Department of Visual & Media Arts

Courses


  • VM100 - History of Media Arts I (4 Credits)
    This is the first of a two-semester course that explores the historical development of the media arts, including the film, broadcasting, and sound recording industries until 1965. Investigates the relationships between economics, industrial history, and social and political systems, and the styles and techniques of specific films and broadcast programs. Special attention is given to the diversity of styles of presentation in the media.
  • VM101 - History of Media Arts II (4 Credits)
    This is the second of a two-semester course that explores the historical development of the media arts, focusing on the continuing development of the film, broadcasting, and sound recording industries after 1965, as well as the development of video and digital technologies. Investigates the relationships between economics, industrial history, and social and political systems, and the styles and techniques of specific films and videos, broadcast programs, and digital media products.
  • VM105 - Introduction to Visual Arts (4 Credits)
    Investigates the visual language of communication shared among all of the visual arts, emphasizing visual analysis, understanding of materials, the history of style and techniques, and the functions and meanings of art in its varied manifestations. Provides a foundation for subsequent studies in the visual and media arts.
  • VM110 - Production Safety Workshop (0 Credit)
    A one-time lecture that empowers students to safely navigate student productions and more fully understand production safety procedures. Course is pass/fail and a passing grade is required to enroll in all 200-level production courses.
    Instructor: Leonard Manzo
  • VM120 - Foundations in Visual and Media Arts Production (4 Credits)
    Seats held for new students
  • VM120 - Foundations in Visual and Media Arts Production (4 Credits)
    A combination of lectures and hands-on workshops examines the relationships among photography, graphics, audio, film, video, and digital media within the context of cross-media concepts, theories, and applications. Traces the creative process from conception and writing through production and post-production. Students proceed through a series of exercises that lead to completion of a final project, establishing a foundation for advanced production coursework.
  • VM200 - Media Criticism and Theory (4 Credits)
    Explores theoretical and critical approaches to the study of photography, film, television and video, audio, and digital culture. Theories and methods examine issues relating to production and authorship in the media arts, audience reception and effects, political ideology, ethics, aesthetics, cultural diversity, and schools of thought within the liberal arts. Extensive critical writing and reading in media criticism and theory.
  • VM202 - Critical Listening (4 Credits)
    Provides a study of the psycho-acoustic perception and analysis of classical and contemporary use of sound in the media. Students identify and define acoustic variables, comparing past and present recordings in all media.
    Instructor: David Doms
  • VM203 - History of Photography: 19th Century to the 1970's (4 Credits)
    Surveys the aesthetic and technical development of photography from its invention to the 1970's with emphasis on the 20th century. A critical analysis of the medium develops an understanding of the influence and appropriation of photography today.
    Instructor: Brian McNeil
  • VM204 - Top: Introduction to Gaming (4 Credits)
    An introduction to game creation that explores the fundamental elements of games, emphasizing non-digital methodologies and rapid prototyping in a hands-on environment. Students engage with and make games as entertainment and communication tools, developing an understanding of play and how to induce it in others.
  • VM204 - Top: Intro to Video Production for Non-VMA Majors only (4 Credits)
    Introduces the art and technology of nonfiction storytelling through a series of workshops, screenings and hands-on production projects. Emphasizes content development, storytelling strategies and production skills in the context of relevant ethical, aesthetic and social issues.
  • VM204 - Top:Intro to Narrative Fiction (4 Credits)
    This course introduces students to the crew and the techniques of single camera narrative fiction production. Emphasis will be placed on organization and the translation of the script into a visual narrative. Students will have the opportunity to hone their production skills on a variety of creative projects. The class is intended to prepare students for advanced-level course work in narrative fiction.
  • VM204 - Top: Intro to Video Production for Non-VMA Majors only (4 Credits)
    This course introduces students to the crew and the techniques of single camera narrative fiction production. Emphasis will be placed on organization and the translation of the script into a visual narrative. Students will have the opportunity to hone their production skills on a variety of creative projects. The class is intended to prepare students for advanced-level course work in narrative fiction.
  • VM204 - Top: Intro to Video Production for Non-VMA Majors only (4 Credits)
    This course is not open to Visual and Media Arts Majors. Introduces students to single camera video production. Topics will include the operation of equipment, the principles underlying shooting, and online distribution. Emphasis will be placed on the traditional stages of preproduction, production and postproduction, but you will also examine how video is used in other environments (such as desktop and smartphone platforms). Students will complete several individual and group projects.
  • VM204 - Top: Intro to Video Production for Non-VMA Majors only (4 Credits)
    This course is not open to Visual and Media Arts Majors. Introduces students to single camera video production. Topics will include the operation of equipment, the principles underlying shooting, and online distribution. Emphasis will be placed on the traditional stages of preproduction, production and postproduction, but you will also examine how video is used in other environments (such as desktop and smartphone platforms). Students will complete several individual and group projects.
  • VM204 - Top: Introduction to Gaming (4 Credits)
    This course will introduce students to the fundamental principles of game design, including concept development, system design, paper prototyping, play testing and development. Students will learn about many different kinds of games, from board and card games, alternate reality games and PC games, to pervasive urban games. No previous design or computer programming experience necessary.
  • VM205 - History Of Photography: 1970's to the Present (4 Credits)
    From documentary and documents of performances to the highly constructed imagery utilized by contemporary artists, students explore diverse subjects, styles, and methods that cover portrait, object, city, memory, appropriation, landscape, and narrative. The course combines weekly slide talks with theory and criticism reading discussions, field trips to exhibitions, visiting artists, research papers, and a final production project and exhibition.
    Instructor: Sarah Pollman
  • VM210 - History of Western Art I: Renaissance and Baroque (4 Credits)
    Explores Renaissance and Baroque art, beginning with Proto-Renaissance works in the 14th century, and concluding with the Late Baroque in the later 17th/early 18th century. Students study major works and artists characterizing these movements, and the critical treatment they received over the centuries.
