of Rivers*
  • JR 320 - Environmental Journalism*
  • LI 217 - Literature, Culture, and the Environment
  • LI 405 - Reading and Writing the Environment*
  • PH 204 - Environmental Ethics

*Note prerequisites

**Check current course listings for specific topics

Advisor: Jon Honea

Global and Post-Colonial Studies Minor 

This minor provides students with an understanding of our increasingly complex, globalized world. Through the lens of literature, the arts, history, politics, and culture, students are introduced to key concepts in global and post-colonial studies. Through an awareness of marginal knowledge systems and neglected histories, students critically engage the global in their lives.

This minor requires four classes (16 credits). 

Required Course

Select one:

  • IN 203 - Post-Colonial Cultures
  • IN 213 - Introduction to Global Studies

Elective Courses

Select three (at least one of which must be at the 300 or 400 level):

  • CC 221 -  Global Political Communication
  • HI 200 -  Contemporary World History
  • HI 201 -  Africa, Asia, and the Middle East in Popular History
  • HI 204 -  Islam in the World
  • HI 227 - Radical Women in Contemporary World History
  • HI 240 -  Topics in World History**
  • HI 310 -  Demystifying Revolutionaries: Race, Imperialism, and Transformative Change in Latin America*
  • HI 340 -  Advanced Topics in World History**
  • IN 110 -  Culture, the Arts, and Social Change
  • IN 203 -  Post-Colonial Cultures (if not used as core course)
  • IN 208 -  Rainbow Nation? Race, Class, and Culture in South Africa
  • IN 210 -  Topics in Global Studies**
  • IN 211 -  Africana Thought and Practice
  • IN 213 -  Introduction to Global Studies (if not used as core course)
  • IN 235 -  The Arab Uprisings: A Social History of the Modern Middle East and North Africa
  • IN 236 -  Global Revolts and the Crisis of Neoliberalism
  • IN 301 - Post-Colonial Cinema
  • IN 304 -  Encountering Africa on Page and Screen
  • IN 307 -  Gender, Sexuality, and the Middle East
  • IN 318 - Worldwide Underground: Hip-Hop as Resistance Around the Globe
  • IN 321 -  Asian/Pacific Rim Film and Literature
  • IN 322 -  Food and Globalization
  • IN 324 -  Visual Ethnography
  • IN 325 -  Space, Race, and Power
  • IN 335 -  500 Years of Globalization
  • IN 351 - Global Social Movements and Radical Social Thought
  • IN 361 - Global Media Literacy: Information and Activism Across Boarders, Across Cultures, Across Divides**
  • IN 370 -  Advanced Topics in Global Studies**
  • IN 421 -  Key Contemporary Thinkers: Fanon
  • JR 270 -  Civic Art and Design Studio
  • LI 211 -  Topics in Global Literature**
  • LI 311 -  Topics in Global Literature* **
  • LI 324 -  Latin American Short Fiction*
  • LI 381 -  Global Literatures*
  • LI 396 -  International Women Writers*
  • LI 423 -  Topics in Global Literature* **
  • LI 424 -  Imagining the Caribbean*
  • LI 436 -  Cultural Criticism*
  • PL 220 -  International Politics
  • PL 222 -  Human Rights
  • PL 230 -  The United States and Latin America
  • PL 310 -  Collective Action and Identity Politics*
  • PL 322 -  Truth, Justice, and Reconciliation
  • RL 115 -  Islamic Ways of Life
  • SO 206 -  Gender in a Global Perspective
  • SO 305 -  Religion and Globalization
  • VM 214 -  History of East Asian Arts
  • VM 215 -  History of South Asian Arts
  • VM 216 -  History of Africa and African Diaspora Arts
  • VM 217 -  Arts of the Americas and the Pacific
  • VM 301 -  Post-Colonial Cinema*
  • VM 311 -  Latin American Cinema*
  • VM 410 - Seminar in Non-Western Art
  • VM 418 -  Transnational Asian Cinemas*

*Note prerequisites

**Check current course listings for specific topics

Advisor: Nigel Gibson

Health and Society Minor

This interdisciplinary minor examines the role that cultural norms, values, history, media, science, and policy play when it comes to issues of health, wellness, and disability. Students gain an understanding of how the body works, the impact of disease, and how to critically evaluate scientific information and data. Students will learn how to communicate science and health information as it relates to our daily lives and in the context of media, policy, and public health.

