Department of Writing, Literature & Publishing

Courses


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  • LF101 - Elementary French 1 (4 Credits)
    Stresses mastery of essential vocabulary and primary grammatical structures through a situational approach. Students perceive that language is "living" and they discover by the third week of the semester that they can already communicate in French. Class time is devoted to interactive practice. Conversational skills, pronunciation, and understanding are verified through regular oral exams.
    Instructor: Pierre Hurel
  • LF102 - Elementary French 2 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of LF 101, this course also incorporates reading skills and exposes students to a wider range of cultural materials.
    Instructor: Pierre Hurel
  • LI120 - Introduction to Literary Studies (4 Credits)
    Gives students intensive practice in literary analysis, critical writing, and related research. In discussing primary texts, considerable attention is given to elements of the different genres (e.g., narrative point of view, narrative structure, metrical and free verse), as well as to issues relevant across literary genres (e.g., form and content, voice, contexts, tone). Readings are chosen from the following genres: poetry, drama, narrative modes, and also include selected literary criticism.
  • LI201 - Literary Foundations (4 Credits)
    Surveys foundational works of Western literature in poetry, nonfiction, fiction, and drama in order to familiarize students with literary history as well as the history of our ideas of love, duty, the afterlife, virtue, and vice. Authors studied may include Homer, Sophocles, Plato, Virgil, Ovid, Dante, Boccaccio, the Beowulf poet, and Chaucer.
  • LI202 - American Literature (4 Credits)
    Introduces representative works of American literature in several genres from the colonial period to the modern by writers such as Bradstreet, Franklin, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Douglass, Melville, Dickinson, Whitman, Chopin, Twain, Crane, Hurston, Faulkner, Williams, and Moore.
  • LI203 - British Literature (4 Credits)
    Historical overview of several genres of British literature from the Renaissance to the 20th century, focusing on writers such as More, Spenser, Milton, Defoe, Bronte, Eliot, Joyce, and Beckett.
  • LI204 - Topics in Literature: Urban Experience in Modern Literature (4 Credits)
  • LI204 - Topics In Literature: (4 Credits)
    hat?s in a face? In this course, we will take up this question by tracing the ways in which the face has been understood in scientific, social, ethical, and political terms over the last two centuries. Beginning in the nineteenth century with the pseudo-sciences of physiognomy and phrenology, we will explore how the face has been variously understood as a surface to be read and interpreted?not least of all in the service of criminology and eugenics. Over the course of the semester, we will read novels and examine scientific case studies and autobiographical accounts of individuals whose relation to ?the face??whether their own face, or the faces of others?is fraught, ruptured, or otherwise called into question. Finally, through an engagement with the philosophical work of Emmanuel Levinas, we will consider what it means for the face to become the site of the ethical encounter with the Other, rounding out the semester by exploring how human rights discourse has recourse to the face to embody a demand for political recognition on a global scale. Course texts may include Charlotte Bronte?s Villette, Oliver Sacks?s ?The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat,? Lucy Grealy?s Autobiography of a Face, J. M. Coetzee?s Life & Times of Michael K, and Michael Ondaatje?s Anil?s Ghost.
  • LI204 - Topics in Literature: (4 Credits)
    So much depends on dinner, and in literature, drama takes a seat among the forks and spoons. Whether it?s eating Chinese Food Naked (Mei Ng) or imagining ?How to Cook A Woolf? (MFK Fisher) food in fiction, poetry, and essays serves forth a banquet for the senses. In this class, we will read a range of writers addressing food, explore symbols and metaphors, and write both creatively and analytically on the subject.
  • LI204 - Topics In Literature: (4 Credits)
    This course examines literary representations of the modern urban experience, focusing primarily on fiction, poetry, and non-fiction. We will look closely at literary representations of the modern urban experience that reflect changes taking place in American society in the first half of the twentieth century, when cities were growing rapidly, and post WWII, when American inner cities, in particular, were experiencing severe urban decline. Specifically, we will be concerned with literature that addresses two major changes in how American people interacted with their environment and with each other in cities: massive migration to cities from rural areas and the division of urban space along social and racial lines. Our main focus will be particular cities and their residents, namely Chicago, New York City, and Washington, D.C.
  • LI204 - Topics in Literature: Slipstream Literature (4 Credits)
    Slipstream is not just a category of literature, but suggests an approach, an attitude toward living. It's not surrealism or magical realism or science fiction: it's a state-of-the-art concept that embraces a curiosity with the visionary, unreliable, odd or metaphysical. Cyberpunk auteur Bruce Sterling coined the phrase to describe writing ?? which unnerves; the way that living in the 21st century makes you feel, if you are a person of a certain sensibility. Slipstream is the Interzone that William Burroughs wrote about.? This semester we will explore work that crosses and jumps and leaps over genre, over borders, and over language to ride the next wave.
    Instructor: Peter Shippy
  • LI204 - Topics in Literature: Fashion, Manners and Morals from Jane Austen to Downtown Abbey (4 Credits)
    This course surveys the world of costume, dancing, and etiquette in literature and television/ film, from the Regency period through to the end of the 1920s. The class analyzes novels by Austen (Pride and Prejudice, Northanger Abbey, and Persuasion), alongside diaries and journals from the period, including those of Austen's cousin, Eliza de Feuillide. And it compares these works with texts from both the British and the American traditions, including novels by D.H. Lawrence (Women in Love), Edith Wharton (The Buccaneers, The Custom of the Country), and F. Scott Fitzgerald (The Great Gatsby and The Beautiful and the Damned). We conclude with a unit on the television series "Downton Abbey," interpreted in the context of the culture and mores of the Edwardian and 1920s periods in England.
    Instructor: Christina Carlson
  • LI204 - Topics In Literature: (4 Credits)
    Through Shakespeare?s history plays (especially Henry VIII and Sir Thomas More), tragedies (Richard III), alongside Hilary Mantel?s Booker prize winning Wolf Hall (2009) and Bring up the Bodies (2012), George R.R. Martin?s book series A Game of Thrones: A Song of Fire and Ice (first published in 1996), and the HBO Television Series based on it, this course examines the application of subjects such as personal self-interest, just rule, the social contract, virtu and fortuna, how to gain power and how to keep it, the perils of idealism, and addresses philosophical questions about the nature of reality, the mind-body split, consciousness and animal-human differentiation. Through its readings from drama, fiction, and non-fiction, this course examines the ways in which both early modern and modern concepts of jurisdiction engage with genealogy, dynasty, and inheritance in ways that are predicated on concepts drawn from Renaissance philosophers such as: Thomas Hobbes (Leviathan, 1651), Niccolo Machiavelli (The Prince, 1513), and Rene Descartes (Letter to the Marquess of Newcastle).