    Instructor: Judith Hull
  • VM212 - History of Western Art III: Modern (4 Credits)
    Examines the major styles, works, and artists of the first half of the 20th century, prior to the advent of Abstract Expressionism. Examines a wide variety of European and American modern art, investigating critical and public reactions. Among the movements studied are: Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Dada, Futurism, Surrealism, the Bauhaus, Constructivism, and De Stijl.
    Instructor: Caroline Shields
  • VM214 - History of Non-Western Art I: East Asian Arts (4 Credits)
    Investigates arts of the East Asian region, particularly the areas of present-day China, Korea, and Japan. Artworks are contextualized within indigenous traditions such as Confucianism and Chan/Zen and examined from a diversity of critical perspectives. Considers issues of identity, religion, politics, and modernization, as well as contemporary artworks such as installation and performance.
    Instructor: De-nin Lee
  • VM220 - Writing the Short Subject (4 Credits)
    Studies the writing of the short subject within the genres of fiction, nonfiction, and experimental concepts and scripts (including animation). Scripts range from 3 to 15 minutes and are suitable for production within the budget and time constraints of an Emerson College class. Students complete comprehensive revisions of their work.
  • VM222 - Writing for Television (4 Credits)
    Examines writing for television in a variety of formats, with a predominant emphasis on situation comedies and drama. The elements of each genre are analyzed, challenging students to find their own unique "voice," and new and innovative ways to write stories within established formats. Also covered are reality television and children's television, story outlining, and script formatting. Each student writes a first-draft script of an existing sitcom or drama.
  • VM230 - Introduction to Film Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces the basics of non-synchronous 16mm filmmaking, including camera operation, principles of cinematography and lighting for black-and-white film, non-sync sound recording and transfers, and picture and sound editing.
  • VM231 - Intermediate Film Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces the technical, conceptual, and procedural skills necessary to successfully complete a short double-system sync-sound 16mm film, including pre-production, production, and post-production procedures and techniques.
  • VM240 - Introduction to Video Field Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces single-camera video production. Students learn the equipment and techniques used in single-camera field production and post-production, writing, and producing a variety of projects, edited in digital non-linear mode.
  • VM241 - Introduction to Studio Television Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces studio television practice. Students learn the principles of pre-production, production, and post-production for the studio as well as control room procedures. Students prepare their own multi-camera, live-on-tape studio productions.
  • VM241 - Introduction to Studio TV Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces studio television practice. Students learn the principles of pre-production, production, and post-production for the studio as well as control room procedures. Students prepare their own multi-camera, live-on-tape studio productions.
  • VM250 - Introduction to Sound Principles and Audio Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces audio physics, sound principles,and the theory and practice of audio recording and mixing. Emphasis is on concept development for sound production, signal routing and the mixer console, analog and digital audio recording, and editing techniques.
  • VM251 - Location Sound Recording (4 Credits)
    Intensive study in the theory and practice of field/location and studio audio recording for film, video, and television. Covers techniques in the use of field/studio recorders and mixers, microphones, boom poles, and shot blocking. Also covers tape-based and hard-disk digital recorders, and time-code synchronization management.
    Instructor: Mark van Bork
  • VM260 - Introduction to Interactive Media (4 Credits)
    Introduces the theory and practice of interactive media. Stresses the conceptual, aesthetic, and technical concerns of interactivity. Technologies covered are HTML, CSS, and Javascript. Additional topics include semantic web design and development, graphics and imaging, interface design, user experience, project management, and the mobile web. Emphasis is on making creative works.
  • VM261 - Computer Animation (4 Credits)
    The first course of a two-course sequence, introducing students to the fundamentals of three-dimensional modeling and animation, and preparing them for the second course, VM 363 Advanced Computer Animation. Students learn to model, texture objects, compose and light scenes, animate, and add dynamics, as well as render animations into movies and compositing audio, titles, and credits in post-production.
  • VM262 - Drawing (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic techniques in drawing, exploring the use of line and image in contemporary art. The language of drawing in contemporary art and architecture will inform the practice of drawing.
    Instructor: William DeWolf
  • VM263 - Drawing For Time-Based Media (4 Credits)
    Imparts key drawing skills required in pre-visualization, concept art creation, set design, storyboarding, two-dimensional media production, and post-production. Develops students' abilities to think spatially, whether constructing a plan for a set or depicting a character in action. Also focuses on anatomy, locomotion, and communication possibilities of the human form.
    Instructor: Anya Belkina
  • VM265 - Introduction to Photography (4 Credits)
    Hybrid section of Introduction to Photography. This course introduces the fundamentals of black-and-white photography by combining darkroom techniques with the latest digital processes. Essential comparisons between the two methods will be explored by learning camera controls, film development to darkroom printing, digital capture to print workflow, and through hybrid techniques such as making digital negatives for darkroom use. Critiques of student work will develop ¨the critical eye.¨ Students must use cameras with adjustable speed and aperture.
  • VM265 - Introduction to Photography (4 Credits)
    Introduces the fundamentals of black-and-white photography by combining darkroom techniques with the latest digital processes. Essential comparisons between the two methods are explored by learning camera controls, film development to darkroom printing, digital capture to print workflow, and through the hybrid combination of these techniques. Critiques of student work develop an aesthetic and conceptual understanding of the creative process. Students must use cameras with manually adjustable speed and aperture.
  • VM300 - Top: Portaiture in the age of art photography. 1980-present (4 Credits)
    How has portrait photography been influenced in the age of information, social media and nascent imaging technologies? Lens based practices has been informed by hybrid content; expanding our notions of portraiture. How are contemporary revisiting and influenced by cinema, painting, journalism, surveillance, revisionist archives, performance, fiction and medical imaging. We will screen artist works that are capitalizing on new strategies of representation and analysis of identity, labor, object, social and the (human) body.
