Department of Writing, Literature & Publishing

Courses


Filter the courses by subject area

  • LF101 - Elementary French 1 (4 Credits)
    Stresses mastery of essential vocabulary and primary grammatical structures through a situational approach. Students perceive that language is "living" and they discover by the third week of the semester that they can already communicate in French. Class time is devoted to interactive practice. Conversational skills, pronunciation, and understanding are verified through regular oral exams.
    Instructor: Pierre Hurel
  • LF102 - Elementary French 2 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of LF 101, this course also incorporates reading skills and exposes students to a wider range of cultural materials.
  • LI120 - Introduction to Literary Studies (4 Credits)
    Gives students intensive practice in literary analysis, critical writing, and related research. In discussing primary texts, considerable attention is given to elements of the different genres (e.g., narrative point of view, narrative structure, metrical and free verse), as well as to issues relevant across literary genres (e.g., form and content, voice, contexts, tone). Readings are chosen from the following genres: poetry, drama, narrative modes, and also include selected literary criticism.
    Instructors: MaryEllen Beveridge, Christina Carlson, Brian Cronin, Jackie Hall, Christopher Hennessy, Gazmend Kapllani, Daniela Kukrechtova
  • LI201 - Literary Foundations (4 Credits)
    Surveys foundational works of Western literature in poetry, nonfiction, fiction, and drama in order to familiarize students with literary history as well as the history of our ideas of love, duty, the afterlife, virtue, and vice. Authors studied may include Homer, Sophocles, Plato, Virgil, Ovid, Dante, Boccaccio, the Beowulf poet, and Chaucer.
  • LI202 - American Literature (4 Credits)
    Introduces representative works of American literature in several genres from the colonial period to the modern by writers such as Bradstreet, Franklin, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Douglass, Melville, Dickinson, Whitman, Chopin, Twain, Crane, Hurston, Faulkner, Williams, and Moore.
  • LI203 - British Literature (4 Credits)
    Historical overview of several genres of British literature from the Renaissance to the 20th century, focusing on writers such as More, Spenser, Milton, Defoe, Bronte, Eliot, Joyce, and Beckett.
  • LI204 - Topics in Literature (4 Credits)
    Courses focus on specific themes or topics, such as literature of the city, artists in literature, or coming of age. All topics include literature in at least three genres (selected from poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama).
  • LI208 - US Multicultural Literatures (4 Credits)
    Introduces poetry, fiction, and other genres produced in the multicultural U.S.A. Explores ways writers from disparate communities use various literary forms to articulate resistance, community, and citizenship. Literary texts are situated in their historical contexts and examine the writing strategies of each author. Also includes essays, journalism, and films to learn how diverse cultural texts work to represent America.
    Instructors: Michelle Graham, Christopher Hennessy
  • LI209 - Topics in US Multicultural Lit (4 Credits)
    Courses focus on literature produced by historically oppressed peoples in the United States and on specific themes or topics, such as slavery and freedom, American Indian multi-genre life-stories, or border identities. All topics include the study of literature in at least three genres (selected from poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama). May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • LI210 - American Women Writers (4 Credits)
    Examines fiction, poetry, and other genres by 19th- and 20th-century American women such as Jacobs, Dickinson, Chopin, Kingston, Welty, Rich, and Morrison.
    Instructors: MaryEllen Beveridge, Indira Ganesan, Daniela Kukrechtova, Anna Ross
  • LI211 - Topics in Global Literature (4 Credits)
    Courses focus on literature produced outside the United States in locations affected by imperial expansion. Specific themes or topics might include Literatures of the Asian Diaspora, Latin American Literature and Cinema, or Literature of Europe's Borders. All topics include literature in at least three genres (selected from poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama). May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • LI212 - Black Revolutionary Thought (4 Credits)
    Traces the protest tradition and radical thinking in African American literature. Using landmark essays by W.E.B Du Bois and Alain Locke to frame the debate and then moving from David Walker to Malcolm X and beyond, this course engages questions about the development of the Jeremiadic tradition in African American literature, the role of the black artist in promoting social change, gendered differences in protest literature, and whether politics informs and elevates art or strangles it.
  • LI214 - Latino Literature (4 Credits)
    Explores the idea of borderlands or living on the hyphen by American writers who identify themselves as straddling two cultures. Students read poetry, essays, fiction and theater by authors in the following traditions: Chicano, Puerto Rican (Borinquen), Cuban and Dominican American.