Students must complete four courses (16 credits) from the list of courses below to complete the minor. At least one course must be completed at the 300 or 400 level.

Students who minor in both Psychology and Health and Society may not double count PS 201 and PS 340.

Courses

Human Biology and Health

Select at least one:

  • CD 234 - Speech and hearing Anatomy & Physiology
  • CD 315 - Autism*
  • CD 403 - Speech Science
  • SC 210 - Human Health and Disease
  • SC 211 - Food and Nutrition
  • SC 212 - Evolution of Human Nature
  • SC 213 - The Brain and Behavior
  • SC 214 - Plagues and Pandemics
  • SC 215 - Personal Genetics and Identity
  • SC 216 - DNA and Society
  • SC 291 - Topics in Human Biology and Health**
  • SC 310 - Science in Translation: Health and Genetics*
  • SC 391 - Advanced Topics in Human Biology and Health* **

Social Sciences, Humanities, and the Arts

Select at least one:

  • CC 210 - Culture, Diversity, and Health Communication
  • CC 214 - Mental Health, Media, and Public Policy
  • CD 240 - Arts, Health and Community
  • CD 153 - Disability and the Media
  • CD 193 - Introduction to Communication Disorders: Diversity and Difference
  • IN 316 - The War on Drugs
  • IN 317 - Special Topics in Health and Society**
  • IN 352 - Sex, Society and Health
  • PH 212 - Ethics of Eating
  • PS 201 - Abnormal Psychology*
  • PS 340 - Narratives of Disorder*

*Note prerequisites

**Check current course listings for specific topics

Advisor: Nancy Allen

History Minor

This minor emphasizes the power of studying the past. Courses chronicle the social, political, economic, and cultural trends that have shaped human society. Among the themes covered are the construction of historical accounts, the role of culture and memory as historical evidence, and the value of history in communication and arts careers and everyday life. Students are encouraged to critically engage with a wide range of primary and secondary sources, and will have the opportunity to examine how the documenting and “telling” of history largely affects what is presented as socially, culturally, and politically possible.

A minimum of four courses, 16 credits, is required for the minor. Students must complete at least one HI course at the 300 or 400 level. Students may choose up to one course that does not have a History (HI) designation. Students wishing to focus in either World History or U.S. History are advised to take two or more courses in those areas.

Required Course

Select one:

  • HI 200 - Contemporary World History
  • HI 235 - History of the United States

Elective Courses

Select three (at least one being a HI course at the 300 or 400 level):

  • HI 200 -  Contemporary World History (if not used as core course)
  • HI 201 -  Africa, Asia, and the Middle East in Popular History
  • HI 203 -  Social Movements in the U.S.
  • HI 204 -  Islam in the World
  • HI 208 -  Europe in Wartime: Conflicts of the 20th Century
  • HI 211 -  African American History
  • HI 214 -  Topics in U.S. History**
  • HI 227 - Radical Women in Contemporary World History
  • HI 235 -  History of the United States (if not used as core course)
  • HI 240 -  Topics in World History**
  • HI 310 -  Demystifying Revolutionaries: Race, Imperialism, and Transformative Change in Latin America*
  • HI 340 -  Advanced Topics in World History**
  • HI 498 -  Directed Study*
  • IN 203 -  Post-Colonial Cultures
  • IN 223 -  Blacks, Whites, and Blues
  • IN 230 -  Evolution of Queer Identity: History, Literature, and Theory
  • IN 304 -  Encountering Africa on Page and Screen
  • IN 316 -  The War on Drugs
  • PL 230 -  The United States and Latin America

*Note Prerequisites

**Check current course listings for specific topics

Advisor: Roger House

Latin American & Latinx Studies Minor

This minor explores Latin American and Latinx political and cultural theory and practice in both historical and contemporary contexts throughout the Americas. By way of an interdisciplinary approach to Latin American intellectual and artistic traditions, students will critically engage with the legacies of colonialism, migration, and globalization that continue to pervade ways of being and interacting. By looking at Latin American and Latinx culture on and across borders and in a range of contexts, this minor addresses the intersectionality of identities constructed between Latin America and the United States.

This minor requires four courses (16 credits). At least one course must be at the 300 or 400 level. Students are encouraged to study abroad and courses will be pre-approved on a case-by-case basis.