  • VM300 - Top: Latin American Cinema (4 Credits)
    This course looks at films from various Latin American countries, examining both popular and artistic traditions that have developed since the early twentieth century. Best known for the innovative film movements of the 1960s, Latin American cinema has a history that goes back to the silent era and continues today in the hands of a new generation of filmmakers. This course focuses on some key moments in this history, while also exploring concepts such us colonialism and postcolonialism, cultural imperialism, Third World filmmaking, transnational cinema, and globalization.
  • VM301 - Post Colonial Cinema (4 Credits)
    An examination of the historical, socioeconomic, and ideological contexts of film production, distribution, and exhibition of post-colonial films that explore and challenge Hollywood and Western notions of identity, narrative, history, and oral traditions. Films viewed are from Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, the United Kingdom, and the United States.
  • VM303 - Studies in Digital Media and Culture (4 Credits)
    Examines the dramatic shift in meaning and processes of contemporary communication by investigating the social, artistic, economic, and political implications of using digital ways of working. Topics include the Internet and the web, cyberspace and censorship, games, digital film and video, multimedia and interactivity, virtual reality, person-machine interfaces, and globalization considerations.
  • VM304 - History of Documentary (4 Credits)
    Examines the history and theory of documentary media production, with attention to the economic, technological, ethical, and aesthetic concerns of documentarians.
    Instructor: Michael Selig
  • VM305 - History of Experimental/Avant-garde (4 Credits)
    Examines the history and theory of experimental and avant-garde film, video, and other moving image practices and their connections to broader art and social movements. Through extensive reading and viewing, students investigate avant-garde and experimental cinema form, style, and content as well as historical and contemporary filmmakers' production methods and distribution networks in film communities and the art world.
    Instructor: William Palumbo
  • VM308 - Cinema and Social Change (4 Credits)
    Throughout cinema's history, numerous filmmakers have sought to harness the power of the medium and to channel it in the service of political and social change. Have they made a difference and by what measure and what strategy: Surveying fiction and documentary, commercial and independent cinema, features and shorts, this course aims to offer a wide-ranging examination of the ways directors around the world have employed their art and their craft in the pursuit of fostering social justice.
    Instructor: John Gianvito
  • VM315 - Top: Christo and Jeanne-Claude: Projects and Films (4 Credits)
    Examines Chinese art from the late 19th century to the present. Explores traditional and reformed idioms of brush-and-ink painting, competing modes of oil painting, printing and vernacular arts, photography, and post-modern strategies to express new concepts of nationhood, mobilize against Japanese aggression, raise political consciousness among workers and peasants, and voice political protest. Addresses issues of art education, art institutions, censorship, propaganda, cultural and national identity, commercialization and globalization. Examines competing expressions of modernism, the avant-garde, and the work of contemporary artists.
  • VM315 - Top: Christo and Jeanne-Claude: Projects and Films (4 Credits)
    This Topics course focuses on the works of Christo and Jeanne-Claude, who produced some of the worlds most notable and spectacular publi art installations including The Gates in Central Park. Foundational concepts such as space, time and community will be examined in relation to particular projects. The class will also consider subjects such as funding and site specific art. Documentaries chronicling the conception and creation of Christo and Jeanne-Claude's pieces will be screened in conjunction with our study of the respective projects. The students will have an opportunity to work on their own site-specific proposals, and interact with local organizations such as Friends of the Public Garden.
  • VM315 - Top: Andy Warhol: Media Maven (4 Credits)
    This course will examine the art and career of Andy Warhol (1928-1987). An icon of Pop Art Warhol produced silkscreened images of mass culture in America such as Campbell¨s Soup and Marilyn Monroe, and was an influential figure in the dramatic transformation that occurs in the visual arts during the 1960s. He worked in a staggering array of media, venturing from the visual arts into film, television, magazine publishing, and promoting rock music. He is among the few visual artists who is a household name. Scholars, critics, historians and other artists consider him to be one of the most important artists in the second half of the twentieth century. How does this artist evolve, in his own words, from creating "symbols of the harsh, impersonal products and brash materialistic objects on which America is built today," to being "an Art Businessman?" Through lectures, readings, and discussion the course will grapple with the complex identity of this artist who has profoundly shaped contemporary culture.
  • VM320 - Writing the Feature Film (4 Credits)
    Examines the fundamentals of writing for narrative feature-length film. Investigates structure, character, conflict, scene writing, and dialogue, taking students from ideation through to the development of a detailed outline. Students write the first 25-30 pages of a screenplay.
  • VM323 - Writing Primetime Drama (4 Credits)
    Examines writing for primetime television drama, including study of the history of television drama and the difference between plot-driven dramas and character-driven dramas, writing effective protagonists and antagonists, and writing for existing dramas and characters. Students write a script for an existing primetime television drama that will be workshopped in class.
    Instructor: James Macak
  • VM324 - Top: Writiing the Comedy Feature Film (4 Credits)
    Some of the top films of all time are biopics because telling true stories can make for compelling cinema. Through study and analysis in this advanced screenwriting course you come to understand the biography genre and you will write an original outline and first act for a biopic feature film. You may focus your feature on a person known only to you or on a person who is world famous. The goal will be to understand the process of bringing the life/lives of people who really lived to the screen. Honing your critical skills, you will be able to engage in intelligent, analytical, and aesthetic discourse about your work, as well as the work of your classmates--the goal always being to make everyone's work the best it can be. This class will be taught from the Los Angeles Campus by Diane Lake and available to Boston via teleconferencing - 1/2 the students for the lcass will be in LA and 1/2 in Boston.
  • VM324 - Top: Writiing the Comedy Feature Film (4 Credits)
    The course objective is to help students start work on a feature comedy screenplay. By semester's end, they will have completed a detailed story outline and up to the first half of the script. Participants will study popular feature comedies and analyze the elements that make these films successful. We'll have in-class pitch sessions with each participant. After their pitch has been approved, each student will develop their outline and then proceed to write the screenplay. Students will read and critique each other's work and submit original written material on a biweekly basis.
