Department of Writing, Literature & Publishing

Courses


Filter the courses by subject area

  • LF101 - Elementary French 1 (4 Credits)
    Stresses mastery of essential vocabulary and primary grammatical structures through a situational approach. Students perceive that language is "living" and they discover by the third week of the semester that they can already communicate in French. Class time is devoted to interactive practice. Conversational skills, pronunciation, and understanding are verified through regular oral exams.
    Instructor: Pierre Hurel
  • LF102 - Elementary French 2 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of LF 101, this course also incorporates reading skills and exposes students to a wider range of cultural materials.
    Instructor: Pierre Hurel
  • LI120 - Introduction to Literary Studies (4 Credits)
    Gives students intensive practice in literary analysis, critical writing, and related research. In discussing primary texts, considerable attention is given to elements of the different genres (e.g., narrative point of view, narrative structure, metrical and free verse), as well as to issues relevant across literary genres (e.g., form and content, voice, contexts, tone). Readings are chosen from the following genres: poetry, drama, narrative modes, and also include selected literary criticism.
  • LI201 - Literary Foundations (4 Credits)
    Surveys foundational works of Western literature in poetry, nonfiction, fiction, and drama in order to familiarize students with literary history as well as the history of our ideas of love, duty, the afterlife, virtue, and vice. Authors studied may include Homer, Sophocles, Plato, Virgil, Ovid, Dante, Boccaccio, the Beowulf poet, and Chaucer.
  • LI202 - American Literature (4 Credits)
    Introduces representative works of American literature in several genres from the colonial period to the modern by writers such as Bradstreet, Franklin, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Douglass, Melville, Dickinson, Whitman, Chopin, Twain, Crane, Hurston, Faulkner, Williams, and Moore.
  • LI203 - British Literature (4 Credits)
    Historical overview of several genres of British literature from the Renaissance to the 20th century, focusing on writers such as More, Spenser, Milton, Defoe, Bronte, Eliot, Joyce, and Beckett.
  • LI204 - Top: Transatlantic Romantics (4 Credits)
    Addresses literature of the British and American Romantic movements, the dialogue between the British and American texts, and the literary, cultural, and aesthetic influences on these texts. Additionally, it will cover topics such as the sublime wilderness, the divinity in nature, the varied Romantic responses to John Milton's Paradise Lost, as well as the often-neglected female voices of the movements. The course may include writers such as Blake, Wordsworth, Percy Shelley, Anna Barbauld, Mary Robinson, Keats, Dickinson, Bryant, Twain, Emerson, and Fuller.
  • LI204 - Top: Myth, Literature, & Theory of Myth (4 Credits)
    Explores the relationship between literature and (largely classical) mythology and seek to deepen students' understanding of both the centrality of mythology as a system of imaging humanity's and the poet's place in the cosmic order in the classical period and the ways in which modern literature has reinterpreted its developing insights into mythology as a system of cultural value and cultural critique. The first part of the course will consider literary texts from Homer, Sappho, and Pindar to Euripides, Catullus, Virgil, and Claudian in the light of work on myth from Rohde, Eliade, and Dumezil to Vernant, Loraux, and Nagy. The second part of the course will consider the use of myth in modernist and recent authors from Pound, Eliot, H.D., and Graves to Plath, Heany, Walcott, Z. Herbert, and others.
  • LI204 - Top: Major Minority Voices in Contemporary Literature (4 Credits)
    Introduces representative works of marginalized, emerging voices in the literary community, focusing primarily on the minority experience and pop-culture literature. The course will explore a study of selected works written by American writers including Roxanne Gay, Suzan-Lori Parks, Saeed Jones, and Danez Smith among others. Students will begin to understand how these writers fit within and how they are changing the future dynamics of their respective genres as well as how to efficiently do research of popular culture.
  • LI204 - Top: Food as Metaphor (4 Credits)
    So much depends on dinner, and in literature, drama takes a seat among the forks and spoons. Whether it's eating Chinese Food Naked (Mei Ng) or imagining "How to Cook A Woolf" (MFK Fisher) food in fiction, poetry, and essays serves forth a banquet for the senses. In this class, we will read a range of writers addressing food, explore symbols and metaphors, and write both creatively and analytically on the subject.
  • LI204 - Top: Graphic Literature (4 Credits)
    Students will examine the wonderful world of graphic novels and comic art, ranging from Art Spiegelman's Maus to mainstream and independent creators such as Alan Moore, Alison Bechdel and Mat Johnson. The world we're exploring is expansive and diverse, and we'll aim to be similarly democratic, with no prejudice toward category or genre. The course works toward an understanding of the ways that image and text combine to create art that moves and inspires us while telling compelling stories.Class will be discussion-oriented; assignments will be critical and creative, both individual and collaborative.
  • LI204 - Top: Renaissance Drama (4 Credits)
    Surveys Renaissance Drama in context, examining the major plays of Shakespeare and his Contemporaries, including Thomas Kyd, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, Philip Massinger, Elizabeth Cary, Thomas Dekker, Francis Beamont, and John Fletcher, in relationship to their major prose, poetry, and additional literary works, including masques and other public or courtly entertainments. It examines the traditions of social and political comedy and tragedy in the light of issues concerning religion, politics, and economics. But it also deals with Senecan influence; the mapping and planning of London as a city; gender, sexuality, and eroticism; visual aesthetics and the literary baroque; developments in trade and commerce; and aspects of individual identity and self-fashioning.
  • LI204 - Top: Autobiography (4 Credits)
    This course is about autobiography and self-narrative in novels, dramas and nonfiction. We analyze the form not only from a literary but from a cultural and historical perspective. Autobiography, although one of the most popular literary genres, remains difficult to define. How can someone be the storyteller and at the same time, the object of his/her narrative? We will read and analyze outstanding autobiographical novels, dramas and nonfiction, from the Middle Ages to present time, exploring the relationship between fiction and autobiography, using a dual approach. First, we will examine autobiography as a form of fiction. Second, we will focus on how fictional techniques can be successfully adopted in autobiographical narratives.
  • LI204 - Top: Myth, Literature, & Theory of Myth (4 Credits)
    Through the study of the origins and transformations of fairy tales, we will explore how storytelling shapes our sense of identity. We examine the recurring motifs within these enduring tales and why and how contemporary authors have subverted these themes and lessons. Above all, we will utilize this traditional literature and its variations to explore various theoretical approaches, which define, interpret, and reflect culture.