  • LI204 - Topics in Literature: Monsters and Victims in Women's Writing (4 Credits)
    This course examines the images of women as either victims or monsters from ancient Greek drama to contemporary women's writing from various parts of the world. It addresses issues such as the role of sex, gender, female sexuality, ritual and domestic violence, all linked with the image-making of such Greek tragedy figures as Medusa, the Harpies, Iphigeneia, Hecuba, Clytaemnestra, Phaedra and Medea, and explores how these issues, as well as the images of women as monsters or victims that they produce, are unsettled in contemporary women?s writing. Among the writers read in the course are Adrienne Rich, Ellen McLaughlin, She Hawke, Carole Braverman, Olga Taxidou, Theodora E. Sutherland and Paula Vogel.
    Instructor: Vassiliki Rapti
  • LI204 - Topics In Literature: Urban Experience in Modern Literature (4 Credits)
    The course comprises a selective investigation of texts that foreground issues of representation and the production of representations, including their own. We will be exploring and analysing ways in which modes of representation and modes of argument shape each other, in which these modes contribute to produce recognizably `literary? and recognizably `philosophical? discourse, and also in which these discourses privilege or exclude other particular modes of speech and representation.The course will juxtapose readings from classical, early modern, and modern philosophy with mostly modern literature in order to explore issues of representation, the construction of subjectivity, and the placement of the subject in the world. Literary texts will include Beckett?s Murphy, Borges? `The Aleph?, Kincaid?s At the Bottom of the River, Shelley?s Frankenstein, poetry Wallace Stevens, Lispector?s The Hour of the Star, and Woolf?s To the Lighthouse. Philosophical texts will include Heidegger?s `Spruch des Anaximanders?, Plato?s Republic, Aristotle?s De anima, Epicurus? `Letter to Men?ceus?, Descartes? Meditations with responses, Hume?s Treatise of Human Nature, Smith?s Theory of Moral Sentiments, Nietzsche?s Birth of Tragedy, and G.E. Moore?s `A Defence of Common Sense?.
    Instructor: Daniela Kukrechtova
  • LI204 - Topics in Literature: Collapsing the Empire (4 Credits)
    This course will focus on literary engagements with empire and representations of gender, race, and post/colonialism in a variety of genres, including novels, poems, and plays. We will primarily focus on the literature of the British Empire ? both English and Anglophone writers ? from the 19th and 20th centuries, though we may also address narratives of imperialism in texts in translation from across the globe. The course will address modernist anxieties over empire in the early 20th century as well as renegotiations of national identity after the independence of former colonies such as Ireland, India, and Jamaica to name a few. We will ask: What does it mean to explore issues or empire within our contemporary moment as well as within the context of history? Authors may include E.M. Forster, Jean Rhys, George Lamming, and Andrea Levy. Students will also engage with postcolonial discourse by theorists such as Edward Said, Bill Ashcroft, and Jenny Sharpe through weekly supplementary readings.
    Instructor: Shannon Derby
  • LI208 - US Multicultural Literatures (4 Credits)
    Introduces poetry, fiction, and other genres produced in the multicultural U.S.A. Explores ways writers from disparate communities use various literary forms to articulate resistance, community, and citizenship. Literary texts are situated in their historical contexts and examine the writing strategies of each author. Also includes essays, journalism, and films to learn how diverse cultural texts work to represent America.
  • LI210 - American Women Writers (4 Credits)
    Examines fiction, poetry, and other genres by 19th- and 20th-century American women such as Jacobs, Dickinson, Chopin, Kingston, Welty, Rich, and Morrison.
    Instructors: Anna Ross, Denise Delgado
  • LI213 - Latin American Literature and Cinema (4 Credits)
    Considers how Latin American authors use poetry, drama, essay, and fiction to provide alternative versions of national foundations, revolutionary movements and political repression. Students view literary writing in relationship to the languages of scientific inquiry, myth, history, anthropology, psychology and journalism.
  • LI215 - Slavery and Freedom (4 Credits)
    Looks at a wide-ranging survey of 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century poems, plays, novels, and nonfiction narratives concerning the issue of American slavery and its aftermath. Explores slave narrative conventions across historical periods as well as themes such as identity, masking, the liberating power of literacy, and masculine and feminine definitions of freedom.
    Instructor: Kimberly McLarin
  • LI216 - Literature of the Gothic (4 Credits)
    Focuses on literary and aesthetic tradition known as the Gothic, following its various manifestations from 18th century England up to present-day America. Students read novels, poetry, short stories and plays. Students interested in postmodern expressions of the Gothic, from graphic novels to film, will be invited to bring these to the table. Is Dracula really about the anxiety of empire? What is Frankenstein saying about social theory and the dangers of Romanticism? And finally, why does Gothic material retain its fascination in the 21st century, when so many aesthetic movements lie moldering in their graves?
    Instructor: William Orem
  • LI217 - Literature, Culture and the Environment (4 Credits)
    Examines the literature, art, and culture of Native and non-Native America and consider how these two very different traditions have affected the environment. Initially, students focus on Native Creation stories and on Genesis in order to better understand the definition of "wilderness." They then study the work of 17th-, 18th-, and 19th-century authors and artists who influenced and/or responded to how the environment should be managed. As students progress to the 20th and 21st centuries, they consider the work of artists, writers, and filmmakers who acknowledge and attempt to come to terms with a drastically changed and oftentimes degraded landscape in their work.
    Instructor: Christine Casson
  • LI303 - The Art of Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Examines a broad range of literary nonfiction works, present and past, paying particular attention to the craft within the nonfiction work but identifying relationships and similarities that literary nonfiction has with the novel and short story. Includes readings from such diverse forms as historical narrative, adventure travel and survival, memoir and the creative nonfiction essay, and other forms of factual writing artfully constructed.
    Instructor: Caitlin D. McGill
  • LI304 - Topics in Literature: (4 Credits)
    This course will focus on the literary and aesthetic tradition known as the Gothic, moving into more detail than the 200-level course (which is not a specific prerequisite). Our attention this semester will be on gothic narratives ranging from the late Victorian though the postmodern period. What does The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mister Hyde tell us about shifting perceptions of selfhood at the turn of the century? What does The War of the Worlds have to do with vegetarianism, religious crisis, and reverse colonization? Are there any ghosts at Bly? And finally, why does Gothic material retain its fascination in the 21st century, when so many aesthetic movements lie moldering in their graves?
  • LI304 - Topics in Literature: Place, Displacement, Memory in Exile Literature (4 Credits)
    Literature has traditionally been a welcoming space for people who, by choice or history, do not fit easily into the mainstream of society. This course will focus on the literature of writers who write from and about the position of an exiled ?outsider,? examining how literary art endeavors to contain, craft, and create that which is remembered. We will consider how narratives of recollection and forgetting produce the particular transport and recovery accessible through literary experience. Among the many questions to be raised, we will consider the ways in which literature can represent and reproduce the human, social, cultural, historical and political experiences of exile, whether an exiled individual experiences a forceful expatriation, a voluntary emigration, or even an internal exile. We will also consider the role that literature might play in creating a sense of community for immigrants, refugees, and other people living in various forms of exile.