  • VM325 - Writing the Adaptation (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the process of analyzing material from another medium (e.g., novels, plays, comic books) and translating into a screenplay. Students write one original first act of a public domain property, as well as one analytical paper.
    Instructor: Stephen Glantz
  • VM328 - Top: Writing for Animation (4 Credits)
    Explores techniques and approaches unique to writing animation and will examine a variety of animation formats, methods, and genres in order to understand the demands, opportunities, challenges, and styles of this storytelling form. Students will write an outline, treatment, and either a television pilot or the first half of a screenplay.
    Instructor: Steven Grossman
  • VM329 - Top:Comedy Writ for Late Night (4 Credits)
    Examines how to write comedy for late night television, with a heavy emphasis on joke writing, monologue writing, sketch writing, current events and satire. In addition to working on individual assignments, students with also learn how to write effectively as a team. The final project will require students to collectively create and write an innovative show designed for late night television.
  • VM329 - Top: Life on Display (4 Credits)
    In this course students study reality television series, and in groups create original "unscripted" series for broadcast, from concept development, to show pitch writing, to preparation for production and production. In groups, the students will research, develop and create a number of original series with emphasis on innovative ways to expand and contribute to the reality genre in docu-soap, lifestyle, competition, or investigative formats. Each student group will write an industry standard Pilot Pitch, with Show Descriptions for 6 to 8 episodes. In addition, they will produce a 5- to 7-minute video Trailer for their original reality series.
  • VM329 - Top: Writing the Web Series (4 Credits)
    The web series is a series of original film shorts involving the same characters in each episode or different characters linked by a common theme. Students will learn about the recent explosion of web series programming primarily on the internet but also on smart phones and TV. Students will be expected to write detailed series proposals and write their own web series with either eight six-to-seven minute episodes or 15 three-to-four minute episodes.
  • VM329 - Top: Writing the Webisode (4 Credits)
    The web series of original film shorts involving the same characters in each episode or different characters linked by a common theme. Students will learn about the recent explosion of the web series programming primarily on the Internet but also on smart phones and TV. Students will be expected to write detailed series proposals and write their own web series with either eight six-to-seven minute episodes or 15 three-to-four minute episodes.
  • VM331 - Top: Production Design (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to the work of the Production Designer, the creative individual responsible for the "look" of a production. Topics will include: developing and implementing the design concept, strategies for working on location or sound stage, and collaboration with the Cinematographer, Art Director and Set Decorator. The work of notable Production Designers will be considered. Class projects and actual production work will combine theory with practice.
  • VM331 - Top:Intro to Production Design (4 Credits)
    This course introduces students to the work of the production designer, the creative individual responsible for the overall "look" of a production. Topics include: developing and implementing the design concept; developing strategies for working on location and in a studio or sound-stage; and creating or obtaining sets, props and other design elements.
  • VM331 - Top: WGBH Partnership Prod (4 Credits)
    Explores various aspects of media arts practice. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM332 - Production Management (4 Credits)
    Introduces the budgeting and logistical organization of film and television productions, reviewing the roles of Associate Producer, Production Unit Manager, First Assistant, Second Assistant Location Manager, and other members of the producer's and director's teams.
    Instructors: Kenneth Golden, Amy DePaola
  • VM335 - Alternative Production Techniques for Filmmaking (4 Credits)
    Intermediate-level 16mm production workshop in the use of unorthodox, non-computer-driven methods and processes for developing and producing motion pictures. Provides an overview of historic methods of formal exploration of the basic materials of film as a projection medium, including camera-less filmmaking, direct animation, and loop projections, as well as alternative mechanical processes such as xerography, hand process, and alternative camera tools and techniques. Primary emphasis is on creative invention and exploration.
  • VM337 - The Emerson Channel (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
    Instructor: Diana Barton
  • VM337 - The Emerson Channel (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
    Instructor: Diana Barton
  • VM340 - SPEC (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM340 - SPEC (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
  • VM341 - Emerson Records (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
    Instructor: Maurice Methot
  • VM341 - Emerson Records (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
    Instructor: Maurice Methot
  • VM342 - Frames Per Second (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
    Instructor: Harlan Bosmajian
  • VM342 - Frames Per Second (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
    Instructor: Harlan Bosmajian
  • VM343 - WERS (FM)/WECB (AM) (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
    Instructor: Jack Casey
  • VM343 - WERS (FM)/WECB (AM) (0 Credit)
    Specified assignments in the College radio stations. The instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
    Instructor: Jack Casey
  • VM344 - National Broadcasting Society/AERho (0 Credit)
    National organization bridging the gap between student and professional, supporting student work in all areas of television, radio, and film. AERho is the Honors Level of NBS, available to seniors with a high grade point average. Instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
    Instructor: Antonio Ascenso
  • VM344 - National Broadcasting Society/AERho (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
    Instructor: Antonio Ascenso
  • VM345 - Film Arts Society (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
    Instructor: Peter Flynn
  • VM345 - Film Arts Society (0 Credit)
    Student publication Latent Image and the cinema-the-que Films from the Margin. The instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
    Instructor: Peter Flynn
  • VM346 - Women in Motion (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM346 - Women in Motion (0 Credit)
    Student-operated film production group with an emphasis on activities and creative work related to women. The instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
  • VM347 - Emerson Independent Video (0 Credit)
    Modeled on a professional television station, students learn all aspects of television production ranging from concept development to post-production. Instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
    Instructor: Daniel Gaucher
  • VM347 - Emerson Independent Video (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
    Instructor: Daniel Gaucher
  • VM348 - EVVYs (0 Credit)
    Preparation and staging of Emerson's annual awards show in conjunction with other end-of-year events and presentations. Instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
    Instructor: Eric Fox
  • VM348 - EVVYs (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
    Instructor: Eric Fox
  • VM349 - Developed Images (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
    Instructor: Lauren Shaw
  • VM349 - Developed Images (0 Credit)
    Student-organized and -produced photography magazine. Work is submitted, reviewed, and selected by students for annual publication. Instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
    Instructor: Lauren Shaw
  • VM350 - Sound Design (4 Credits)
    Introduces the art of inventing sounds and composing soundtracks for visual media such as film, video, computer animation, and websites. Focus is on audio post-production and the roles of the supervising sound editor and the sound designer. Post-production techniques include sound recording, sound editing, and sound mixing in stereo and surround sound.