Required Course

  • PL 230 - The United States and Latin America

Elective Courses

Select three (at least one course must be at the 300 or 400 level):

  • HI 310 -  Demystifying Revolutionaries: Race, Imperialism, and Transformative Change in Latin America*
  • IN 209 - Women Warriors of Latin America
  • IN 360 -  Visual Art, Theatre, and Culture in Barcelona, Spain
  • LI 213 -  Latin American Literature and Cinema
  • LI 214 -  Latinx Literature
  • LI 310 -  Advanced Topics in Latin American Literature
  • LI 324 -  Latin American Short Fiction
  • LI 362 -  Topics in U.S. Latinx Literature*
  • LI 424 -  Imagining the Caribbean*
  • PL 310 - Collective Action and Identity Politics
  • PL 322 -  Truth, Justice, and Reconciliation*
  • VM 311 -  Latin American Cinema*

*Note prerequisites

** Check current course listings for specific topics

Advisors: Katerina Gonzalez Seligmann, Sebastian Ferrada

Literature Minor

This minor provides an introduction to broad, culturally inclusive, and interdisciplinary understanding of literature and what it means to write and communicate in a global community. Students have the opportunity to choose from a wide selection of literature courses that cover a broad range of aesthetic styles, formal genres, and political and historical contexts as they explore one of our more complex and important art forms.

At least 16 credits in Literature courses. No more than one course (4 credits) may be at the 200 level. The remaining 12 credits must be in courses numbered 300 or above. These courses should have a planned coherence; they may focus, for example, on a genre, tradition, area, or period.

Music History and Culture

The Music History and Culture Minor focuses on the study of music as part of the human experience, examining musical cultures across time and within different social and political contexts. Subjects range from broad overviews of classical, jazz, and world music to more focused studies of film, theater, electronic, and popular music.

This minor requires four courses (16 credits) of coursework from the following:

Required Course

  • MU 137 - Listening to Music 

Survey Courses

Select two:

  • MU 201 - History of Music: European
  • MU 202 - History of Music: American
  • MU 203 - Perspectives in World Music
  • MU 220 - History of American Popular Music 
  • MU 239 - History of Jazz
  • MU 256 - Deconstructing 20th Century Art Music
  • IN 223 - Blacks, Whites, and Blues

Upper-Level Courses

Select one:

  • MU 304 - History of the American Musical
  • MU 313 - Topics in Music History and Culture
  • MU 413 - Seminar in Music History and Culture
  • IN 318 - Worldwide Underground: Hip Hop as Resistance Around the Globe 

Students may use one course from the Liberal Arts requirements towards the Music History and Culture minor.

Peace and Social Justice Minor

This minor provides students with an opportunity to engage in critical inquiry around peace and social justice as a historical and contemporary topic. Through the lens of the social sciences, arts and humanities, political communication, media, and technology, students are introduced to key concepts, empirical realities and trends, and practical strategies linked with advocacy for peace and social justice. Students are encouraged to engage with the Office of Academic Engagement and the Elma Lewis Center, as well as programs such as Alternative Spring Break.

A minimum of four courses, 16 credits, are required for the minor. Students select courses from the list below and must include at least one course at the 300 or 400 level.

Courses

  • IN 110 -  Culture, the Arts, and Social Change
  • IN 154 -  Power and Privilege
  • IN 155 -  Post Racial America?
  • IN 208 -  Rainbow Nation? Race, Class, and Culture in South Africa
  • IN 211 -  Africana Thought and Practice
  • IN 235 -  The Arab Uprisings
  • IN 236 - Global Revolts and the Crisis of Neoliberalism
  • IN 326 -  Too Thick to Navigate: The Ecology and Economics of Rivers*
  • IN 333 -  Power and Public Spheres
  • IN 336 -  It's Not Paranoia if They're Really After You
  • IN 351 - Global Social Movements and Radical Social Thought
  • IN 353 - Topics in Peace and Social Justice
  • CC 220 -  Public Discourse in the U.S.
  • CC 263 -  Argument and Advocacy
  • CC 303 -  Politics, Advocacy, and Public Opinion
  • CC 344 -  Rhetoric of Social Movements*
  • CC 361 -  Public Diplomacy and Global Activism
  • CC 471 - Advanced Topics in Leadership, Politics, and Social Advocacy*
  • HI 203 -  Social Movements in the U.S.
  • HI 227 - Radical Women in Contemporary World History
  • JR 270 -  Civic Art and Design Studio
  • JR 300 -  History of the Alternative Press*
  • PH 110 -  Ethics and Justice
  • PL 222 -  Human Rights
  • PL 310 -  Collective Action and Identity Politics
  • PL 322 -  Truth, Justice, and Reconciliation*
  • TH 404 - U.S. Theatre and Society
  • VM 308 -  Cinema and Social Change*