    Instructor: Daniela Kukrechtova
  • LI304 - Topics in Literature: (4 Credits)
    This course examines how contemporary writers of U.S. Latino literature challenge and expand what it means to be American. Readings include works produced from 1985 to 2015 by authors such as Gloria Anzaldua, Miguel Pi?ero, Sandra Cisneros, Julia Alvarez, Junot Diaz, Giannina Braschi, Francisco Goldman, Justin Torres, Richard Blanco, Daniel Alarcon, Jennine Capo Crucet and Cristina Henriquez.
  • LI305 - Modern Poetry and After (4 Credits)
    Explores modern and postmodern traditions of poetry in the works of such 20th-century poets as Eliot, Stevens, Auden, Moore, Lowell, Bishop, Plath, Larkin, Rich, Ashbery, and, in translation, Neruda, Rilke, Herbert, Kazuk, and Tsvetaeva.
  • LI306 - Literatures of Continental Europe (4 Credits)
    Explores seminal works in the European literary tradition, with a particular focus on close reading, textual and rhetorical analysis, and aesthetic criticism. The course may include works by Montaigne, Rousseau, Flaubert, Holderlin, Novalis, Heine, Flaubert, Dostoyevsky, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Proust, Rilke, Kafka, Borges, Bachmann, and Bernhard.
    Instructor: Yu-jin Chang
  • LI307 - The Art of Poetry (4 Credits)
    Through reading and discussion of poems from different historical periods, students learn the technical aspects of poetry (such as meter, rhyme, and structure) and how poets use these techniques to create meanings and effects, giving students a critical vocabulary for reading and practicing poetry. For students who want to enhance their ability to discuss and write about poetry by learning the essentials of the poet's art.
    Instructor: Robin Riley Fast
  • LI308 - The Art of Fiction (4 Credits)
    Explores a broad range of short stories and novels by American and international authors. Teaches students to look at fiction from the perspective of the writer's craft, and emphasizes such elements as structure, narrative, characterization, dialogue, and the differences between shorter and longer forms. Students gain an appreciation of the fiction writer's craft and an enhanced sense of the drama inherent in effective storytelling.
  • LI309 - Topics in Multicultural Literature: Harlem Renaissance (4 Credits)
    Course examines some of the major poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction (autobiography and essay) of one of the most celebrated African American and American arts movements: the Harlem Renaissance. An extension of post-slavery identity for African Americans, the Harlem Renaissance emerged from the intersection of rural and urban; traditional and modern; nationalistic and cosmopolitan; and black and white. We will pay particular attention to migration, inter- and intra-racial relations, the interplay of race, gender, class, and sexuality, and the phenomenon of passing. In addition, although our primary focus will be on written texts, we will also explore the influence of music (jazz and blues) and visual art on the literature and culture of the period.
    Instructor: Erika R. Williams
  • LI311 - Topics in Global Literature: Latin American Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    This seminar explores the ways Latin American writers since the seventeenth century have constructed their identity by redefining literary journalism, memoir and autobiography. These writers and political activists inevitably project their sense of self within and against the religious, social and political realities that characterize their homeland at a specific historical moment. Voice, time and place are inextricably tied. Class discussion centers on text analysis in conjunction with essays that facilitate comprehension of the writer?s reality.
    Instructor: Flora Gonzalez
  • LI313 - Novel into Film (4 Credits)
    Studies the adaptation of novels into films, and the narrative conventions that govern each medium. Texts include the works of such writers as Kesey, Burgess, Kundera, Walker, Nabokov, and Puig; films include the work of directors such as Kubrick, Forman, Spielberg, and Babenco.
    Instructor: William Donoghue
  • LI339 - British Novel 1 (4 Credits)
    Engages in social and cultural analysis of the "rise" of the novel in England with representative works from the Restoration (1660) through the end of the 19th century. May include authors such as Behn, Defoe, Sterne, Richardson, Austen, Bronte, Shelley, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy.
    Instructor: William Donoghue
  • LI361 - Native American Literature (4 Credits)
    Studies works in several genres, including consideration of how traditional myth, story, and ritual contribute to contemporary fiction and poetry, and how the literature reflects and responds to historical and contemporary conditions. May include such authors as Silko, Momaday, Ortiz, Harjo, and Erdrich.
  • LI371 - Shakespearean Tragedy (4 Credits)
    Carefully examines selected tragedies from Romeo and Juliet to Antony and Cleopatra, emphasizing the development of the tragic form.
    Instructor: Adele Lee
  • LI382 - African-American Literature (4 Credits)
    Surveys African American literature (prose, poetry, and drama) from Olaudah Equiano through Toni Morrison and examines African American literature as part of the field of Diaspora studies. Also explores connections between African American and Caribbean American literatures conceived as literatures of the African Diaspora.
    Instructor: Wendy W. Walters
  • LI393 - American Novel 1 (4 Credits)
    Studies representative American novels written before the 20th century, including works by such authors as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Twain, Chopin, Wharton, and James
    Instructor: Lynne Feeley
  • LI394 - American Novel 2 (4 Credits)
    Studies representative works of 20th-century American fiction. May cover authors from the first half of the century such as Anderson, Cather, Faulkner, James, Hemingway, Dreiser, Wright, Ellison, and Bellow as well as more contemporary writers such as Roth, Coover, Nabokov, Morrison, DeLillo, Burroughs, Momaday, and Silko.
  • LI396 - International Women Writers (4 Credits)
    Explores works by contemporary international women writers within their social and political contexts. Readings include work by such writers as Nadine Gordimer, Jamaica Kincaid, Michelle Cliff, Mawal El Saadawi, Bessie Head, Luisa Valenzuela, and others.
  • LI401 - Topics in Poetry: (4 Credits)
    To paraphrase Charles Simic, reading a prose poem is like trying to catch a fly in a dark room. The fly isn't even there, the fly is inside your head, still, you keep tripping over and bumping into things while in hot pursuit. The prose poem is a burst of language following a collision with a large piece of furniture. Ouch. We will read marvelous work by Simic, Russell Edson, Anne Carson, Margaret Atwood, James Tate, All en Ginsberg, Mairead Byrne, Rita Dove, Matthea Harvey Frank O'Hara and many others.
  • LI411 - Topics in European Literature: (4 Credits)
    Games, gaming, gambling and play in every possible form, including video games, permeate our culture. This class will explore the theme of games in literature and in theory in a variety of genres. Drawing on the theory of games in literature and culture, such as the seminal works "Homo Ludens: A Study of the Play Element in Culture" (1955) by Johan Huizinga, or Roger Caillois's "Man, Play, and Games" (1961) and R. Rawdon Wilson's "Palamedes' Shadow: Explorations in Play, Game, and Narrative Theory" (1990), students not only will acquire new critical tools of reading literature, but also they will grasp a better understanding of how games lie at the heart of the art of fiction and how they define our perception of culture. Students will read some landmarks of literature such as J.R.R. Tolkien?s "The Fellowship of the Ring", poems by Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Dostoyevsky's "The Gambler", Samuel Beckett's "The End Game" and Julio Cortazar's "Hopscotch" among others.