    Instructor: Flora Gonzalez
  • LI215 - Slavery and Freedom (4 Credits)
    Looks at a wide-ranging survey of 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century poems, plays, novels, and nonfiction narratives concerning the issue of American slavery and its aftermath. Explores slave narrative conventions across historical periods as well as themes such as identity, masking, the liberating power of literacy, and masculine and feminine definitions of freedom.
    Instructor: Kimberly McLarin
  • LI216 - Literature of the Gothic (4 Credits)
    Focuses on literary and aesthetic tradition known as the Gothic, following its various manifestations from 18th century England up to present-day America. Students read novels, poetry, short stories and plays. Students interested in postmodern expressions of the Gothic, from graphic novels to film, will be invited to bring these to the table. Is Dracula really about the anxiety of empire? What is Frankenstein saying about social theory and the dangers of Romanticism? And finally, why does Gothic material retain its fascination in the 21st century, when so many aesthetic movements lie moldering in their graves?
    Instructor: William Orem
  • LI217 - Lit, Culture & the Environment (4 Credits)
    Examines the literature, art, and culture of Native and non-Native America and consider how these two very different traditions have affected the environment. Initially, students focus on Native Creation stories and on Genesis in order to better understand the definition of "wilderness." They then study the work of 17th-, 18th-, and 19th-century authors and artists who influenced and/or responded to how the environment should be managed. As students progress to the 20th and 21st centuries, they consider the work of artists, writers, and filmmakers who acknowledge and attempt to come to terms with a drastically changed and oftentimes degraded landscape in their work.
    Instructor: Christine Casson
  • LI303 - The Art of Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Examines a broad range of literary nonfiction works, present and past, paying particular attention to the craft within the nonfiction work but identifying relationships and similarities that literary nonfiction has with the novel and short story. Includes readings from such diverse forms as historical narrative, adventure travel and survival, memoir and the creative nonfiction essay, and other forms of factual writing artfully constructed.
    Instructor: Richard Hoffman
  • LI304 - Topics in Literature (4 Credits)
    Courses focus on specific themes or topics, such as literature of the city, artists in literature, or coming of age. All topics include literature in at least three genres (selected from poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama). May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: William Donoghue
  • LI305 - Modern Poetry and After (4 Credits)
    Explores modern and postmodern traditions of poetry in the works of such 20th-century poets as Eliot, Stevens, Auden, Moore, Lowell, Bishop, Plath, Larkin, Rich, Ashbery, and, in translation, Neruda, Rilke, Herbert, Kazuk, and Tsvetaeva.
  • LI306 - Literatures of Continental Europe (4 Credits)
    Explores seminal works in the European literary tradition, with a particular focus on close reading, textual and rhetorical analysis, and aesthetic criticism. The course may include works by Montaigne, Rousseau, Flaubert, Holderlin, Novalis, Heine, Flaubert, Dostoyevsky, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Proust, Rilke, Kafka, Borges, Bachmann, and Bernhard. Students write short responses to each work and discuss their ideas in class.
  • LI307 - The Art of Poetry (4 Credits)
    Through reading and discussion of poems from different historical periods, students learn the technical aspects of poetry (such as meter, rhyme, and structure) and how poets use these techniques to create meanings and effects, giving students a critical vocabulary for reading and practicing poetry. For students who want to enhance their ability to discuss and write about poetry by learning the essentials of the poet's art.
  • LI308 - The Art of Fiction (4 Credits)
    Explores a broad range of short stories and novels by American and international authors. Teaches students to look at fiction from the perspective of the writer's craft, and emphasizes such elements as structure, narrative, characterization, dialogue, and the differences between shorter and longer forms. Students gain an appreciation of the fiction writer's craft and an enhanced sense of the drama inherent in effective storytelling.
  • LI309 - Topics in Multicultural Literature (4 Credits)
    Courses focus on literature produced by historically oppressed peoples in the United States and on specific themes or topics, such as slavery and freedom, American Indian multi-genre life-stories, or border identities. All topics include the study of literature in at least three genres (selected from poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama). May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Erika Williams
  • LI313 - Novel into Film (4 Credits)
    Studies the adaptation of novels into films, and the narrative conventions that govern each medium. Texts include the works of such writers as Kesey, Burgess, Kundera, Walker, Nabokov, and Puig; films include the work of directors such as Kubrick, Forman, Spielberg, and Babenco.