  • LI208 - US Multicultural Literatures (4 Credits)
    Introduces poetry, fiction, and other genres produced in the multicultural U.S.A. Explores ways writers from disparate communities use various literary forms to articulate resistance, community, and citizenship. Literary texts are situated in their historical contexts and examine the writing strategies of each author. Also includes essays, journalism, and films to learn how diverse cultural texts work to represent America.
  • LI209 - Top: Harlem Renaissance (4 Credits)
    Course examines some of the major poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction (autobiography and essay) of one of the most celebrated African American and American arts movements: the Harlem Renaissance. An extension of post-slavery identity for African Americans, the Harlem Renaissance emerged from the intersection of rural and urban; traditional and modern; nationalistic and cosmopolitan; and black and white. We will pay particular attention to migration, inter- and intra-racial relations, the interplay of race, gender, class, and sexuality, and the phenomenon of passing. In addition, although our primary focus will be on written texts, we will also explore the influence of music (jazz and blues) and visual art on the literature and culture of the period.
    Instructor: Erika Williams
  • LI210 - American Women Writers (4 Credits)
    Examines fiction, poetry, and other genres by 19th- and 20th-century American women such as Jacobs, Dickinson, Chopin, Kingston, Welty, Rich, and Morrison.
  • LI211 - Top: Southeastern Europe: Between the Empires (4 Credits)
    What do vampires and democracy have in common? Join us as we explore the contexts of European imperialism through the literatures of Southeastern Europe from the 18th to the 21st century. The course will map relations between empires and subjects, centers and peripheries, nation building and global movements, political repression and poetic imagination, myth and history. The focus will be equally distributed between modern Greece, its Balkan neighbors, and the last decades of the Ottoman Empire. Representative works of fiction, poetry, essay and travel writing, historiography, anthropology, ethnography, and journalism will be included.
    Instructor: Vladimir Boskovic
  • LI212 - Black Revolutionary Thought (4 Credits)
    Traces the protest tradition and radical thinking in African American literature. Using landmark essays by W.E.B Du Bois and Alain Locke to frame the debate and then moving from David Walker to Malcolm X and beyond, this course engages questions about the development of the Jeremiadic tradition in African American literature, the role of the black artist in promoting social change, gendered differences in protest literature, and whether politics informs and elevates art or strangles it.
    Instructor: Kimberly McLarin
  • LI214 - Latino Literature (4 Credits)
    Explores the idea of borderlands or living on the hyphen by American writers who identify themselves as straddling two cultures. Students read poetry, essays, fiction and theater by authors in the following traditions: Chicano, Puerto Rican (Borinquen), Cuban and Dominican American.
    Instructor: Flora Gonzalez
  • LI215 - Slavery and Freedom (4 Credits)
    Looks at a wide-ranging survey of 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century poems, plays, novels, and nonfiction narratives concerning the issue of American slavery and its aftermath. Explores slave narrative conventions across historical periods as well as themes such as identity, masking, the liberating power of literacy, and masculine and feminine definitions of freedom.
    Instructor: Kimberly McLarin
  • LI216 - Literature of the Gothic (4 Credits)
    Focuses on literary and aesthetic tradition known as the Gothic, following its various manifestations from 18th century England up to present-day America. Students read novels, poetry, short stories and plays. Students interested in postmodern expressions of the Gothic, from graphic novels to film, will be invited to bring these to the table. Is Dracula really about the anxiety of empire? What is Frankenstein saying about social theory and the dangers of Romanticism? And finally, why does Gothic material retain its fascination in the 21st century, when so many aesthetic movements lie moldering in their graves?
    Instructor: William Orem
  • LI217 - Lit, Culture & the Environment (4 Credits)
    Examines the literature, art, and culture of Native and non-Native America and consider how these two very different traditions have affected the environment. Initially, students focus on Native Creation stories and on Genesis in order to better understand the definition of "wilderness." They then study the work of 17th-, 18th-, and 19th-century authors and artists who influenced and/or responded to how the environment should be managed. As students progress to the 20th and 21st centuries, they consider the work of artists, writers, and filmmakers who acknowledge and attempt to come to terms with a drastically changed and oftentimes degraded landscape in their work.
    Instructor: Christine Casson
  • LI303 - The Art of Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Examines a broad range of literary nonfiction works, present and past, paying particular attention to the craft within the nonfiction work but identifying relationships and similarities that literary nonfiction has with the novel and short story. Includes readings from such diverse forms as historical narrative, adventure travel and survival, memoir and the creative nonfiction essay, and other forms of factual writing artfully constructed.
    Instructor: Richard Hoffman
  • LI304 - Top: Making it Strange: Fictions of Effect (4 Credits)
    "All stories today are clich‚ and obsolete." (Bela Tarr). This course will look at some works that are less interested in story and resolution than in de-familiarizing the familiar, that try to create a tone or effect, to do rather than mean - works that are not so much about things as an attempt to make them happen and bring something into being.
  • LI304 - Top: The Prose Poem (4 Credits)
    "Writing a prose poem is a bit like trying to catch a fly in a dark room."-Charles Simic. This class will focus on American masters of the form, from Gertrude Stein and William Carlos Williams to contemporary virtuosos like Charles Simic, Russell Edson, Harryette Mullen, James Tate, Matthea Harvey, and Anne Carson. We'll also sample the international poets who created and nurtured prose poetry, including Aloysius Bertrand, Charles Baudelaire, Wislawa Szymborska, and Julio Cortazt r.
  • LI305 - Modern Poetry and After (4 Credits)
    Explores modern and postmodern traditions of poetry in the works of such 20th-century poets as Eliot, Stevens, Auden, Moore, Lowell, Bishop, Plath, Larkin, Rich, Ashbery, and, in translation, Neruda, Rilke, Herbert, Kazuk, and Tsvetaeva.
    Instructor: Christine Casson
  • LI306 - Literatures of Continental Europe (4 Credits)
    Explores seminal works in the European literary tradition, with a particular focus on close reading, textual and rhetorical analysis, and aesthetic criticism. The course may include works by Montaigne, Rousseau, Flaubert, Holderlin, Novalis, Heine, Flaubert, Dostoyevsky, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Proust, Rilke, Kafka, Borges, Bachmann, and Bernhard. Students write short responses to each work and discuss their ideas in class.
    Instructor: Yu-jin Chang
  • LI307 - The Art of Poetry (4 Credits)
    Through reading and discussion of poems from different historical periods, students learn the technical aspects of poetry (such as meter, rhyme, and structure) and how poets use these techniques to create meanings and effects, giving students a critical vocabulary for reading and practicing poetry. For students who want to enhance their ability to discuss and write about poetry by learning the essentials of the poet's art.