  • LI414 - After the Disaster: Post-War European Literature (4 Credits)
    Explores post-war European literary works that are marked by a profound sense of loss, disorientation, and pessimism, with a particular focus on the practices of close reading, textual analysis, and theoretically oriented criticism. Explores how the events of the war- most notably the Holocaust -affected the literature of Europe in their wake. Authors to be read include Primo Levi, Ruth Kluger, Marguerite Duras, Maurice Blanchot, Michel Houellebecq, and W.G. Sebald.
    Instructor: Yu-jin Chang
  • LI421 - Topics in American Literature: (4 Credits)
    Walt Whitman?s poetry evokes varied and strong responses from readers. It has also inspired numerous other poets from diverse backgrounds. In this course we will be discovering how quite distinctive poets, each interesting and important in his or her own right, have created poetry that in differing ways reflects Whitman?s influence while pushing beyond his limits, talking back to him, and creating their own voices, styles, and poetics. In addition to Whitman, we will study poetry by several of the following: Allen Ginsberg, Pablo Neruda, Adrienne Rich, Suzanne Gardinier, June Jordan, Martin Espada, and Simon J. Ortiz.
  • LI423 - Topics in Global Literature: (4 Credits)
    What is (human) life worth, and at what cost?to our planet, to other species, to our own future?do we secure its well-being, convenience, and comfort? The contemporary novels we take up in this course all interrogate, in one way or another, the narratives of human exceptionalism that provide the justification for the forms of everyday violence that we inflict upon our environment, other species, and each other. In this course, we will consider how the value of some lives is secured through the devaluation of lives that are rendered ?disposable,? asking: who is (or can become) a disposable ?other,? and what is our ethical responsibility toward him, or her, or it? Course texts may include Margaret Atwood?s The Handmaid?s Tale, J. M. Coetzee?s Waiting for the Barbarians and Disgrace, Kazuo Ishiguro?s Never Let Me Go, Michael Ondaatje?s Anil?s Ghost, Primo Levi?s Survival in Auschwitz, and Ta-Nehisi Coates?s Between the World and Me.
  • LI423 - Topics in Global Literature: Latin American Short Fiction (4 Credits)
    Latin American Short Fiction considers short fiction written since the 1940s. It concentrates on major figures of the twentieth century beginning with Jorge Luis Borges who set the parameters of postmodern fiction in Latin American letters. The course centers on authors who ?problematize both the nature of the referent and its relation to the real, historical world by its paradoxical combination of metafictional self-reflexivity with historical subject matter? (Linda Hutcheon, A Poetics of Postmodernism). The course will also consider how writers reach out to a global audience by engaging popular literary forms such as detective fiction, the fantastic, melodrama, new journalism and magical realism.
  • LI423 - Topics in Global Literature: Transnational Englishes (4 Credits)
    This course explores the spread and diversification of English, its interactions with other languages, and its production and use in literature, politics, and everyday life. The course considers debates about "linguistic imperialism" and the ?inevitability? of English as a global lingua franca, the complicated relations of power between metropolitan and other varieties of English, and the cross-fertilizations of English and other languages as literary, political, and cultural resources
    Instructor: John Trimbur
  • LI423 - Topics in Fiction: Utopian, Dystopian, and Apocalyptic Fictions (4 Credits)
    ?That?s great, it starts with an earthquake? -R.E.M. This course takes early modern, romantic, and victorian visions of utopian worlds, 20th century dystopian visions, and some contemporary apocalyptic fictions. After dispensing some of the obvious allegorical questions about the function of these visions of ?Brave New Worlds,? we consider some of the more complex contours of utopian projects in opposition to dystopian and apocalyptic refutations and whether they are refutations at all. In particular we consider the idea of progress and futurity in the context of Marxist, postmodern, and poststructural theory. Possible texts may include More?s `Utopia?, Cavendish?s `The Blazing World?, Shelley?s `The Last Man', Orwell?s `1984?, Lawrence?s `Apocalypse?, Atwood?s `The Handmaid?s Tale?, Ishiguro?s `Never Let Me Go?, MacCarthy?s `The Road?, selections of Kirkman?s `The Walking Dead?, Mitchell?s `Cloud Atlas?.
    Instructor: Roy Kamada
  • LI481 - Topics in African-Amer Lit: (4 Credits)
    The course will survey the literary production and influence of Black English on American literature and culture. A particular focus will be placed on that broad section of primary texts, extending from slave narratives to contemporary African American expressions in literature, film, theatre, and even music. In addition to examining these works, a considerable focus will be placed on the secondary texts surrounding the development of Black and African-American aesthetics.
  • LI482 - Topics in Fiction: (4 Credits)
    An examination of some literary and visual ecosystems that generate intensity through the collision of energy fields and systems of notation rather than by appeals to the heart / may include works by Saramago, Murakami, Krasznahorkai, Tarkovsky and Bela Tarr, along with readings in functionalism and social theory by Bateson, Porush, Luhmann, Foucault et al.
  • LI612 - Topics in Poetry: (4 Credits)
    This course will explore the work of modern and contemporary European poets whose poems reflect a range of ideas about what poetry "is" and "does" in an aesthetically unsettled time.. Among the poets we may focus on: Baudelaire, Rilke, Aragon, Akhmatova, Michaux, Jabes, Pavese, Ungaretti, Celan, Bachmann, and Bernhard.
  • LI612 - Topics in Poetry: American Narrative Poetry (4 Credits)
    Examines the development of contemporary narrative poetry out of Romantic, Modern, and Postmodern conceptions of consciousness as initially defined by Virginia Woolf in her essay ?The Novel of Consciousness? where she objects to ?the tyranny of plot? in shaping narrative. We will begin by exploring the use of ?submerged plots? in Eliot, Pound, Crane, as well as the threat to consciousness implied by the seemingly straightforward narratives of Frost and the roots of that threat in Wordsworth?s ?The Prelude.? From here, we will question post-modern applications of narrative in new narrative poets such as Rita Dove, Dana Gioia, Andrew Hudgins, B. H. Fairchild and others, in addition to contemporary non-formalist poets like Ellen Bryant Voigt, C.K. Williams, and Eleanor Wilner whose experiments with narrative offer adaptations of the genre not normally accounted for in contemporary postmodern critiques by Marjorie Perloff, Charles Bernstein, and other critics for whom narrative appears little more than a nostalgic reiteration of an outmoded idea of human subjectivity. Above all, the class aims to offer an opportunity for you to read, consider, and discuss a wide range of modern and contemporary narrative poetry.
    Instructor: Daniel Tobin
  • LI615 - Topics in Multiple Genres and Hybrid Forms: (4 Credits)
    Students will study writers such as Emerson, Thoreau, and Margaret Fuller through the lens of the Transcendentalists' journal The Dial (1840-44), which featured poetry and prose in a variety of forms. Attention will also be given to William Lloyd Garrison's anti-slavery weekly The Liberator and to African-American writers of the ante-bellum period such as Frederick Douglass and Charlotte Forten with New England roots and literary ties. Students will write a research-based essay and give a presentation on one writer's work or a topic of relevance to the period, and contribute their own writing to the online Dial created by the inaugural section of LI687 in 2012 at www.newdialmag.com. Writers in all genres are encouraged to join this class to support the diversity of our online publication.