  • VM351 - Audio for New Media (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the creative possibilities of sound in a variety of digital media environments. Topics include MIDI control, digital sound synthesis, data compression, and real-time control of sound within applications such as Flash, MAX/MSP/Jitters, and CSound.
    Instructor: Maurice Methot
  • VM352 - Studio Recording (4 Credits)
    Explores the principal tools of the professional audio production studio and how they can be used for creative productions. Includes instruction in multi-track recording and sound processing equipment.
  • VM360 - Film Animation (4 Credits)
    Introduces film animation in which short animated exercises and individual sequences are located within a survey of animation as an art form and commercial product. Students employ a range of media, exploring and developing ideas and skills in producing 16mm animated sequences, culminating in a final project.
    Instructor: Joseph Kolbe
  • VM362 - Motion Graphics (4 Credits)
    Covers the practice and art of motion graphics and visual effects, including the design process, artistic concepts, and technologies. Production techniques range from title sequences for film, to compositing of real and virtual worlds and a myriad of digital time-based art forms. Students make a series of projects using post-production and compositing software.
  • VM363 - Advanced Computer Animation (4 Credits)
    The second course in the two-course computer animation sequence, introducing students to advanced three-dimensional modeling and animation techniques and preparing them for independent computer animation production work. Continues to develop skills acquired in computer animation, including modeling, texturing objects, composing and lighting scenes, animating, dynamics, rendering, and post-production compositing.
    Instructors: Anya Belkina, Ezra Cove
  • VM364 - 3D Computer Gaming (4 Credits)
    Provides students with the fundamentals of game design and theory. Students learn to create and import assets, develop objectives, script behaviors and action, and build game levels. Students complete the course with an original portfolio-ready single player game.
    Instructor: Richard Kimbrough
  • VM365 - Darkroom Photography (4 Credits)
    An intermediate-level course in black-and-white photography designed to explore a variety of "ways of seeing" as well as demonstrate techniques that further enhance the photographic image. Assignments build on one another (tone, time, frame, point of view, scale, and sequence). Critical viewing and seeing as well as guest artists and gallery visits are encouraged as students begin to form their personal photographic vision.
    Instructors: Lauren Shaw, David Akiba
  • VM366 - Digital Photography (4 Credits)
    A hands-on production class created especially for the photography student who is interested in the digital darkroom. It is designed to give students a basic introduction to the elements of digital capture, manipulation, and output. The course addresses the digital tools within the context of the aesthetics of photography. Photoshop is used as another photographic tool.
    Instructor: Camilo Ramirez
  • VM370 - Business Concepts for Modern Media (4 Credits)
    Focuses on strategic thinking, planning, organization, and implementation of media projects from conception (pre-production) through release/distribution/exhibition (theatrical, non-theatrical, digital, web). Includes acquiring fundamental skills and a working knowledge of business math, business plans, intellectual property and copyright basics, grant writing and resources, and current trends in advertising, marketing, and press package materials.
  • VM371 - Alternative Media Production: Out of the Box (4 Credits)
    Fosters an exploratory approach to making media projects by providing unorthodox conceptual frameworks in which students conceive and execute short projects using both conventional and unconventional acquisition devices in a variety of media. Students work individually or collaboratively throughout the course to develop ideas and acquire material for assignments.
    Instructor: Robert Todd
  • VM372 - Directing Image and Sound (4 Credits)
    Department Permissin Required
  • VM372 - Directing Image and Sound (4 Credits)
    Examines a director's preparation in detail, with particular emphasis on forming creative approaches to the script, as well as image and sound design. Production and post-production strategies are also addressed.
  • VM373 - Directing Actors for the Screen (4 Credits)
    Develops skills in directing actors in dramatic performances for the screen. Students are taken step by step through the directing process with a particular emphasis on research and visualization, as they learn how to plan and direct narrative sequences. Classes will be offered in conjunction with Acting for the Camera classes in Performing Arts.
  • VM375 - Advanced Interactive Media (4 Credits)
    Continues to explore interactive media, including consideration of conceptual, aesthetic, and technical concerns. Technologies covered include interactive web elements, databases, mobile development, and an introduction to programming. Emphasis is on making creative works.
    Instructor: David Kelleher
  • VM376 - Editing for Film and Video (4 Credits)
    Department Permission Required
  • VM376 - Editing for Film and Video (4 Credits)
    Furthers understanding of and ability to work with medium- to long-format post-production processes through editing assignments in film and video, along with critical examination of completed motion pictures.
  • VM377 - Documentary Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Develops skills necessary to produce documentary productions in video or film. Covers production processes from story development through all the production phases. Practical considerations of production are balanced with theoretical debates on the legal and ethical responsibilities of those who document others.
  • VM378 - Basic Cinematography and Videography (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic elements of the aesthetics, technology, and craft of cinematography and videography. Students gain a working knowledge of 16mm and digital video cameras, as well as basic lighting design and equipment, with an emphasis on crew relations and organization. Includes a comprehensive exploration of the work of significant cinematographers.