  • LI308 - The Art of Fiction (4 Credits)
    Explores a broad range of short stories and novels by American and international authors. Teaches students to look at fiction from the perspective of the writer's craft, and emphasizes such elements as structure, narrative, characterization, dialogue, and the differences between shorter and longer forms. Students gain an appreciation of the fiction writer's craft and an enhanced sense of the drama inherent in effective storytelling.
  • LI309 - Topics in Multicultural Literature (4 Credits)
    Courses focus on literature produced by historically oppressed peoples in the United States and on specific themes or topics, such as slavery and freedom, American Indian multi-genre life-stories, or border identities. All topics include the study of literature in at least three genres (selected from poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama). May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Erika Williams
  • LI313 - Novel into Film (4 Credits)
    Studies the adaptation of novels into films, and the narrative conventions that govern each medium. Texts include the works of such writers as Kesey, Burgess, Kundera, Walker, Nabokov, and Puig; films include the work of directors such as Kubrick, Forman, Spielberg, and Babenco.
  • LI323 - The American Short Story (4 Credits)
    Acquaints students with the changing thematic and stylistic concerns of the American short story and develops students' critical writing and reading skills. May include authors such as Chopin, Poe, Parker, Hemingway, Faulkner, Stafford, Bambara, Paley, Ford, Oates, and Updike.
    Instructor: Sarah Osment
  • LI339 - British Novel 1 (4 Credits)
    Engages in social and cultural analysis of the "rise" of the novel in England with representative works from the Restoration (1660) through the end of the 19th century. May include authors such as Behn, Defoe, Sterne, Richardson, Austen, Bronte, Shelley, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy.
    Instructor: William Donoghue
  • LI340 - British Novel 2 (4 Credits)
    Studies representative works of 20th-century British fiction. May cover Modernist authors from the first half of the century such as Forster, Joyce, Ford, Lawrence, Woolf, Waugh, O'Brien, Durrell, Greene, Beckett, Lessing, Murdoch, Golding, and Fowles as well as more contemporary writers from England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland such as McEwan, Barnes, Amis, Crace, Kelman, and Carter.
    Instructor: William Donoghue
  • LI361 - Native American Literature (4 Credits)
    Studies works in several genres, including consideration of how traditional myth, story, and ritual contribute to contemporary fiction and poetry, and how the literature reflects and responds to historical and contemporary conditions. May include such authors as Silko, Momaday, Ortiz, Harjo, and Erdrich.
    Instructor: Robin Fast
  • LI371 - Shakespearean Tragedy (4 Credits)
    Carefully examines selected tragedies from Romeo and Juliet to Antony and Cleopatra, emphasizing the development of the tragic form.
    Instructors: Murray Schwartz, DeWitt Henry
  • LI372 - Shakespearean Comedy (4 Credits)
    Detailed study of selected comedies from A Midsummer Night's Dream to The Winter's Tale, emphasizing Shakespeare's development of the comic form.
    Instructor: DeWitt Henry
  • LI382 - African-American Literature (4 Credits)
    Surveys African American literature (prose, poetry, and drama) from Olaudah Equiano through Toni Morrison and examines African American literature as part of the field of Diaspora studies. Also explores connections between African American and Caribbean American literatures conceived as literatures of the African Diaspora.
    Instructor: Wendy W. Walters
  • LI393 - American Novel 1 (4 Credits)
    Studies representative American novels written before the 20th century, including works by such authors as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Twain, Chopin, Wharton, and James
    Instructor: Raymond Liddell
  • LI396 - International Women Writers (4 Credits)
    Explores works by contemporary international women writers within their social and political contexts. Readings include work by such writers as Nadine Gordimer, Jamaica Kincaid, Michelle Cliff, Mawal El Saadawi, Bessie Head, Luisa Valenzuela, and others.
    Instructor: Vivek Freitas
  • LI413 - The Forms of Poetry: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)
    Students study forms of poetry as used by historical and contemporary poets, and then write original poems in those forms (such as the sonnet, villanelle, haiku, sestina, syllabic, and renga), and genre forms (such as Surrealist, Expressionist, Anti-poem, Open Field, and Language poetry).
    Instructor: Daniel Tobin
  • LI414 - After the Disaster: Post-War European Literature (4 Credits)
    Explores post-war European literary works that are marked by a profound sense of loss, disorientation, and pessimism, with a particular focus on the practices of close reading, textual analysis, and theoretically oriented criticism. Explores how the events of the war- most notably the Holocaust -affected the literature of Europe in their wake. Authors to be read include Primo Levi, Ruth Kluger, Marguerite Duras, Maurice Blanchot, Michel Houellebecq, and W.G. Sebald.
    Instructor: Yu-jin Chang
  • LI415 - Travel Literature (4 Credits)
    Home and away, placement and displacement, location and dislocation are all themes that abound not only in contemporary literature in all its forms (fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama) but also in contemporary literary and cultural criticism. This course explores the theme of travel in literature across its historical terrain in order to understand not only the evolution of its forms but also its role in the construction of identities, familiar and foreign.
    Instructor: Shannon Derby
  • LI421 - Top: Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman (4 Credits)
    Dickinson and Whitman are not only the two most important poets writing in the U.S. in the 19th century; their radical departures from the conventions of their time make their work powerful and inspiring for contemporary readers and writers. While their poetic forms could hardly be more different, thematically (e.g., sexuality, war, power, and spirituality) their interests often overlap, even when their responses, like their styles, diverge. Through intensive study of their poetry and selected prose, we will examine the techniques and voices, and some of the thematic concerns, of these two revolutionary poets. Study of changes made in drafts or successive editions of the poetry will allow us to speculate about their writing processes and about the development of their poetics.
  • LI421 - Top: 20th Century American Women Writers and the American Dream (4 Credits)
    In the 19th century American writers created a distinct literature that articulated a national rhetoric of Western expansion, unfettered class mobility, domestic harmony, and a homogenous ideal of "Americanness." In the 20th century writers began to critique these ideals. Using a diverse and multicultural range of writers, this course examines how American women writers enter and often amplify this critique by depicting the limitations (and failures) of both nationalism and domesticity. Course explores the American Dream of unfettered class mobility and individual liberty as a formation of what critic Lauren Berlant calls "national fantasy," a utopian national idea regarded as universally accessible and made forever unattainable by differences of gender, race, and sexuality. Course also considers how American women writers mark the distance between this national fantasy and historical and lived reality and record the social, psychic, and emotional costs of adhering to a national ideal.