  • LI615 - Topics in Multiple Genres and Hybrid Forms: Native American Literature (4 Credits)
    We will read selected poetry and prose narratives published by American Indian writers since the late 1960s?writers who come from diverse tribal backgrounds, and whose work reflects mixed cultural influences. Though I haven?t yet decided on the texts, they will be chosen from works by some of the following: Simon J. Ortiz, Gerald Vizenor, Leslie Marmon Silko, N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, Sherman Alexie, Thomas King, Joy Harjo, Ernestine Hayes, Carter Revard, Cheryl Savageau, Linda LeGarde Grover, Luci Tapahonso, Deborah Miranda, and Linda Hogan. These writers share, in broad terms, an ethics and aesthetics that focuses on relationship, continuance, struggle, and survival. Their work, consequently, often blends the lyrical and the political, as it simultaneously tells individual and communal stories, and contests the individualism that, from a ?mainstream? perspective, is central to the ?American Dream.? In fact, more often than not they contest that dream. We will explore how our writers? texts reflect such commonalities as they also create distinctive meanings and effects: how they use style, structure, language, voice, imagery, character, setting, and so on. As this literature also insists upon the importance of context, we will attend as well to the contexts from which the writing develops.
    Instructor: Robin Riley Fast
  • LI615 - Topics in Multiple Genres and Hybrid Forms: The Writer, The Daemon, and the Crafstman (4 Credits)
    ?Wild thing, you make my heart sing.? (Chip Taylor, The Troggs) Why has to much workshop writing gone the way of primness and propriety? Why the over-emphasis on form and technique? This course seeks to restore the balance between wildness and craft by exploring the intersection between Dionysus and Apollo in the works of modern and contemporary masters. Readings will include works by Italo Calvino, Marguerite Duras, Federico Garcia Lorca, Vicente Huidobro, Clarice Lispector, Claudia Rankine, and others, as well as a weekly critical essay. Course requirements will include weekly annotations on the readings, an oral presentation by each student, and one ten-page literary essay due at semester?s end.
    Instructor: Pablo Medina
  • LI615 - Topics in Multiple Genres and Hybrid Forms: Sources of Inspiration: Archival Research for Writers (4 Credits)
    Open to writers in all genres, this course will introduce students to a number of Boston area archives, including the Massachusetts Historical Society, the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Boston University's Howard Gotlieb Center, and show them how to search there for subjects they may use in their work. Online historical research will be treated as well. There will be readings in historical fiction, historical narrative nonfiction, and historical narrative poetry.
    Instructor: Megan Marshall
  • LI615 - Topics in Multiple Genres and Hybrid Forms: Travel Literature (4 Credits)
    Home and away, placement and displacement, location and dislocation are all themes that abound not only in contemporary literature in all its forms (fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama) but also in contemporary literary and cultural criticism. This class explores the theme of travel in literature across its historical terrain in order to understand not only the evolution of its forms but also its role in the construction of identities, familiar and foreign.
    Instructor: Maria Koundoura
  • LI625 - Topics in Fiction: (4 Credits)
    This course considers the literary strategies that Cuban writers from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries have utilized to decolonize literature and culture on the island. Readings include literary works in several genres by Juan Francisco Manzano, Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda, Cirilo Villaverde, Jose Marti, Lydia Cabrera, Nicolas Guillen, Virgilio Pi?era, Reinaldo Arenas, Nancy Morejon, Reina Maria Rodriguez and Victor Fowler Calzada.
  • LS101 - Elementary Spanish I (4 Credits)
    Stresses mastery of the essential vocabulary and primary grammatical structures through a situational approach. Students perceive that language is "living" and they discover by the third week of the semester that they can already communicate in Spanish. Class time is devoted to interactive practice. Conversational skills, pronunciation, and understanding are verified through regular oral exams.
  • LS102 - Elementary Spanish 2 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of LS 101, this course also incorporates reading skills and exposes students to a wider range of cultural materials.
  • PB203 - Introduction to Electronic Publishing (4 Credits)
    Explores various methods of digital publishing including e-books, digital magazines and web site creation.The course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the planning, development and management of digital content.
    Instructor: John Rodzvilla
  • PB207 - Introduction to Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces writing for commercial markets. Students develop, research, and write nonfiction articles and learn where to market them. May be repeated once for credit and may be substituted for one 200-level WR (writing) workshop.
  • PB302 - Copyediting (4 Credits)
    Practical course about the process of editing and preparing manuscripts for publication. Together with hands-on assignments, the course considers the relation of editor to author, the nature of copyediting in various publishing environments, and other topics.
    Instructors: Daniel Fitts, Teresa Elsey
  • PB307 - Intermediate Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Requires students to research and write an article or magazine feature. Students learn terms, concepts, and techniques to improve both writing and critical thinking. May be repeated once for credit and may be substituted for one 300-level WR (writing) workshop.
    Instructor: Delia Cabe
  • PB380 - Magazine Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Provides an understanding of the magazine field from the perspective of writers and editors. Looks at the similarities and differences between general interest magazines and more focused magazines, and how magazines compete with each other and with other media for audiences and revenues. Topics include how magazines carve out niches, the relationship between the business and editorial departments, and the editorial operations of magazines. The course also looks at the history of the magazine industry.
    Instructor: Gian Lombardo
  • PB383 - Book Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Examines the acquisition and editing of a manuscript, its progress into design and production, and the final strategies of promotion and distribution of a finished book.
  • PB395 - Applications for Print Publishing (4 Credits)
    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the publishing industry. Students also learn related computer-based skills, such as type and image sourcing, image acquisition, including scanning, and copyright issues. Although some design issues are addressed, the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes students have basic Macintosh skills.
  • PB402 - Book Editing (4 Credits)
    Book editing, or substantive editing, is a highly subjective, visceral skill informed by flexibility, judgment, life experience, grammatical grace, signposts, caution lights, road maps, respect for the author, and subtle diplomacy in the author/editor relationship, all directed toward helping the writer to the intended creative goal. In other words, book editing is an art, not a science. However, an exploration of the foundations of constructive shaping, development, organization, and line-editing may release the inner shepherd/wrangler in you.
    Instructor: Daniel Weaver
  • PB481 - Book Design and Production (4 Credits)
    Covers book and book jacket design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. This is not a software instruction course.
  • PB491 - Topics in Publishing: (4 Credits)
    Course is designed as an extension of the Book Publishing Overview course for students who want to further explore the sales and marketing sides of business - where marketing and sales fit into the life of a book, the differences between the two areas, and the distinct effect that each, done well or badly, has on a book's success. It then tracks the marketing and sales process through a book's publication with specific assignments at each stage based on real-world publications tasks from sales forecasting to planning (and budgeting for) marketing campaigns to sales calls and the retailers' buying processes.