    Instructors: Shaun Clarke, Joseph Kolbe, Nicholas Manley, Brian Dowley
  • VM378 - Basic Cinematography and Videography (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic elements of the aesthetics, technology, and craft of cinematography and videography. Students gain a working knowledge of 16mm and digital video cameras, as well as basic lighting design and equipment, with an emphasis on crew relations and organization. Includes a comprehensive exploration of the work of significant cinematographers.
    Instructors: Shaun Clarke, Joseph Kolbe, Nicholas Manley, Brian Dowley
  • VM380 - Media Copyright and Content (4 Credits)
    Copyright is the legal foundation that gives value and property rights to any creative work. This includes music as well as books, films, television shows, choreographed work, architectural designs, plays, paintings, maps, photographs, video games, and computer software. Students look at the history, development, and purpose of copyright and other intellectual property law. They also explore the purpose and value of fair use and of the public domain, and alternative views of copyright such as the "Creative Commons."
    Instructor: Barry Marshall
  • VM400 - Top: The Hollywood Renaissance (4 Credits)
    Amid the death of the sunny idealism of the 1960s counterculture and the decline of the studio system, a new age of Hollywood filmmakers led an awakening of cinema culture. Artists assaulted the genres that formed the bedrock of Hollywood's economic and aesthetic success. This course will explore this "Hollywood Renaissance" through filmmakers like Penn, Coppola, Scorsese, and many others, and how the radical ideas of this era became mainstreamed into American life and culture.
  • VM400 - Top: Cyberactivisim: Crashing the System (4 Credits)
    Digital technology has not only allowed for the unprecedented global dissemination of information within the last decades, new media have become a powerful tool for social and political activists everywhere. From the MoveOn.org movement to the events of the Arab Spring, online social networks provide an influential contemporary forum for advocating for change. This course explores "cyberactivism" both in theory and in practice, investigating the different approaches used today to transform our virtual and real worlds.
  • VM400 - Top: Surveillance in a Digial Age (4 Credits)
    Surveillance is something once reserved for spy movies and government agencies. Today, as technology weaves even further into our daily lives more questions are arising around the "who", "why", "what", and "how" of electronic surveillance. This course will explore how surveillance has evolved and how growing advancements in technology are raising it to a new level. We will cover current headlines involving surveillance and a not-too-geeky technical explanation of some common surveillance methods, as well as, dive into important questions around privacy, laws facilitating electronic surveillance, and who is behind it all?
  • VM400 - Top: Cyberactivisim: Crashing the System (4 Credits)
    This course surveys cinematic disaster: as a motif in numerous Hollywood genre movies, independent and avant-garde films; as a specific genre; and, as historically specific film cycles. Focusing on historical, theoretical, social and aesthetic issues, the course continually considers how disaster movies represent hegemonic norms related to national and social identity, gender, race/ethnicity, class, sexuality, and other social categories. Course content includes lecture, discussion, exams and papers.
  • VM402 - Sem: Sex on Screen (4 Credits)
    Explores the complex history of sexually oriented moving images in the United States from Thomas Edison's "The Kiss" to contemporary mobile media culture in forms ranging from simple loops and cheesecake films, to Hollywood narratives, to educational films, to sexploitation and pornography. Among the issues we will address are how sexuality and gender have been represented on screen, the ways in which sexuality and "power" have been historically intertwined, how sexual minorities have been portrayed, how censorship, self-regulation and politics have influenced image making, the ways in which content has created controversy and, conversely, how controversy has changed content. With a special focus on the "sexual revolution" of the 1960s and '70s, this seminar will invite students to engage with a wide range of historical, social, political and ethical issues surrounding moving images that have had a direct impact on the lives of Americans for over a century.
  • VM402 - Sem: Media Ethics and Cultural Diversity (4 Credits)
    Focuses upon ethical issues in media such as privacy, exploitation, deception, security, pornography, and issues of cultural diversity such as discrimination, racism, gender bias, homophobia, and myth-representation. As a media seminar the course includes much discussion, debate, screening, and case studies. While philosophical classical ethics forms a back-bone, emphasis is upon more contemporary applied ethical issues in all primary media including film, television, Internet, audio, and photography and in several career areas including production, entertainment, journalism, advertising, and documentary.
  • VM402 - Sem: Silent Hollywood (4 Credits)
    From the late 1910s until the coming of sound in the late 1920s, the Hollywood film industry reached unprecedented commercial and artistic success. SILENT HOLLYWOOD chronicles the development of the industry during x this crucial ten-year period and examines the careers of many of its key filmmakers
  • VM402 - Sem: Media Ethics and Cultural Diversity (4 Credits)
    Many ethical issues arise in media production including the "myth representation" (cf. Misrepresentation) of people of diverse backgrounds. This seminar will explore related issues including racism, discrimination, defamation of character, stereotyping, hate speech, deception, privacy, pornography, censorship, obscenity, ethnocentricity, fairness, conflict of interest, emic vs. ethics representation, and confidentiality. Primary consideration will be given to the VMA production processes within film, video, new media, audio, and photography although related processes such as advertising and journalism will also receive attention.
  • VM402 - Sem: Sound as Fine Art (4 Credits)
    Surveys the world of auditory art from the oral tradition to contemporary art works of sound and noise/music composition. The course examines the influences of culture, society, and the arts and sciences on the movements and conceptual constructs existing within the culture of sound art. The seminar's focus is on Post World War I, Twentieth & Twenty-First Century experiments and explorations into sound, noise and radio; the avant-garde in sound & experimental music; aleatory forms of composition & performance; computer generative works; visual elements in sound performance; installation art; and the aesthetics of silence.
  • VM402 - Sem: The Western in Film & TV (4 Credits)
    The Western genre was once a staple of the American motion picture industry and the most popular programming in the first two decades of American television. The Western has all but disappeared as a predominant story type, but the impact of the genre's representation of American westward expansion, American masculinity, and race and gender continue to be felt in public discourse and in public life. This course will investigate the history of the Western in film and television, its conventional formulation, and various innovative instances of the genre. Conducted as a seminar, discussion and student presentations of material will be the format for the class.