    Instructor: Kevin Miller
  • LI323 - The American Short Story (4 Credits)
    Acquaints students with the changing thematic and stylistic concerns of the American short story and develops students' critical writing and reading skills. May include authors such as Chopin, Poe, Parker, Hemingway, Faulkner, Stafford, Bambara, Paley, Ford, Oates, and Updike.
  • LI339 - British Novel 1 (4 Credits)
    Engages in social and cultural analysis of the "rise" of the novel in England with representative works from the Restoration (1660) through the end of the 19th century. May include authors such as Behn, Defoe, Sterne, Richardson, Austen, Bronte, Shelley, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy.
    Instructor: William Donoghue
  • LI340 - British Novel 2 (4 Credits)
    Studies representative works of 20th-century British fiction. May cover Modernist authors from the first half of the century such as Forster, Joyce, Ford, Lawrence, Woolf, Waugh, O'Brien, Durrell, Greene, Beckett, Lessing, Murdoch, Golding, and Fowles as well as more contemporary writers from England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland such as McEwan, Barnes, Amis, Crace, Kelman, and Carter.
  • LI361 - Native American Literature (4 Credits)
    Studies works in several genres, including consideration of how traditional myth, story, and ritual contribute to contemporary fiction and poetry, and how the literature reflects and responds to historical and contemporary conditions. May include such authors as Silko, Momaday, Ortiz, Harjo, and Erdrich.
  • LI371 - Shakespearean Tragedy (4 Credits)
    Carefully examines selected tragedies from Romeo and Juliet to Antony and Cleopatra, emphasizing the development of the tragic form.
  • LI372 - Shakespearean Comedy (4 Credits)
    Detailed study of selected comedies from A Midsummer Night's Dream to The Winter's Tale, emphasizing Shakespeare's development of the comic form.
  • LI382 - African-American Literature (4 Credits)
    Surveys African American literature (prose, poetry, and drama) from Olaudah Equiano through Toni Morrison and examines African American literature as part of the field of Diaspora studies. Also explores connections between African American and Caribbean American literatures conceived as literatures of the African Diaspora.
    Instructor: Wendy W. Walters
  • LI393 - American Novel 1 (4 Credits)
    Studies representative American novels written before the 20th century, including works by such authors as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Twain, Chopin, Wharton, and James
    Instructor: Raymond Liddell
  • LI396 - International Women Writers (4 Credits)
    Explores works by contemporary international women writers within their social and political contexts. Readings include work by such writers as Nadine Gordimer, Jamaica Kincaid, Michelle Cliff, Mawal El Saadawi, Bessie Head, Luisa Valenzuela, and others.
  • LI410 - British Romanticism (4 Credits)
    Introduces one of the most significant and revolutionary periods in British literature. Writers such as William Wordsworth, Mary Shelley, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Blake dominated the literary landscape, and their poetry and prose captured this remarkable period of history. This course considers such writers as these in their historical and aesthetic context, and pays particular attention to the ways in which the legacies of the Romantics survive and inform even contemporary modes of literature.
  • LI413 - The Forms of Poetry: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)
    Students study forms of poetry as used by historical and contemporary poets, and then write original poems in those forms (such as the sonnet, villanelle, haiku, sestina, syllabic, and renga), and genre forms (such as Surrealist, Expressionist, Anti-poem, Open Field, and Language poetry).
  • LI414 - After the Disaster: Post-War European Literature (4 Credits)
    Explores post-war European literary works that are marked by a profound sense of loss, disorientation, and pessimism, with a particular focus on the practices of close reading, textual analysis, and theoretically oriented criticism. Explores how the events of the war- most notably the Holocaust -affected the literature of Europe in their wake. Authors to be read include Primo Levi, Ruth Kluger, Marguerite Duras, Maurice Blanchot, Michel Houellebecq, and W.G. Sebald.
    Instructor: Yu-jin Chang
  • LI415 - Travel Literature (4 Credits)
    Home and away, placement and displacement, location and dislocation are all themes that abound not only in contemporary literature in all its forms (fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama) but also in contemporary literary and cultural criticism. This course explores the theme of travel in literature across its historical terrain in order to understand not only the evolution of its forms but also its role in the construction of identities, familiar and foreign.