  • LI423 - Top: Utopian, Dystopian, and Apocalyptic Fictions (4 Credits)
    "That's great, it starts with an earthquake" -R.E.M. This course takes early modern, romantic, and victorian visions of utopian worlds, 20th century dystopian visions, and some contemporary apocalyptic fictions. After dispensing some of the obvious allegorical questions about the function of these visions of "Brave New Worlds," we consider some of the more complex contours of utopian projects in opposition to dystopian and apocalyptic refutations and whether they are refutations at all. In particular we consider the idea of progress and futurity in the context of Marxist, postmodern, and poststructural theory. Possible texts may include More's 'Utopia', Cavendish's 'The Blazing World', Shelley's 'The Last Man', Orwell's '1984', Lawrence's 'Apocalypse', Atwood's 'The Handmaid's Tale', Ishiguro's 'Never Let Me Go', MacCarthy's 'The Road', selections of Kirkman's 'The Walking Dead', Mitchell's 'Cloud Atlas'.
  • LI423 - Top: Cultural Translations (4 Credits)
    Explores this history of translation and offers the means through which students can learn the transnational literacy that is necessary for translating cultures today. Through reading a series of texts on and in translation, the class illustrates the jagged relationship between condition and effect of knowing, that is, the difference between the way a text conveys its truth to its particular cultural context and the knowledge conveyed to the reader at large. The aim of this class is to offer students tools through which they can act in an ethical way, a political way, when it comes to cultural translations in a global cultural context.
  • LI423 - Top: Latin American Short Fiction (4 Credits)
    Latin American Short Fiction considers short fiction written since the 1940s. It concentrates on major figures of the twentieth century beginning with Jorge Luis Borges who set the parameters of postmodern fiction in Latin American letters. The course centers on authors who "problematize both the nature of the referent and its relation to the real, historical world by its paradoxical combination of metafictional self-reflexivity with historical subject matter" (Linda Hutcheon, A Poetics of Postmodernism). The course will also consider how writers reach out to a global audience by engaging popular literary forms such as detective fiction, the fantastic, melodrama, new journalism and magical realism.
  • LI423 - Top: Colonization and Diaspora: in the Light of Indian, Caribbean and African Novels (4 Credits)
    This course will address the topics of colonization and its aftermath diaspora. We will start journey through the reading of the Indian novelist Amitav Ghosh's Sea of Poppies where Indians were deported to Mauritius as indentured laborers. Along that line, we will also study the Caribbean novelist Jamaica Kincaid's At the Bottom of the River to study the sad history of colonization in Caribbean Islands. This will take us to the next phase of our journey where we will read Indian female novelists like JhumpaLahiri and Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni to experience lives of immigrants, their struggle and success stories in the USA. Finally, we will take into consideration the bleak truth of African diaspora through Toni Morrison's Beloved. Students will also read articles and books chapters as well as watch a film to guide them into theoretical and critical contexts of colonization, and diaspora. Class will be conducted as a seminar primarily based on discussion and presentations.
  • LI436 - Cultural Criticism (4 Credits)
    Surveys the dominant theoretical approaches to the study of culture. The course traces their main arguments and helps students develop a sense of what it means to be a producer and a consumer of culture today.
    Instructor: George Katsaros
  • LI481 - Top: Afrofuturism (4 Credits)
    This course examines several genres of black speculative fiction, studying their historical trajectories and future projections, moving from W.E.B. Du Bois to digital diasporas. We will analyze how speculative fiction enables a writer and a reader to imagine new possibilities about race and society. Studying the principles of Afrofuturism, we will read novels, short fiction, and critical theory. At the end of this course you will be able to articulate and defend a working definition of Afrofuturism, drawing on a range of readings from critical analyses to short stories, to cultural theory, to canonical novels.
    Instructor: Wendy W. Walters
  • LI482 - Top: Modern Grotesque (4 Credits)
    Explores the unnerving, freakish, horrifying, and comic world of the modern grotesque. Readings will include short stories and novels by writers such as Franz Kafka, Amos Tutuola, Flannery O'Connor, Stona Fitch, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Nathanael West. We'll also touch upon visual representations of the grotesque, looking at works by artists and filmmakers such as Diane Arbus, Joel-Peter Witkin, Jan Svankmajer, Alejandro Jodorowski, and Werner Herzog. An appreciation of modern grotesque literature and art requires a sense of humor, a willingness to consider the bizarre, and, on occasion, a steady nerve. Concerned with what critic Philip Thomson calls "the unresolved clash of incompatibles," the modern grotesque offers an unflinchingly look at the essential dislocation of our world.
  • LI482 - Top: The Great Books (4 Credits)
    There are some great books everyone should have a chance to read and talk about. Two of them, both by Joyce, are Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Ulysses. This is an upper-level literature course with a small-group seminar format that will explore the previously listed two texts together with critical essays on Portrait, and the companion gloss of Ulysses by Kenner. Discussion will be organized largely around student presentations, with some specific topics for group discussion.
  • LI612 - Top: Poet, Daemon & Craftsman (4 Credits)
    "Wild thing, you make my heart sing." (Chip Taylor, The Troggs). Why has too much workshop poetry gone the way of primness and propriety? Why the over-emphasis on form and technique? This course seeks to restore the balance between wildness and craft by exploring the intersection between Dionysius and Apollo in the works of modern and contemporary masters. Readings will include works by Apollinaire, Dickinson, Neruda, Storni, Corso, Huidobro, Parra, Zagajewski, Amichai, Lleshanaku, and others. Weekly annotations on the readings and one literary essay.
  • LI612 - Top: Modern and Contemporary Poetry in Translation (4 Credits)
    Course focuses on translations of poems by modern and contemporary writers who areconcerned with the way the art of poetry can help us think more deeply and wisely about what it means to live in a complex and difficult modern world.This became especially relevant in the modern time period when poets started using forms, themes, and poetic language that were more closely tied to their political and social experience and found it irresistible and difficult to reconcile the issues of aesthetics and politics. The poets we'll examine offer new literary traditions and distinct poetic voices to the English-speaking audience; their poetry also, in Seamus Heaney's words, "link[s] the new literary experience to a modern martyrology, a record of courage and sacrifice which elicits our.admiration."
  • LI615 - Top: Literature of Evil (4 Credits)
    An exploration of European literary works that are haunted by a sense of `evil,¨ as defined by Georges Bataille (whose Literature and Evil provides something of a framework for the course), with a particular focus on the practices of close reading, textual analysis and theoretically oriented criticism. Works include Emily Bront‰'s Wuthering Heights, Baudelaire's Flowers of Evil, Duras' Malady of Death, Houellebecq's Elementary Particles, and Sebald's Rings of Saturn.