  • VM402 - Sem: Popularity & Profits: TV Culture (4 Credits)
    This course looks at how TV makes a commodity of culture or what is known the business as a program. We examine American TV as an institution as well as a cultural producer. This knowledge involves the mapping of the intricacies of TV practice as well as an understanding the role of American culture. Although the television has gone through massive economic changes in its fifty-five years, its production process has not measurably altered. So what is the method of TV? If it is not simply mass production, what is it? Can TV be original? Where does it get its ideas? Who is the "creator" of a program. By combining the study of genres and cultural theories derived from the sociology of culture, the course will introduce students to the complex relationship of economics to culture. In the process we learn to think, argue, and write about television on a conceptually sophisticated and informed level.
  • VM402 - Sem: Queer Film & Video (4 Credits)
    This course will survey queer film and video from social-historical, aesthetic, and theoretical perspectives. Subjects include: Weimar German films (among the first lesbian and gay films); classical Hollywood and queer fandom, authorship, and stereotyping; subcultural coding and camp sensibility; the 1960s Underground cinema movement; network television and Hollywood films of the 1960s and 1970s; lesbian and gay liberation cinema of the 1970s; the AIDS activist video movement and the New Queer Cinema and Video movement of the 1980s and 1990s; LGBTQ representations on television in the 1990s and 2000s; and transgender films and television programs of the 2000s.
  • VM402 - Sem: TV Creators: Understanding the Whedonesque (4 Credits)
    This course will use the career of Joss Whedon to introduce students to the variety of positions in the entertainment industry and their potential for fulfilling and creative work. Whedon's career spans the many production lines in the American Dream Factory: TV series staff writer, script doctor, film screenwriter, TV creator in a wide variety of genres, Internet series creator, comic book writer and creator, niche genre film director, and blockbuster filmmaker. By examining his work at various stages, students will better understand auteur theory, modern industrial entertainment production, and artistic production across media. Works covered include: Roseanne, Alien: Resurrection, Buffy the Vampire Slayer as a film and TV series, Angel, Firefly and Serenity, Dollhouse, The Cabin in the Woods, The Avengers, Much Ado About Nothing, Buffy: Season Eight, and Astonishing X-Men.
  • VM402 - Sem: Queer TV After Ellen Came Out (4 Credits)
    This seminar examines LGBTQ representations in TV comedy since 1997, beginning with Ellen DeGeneres' historic sitcom Ellen. Historical, ideological and formal/aesthetic analyses explore how and why comedy has served a central means to integrate LGBTQ characters into television, in addition to how stereotyping, the closet, camp, carnivalesque sexuality and gender performativity have served as comedic devices with multiple functions and meanings. Students are expected to conduct intensive research for writing assignments, spoken presentations and class discussions.
  • VM402 - Sem: Animation Histories: From Concept to Screen (4 Credits)
    This seminar focuses on the historical, cultural, and critical analysis of animated films and Directors. The seminar will study five films produced or co-produced on the West Coast: Walt Disney's Fantasia; United Production America's Gerald McBoing Boing; Tim Burton and Henry Selick's, Nightmare Before Christmas; Pixar's Toy Story; and Hayao Miyasaki's Spirited Away. A participation-intensive, research-intensive and writing-intensive seminar to identify, study, and critically analyze the historical and cultural threads that weave the fabric of these five cinematic cartoons, the animated mode as an experimental art form, the animation industry, and the Directors who gave rise to their genesis. The seminar will also take a tertiary look at the influences of higher educational institutions that fostered a culture of innovation for the Directors being researched, discussed and critically analyzed.
  • VM402 - Sem: Animation Histories: From Concepts to Screen (4 Credits)
    This seminar will focuses on the historical, cultural, and critical analysis of animated films and their Directors. The seminar will study five films produced on the West Coast: Walt Disney's Fantasia (European Roots/1939-40/Modernism/Experimental Animation/FantaSound/Disney Strike); United Production America's Gerald McBoingBoing (WW II/UPA/House Committee on Un-American Activities/Dr. Seuss/Robert "BoBo" Cannon/1956-57); Tim Burton's film Directed by Henry Selick, Nightmare Before Christmas (Disney/1993); Pixar's Toy Story (Computer Animation Feature/John Lasseter/Walt Disney/LucasFilm/SteveJobs/Disney); and Hayao Miyasaki's Spirited Away (Ghibli Studio/Japan/Translation/John Lasseter/Walt Disney). This participation-intensive and writing-intensive seminar will identify, study, and critically analyze the historical and cultural threads that weaved the fabric of these cinematic cartoons, the animated mode, the animation industry, and the Directors who gave rise to their genesis, including a look at the influences of higher educational institutions that fostered a culture of innovation for the Directors being researched, discussed and critically analyzed.
  • VM402 - Sem: Hitchcock (4 Credits)
    explores the life, work, and legend of Alfred Hitchcock whose films remain as popular as ever with critics, film historians, and the public. We will approach his career in four phases: as a director in the beleaguered British film industry in the 1920s and '30s, as a contract director in Hollywood in the 1940s, as an independent producer/director from the late 1940s into the 1970s, and as a force in a wide range of media from the 1950s until his death in 1980. Hitchcock's ability to negotiate different modes of production while "branding" and marketing himself in the changing entertainment landscape will be assessed. His films will be considered from a formal standpoint, with emphasis on how suspense is created through cinematography, editing, and sound; they will be examined through various theories that have been brought to bear on the work. Question of authorship and biography will be explored as will Hitchcock's continuing legacy as the "Master of Suspense".