  • LI421 - Topics in American Literature (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in American Literature that concentrate on the study of particular authors, genres, or themes, or on topics related to the special interests and expertise of the faculty. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Robin Fast
  • LI423 - Topics in Global Literature (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in Global Literature that include such topics as Latin American Short Fiction, Postcolonial Literature, and the Hispanic Caribbean, or on topics related to the special interests and expertise of the faculty.
  • LI436 - Cultural Criticism (4 Credits)
    Surveys the dominant theoretical approaches to the study of culture. The course traces their main arguments and helps students develop a sense of what it means to be a producer and a consumer of culture today.
  • LI481 - Topics in African-Amer Lit (4 Credits)
    Studies traditions of African American literature, such as the Harlem Renaissance, Depression Poets and Novelists, or Neo-slave Narratives. Courses may focus on Political Plays of the Sixties, The Blues as Poetry, Spirituals and Jazz as Literature, and include such authors as Wright, Petry, Baraka, Himes, Naylor, and Smith. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • LI482 - Topics in Fiction (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in the novel, novella, and other modes of short fiction from various periods. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Kevin Miller
  • LI612 - Topics in Poetry (4 Credits)
    Intensive study of poetry, which may focus on an individual poet, a small group of poets, or a school of poetry, and/or may be defined by a single form, theme, region, or period. Topics have included Bishop and Lowell, American Narrative Poetry, Dickinson and Whitman, modern and contemporary Eastern European Poets, and Visionary Poetry.
    Instructor: Pablo Medina
  • LI615 - Top Mult Genres and Hybrid Frm (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in topics that range over two or more genres, and/or focus on combining generic forms. Topics have included The Harlem Renaissance, Native American Literature, Writing on War in the 20th Century, Literature and Violence, The Writer in the Archive, and Hybrid Forms in Literature.
  • LI625 - Topics in Fiction (4 Credits)
    Focuses on fictional narrative. Depending on the instructor, the class may examine texts defined by geography, chronology, culture, and genre. Possible topics of discussion include such issues as craft, theory, mechanics, form, aesthetics, literary movements, and themes. Topics have included Latin American Short Fiction, Diaspora Novelists Between History and Memory, Alienation and the Modern European Novel, Salman Rushdie, Toni Morrison, and Novel into Film.
    Instructor: Flora Gonzalez
  • LI650 - Seminar in the Novel (4 Credits)
    Examines particular narrative strategies in storytelling. Students examine such practices as multiple points of view, chronology, indirect discourse, focalization, etc., as well as historical and cultural contexts. Reading might include works by Nabokov, Proust, Woolf, Faulkner, Sterne, Bernhard, Bowles, among others.
    Instructor: Frederick Reiken
  • LI651 - Seminar in Poetry (4 Credits)
    Analytical and critical study of a variety of poets and/or schools of poetry, modern and contemporary, that explores their approaches to craft, form, and theme, as well as their aesthetic, cultural, and historical assumptions for and about the art.
    Instructor: Jonathan Aaron
  • LI652 - Seminar in Short Fiction (4 Credits)
    Analytical and critical study of a variety of recent American short stories, mostly modern and contemporary, exploring their approaches to form, theme, and technique.
    Instructor: Ladette Randolph
  • LI653 - Seminar in Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the nonfiction narrative, including memoir, personal essay, biography, travel writing, nature writing, and other nonfiction writing from various periods, with particular attention paid to issues of craft and structure, as well as historical and cultural contexts.
    Instructor: Richard Hoffman
  • LI687 - Topics in Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in autobiography, biography, travel writing, nature writing, hybrid forms, and other nonfiction writing from various periods. Recent topics include the Twentieth Century in the First Person, Latin American Women's Autobiography, and the Literary Essay.
  • LS101 - Elementary Spanish 1 (4 Credits)
    Stresses mastery of the essential vocabulary and primary grammatical structures through a situational approach. Students perceive that language is "living" and they discover by the third week of the semester that they can already communicate in Spanish. Class time is devoted to interactive practice. Conversational skills, pronunciation, and understanding are verified through regular oral exams.
  • LS102 - Elementary Spanish 2 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of LS 101, this course also incorporates reading skills and exposes students to a wider range of cultural materials.