  • LI615 - Top: Travel Literature (4 Credits)
    Home and away, placement and displacement, location and dislocation are all themes that abound not only in contemporary literature in all its forms (fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama) but also in contemporary literary and cultural criticism. This class explores the theme of travel in literature across its historical terrain in order to understand not only the evolution of its forms but also its role in the construction of identities, familiar and foreign.
  • LI615 - Top: Translation Seminar (4 Credits)
    This seminar will explore a number of issues inherent in translation, among them the translator's responsibility to the source text; the translatability of culture, music, and dialect; the ethics of translation, and others. The course will also function as a workshop where student translations will be discussed and critiqued. Students will be asked to write short 2-page weekly annotations on readings assigned. In addition, students will be asked to complete a translation project in poetry (10 pages, no more than one poem per page) or fiction (15 pages), with an introduction explaining the approach they used. A working knowledge of a second language is helpful but not essential.
  • LI625 - Top: Latin American Short Fiction (4 Credits)
    Latin American Short Fiction considers short fiction written since the 1940s. It concentrates on major figures of the twentieth century beginning with Jorge Luis Borges who set the parameters of postmodern fiction in Latin American letters. The course centers on authors who "problematize both the nature of the referent and its relation to the real, historical world by its paradoxical combination of metafictional self-reflexivity with historical subject matter" (Linda Hutcheon, A Poetics of Postmodernism). The course will also consider how writers reach out to a global audience by engaging popular literary forms such as detective fiction, the fantastic, melodrama, new journalism and magical realism.
  • LI625 - Top: Craft and the Contemporary Short Story (4 Credits)
    This is a literature class for the serious writing student. The course will operate on a simple premise: in order to learn the craft of writing, one must read and study literature with rigor and care. We'll immerse ourselves in the works of nine acknowledged masters of the short story, form among them Flannery O'Connor, Raymond Carver, Denis Johnson, Alice Munro and Sherman Alexie so that we can focus on how they tell stories, create characters, use language, and employ fiction techniques.
  • LI650 - Seminar in the Novel (4 Credits)
    Examines particular narrative strategies in storytelling. Students examine such practices as multiple points of view, chronology, indirect discourse, focalization, etc., as well as historical and cultural contexts. Reading might include works by Nabokov, Proust, Woolf, Faulkner, Sterne, Bernhard, Bowles, among others.
    Instructor: Frederick Reiken
  • LI651 - Seminar in Poetry (4 Credits)
    Analytical and critical study of a variety of poets and/or schools of poetry, modern and contemporary, that explores their approaches to craft, form, and theme, as well as their aesthetic, cultural, and historical assumptions for and about the art.
    Instructor: Jonathan Aaron
  • LI652 - Seminar in Short Fiction (4 Credits)
    Analytical and critical study of a variety of recent American short stories, mostly modern and contemporary, exploring their approaches to form, theme, and technique.
    Instructor: Ladette Randolph
  • LI653 - Seminar in Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the nonfiction narrative, including memoir, personal essay, biography, travel writing, nature writing, and other nonfiction writing from various periods, with particular attention paid to issues of craft and structure, as well as historical and cultural contexts.
    Instructor: Richard Hoffman
  • LI687 - Top: 20th Century 1st Person (4 Credits)
    This course will examine the twentieth century, its upheavals, dislocations, and diasporas, through the study of ten memoirs from around the world. These memoirs will be explored as instances of witness to events that continue to shape the world we live in.
    Instructor: Richard Hoffman
  • LS101 - Elementary Spanish 1 (4 Credits)
    Stresses mastery of the essential vocabulary and primary grammatical structures through a situational approach. Students perceive that language is "living" and they discover by the third week of the semester that they can already communicate in Spanish. Class time is devoted to interactive practice. Conversational skills, pronunciation, and understanding are verified through regular oral exams.
  • LS102 - Elementary Spanish 2 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of LS 101, this course also incorporates reading skills and exposes students to a wider range of cultural materials.
  • PB207 - Introduction to Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces writing for commercial markets. Students develop, research, and write nonfiction articles and learn where to market them. May be repeated once for credit and may be substituted for one 200-level WR (writing) workshop.
  • PB302 - Copyediting (4 Credits)
    Practical course about the process of editing and preparing manuscripts for publication. Together with hands-on assignments, the course considers the relation of editor to author, the nature of copyediting in various publishing environments, and other topics.
  • PB307 - Intermediate Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Requires students to research and write an article or magazine feature. Students learn terms, concepts, and techniques to improve both writing and critical thinking. May be repeated once for credit and may be substituted for one 300-level WR (writing) workshop.
    Instructor: Delia Cabe
  • PB380 - Magazine Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Provides an understanding of the magazine field from the perspective of writers and editors. Looks at the similarities and differences between general interest magazines and more focused magazines, and how magazines compete with each other and with other media for audiences and revenues. Topics include how magazines carve out niches, the relationship between the business and editorial departments, and the editorial operations of magazines. The course also looks at the history of the magazine industry.
  • PB383 - Book Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Examines the acquisition and editing of a manuscript, its progress into design and production, and the final strategies of promotion and distribution of a finished book.
  • PB395 - Applications for Print Publishing (4 Credits)
    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the publishing industry. Students also learn related computer-based skills, such as type and image sourcing, image acquisition, including scanning, and copyright issues. Although some design issues are addressed, the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes students have basic Macintosh skills.
  • PB402 - Book Editing (4 Credits)
    Book editing, or substantive editing, is a highly subjective, visceral skill informed by flexibility, judgment, life experience, grammatical grace, signposts, caution lights, road maps, respect for the author, and subtle diplomacy in the author/editor relationship, all directed toward helping the writer to the intended creative goal. In other words, book editing is an art, not a science. However, an exploration of the foundations of constructive shaping, development, organization, and line-editing may release the inner shepherd/wrangler in you.
  • PB403 - Electronic Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Explores various methods of digital publishing including e-books and web site creation. The course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the planning, development and management of digital content.
  • PB481 - Book Design and Production (4 Credits)
    Covers book and book jacket design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. This is not a software instruction course.
    Instructor: Melissa Gruntkosky
  • PB491 - Top: Ed Tech Times: Content Development and Web Design for an Online Information Hub (4 Credits)
    Focused on a project with EdTech Times (ETT), a start-up that publishes news dedicated to the education technology industry, located in the offices of Learn Launch, an education technology incubator in Boston. The course seeks students across a variety of disciplines to help ETT with repositioning for greater audience engagement by redesigning their website and exploring new content forms (including original written content, video, data visualizations, and info-graphics, etc). The course will immerse students in an experiential learning environment that will require them to develop content through creative inquiry across multiple disciplines, collaboration with ETT, and iterative experimentation among teams. Students will learn the process for developing web pages from inititial design to development and best practices in writing for the web.