*Note prerequisites

**Check current course listings for specific topics

Advisor: Yasser Munif

Philosophy Minor

Courses in this minor challenge students to articulate the foundations of their beliefs, judgments, and choices, to subject their implicit commitments to critical analysis, to reevaluate their values, and to pursue an examined life that is worth living. In a world inundated by banal information, the philosopher is a lover of radical wisdom who approaches life with the courage of her or his own convictions.

A minimum of four courses, 16 credits, are required for the minor. Students select courses from the list below and must include at least one course at the Liberal Arts 95 300 or 400 level. In addition to any PH course, students may elect to use HS 202 Sophomore Honors Seminar toward the Philosophy minor.

  • PH 105 - Introduction to Ethics
  • PH 110 - Ethics and Justice
  • PH 200 - Contemporary Ethics
  • PH 203 - Special Topics in Ethics or Value Theory
  • PH 204 - Environmental Ethics
  • PH 205 - Virtues, Vices, and Temptations
  • PH 206 - Free Will, Responsibility, and Agency
  • PH 210 - Narrative Ethics
  • PH 212 - The Ethics of Eating
  • PH 215 - Political Philosophy
  • PH 220 - On Friendship
  • PH 221 - How to Be Human
  • PH 300 - Special Topics in Philosophy**
  • PH 303 - Citizenship As Civic Engagement
  • PH 305 - Great Philosophers*
  • PH 306 - Liberal Politics and Religion
  • PH 307 - Genesis
  • PH 308 - Moral Sentiments
  • PH 498 - Directed Study in Philosophy*
  • HS 202 - Sophomore Honors Seminar (Honors students only)

*Note prerequisites

**Check current course listings for specific topics

Political Science Minor

This minor offers students the opportunity to explore relationships between political, economic, cultural, and historical phenomena to facilitate analyses of the political world. Students will address the political nature of institutions, states, communities, and individuals by studying their constraints, choices, policies, and practices in the United States and around the world.

A minimum of four courses, 16 credits, is required for the minor. Students select courses from the list below and must include at least one PL course at the 300 or 400 level.

Required Course:

Select one:

  • PL 222 - Human Rights
  • PL 225 - U.S. Government and Politics
  • PL 230 - The United States and Latin America

Elective Courses:

Select three (at least one being a PL course at the 300 or 400 level):

  • PL 220 -  International Politics
  • PL 222 -  Human Rights (if not used as core course)
  • PL 225 -  U.S. Government and Politics (if not used as core course)
  • PL 230 -  The United States and Latin America (if not used as core course)
  • PL 240 -  Communication, Politics, and Law
  • PL 310 - Collective Action and Identity Politics*
  • PL 322 -  Truth, Justice, and Reconciliation
  • PL 332 -  Civil Rights
  • PL 333 -  The First Amendment
  • PL 410 -  Collective Action and Identity Politics*
  • PL 498 -  Directed Study in Political Science*
  • CC 405 -  Political Polling
  • HI 200 -  Contemporary World History
  • IN 213 -  Introduction to Global Studies
  • PH 215 -  Political Philosophy
  • PH 306 -  Liberal Politics and Religion

One course from the Washington DC Program may be applied toward the Political Science minor.

*Note prerequisites

Advisor: Mneesha Gellman

Psychoanalysis as Cultural Criticism Minor

This minor enables students to gain a foundation in the history of psychoanalysis, its central concepts, and contemporary applications in psychology, cultural studies, literature, and other fields. Students learn the basic ideas and methods of psychoanalysis, the ways in which these enhance understanding of human relations and creative practices, and a fuller appreciation of their usage in contemporary social and cultural theory.

The minor is a cooperative venture between Emerson College and the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute (BPSI). Students enrolled in any course that fulfills the minor will be offered special membership status and access to the events and library resources of BPSI, and BPSI-affiliated psychanalysts with special interest in the arts will be invited to teach.