  • PB491 - Topics in Writing and Publishing: (4 Credits)
    Students gain practical experience creating content for The Culture-ist, an online travel and culture magazine that focuses on social good and millennials. Students will pitch and critique story ideas; make assignments; report, write, and edit articles; and manage the editorial workflow. They?ll examine best practices for web publishing and analyze which stories get the most traction online. Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the instructor. Students must email susanne_althoff@emerson.edu a short writing sample and one story idea for The Culture-ist. Students from every department, who are interested in writing, are invited to apply.
  • PB491 - Topics in Publishing: (4 Credits)
    Examines the marketplace of women?s magazines and websites?the major players and the upstarts, their audience, and their business models. Students will explore the history of these publications, their role in defining women?s interests and status, and their digital future. Student teams will be charged with developing a new women?s magazine or website, something that meets a need not currently satisfied, and creating and pitching its business plan and prototype.
  • PB491 - Topics in Publishing: Advanced Publication Design (4 Credits)
    This workshop course examines the process of publication design and production, from the time the content leaves editorial to delivery of printed book or magazine. You will increase your understanding of the field, and the skills you acquire will make you better prepared to work on future projects, for print or other design media. Through presentation and revision, you will design a book or magazine on a subject of your choosing.
    Instructor: Lisa Diercks
  • PB491 - Topics in Publishing: Writing and Editing for The Cultureist.com (4 Credits)
    Students gain practical experience creating content for The Culture-ist, an online travel and culture magazine that focuses on social good and millennials. Students will pitch and critique story ideas; make assignments; report, write, and edit articles; and manage the editorial workflow. They?ll examine best practices for web publishing and analyze which stories get the most traction online. Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the instructor. Students must email susanne_althoff@emerson.edu a short writing sample and one story idea for The Culture-ist. Students from every department, who are interested in writing, are invited to apply.
    Instructor: Susanne Althoff
  • PB675 - Publishing Management and Innovation (4 Credits)
    Examines the skills needed to be a successful publishing manager in a changing industry. Covers new business models, new revenue streams, strategic planning, leadership, organization, finance, personnel, and more. Addresses book, magazine, and electronic publishing.
    Instructor: Susanne Althoff
  • PB676 - Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Gives students experience in developing magazine feature stories. Students brainstorm, report, and write their own magazine-style stories, with emphasis on the shaping and editing stage. They also read and discuss published work by professionals. Class is conducted as a writing workshop in a style that mimics a magazine atmosphere. This course may count for 1 workshop credit for nonfiction students.
    Instructor: Bill Beuttler
  • PB678 - Magazine Editing (4 Credits)
    Course about the magazine editing process. Covers topics ranging from focus, direction, topicality, structure, sense of audience, and voice, and explores the practical application of editing skills as well as historic examples of editors and their magazines.
    Instructor: Bill Beuttler
  • PB680 - Magazine Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    MA Students only.
  • PB682 - Magazine Design and Production (4 Credits)
    Covers magazine design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. Students produce sample magazines through a workshop process of presentations and revisions. Course assumes students have necessary computer skills.
    Instructor: Lisa Diercks
  • PB683 - Book Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Introduction to the book publishing industry, including a detailed examination of the editorial, marketing, and design and production stages of the book publishing process. Course also looks at important developments and issues within the field, such as online publishing, and at various jobs in book publishing.
  • PB686 - Book Design and Prod. (4 Credits)
    Covers book and book jacket design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. Students design a book through a workshop process of presentations and revisions. Course assumes students have necessary computer skills.
  • PB687 - Column Writing (4 Credits)
    Magazine publishing course explores the process of researching, writing, and revising magazine columns, and examines the importance of audience. This course may count for one workshop requirement for nonfiction students.
  • PB688 - Copyediting (4 Credits)
    Covers the process of editing and preparing manuscripts for publication. Together with hands-on assignments, the course considers the relation of editor to author, the nature of copyediting in various publishing environments, and other topics.
  • PB689 - Book Publicity (4 Credits)
    Familiarizes students with trade book promotion to the media. Begins with an overview of book publicity and then covers the publicity process, the type of freelance help available, crafting press material, the author/publicist dynamic, how to secure and promote bookstore events, the art of the interview, and the art of the pitch. All assignments and classroom activities are based on real-world publishing tasks so that students leave the class thoroughly prepared to promote their book or someone else's.
  • PB691 - Applications for Print Publish (4 Credits)
    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the print publishing industry. Some design issues are addressed, but the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes the student has basic Macintosh skills.
    Instructor: Joseph Durand
  • PB691 - Applications for Print Publishing (4 Credits)
    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the print publishing industry. Some design issues are addressed, but the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes the student has basic Macintosh skills.
  • PB692 - Electronic Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Introduces electronic and new media publishing formats, including but not limited to the web, online publishing, CD-ROM, and DVD. Course assumes the student has basic computer skills.
  • PB693 - Book Marketing & Sales (4 Credits)
    Course is designed as an extension of the Book Publishing Overview course for students who want to further explore the sales and marketing sides of business - where marketing and sales fit into the life of a book, the differences between the two areas, and the distinct effect that each, done well or badly, has on a book's success. It then tracks the marketing and sales process through a book's publication with specific assignments at each stage based on real-world publications tasks from sales forecasting to planning (and budgeting for) marketing campaigns to sales calls and the retailers' buying processes.
    Instructor: Beth Ineson
  • PB694 - Topics in Writing and Publishing: Works, Texts & Documents: Textual Editing and Criticism (4 Credits)
    An introduction to literary editing, we will explore the different ways that literary works, and their physical manifestations, have been produced, transmitted and revised over time. We will focus on how the editor's cultural and aesthetic framework affect the editor's approach to a literary work -- about how different theories of the text and differences in the means of textual reproduction yield both a wide range of interpretive practices and differing "stabilized" texts. The process of determining the physical representation of a work is not only an interpretive activity but it is also one that has empirical, or scientific, underpinnings. The goals of this course are twofold: to give students greater awareness of the intrinsic value of editing as it relates to the work itself and not to any considerations of sale-ability; and to provide an environment in which students have the opportunity to become informed, critical and skeptical readers of literary texts and documents.
    Instructor: Gian Lombardo
  • PB694 - Topics in Writing and Publishing: The Art of Literary Publishing (4 Credits)
    The course will focus on contemporary, small press, literary book publishers. In this class, students will have the opportunity to think about the aesthetics of publishing using Roberto Calasso's book The Art of Publishing and the new anthology Literary Publishing in the Twenty-First Century as a means to concentrate our conversations and help students think about publishing values. As a part of our conversation, we will be discussing the various ways publishers develop and deliver "content," create series and lists, design covers, market, distribute, and manage backlists.
    Instructor: Ladette Randolph
  • PB694 - Topics in Writing and Publishing: Writing and Editing for TheCultureist.com (4 Credits)
    Students gain practical experience creating content for The Culture-ist, an online travel and culture magazine that focuses on social good and millennials. Students will pitch and critique story ideas; report, write, and edit articles; and manage the editorial workflow. They'll finish the semester with several published clips. They'll also examine best practices for digital publishing and analyze which stories get the most traction online. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Students must email susanne_althoff@emerson.edu a short writing sample and one story idea for The Culture-ist. Students from every department are invited to apply.