  • PB207 - Introduction to Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces writing for commercial markets. Students develop, research, and write nonfiction articles and learn where to market them. May be repeated once for credit and may be substituted for one 200-level WR (writing) workshop.
  • PB302 - Copyediting (4 Credits)
    Practical course about the process of editing and preparing manuscripts for publication. Together with hands-on assignments, the course considers the relation of editor to author, the nature of copyediting in various publishing environments, and other topics.
    Instructor: Carol Parikh
  • PB307 - Intermediate Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Requires students to research and write an article or magazine feature. Students learn terms, concepts, and techniques to improve both writing and critical thinking. May be repeated once for credit and may be substituted for one 300-level WR (writing) workshop.
    Instructor: Delia Cabe
  • PB380 - Magazine Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Provides an understanding of the magazine field from the perspective of writers and editors. Looks at the similarities and differences between general interest magazines and more focused magazines, and how magazines compete with each other and with other media for audiences and revenues. Topics include how magazines carve out niches, the relationship between the business and editorial departments, and the editorial operations of magazines. The course also looks at the history of the magazine industry.
  • PB383 - Book Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Examines the acquisition and editing of a manuscript, its progress into design and production, and the final strategies of promotion and distribution of a finished book.
  • PB395 - Applications for Print Publishing (4 Credits)
    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the publishing industry. Students also learn related computer-based skills, such as type and image sourcing, image acquisition, including scanning, and copyright issues. Although some design issues are addressed, the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes students have basic Macintosh skills.
  • PB401 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Column Writing (4 Credits)
    This magazine publishing course covers the process of researching, writing, and revising magazine columns with an understanding of the importance of audience. Draws on both the published writing of seasoned columnists from a variety of genres as well as weekly columns written by students. May be substituted for one 400-level WR (writing) workshop.
  • PB402 - Book Editing (4 Credits)
    Book editing, or substantive editing, is a highly subjective, visceral skill informed by flexibility, judgment, life experience, grammatical grace, signposts, caution lights, road maps, respect for the author, and subtle diplomacy in the author/editor relationship, all directed toward helping the writer to the intended creative goal. In other words, book editing is an art, not a science. However, an exploration of the foundations of constructive shaping, development, organization, and line-editing may release the inner shepherd/wrangler in you.
    Instructor: Daniel Weaver
  • PB403 - Electronic Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Explores various methods of digital publishing including e-books and web site creation. The course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the planning, development and management of digital content.
    Instructor: John Rodzvilla
  • PB481 - Book Design and Production (4 Credits)
    Covers book and book jacket design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. This is not a software instruction course.
  • PB482 - Magazine Design and Production (4 Credits)
    Course covers magazine design fundamentals: typography, image research and assignment, prepress and manufacturing, and traditional and computer-based tools and equipment. Each student produces a sample magazine through a workshop process of presentations and revisions. This is not a software instruction course.
  • PB483 - Magazine Editing (4 Credits)
    Provides students with an understanding of the magazine editing process. Topics range from idea generation and story selection to the mechanics of editing, the editorial process, and the somewhat elusive topic of the role of the editor. Students address such issues as story focus, direction, topicality, structure, sense of audience, and voice, often through popular magazines with long and interesting histories.
  • PB491 - Topics in Publishing (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in book, magazine, and electronic publishing. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • PB675 - Principles of Management for Publishing (4 Credits)
    This course will provide students with a basic overview and knowledge of how different publishing enterprises are organized and managed. Helps students develop a firm understanding of the organizational and financial skills required for a career in publishing.
    Instructor: Jeanne Emanuel
  • PB676 - Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Gives students experience in developing magazine feature stories. Students brainstorm, report, and write their own magazine-style stories, with emphasis on the shaping and editing stage. They also read and discuss published work by professionals. Class is conducted as a writing workshop in a style that mimics a magazine atmosphere. This course may count for 1 workshop credit for nonfiction students.
    Instructor: William Beuttler
  • PB678 - Magazine Editing (4 Credits)
    Course about the magazine editing process. Covers topics ranging from focus, direction, topicality, structure, sense of audience, and voice, and explores the practical application of editing skills as well as historic examples of editors and their magazines.
  • PB679 - The Editor/Writer Relationship (4 Credits)
    Examines the magazine writing and editing process, and covers topics ranging from idea generation and story selection to the mechanics of editing and how the editorial process works.