The Psychoanalysis as Cultural Criticism minor requires four courses (16 credits), two of which must be IN courses and one must be at the 300 or 400 level. Students are encouraged but not required to complete the minor with a capstone directed studies project, IN 498. 

Required Course

  • IN 227 - Topics in Psychoanalysis as Cultural Criticism

Elective Courses

Select three (two of which must be IN courses and one must be at the 300 or 400 level):

  • IN 227 - Topics in Psychoanalysis as Cultural Criticism (topic not used as above)
  • IN 315 - Advanced Topics in Psychoanalysis as Cultural Criticism**
  • IN 421 - Key Contemporary Thinkers: Fanon
  • IN 424 - Key Contemporary Thinkers: Freud
  • IN 498 - Directed Study
  • LI 436 - Cultural Criticism*
  • SO 212 - Sociology of Emotions
  • PS 201 - Abnormal Psychology*
  • PS 307 - Psychology of Relationships*
  • PS 340 - Narratives of Disorder*

*Note prerequisites

**Check current course listings for specific topics

Psychology Minor

This minor provides students with a comprehensive background in psychology: the science of behavior and the mind. Students will examine core ideas, theoretical foundations, empirical research, and practical applications intended to enhance their understanding of psychological science and of themselves and others. Students also will have the opportunity to explore a range of topics in which psychological processes are at work, including the human nervous system, sensation and perception, language acquisition, cognition and learning, social development and interaction, and mental illness and psychotherapy.

The Psychology minor requires four courses (16 credits), two of which must be taken at Emerson, and one of them being at the 300 or 400 level. Students who minor in both Psychology and Science may not double-count SC 213 or SC 312.

Required Course

  • PS 101 - Introductory Psychology

Elective Courses

Select three (one must be at the 300 or 400 level):

  • PS 200 - Social Psychology
  • PS 201 - Abnormal Psychology
  • PS 202 - Developmental Psychology
  • PS 203 - Cognitive Psychology
  • PS 210 - Topics in Psychology
  • PS 301 - Personal Growth and Adjustment
  • PS 306 - Psychology of Prejudice
  • PS 307 - Psychology of Relationships
  • PS 340 - Narratives of Disorder
  • PS 380 - Advanced Topics in Psychology
  • PS 405 - Advanced Seminar in Psychology
  • PS 498 - Directed Study in Psychology
  • CD 201 - Language Acquisition
  • CD 315 - Autism
  • SC 213 - The Brain and Behavior
  • SC 312 - Visual and Spatial Perception

Advisor: Eileen McBride

Science Minor

This minor is an opportunity to explore what science has revealed about human biology and environmental science and to experience with more depth how science contributes to this body of knowledge. Students may pursue a minor in Science to satisfy curiosity about how the natural and physical world works, to hone approaches for acquiring reliable knowledge, and to inform interests in science as content and context for media-making.

The minor requires a minimum of four courses (16 credits), three of which must be taken at Emerson. All minors must include at least one course from the Human Biology and Health cluster, at least one from the Liberal Arts 97 Environmental Science cluster, and at least one 300 level Science course.

Human Biology and Health Courses

Select at least one:

  • CD 315 - Autism
  • CD 403 - Speech Science
  • HS 201 - Sophomore Honors Seminar
  • SC 210 - Human Health and Disease
  • SC 211 - Food and Nutrition
  • SC 212 - Evolution of Human Nature
  • SC 213 - The Brain and Behavior
  • SC 214 - Plagues and Pandemics
  • SC 215 - Personal Genetics and Identity
  • SC 216 - DNA and Society
  • SC 291 - Topics in Human Biology and Health
  • SC 310 - Science in Translation: Health and Genetics
  • SC 312 - Visual and Spatial Perception
  • SC 391 - Advanced Topics in Human Biology and Health

Environmental Science Courses

Select at least one:

  • SC 220 - Energy & Sustainability
  • SC 221 - Meteorology
  • SC 222 - Earth Science: Natural Disasters
  • SC 223 - Climate Change
  • SC 224 - Ecology & Conservation
  • SC 225 - The Science & Politics of Water
  • SC 226 - Plants and People
  • SC 292 - Topics in Environmental Science
  • SC 320 - Science in Translation: Environmental Science
  • SC 321 - Environments, Ecosystems, and Cultures of the Past
  • SC 392 - Advanced Topics in Environmental Science