  • PB491 - Top: Writing about Subcultures (4 Credits)
    In this an advanced writing and publishing class, students will immerse themselves for the semester in a subculture of their choosing and write an 8,000- to 10,000-word magazine piece. In addition, students will read the work of a wide variety of leading nonfiction and magazine writers-including Ted Conover, Susan Orlean, and Hunter S. Thompson-who have chronicled hidden, misunderstood, or stigmatized groups and communities. Many of the writers will speak to class via Skype.
  • PB491 - Top: Advanced Applications for Print Publishing (4 Credits)
    Students will learn how to write about other people--whether famous, ordinary, overlooked, or controversial. We will read the work of the best magazine profile writers writing today, and many of those writers will speak to the class via Skype. Students will write several profiles, including a long magazine-length final project. We will workshop the profiles in class. This class is designed for students interested in magazine writing, biography, journalism feature writing, and nonfiction writing that focuses on the lives of other people. This is an advanced course, and it is highly advised that students have already taken a 300-level writing workshop, magazine writing course, or journalism class.
  • PB491 - Top: Music Writing (4 Credits)
    This course will concern writing about popular music. Students will write and workshop concert and album reviews, musician or band profiles, and columns. They will also read and discuss the work of professional music writers. Most of this latter reading will be come from two course textbooks, Lost Highway, by Peter Guralnick, and The Best American Music Writing 2011, edited by Alex Ross and Daphne Carr. There will be visits from professional music writers and editors (possibly to include Guralnick himself), and the class will attend one or two free Wednesday-night concerts together, which they will review as a class assignment.
  • PB491 - Top: Advanced Applications for Print Publishing (4 Credits)
    Using the software, design, and production skills learned in Applications for Print Publishing as a foundation, students learn advanced techniques in InDesign and Photoshop, as well as the basics of Illustrator. The class will focus on a number of design projects with several rounds of critiques. Through these projects, as well as occasional lectures, readings, and exercises, students continue to grow the software and design skills needed to create print publications while developing projects to show in their portfolios. Conceptual thinking, problem solving skills, and technical skill will all be stressed.
  • PB675 - Principles of Management for Publishing (4 Credits)
    This course will provide students with a basic overview and knowledge of how different publishing enterprises are organized and managed. Helps students develop a firm understanding of the organizational and financial skills required for a career in publishing.
    Instructor: Jeanne Emanuel
  • PB676 - Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Gives students experience in developing magazine feature stories. Students brainstorm, report, and write their own magazine-style stories, with emphasis on the shaping and editing stage. They also read and discuss published work by professionals. Class is conducted as a writing workshop in a style that mimics a magazine atmosphere. This course may count for 1 workshop credit for nonfiction students.
    Instructor: William Beuttler
  • PB678 - Magazine Editing (4 Credits)
    Course about the magazine editing process. Covers topics ranging from focus, direction, topicality, structure, sense of audience, and voice, and explores the practical application of editing skills as well as historic examples of editors and their magazines.
    Instructor: William Beuttler
  • PB679 - The Editor/Writer Relationship (4 Credits)
    Examines the magazine writing and editing process, and covers topics ranging from idea generation and story selection to the mechanics of editing and how the editorial process works.
    Instructor: William Beuttler
  • PB680 - Magazine Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Examines the magazine field from the perspective of writers and editors, and covers the editorial and business operations of magazines, the editorial mix, and magazine geography.
    Instructors: Johannah Haney, Leslie Brokaw, Benoit Denizet-Lewis
  • PB680 - Magazine Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    MA Students only.
    Instructors: Johannah Haney, Leslie Brokaw, Benoit Denizet-Lewis
  • PB682 - Magazine Design and Prod. (4 Credits)
    Covers magazine design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. Students produce sample magazines through a workshop process of presentations and revisions. Course assumes students have necessary computer skills.
    Instructor: Lisa Diercks
  • PB683 - Book Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Introduction to the book publishing industry, including a detailed examination of the editorial, marketing, and design and production stages of the book publishing process. Course also looks at important developments and issues within the field, such as online publishing, and at various jobs in book publishing.
  • PB683 - Book Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    MA Students only.
  • PB685 - Book Editing (4 Credits)
    Considers book editing skills, tasks, and responsibilities from initial review and acquisition of a book manuscript through project development. Emphasizes trade book editing, but also considers editorial work at scholarly and professional presses.
    Instructor: David Emblidge
  • PB686 - Book Design and Prod. (4 Credits)
    Covers book and book jacket design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. Students design a book through a workshop process of presentations and revisions. Course assumes students have necessary computer skills.
    Instructor: Lisa Diercks
  • PB687 - Column Writing (4 Credits)
    Magazine publishing course explores the process of researching, writing, and revising magazine columns, and examines the importance of audience. This course may count for one workshop requirement for nonfiction students.
  • PB688 - Copyediting (4 Credits)
    Covers the process of editing and preparing manuscripts for publication. Together with hands-on assignments, the course considers the relation of editor to author, the nature of copyediting in various publishing environments, and other topics.
  • PB689 - Book Publicity (4 Credits)
    Familiarizes students with trade book promotion to the media. Begins with an overview of book publicity and then covers the publicity process, the type of freelance help available, crafting press material, the author/publicist dynamic, how to secure and promote bookstore events, the art of the interview, and the art of the pitch. All assignments and classroom activities are based on real-world publishing tasks so that students leave the class thoroughly prepared to promote their book or someone else's.
    Instructor: Lissa Warren
  • PB691 - Applications for Print Publish (4 Credits)
    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the print publishing industry. Some design issues are addressed, but the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes the student has basic Macintosh skills.
  • PB691 - Applications for Print Publishing (4 Credits)
    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the print publishing industry. Some design issues are addressed, but the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes the student has basic Macintosh skills.
  • PB692 - Electronic Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Introduces electronic and new media publishing formats, including but not limited to the web, online publishing, CD-ROM, and DVD. Course assumes the student has basic computer skills.
  • PB693 - Book Marketing & Sales (4 Credits)
    Course is designed as an extension of the Book Publishing Overview course for students who want to further explore the sales and marketing sides of business - where marketing and sales fit into the life of a book, the differences between the two areas, and the distinct effect that each, done well or badly, has on a book's success. It then tracks the marketing and sales process through a book's publication with specific assignments at each stage based on real-world publications tasks from sales forecasting to planning (and budgeting for) marketing campaigns to sales calls and the retailers' buying processes.