    Instructor: Susanne Althoff
  • PB694 - Topics in Writing and Publishing: (4 Credits)
    Students gain practical experience creating content for The Culture-ist, an online travel and culture magazine that focuses on social good and millennials. Students will pitch and critique story ideas; make assignments; report, write, and edit articles; and manage the editorial workflow. They?ll examine best practices for web publishing and analyze which stories get the most traction online. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Students must email susanne_althoff@emerson.edu a short writing sample and one story idea for The Culture-ist. Students from every department, who are interested in writing, are invited to apply.
  • PB696 - Web Development for Electronic Publishing (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the design and format of text and images for the computer and mobile phone screen. Students create sites using HTML and CSS. Topics covered include: content evaluation, usability standards, design aesthetics, user experience, JavaScript, and hosting solutions.
    Instructor: Christopher Lackey
  • PF610 - Writing Workshop in Popular Fiction (4 Credits)
    Instructor: Kimberly McLarin
  • PF616 - Topics in the History of Popular Forms: Utopian, Dystopian & Apocalyptic Literature (4 Credits)
    This course will take as its starting point early modern Romantic, and Victorian visions of Utopian worlds, 20th century dystopian visions, and some contemporary apocalyptic fictions. After dispensing with some of the obvious allegorical questions about the function of these visions of "Brave New Worlds," we will consider some of the more complex contours of utopian projects in opposition to dystopian and apocalyptic refutations (and whether they are refutations at all). In particular we will consider the idea of progress and futurity in the context of Marxist, postmodern, and poststructural theory as well as in the context of some religious eschatological traditions.
    Instructor: Roy Kamada
  • WR101 - Intro to College Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces college writing, focusing on cultural analysis that appears in academic work and in the public intellectual sphere. Emphasizes how writers work with texts (including images, film, music, and other media) to develop writing projects. Through four main writing projects that concentrate on drafting, peer review, and revision, students learn to be constructive readers of each other's writing and to understand the rhetoric of intellectual inquiry.
    Instructors: Andrew Dugan, Anna Sims, Arige Shrouf, Ashley Wells, Breauna Roach, Cathryn Title, Christopher Poole, Colleen Fullin, Daniel DiPaolo, Douglas Koziol, Elizabeth Parfitt, Eric Marshall, Erin Jones, John Taylor, Jordan Escobar, Katherine Faigen, Kayleigh Shoen, Kit Haggard, Lauren Clairmont, Lindsey Haber, Matthew Zazzarino, Michael R. Schrimper, Michelle Betters, Noah Grabeel, Nora Caplan-Bricker, Oscar Mancinas, Pamela DeGregorio, Paul Haney, Peter Medeiros, Raquel Kaplan, Regina Tavani, Ricky Davis, Sarah Burnette, Sarah Cadorette, Stephen Shane, Steve Himmer, Tamera Marko, Wiliam Tierney, Zyanya Dickey
  • WR121 - Research Writing (4 Credits)
    Research-based writing course that explores how rhetorical situations call on writers to do research and how writers draw on various types of writing to present the results of their research. Through four main writing projects, students develop an understanding of the purposes and methods of research and a rhetorical awareness of how research-based writing tasks ask them to consider their relation to the issues they are researching and to their audiences.
  • WR211 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Fiction and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR212 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Poetry and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: Christine Casson
  • WR216 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Nonfiction and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR311 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction (4 Credits)
    Original Fiction is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR312 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Poetry (4 Credits)
    Original Poetry is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: Nicole Dutton
  • WR313 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Drama (4 Credits)
    Original Drama is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR315 - Intermediate Comedy Writing; Sketch Troup Writing (4 Credits)
    This course will allow the student to explore many different aspects of comedy writing, including sketch comedy, and improvisation. In addition there will be class discussions on the ethics of comedy, brainstorming sessions and discussions of current industry events and trends. The class will act as a comedy sketch troupe and will write, produce and perform a full sketch show.
  • WR315 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Comedy (4 Credits)
    This course will allow the student to explore many different aspects of stand-up comedy writing, including generating material, character development, improvisation, and performance technique. In addition there will be class discussions on the ethics of comedy, brainstorming sessions and discussions of current industry events and trends. Each student will write a stand-up comedy routine, which will be revised, and presented at a comedy club.
  • WR315 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Sketch Troup Writing (4 Credits)
    This course will allow the student to explore many different aspects of comedy writing, including sketch comedy, and improvisation. In addition there will be class discussions on the ethics of comedy, brainstorming sessions and discussions of current industry events and trends. The class will act as a comedy sketch troupe. They will write, produce and perform a full sketch show.
    Instructor: Michael Bent
  • WR316 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Original Nonfiction is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: Jerald Walker
  • WR317 - Topics in Creative Writing: Hybrid Forms Workshop (4 Credits)
    In this genre busting workshop students will write prose poems, brief essays, flash fiction, playlets, unfilmable films, fables, lyric essays, epistles, ear plays, and a few forms that you?ll create. Students will explore the uses, abuses and meanings of genre and form labels in past and in current literary practice and their impacts on literature for us as writers and readers, and on writing audiences and will read and discuss literature that pushes the boundaries of genre and/or form categories, or that may propose their own categories.
    Instructor: Peter Shippy
  • WR317 - Topics in Creative Writing: Re-visionaries (4 Credits)
    Break boundaries and explore the craft of creative writing outside the traditional classroom while amplifying the voices of others. This course allows you to share the power of poetry and creative expression with individuals at locations such as homeless shelters and addiction rehabilitation facilities. We will also examine the broader relationship between the arts and advocacy, public education, and therapy through current literature, media and guest lectures by experts in related fields. Classes will meet as a group both off site and at school each week. Those considering hybrid careers in writing or teaching along with social justice, political advocacy or the healing arts may be most interested in this experience.
    Instructor: Cheryl Buchanan
  • WR320 - Travel Writing (4 Credits)
    The best travel writing takes readers on a journey that is not only geographic, but also narrative. This intermediate course in literary travel writing introduces writers to key ways to transform their experiences in the world- be it a far-flung travel destination or one's hometown- into compelling narratives in the form of short essay or memoir. In addition to short reading and writing assignments, students complete three polished travel essays: two to be workshopped and one to hand into the instructor on the last day of class.
  • WR405 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Poetry (4 Credits)
    Advanced writing workshop in poetry with in-class discussion of original poems by students already seriously engaged in writing poetry. The course pays special attention to getting published and students are encouraged to submit their work to magazines. May be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: Daniel Tobin
  • WR407 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Fiction (4 Credits)
    Extensive fiction writing of short stories and/or novels coupled with in-class reading for criticism and the craft of fiction. May be repeated once for credit.