Other Science Courses

  • SC 232 - Physics in Everyday Life
  • SC 290 - Topics in Science
  • SC 390 - Advanced Topics in Science
  • SC 498 - Directed Study in Science

Advisor: Amy Vashlishan Murray

Sociology and Anthropology Minor

This minor emphasizes the study of social life, social change, and patterns of human behavior. Through critical engagement with the complexities of social life, cultural expressions that may seem familiar are understood anew in relation to much larger social structures and forces. Student will gain a unique understanding of how culture is shaped and how social systems work in relation to broad processes such as globalization, nationalism, inequality, and social change.

The minor consists of four courses (16 credits), one of which must be a SO course at the 300 or 400 level.

Courses

  • SO 150 - Principles of Sociology/Anthropology
  • SO 180 - Culture and Power
  • SO 200 - Race and Ethnicity: The Key Concepts
  • SO 206 - Gender in a Global Perspective
  • SO 208 - Visual Society
  • SO 210 - Topics in Sociology and Anthropology
  • SO 212 - Sociology of Emotions
  • SO 222 - Humor and Society
  • SO 305 - Religion and Globalization
  • SO 310 - Advanced Topics in Sociology and Anthropology
  • SO 360 - Sociology of Insiders and Outsiders
  • SO 498 - Directed Study in Sociology/Anthropology
  • IN 152 - Cultural Constructions of Identity
  • IN 154 - Power and Privilege
  • IN 155 - Post-racial America?
  • IN 236 - Global Revolts and the Crisis of Neoliberalism
  • IN 307 - Gender, Sexuality, and the Middle East
  • IN 310 - Gender, Sexuality, and the American Music Industry
  • IN 322 - Food and Globalization
  • IN 324 - Visual Ethnography
  • IN 325 - Space, Race, and Power
  • IN 335 - 500 Years of Globalization
  • IN 421 - Key Contemporary Thinkers: Fanon
  • IN 422 - Key Contemporary Thinkers: Marx
  • IN 423 - Key Contemporary Thinkers: DuBois

Advisor: Samuel Binkley

Women's, Gender, & Sexuality Studies Minor

This minor offers students the opportunity to think critically about the meaning and expression of gender and sexuality in everyday life, culture, and institutions. Students will develop a historical awareness of the role of feminism as well as LGBTQ movements in both local and global contexts. This history and the more contemporary lived practices of sex, gender, and sexual orientation will be contextualized in relation to other categories of difference. After completing the minor, students will be more versed in imagining effective ways to combat inequity and foster transformations of identities and social roles.

The minor consists of four courses (16 credits), at least one of which must be at the 300 or 400 level.

Required Course

Select one:

  • IN 200 - Feminisms
  • SO 206 - Gender in a Global Perspective

Courses

Select three (at least one of which must be at the 300 or 400 level):

  • HI 227 - Radical Women in Contemporary World History
  • IN 117 - Women Artists in Cultural Contexts
  • IN 152 - Cultural Construction of Identity
  • IN 154 - Power and Privilege
  • IN 200 - Feminisms (if not used as core course)
  • IN 209 - Women Warriors of Latin America
  • IN 214 - Topics in Gender Studies
  • IN 230 - Evolution of Queer Identity: History, Literature, and Theory
  • IN 307 - Gender, Sexuality, and the Middle East
  • IN 310 - Gender, Sexuality, and the American Music Industry
  • IN 319 - Feminist Cultural Theory*
  • IN 350 - Sexual Outcasts and Uncommon Desires
  • IN 352 - Sex, Society and Health
  • IN 374 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies**
  • IN 406 - Queer Dreams: Politics, Culture, and Difference*
  • LI 210 - American Women Writers
  • LI 396 - International Women Writers*
  • LI 436 - Cultural Criticism*
  • PS 306 - Psychology of Prejudice*
  • PS 307 - Psychology of Relationships*
  • SO 206 - Gender in a Global Perspective (if not used as core course)
  • TH 205 - Dress Codes: American Clothes in the 20th Century
  • TH 531 - Contemporary Women Playwrights

*Note prerequisites

**Check current course listings for specific topics

Advisor: Erika Williams