    Instructor: Beth Ineson
  • PB694 - Top: Ed Tech Times: Content Development and Web Design for an Online Information Hub (4 Credits)
    Focused on a project with EdTech Times (ETT), a start-up that publishes news dedicated to the education technology industry, located in the offices of Learn Launch, an education technology incubator in Boston. The course seeks students across a variety of disciplines to help ETT with repositioning for greater audience engagement by redesigning their website and exploring new content forms (including original written content, video, data visualizations, and info-graphics, etc). The course will immerse students in an experiential learning environment that will require them to develop content through creative inquiry across multiple disciplines, collaboration with ETT, and iterative experimentation among teams. Students will learn the process for developing web pages from inititial design to development and best practices in writing for the web.
  • PB694 - Top: Advanced e-books (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the creation and design of interactive texts in the EPUB format. Students will explore the rationale behind adding media and interactivity to e-books and think about what this change means for how we interact with text. The course covers the current trends and tools of the industry and will cover how create fixed-layout ebooks for art and children's titles, adding video and audio to an e-book, and using javascript to create interactivity.
  • PB694 - Top: Online Writing (4 Credits)
    Online Writing & Editing will focus on how to craft engaging content for online media. We will explore issues including how writing differs in online media vs. traditional print format; how online writing fits into the realms of journalism, literature, politics, and business; and how online writing can be used within various professions. The class will draw on discussions of assigned readings and students own writing. Assignments will include writing articles, pitch letters, blog entries, and other short forms, as well as editing an online publication.
  • PB694 - Top: Educational Publishing (4 Credits)
    Presents an overview of publishing in the following areas: elementary, and secondary schools (K-12 Education), colleges and universities (Higher Education), and scholarly and professional (Ongoing Adult Education). Students are expected to gain an understanding of the structure of these areas of the industry, who the publishers are, what they produce (from books to software to material delivered via the Internet), how--and why--they produce their products, who constitutes the market in the various areas, and how the publishers reach those markets.
  • PB694 - Top: Magazine Marketing (4 Credits)
    Provides students with an understanding of how publications market themselves to readers and make business decisions based on the market. Building upon a foundation of core marketing concepts, students will get hands-on experience applying those concepts to magazines. Topics covered include strategic planning, consumer behavior and audience research, social media strategy, circulation tactics, content marketing, positioning, digital channels, measurement, advertising, business models, and applying marketing methods to create a personal professional brand.
  • PB694 - Top: Innovation in Publishing: Trade & Literary Entrepreneurship (4 Credits)
    The last ten years have seen a sea change in publishing. The advent of the ebook, apps for mobile devices, an explosion in the numbers of small independent publishers, the rise of self-publishing and greater consolidation of the major trade publishers have had far-reaching effects on how publishers do business. While many organizations are resisting change, many companies have sprung up in the last decade that have embraced change. We will examine these companies and their business models to determine which models might turn out to be the most successful in the marketplace, what practices might be replicable and where openings for further innovation exist. In addition, we will explore how to create such an entrepreneurial organization and discuss the particular concerns of start-ups and how best to find and mine market opportunities.
  • PB695 - Creating Electronic Publications for the Web and E-Readers (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the creation and design of complete texts in a variety of e-formats. Students will produce complete texts using the extensible Markup Language (XML) and .epub formats. The course covers the current trends and tools of the industry and explores how e-texts are created for e-readers and tablets.
    Instructor: Colleen Cunningham
  • PB696 - Web Development for Electronic Publishing (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the design and format of text and images for the computer and mobile phone screen. Students create sites using HTML and CSS. Topics covered include: content evaluation, usability standards, design aesthetics, user experience, JavaScript, and hosting solutions.
    Instructor: John Rodzvilla
  • WR101 - Introduction to College Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces college writing, focusing on cultural analysis that appears in academic work and in the public intellectual sphere. Emphasizes how writers work with texts (including images, film, music, and other media) to develop writing projects. Through four main writing projects that concentrate on drafting, peer review, and revision, students learn to be constructive readers of each other's writing and to understand the rhetoric of intellectual inquiry.
  • WR101 - Introduction to College Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces college writing, focusing on cultural analysis that appears in academic work and in the public intellectual sphere. Emphasizes how writers work with texts (including images, film, music, and other media) to develop writing projects. Through four main writing projects that concentrate on drafting, peer review, and revision, students learn to be constructive readers of each other's writing and to understand the rhetoric of intellectual inquiry.
  • WR101 - Introduction to College Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces college writing, focusing on cultural analysis that appears in academic work and in the public intellectual sphere. Emphasizes how writers work with texts (including images, film, music, and other media) to develop writing projects. Through four main writing projects that concentrate on drafting, peer review, and revision, students learn to be constructive readers of each other's writing and to understand the rhetoric of intellectual inquiry.
  • WR101 - Introduction to College Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces college writing, focusing on cultural analysis that appears in academic work and in the public intellectual sphere. Emphasizes how writers work with texts (including images, film, music, and other media) to develop writing projects. Through four main writing projects that concentrate on drafting, peer review, and revision, students learn to be constructive readers of each other's writing and to understand the rhetoric of intellectual inquiry.
  • WR121 - Research Writing (4 Credits)
    Research-based writing course that explores how rhetorical situations call on writers to do research and how writers draw on various types of writing to present the results of their research. Through four main writing projects, students develop an understanding of the purposes and methods of research and a rhetorical awareness of how research-based writing tasks ask them to consider their relation to the issues they are researching and to their audiences.
  • WR121 - Research Writing-Application (4 Credits)
    Research-based writing course that explores how rhetorical situations call on writers to do research and how writers draw on various types of writing to present the results of their research. Through four main writing projects, students develop an understanding of the purposes and methods of research and a rhetorical awareness of how research-based writing tasks ask them to consider their relation to the issues they are researching and to their audiences.
  • WR121 - Research Writing-YR (4 Credits)
    Research-based writing course that explores how rhetorical situations call on writers to do research and how writers draw on various types of writing to present the results of their research. Through four main writing projects, students develop an understanding of the purposes and methods of research and a rhetorical awareness of how research-based writing tasks ask them to consider their relation to the issues they are researching and to their audiences.
  • WR121 - Research Writing: Bilingual (4 Credits)
    Research-based writing course that explores how rhetorical situations call on writers to do research and how writers draw on various types of writing to present the results of their research. Through four main writing projects, students develop an understanding of the purposes and methods of research and a rhetorical awareness of how research-based writing tasks ask them to consider their relation to the issues they are researching and to their audiences.