    Instructor: William Beuttler
  • PB680 - Magazine Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Examines the magazine field from the perspective of writers and editors, and covers the editorial and business operations of magazines, the editorial mix, and magazine geography.
  • PB682 - Magazine Design and Prod. (4 Credits)
    Covers magazine design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. Students produce sample magazines through a workshop process of presentations and revisions. Course assumes students have necessary computer skills.
    Instructor: Lisa Diercks
  • PB683 - Book Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Introduction to the book publishing industry, including a detailed examination of the editorial, marketing, and design and production stages of the book publishing process. Course also looks at important developments and issues within the field, such as online publishing, and at various jobs in book publishing.
  • PB685 - Book Editing (4 Credits)
    Considers book editing skills, tasks, and responsibilities from initial review and acquisition of a book manuscript through project development. Emphasizes trade book editing, but also considers editorial work at scholarly and professional presses.
  • PB686 - Book Design and Prod. (4 Credits)
    Covers book and book jacket design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. Students design a book through a workshop process of presentations and revisions. Course assumes students have necessary computer skills.
  • PB687 - Column Writing (4 Credits)
    Magazine publishing course explores the process of researching, writing, and revising magazine columns, and examines the importance of audience. This course may count for one workshop requirement for nonfiction students.
    Instructor: Delia Cabe
  • PB688 - Copyediting (4 Credits)
    Covers the process of editing and preparing manuscripts for publication. Together with hands-on assignments, the course considers the relation of editor to author, the nature of copyediting in various publishing environments, and other topics.
  • PB689 - Book Publicity (4 Credits)
    Familiarizes students with trade book promotion to the media. Begins with an overview of book publicity and then covers the publicity process, the type of freelance help available, crafting press material, the author/publicist dynamic, how to secure and promote bookstore events, the art of the interview, and the art of the pitch. All assignments and classroom activities are based on real-world publishing tasks so that students leave the class thoroughly prepared to promote their book or someone else's.
  • PB691 - Applications for Print Publish (4 Credits)
    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the print publishing industry. Some design issues are addressed, but the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes the student has basic Macintosh skills.
  • PB692 - Electronic Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Introduces electronic and new media publishing formats, including but not limited to the web, online publishing, CD-ROM, and DVD. Course assumes the student has basic computer skills.
  • PB693 - Book Marketing & Sales (4 Credits)
    Course is designed as an extension of the Book Publishing Overview course for students who want to further explore the sales and marketing sides of business - where marketing and sales fit into the life of a book, the differences between the two areas, and the distinct effect that each, done well or badly, has on a book's success. It then tracks the marketing and sales process through a book's publication with specific assignments at each stage based on real-world publications tasks from sales forecasting to planning (and budgeting for) marketing campaigns to sales calls and the retailers' buying processes.
    Instructor: Beth Ineson
  • PB694 - Top in Writing and Publishing (4 Credits)
    Topics may include offerings in genre nonfiction writing, review and criticism, literary editing, alternative publishing, online editing and writing, business and legal issues, among others. Some topics may require a prerequisite or permission of instructor.
  • PB695 - Creating Electronic Publications for the Web and E-Readers (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the creation and design of complete texts in a variety of e-formats. Students will produce complete texts using the extensible Markup Language (XML) and .epub formats. The course covers the current trends and tools of the industry and explores how e-texts are created for e-readers and tablets.
    Instructor: Colleen Cunningham
  • PB696 - Web Development for Electronic Publishing (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the design and format of text and images for the computer and mobile phone screen. Students create sites using HTML and CSS. Topics covered include: content evaluation, usability standards, design aesthetics, user experience, JavaScript, and hosting solutions.
    Instructor: John Rodzvilla
  • WR101 - Introduction to College Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces college writing, focusing on cultural analysis that appears in academic work and in the public intellectual sphere. Emphasizes how writers work with texts (including images, film, music, and other media) to develop writing projects. Through four main writing projects that concentrate on drafting, peer review, and revision, students learn to be constructive readers of each other's writing and to understand the rhetoric of intellectual inquiry.
  • WR121 - Research Writing (4 Credits)
    Research-based writing course that explores how rhetorical situations call on writers to do research and how writers draw on various types of writing to present the results of their research. Through four main writing projects, students develop an understanding of the purposes and methods of research and a rhetorical awareness of how research-based writing tasks ask them to consider their relation to the issues they are researching and to their audiences.