  • WR408 - Writing the Novella (4 Credits)
    This workshop is designed to help students write novellas of at least 60 pages during the semester. There is also a significant reading component, as students discuss selected published novellas in the service of helping them plan and write their own drafts. The course is aimed at serious writing students wishing to explore a form that allows for more extended development of plot, theme and character than in the traditional short story, without making the elaborate structural demands of a full-length novel. The fantasy genre is discouraged.
    Instructor: Scott Sanders
  • WR415 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Advanced writing workshop in various nonfiction forms, such as memoir, travel writing, literary journalism, or other narrative nonfiction writing. Students will already have completed at least one nonfiction workshop, have a project in development, and be capable of discussing such techniques as characterization, point of view, and narrative structure as they appear in literary nonfiction forms.
    Instructor: Jerald Walker
  • WR450 - Community Writing: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)
    Introduces community literacy theories and writing pedagogies with the practical aim of preparing students for work in community writing centers. Students read and explore writing center theory and tutoring pedagogy to gain practice-based knowledge for assessing student writing across multiple disciplines and knowledge levels, utilizing various tutoring strategies, and working with multilingual writers. In addition, the course examines the challenges and benefits involved in community writing projects, from both logistical and philosophical standpoints, by considering definitions of ?community? and ?literacy,? and exploring what is ?exchanged? in these collaborative partnerships. Students participate in and reflect on weekly tutoring assignments at targeted community partners.
  • WR490 - Senior Creative Thesis: Poetry (4 Credits)
    Required of all BFA majors: During the final semester of his/her senior year, each student produces an extended literary work-several short stories, a group of poems, a short novel, a nonfiction narrative, a piece of investigative journalism, a play, or a film script. Each student works independently, but consults regularly with an advisor to evaluate and revise the work-in-progress. The final manuscript measures and represents the student's abilities and his/her commitment to a serious creative endeavor. At the time a student writes their BFA thesis, they shall have previously taken, or be currently enrolled in, a WR 400 level class in the genre of their thesis.
  • WR490 - Senior Creative Thesis: Fiction and Non-Fiction (4 Credits)
    Required of all BFA majors: During the final semester of his/her senior year, each student produces an extended literary work-several short stories, a group of poems, a short novel, a nonfiction narrative, a piece of investigative journalism, a play, or a film script. Each student works independently, but consults regularly with an advisor to evaluate and revise the work-in-progress. The final manuscript measures and represents the student's abilities and his/her commitment to a serious creative endeavor. At the time a student writes their BFA thesis, they shall have previously taken, or be currently enrolled in, a WR 400 level class in the genre of their thesis.
  • WR490 - Senior Creative Thesis (4 Credits)
    Required of all BFA majors: During the final semester of his/her senior year, each student produces an extended literary work-several short stories, a group of poems, a short novel, a nonfiction narrative, a piece of investigative journalism, a play, or a film script. Each student works independently, but consults regularly with an advisor to evaluate and revise the work-in-progress. The final manuscript measures and represents the student's abilities and his/her commitment to a serious creative endeavor. At the time a student writes their BFA thesis, they shall have previously taken, or be currently enrolled in, a WR 400 level class in the genre of their thesis.
  • WR490 - Senior Creative Thesis: Fiction (4 Credits)
    Required of all BFA majors: During the final semester of his/her senior year, each student produces an extended literary work-several short stories, a group of poems, a short novel, a nonfiction narrative, a piece of investigative journalism, a play, or a film script. Each student works independently, but consults regularly with an advisor to evaluate and revise the work-in-progress. The final manuscript measures and represents the student's abilities and his/her commitment to a serious creative endeavor. At the time a student writes their BFA thesis, they shall have previously taken, or be currently enrolled in, a WR 400 level class in the genre of their thesis.
  • WR600 - Teaching College Composition (4 Credits)
    Introduction to composition history, theory, and pedagogy that prepares students to teach college writing courses. Examines debates and practices in college composition and their conceptual foundations and introduces rhetoric as a productive art and means of analysis. In preparation to teach writing, students learn how to design writing assignments, to run writing workshops, to respond to and evaluate student writing, and to produce a syllabus for a first-year composition course. Must be in a WLP Residential program to enroll.
  • WR605 - Poetry Workshop (4 Credits)
    In-class discussions of original poems aim to help students learn strategies for generating and revising work. The workshop asks students to consider their work in light of the essential issues of the poet's craft, and to articulate their individual sensibilities as poets.
    Instructor: John Skoyles
  • WR606 - Fiction Workshop (4 Credits)
    Uses student manuscripts as its main texts, supplemented by published stories, to illustrate the fundamental aspects of fiction, mainly in the short story form. Explores the complexities of narration, characterization, scene, dialogue, style, tone, plot, etc. Emphasis is on the generation of fictional works and on their revision.
  • WR608 - Special Topics in Fiction Workshop: The Short Short Story (4 Credits)
    The focus of this class is student work in the short-short story form?stories from 3 sentences to 100 words to 3 pages. A ?short-short? is not a condensed long story, but a story that requires this length and particular form. Students will be given a topic or form for each story due, so please note that students will be generating all new work for this workshop. (For example, one assignment might be to write a one-sentence story that has urgency and forward movement. Or write a list story. Or write a road-trip story that has two or more characters.) In addition, we?ll read and discuss short short stories by a variety of writers whose work appears in Flash Fiction, one anthology of microfiction, and various journals whose focus is the short short story.
    Instructor: Pamela Painter
  • WR610 - Forms in Poetry (4 Credits)
    Explores how poems are shaped by attention to metrical lineation and rhythm, stanza structure, and the forms of poetry, such as the sonnet, sestina, villanelle, renga, ballade, ghazal, etc. Students are expected to write original poems in forms as well as develop their practical knowledge of prosody.
  • WR613 - Nonfiction Workshop (4 Credits)
    Stresses the writing of many forms of nonfiction, such as informal essays, autobiography, profiles, travel writing, or literary journalism, coupled with reading assignments of relevant texts.
  • WR650 - Community Writing: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)
    Introduces community literacy theories and writing pedagogies with the practical aim of preparing students for work in community writing centers. Students read and explore writing center theory and tutoring pedagogy to gain practice-based knowledge for assessing student writing across multiple disciplines and knowledge levels, utilizing various tutoring strategies, and working with multilingual writers. In addition, the course examines the challenges and benefits involved in community writing projects, from both logistical and philosophical standpoints, by considering definitions of ?community? and ?literacy,? and exploring what is ?exchanged? in these collaborative partnerships. Students participate in and reflect on weekly tutoring assignments at targeted community partners.
  • WR652 - Novel Workshop (4 Credits)
    A workshop in structuring and writing the opening chapters of a novel. Explores story premise, stylistic approach, point-of-view, and other structural parameters, as well as revision.
    Instructor: Pablo Medina
  • WR655 - Writing the Nonfiction Book (4 Credits)
    Workshop on the extended narrative, with discussions of organizing the research, developing an outline and devising a structure, carrying out the plan, and writing the book proposal. Students submit their own work and also examine various approaches of nonfiction books.
    Instructor: Douglas Whynott