  • WR121 - Research Writing:International (4 Credits)
    Research-based writing course that explores how rhetorical situations call on writers to do research and how writers draw on various types of writing to present the results of their research. Through four main writing projects, students develop an understanding of the purposes and methods of research and a rhetorical awareness of how research-based writing tasks ask them to consider their relation to the issues they are researching and to their audiences.
  • WR211 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Fiction and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR212 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Poetry and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR216 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Nonfiction and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR311 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction (4 Credits)
    Original Fiction is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR312 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Poetry (4 Credits)
    Original Poetry is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR313 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Drama (4 Credits)
    Original Drama is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: William Orem
  • WR315 - Intermediate Comedy Writing; Sketch Troup Writing (4 Credits)
    This course will allow the student to explore many different aspects of comedy writing, including sketch comedy, and improvisation. In addition there will be class discussions on the ethics of comedy, brainstorming sessions and discussions of current industry events and trends. The class will act as a comedy sketch troupe and will write, produce and perform a full sketch show.
    Instructor: Michael Bent
  • WR315 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Comedy (4 Credits)
    This course will allow the student to explore many different aspects of stand-up comedy writing, including generating material, character development, improvisation, and performance technique. In addition there will be class discussions on the ethics of comedy, brainstorming sessions and discussions of current industry events and trends. Each student will write a stand-up comedy routine, which will be revised, and presented at a comedy club.
    Instructor: Michael Bent
  • WR315 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Sketch Troup Writing (4 Credits)
    This course will allow the student to explore many different aspects of comedy writing, including sketch comedy, and improvisation. In addition there will be class discussions on the ethics of comedy, brainstorming sessions and discussions of current industry events and trends. The class will act as a comedy sketch troupe. They will write, produce and perform a full sketch show.
    Instructor: Michael Bent
  • WR316 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Original Nonfiction is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR317 - Top: Noir Fiction (4 Credits)
    Students write noir and neo-noir fiction: dark, gritty stories in which the protagonist is not a detective but the perpetrator, the victim, the suspect; someone destined to lose, trapped in a web of lust, betrayal, and paranoia. Reading published noir and neo-noir short fiction encompassing a variety of genres (for instance, crime thrillers, Westerns, and speculative fictions) will help define the elements essential to a noir sensibility.
    Instructor: Kevin Miller
  • WR320 - Travel Writing (4 Credits)
    The best travel writing takes readers on a journey that is not only geographic, but also narrative. This intermediate course in literary travel writing introduces writers to key ways to transform their experiences in the world- be it a far-flung travel destination or one's hometown- into compelling narratives in the form of short essay or memoir. In addition to short reading and writing assignments, students complete three polished travel essays: two to be workshopped and one to hand into the instructor on the last day of class.
    Instructor: Alden Jones
  • WR405 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Poetry (4 Credits)
    Advanced writing workshop in poetry with in-class discussion of original poems by students already seriously engaged in writing poetry. The course pays special attention to getting published and students are encouraged to submit their work to magazines. May be repeated once for credit.
    Instructors: Gail Mazur, Peter Shippy
  • WR407 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Fiction (4 Credits)
    Extensive fiction writing of short stories and/or novels coupled with in-class reading for criticism and the craft of fiction. May be repeated once for credit.
  • WR415 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Advanced writing workshop in various nonfiction forms, such as memoir, travel writing, literary journalism, or other narrative nonfiction writing. Students will already have completed at least one nonfiction workshop, have a project in development, and be capable of discussing such techniques as characterization, point of view, and narrative structure as they appear in literary nonfiction forms.
  • WR440 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Screenwriting (4 Credits)
    Advanced workshop in feature film writing in which students learn how to work with characters, dialogue, and dramatic structure through story development, mini treatments, and scene breakdown. Students beginning new scripts produce at least half of a screenplay and a solid, outlined second half. Students continuing a work-in-progress script revise and polish. Course also includes study and discussion of successfully produced film/TV scripts. May be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: Christopher Keane
  • WR600 - Teaching College Composition (4 Credits)
    Introduction to composition history, theory, and pedagogy that prepares students to teach college writing courses. Examines debates and practices in college composition and their conceptual foundations and introduces rhetoric as a productive art and means of analysis. In preparation to teach writing, students learn how to design writing assignments, to run writing workshops, to respond to and evaluate student writing, and to produce a syllabus for a first-year composition course.
  • WR605 - Poetry Workshop (4 Credits)
    In-class discussions of original poems aim to help students learn strategies for generating and revising work. The workshop asks students to consider their work in light of the essential issues of the poet's craft, and to articulate their individual sensibilities as poets.
  • WR606 - Fiction Workshop (4 Credits)
    Uses student manuscripts as its main texts, supplemented by published stories, to illustrate the fundamental aspects of fiction, mainly in the short story form. Explores the complexities of narration, characterization, scene, dialogue, style, tone, plot, etc. Emphasis is on the generation of fictional works and on their revision.
  • WR608 - Top: Linked Stories (4 Credits)
    Students will write three stories in the course of the semester linked by character, place or preoccupation. Texts: Olive Kittredge by Elizabeth Strout, Ideas of Heaven by Joan Silber, plus various collections of linked stories.
  • WR608 - Top: Short Short (4 Credits)
    The focus of this class is student work in the short-short story form-stories from 250 words to 3 pages. A "short-short" is not a condensed long story, but a story that requires this length and particular form. Students will be given a topic or form for each story due, so please note that each student will be generating all new work for this workshop. (For example, one assignment might be to write a one-sentence story that has urgency and forward movement similar to Molly Lanzarotta's "One Day Walk Through the Front Door.") In addition, we'll read and discuss short stories by a variety of writers whose work appears in Flash Fiction, one anthology of microfiction, and various magazines that welcome the short short story.
  • WR613 - Nonfiction Workshop (4 Credits)
    Stresses the writing of many forms of nonfiction, such as informal essays, autobiography, profiles, travel writing, or literary journalism, coupled with reading assignments of relevant texts.
  • WR652 - Novel Workshop (4 Credits)
    A workshop in structuring and writing the opening chapters of a novel. Explores story premise, stylistic approach, point-of-view, and other structural parameters, as well as revision.
    Instructor: Mako Yoshikawa
  • WR655 - Writing the Nonfiction Book (4 Credits)
    Workshop on the extended narrative, with discussions of organizing the research, developing an outline and devising a structure, carrying out the plan, and writing the book proposal. Students submit their own work and also examine various approaches of nonfiction books.
    Instructor: Douglas Whynott