    Instructors: Priscilla Andrade, Cheryl Buchanan, Sarah Ehrich, John Fantin, Tamera Marko, Jordan Pailthorpe, Ashley Rivers
  • WR211 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Fiction and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR212 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Poetry and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR216 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Nonfiction and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR311 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction (4 Credits)
    Original Fiction is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR312 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Poetry (4 Credits)
    Original Poetry is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR313 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Drama (4 Credits)
    Original Drama is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR315 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Comedy (4 Credits)
    Original Comedy is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: Michael Bent
  • WR316 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Original Nonfiction is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: Douglas Whynott
  • WR317 - Topics in Creative Writing (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in various genres of writing such as Experimental Fiction, Lyric Poetry, Micro Essays, among others. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Kevin Miller
  • WR320 - Travel Writing (4 Credits)
    The best travel writing takes readers on a journey that is not only geographic, but also narrative. This intermediate course in literary travel writing introduces writers to key ways to transform their experiences in the world- be it a far-flung travel destination or one's hometown- into compelling narratives in the form of short essay or memoir. In addition to short reading and writing assignments, students complete three polished travel essays: two to be workshopped and one to hand into the instructor on the last day of class.
  • WR405 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Poetry (4 Credits)
    Advanced writing workshop in poetry with in-class discussion of original poems by students already seriously engaged in writing poetry. The course pays special attention to getting published and students are encouraged to submit their work to magazines. May be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: Gail Mazur
  • WR407 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Fiction (4 Credits)
    Extensive fiction writing of short stories and/or novels coupled with in-class reading for criticism and the craft of fiction. May be repeated once for credit.
  • WR415 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Advanced writing workshop in various nonfiction forms, such as memoir, travel writing, literary journalism, or other narrative nonfiction writing. Students will already have completed at least one nonfiction workshop, have a project in development, and be capable of discussing such techniques as characterization, point of view, and narrative structure as they appear in literary nonfiction forms.
    Instructor: Douglas Whynott
  • WR440 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Screenwriting (4 Credits)
    Advanced workshop in feature film writing in which students learn how to work with characters, dialogue, and dramatic structure through story development, mini treatments, and scene breakdown. Students beginning new scripts produce at least half of a screenplay and a solid, outlined second half. Students continuing a work-in-progress script revise and polish. Course also includes study and discussion of successfully produced film/TV scripts. May be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: Christopher Keane
  • WR600 - Teaching College Composition (4 Credits)
    Introduction to composition history, theory, and pedagogy that prepares students to teach college writing courses. Examines debates and practices in college composition and their conceptual foundations and introduces rhetoric as a productive art and means of analysis. In preparation to teach writing, students learn how to design writing assignments, to run writing workshops, to respond to and evaluate student writing, and to produce a syllabus for a first-year composition course.
  • WR605 - Poetry Workshop (4 Credits)
    In-class discussions of original poems aim to help students learn strategies for generating and revising work. The workshop asks students to consider their work in light of the essential issues of the poet's craft, and to articulate their individual sensibilities as poets.
  • WR606 - Fiction Workshop (4 Credits)
    Uses student manuscripts as its main texts, supplemented by published stories, to illustrate the fundamental aspects of fiction, mainly in the short story form. Explores the complexities of narration, characterization, scene, dialogue, style, tone, plot, etc. Emphasis is on the generation of fictional works and on their revision.
  • WR608 - Spec Top in Fiction Workshop (4 Credits)
    This course continues to examine the art and craft of short fiction by focusing on special topics such as revision, microfiction and linked stories.
  • WR613 - Nonfiction Workshop (4 Credits)
    Stresses the writing of many forms of nonfiction, such as informal essays, autobiography, profiles, travel writing, or literary journalism, coupled with reading assignments of relevant texts.
    Instructor: Richard Hoffman
  • WR652 - Novel Workshop (4 Credits)
    A workshop in structuring and writing the opening chapters of a novel. Explores story premise, stylistic approach, point-of-view, and other structural parameters, as well as revision.
    Instructor: Mako Yoshikawa
  • WR655 - Writing the Nonfiction Book (4 Credits)
    Workshop on the extended narrative, with discussions of organizing the research, developing an outline and devising a structure, carrying out the plan, and writing the book proposal. Students submit their own work and also examine various approaches of nonfiction books.
    Instructor: Douglas Whynott