  • VM409 - Sem: Europe After the Rain: Art in Post-War Europe, 1945-1989 (4 Credits)
    During World War II, Europe suffered the destruction of its social, political and cultural fabric. Artists responded by moving away from the hand of the artist, rejecting traditional painting, and questioning the object as the centerpiece of Modern art, dismantling Modern art and creating contemporary art. This course sketches an outline of art history that has resulted in a new media, video, film, and alternative means of expression.
  • VM409 - Sem: Postwar Art & Technology to Contemporary New Media and Digital Art (4 Credits)
    This course will survey the development of new media art surveying the historical new technology art work in the early twentieth century, then focusing on the post-World War II period through to contemporary multimedia and digital visual art. This course will be divided into two parts. During the first half we will learn about historical new media art from the early twentieth century through the post-World War II period, the so-called Art & Technology movement. Then, the second half will be an extended research project on contemporary new media and digital art.
  • VM409 - Sem: Urban Public Art: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)
    This seminar investigates the design, creation, commission, patronage and placement of public art within the urban fabric. Students examine their roles as community members and participate in multiple field trips. Topics include: practical concerns and historical background; public art typologies; public art's relationships with institutions; funding; audience agency; and temporary and alternative art forms. The artworks studied range from traditional sculpture and mural painting, to less conventional and more transgressive works including interventions and ephemeral installations.
  • VM410 - Sem: Latin American Art (4 Credits)
    An exploration of modern and contemporary Latin American Art in its political, social and cultural contexts. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Reality, Politics and Culture: The Mexican Muralists; 2) The Fantastic and Beyond; 3) Archetypes: Icons, Images and Symbols in Latin American Art; and 4) Contemporary Visions and Border Crossers. Our study centers on the work of important artists who represent identity, culture, and politics as the complex and multifaceted expression of the experience of living within and between nations and cultures in an age of globalization. Through lectures, videos, slide presentations, artist talks, discussions, student research presentations and workshops, we will explore the common themes, disparate perspectives and changing visions of artists from the "other" Americas.
    Instructor: Mirta Tocci
  • VM412 - American Film Comedy (4 Credits)
    A historical approach to the development of American film comedy explores theories of comedy and their value to the critical interpretation of comic films. Also considers the varying ways spectators are addressed, and the impact of performers and directors on various comedy styles.
    Instructor: Michael Selig
  • VM418 - Transnational Asian Cinemas (4 Credits)
    Asian "national" cinemas are examined and problematized in the contexts of media and economic globalization, including: the politics of transnational film practices; issues surrounding filmic representation and diasporic identities; the construction and negotiation of national, gender, and genre differences; local-regional-global dynamics; and questions of the postcolonial in Asian contexts.
    Instructor: Shujen Wang
  • VM420 - Top: Directing and Producing the Narrative Motion Picture (4 Credits)
    A pre-production, production and post-production intensive class taught by two Emerson industry professionals (Director Regge Life and Cinematographer Harlan Bosmajian) resulting in a completed 20min. narrative short film. Designed for second semester juniors and seniors, This class is a chance for students to hone their specific interests in an educational environment that will be as much like a professionally run film-set as the students would encounter outside Emerson College. Regge Life's section will consist of students focused on directing, producing and Production Design. Interested students should email: Theodore_Life@emerson.edu for information and instructor approval.
  • VM420 - Top: Technical Craft of the Narrative Motion Picture (4 Credits)
    A pre-production, production and post-production intensive class taught by two Emerson industry professionals (Director Theodore Life and Cinematographer Harlan Bosmajian) resulting in a completed 20min. narrative short film. Designed for second semester juniors and seniors, this class is a chance for students to hone their specific interests in an educational environment that will be as much like a professionally run film-set as the students would encounter outside Emerson College. This section will consist of students focused on Camera, Grip/Electric, Editing/DIT/Color Correction and sound. Interested students should email: Harlan_bosmajian@emerson.edu for more information and instructor approval.
  • VM420 - Top: Ed Tech Times: Content Development and Web Design for an Online Information Hub (4 Credits)
    Focused on a project with EdTech Times (ETT), a start-up that publishes news dedicated to the education technology industry, located in the offices of Learn Launch, an education technology incubator in Boston. The course seeks students across a variety of disciplines to help ETT with repositioning for greater audience engagement by redesigning their website and exploring new content forms (including original written content, video, data visualizations, and info-graphics, etc). The course will immerse students in an experiential learning environment that will require them to develop content through creative inquiry across multiple disciplines, collaboration with ETT, and iterative experimentation among teams. Students will learn the process for developing web pages from inititial design to development and best practices in writing for the web.
  • VM420 - Top: Transmedia Development (4 Credits)
    Stories are told across film, TV, radio, Web, games, books, magazines, CDs, and live events - often simultaneously across multiple platforms. Transmedia is changing audiences' relationship with media, creating immersive, participatory experiences in rich storyworlds. And, it's blurring the lines between entertainment content and its marketing. Whether you call it story, content marketing, or a hybrid - be transmedia. In this new world order, Transmedia Development is for both media makers and media marketers. This hands-on course explores transmedia storytelling - creating media projects across multiple platforms, and transmedia marketing - promoting 21st century properties across multiple platforms. Students develop their own transmedia projects by applying the fundamentals of storytelling to an array of media platforms, and by employing best practices for marketing film, TV, games, and digital media - from branding, industry events, and media relations to trailers, advertising, and socialized screens.
  • VM420 - Top: Writing the Film Musical (4 Credits)
    The course will allow students to study the screenplays of a variety of film musicals from the beginning of the genre to the present. In addition to focusing on the writing of the musical film, the manner in which song assists in telling the story will be of particular interest. Working in teams of two, students from Emerson will complete an outline and first act of an original screenplay, and music students from Berklee will compose the songs that will help tell that story. The semester will culminate in a staged reading, with music, performed by students from both Berklee and Emerson. Prequesites: Junior standng and permission of the instructor. Students must email Diane_lake@emerson.edu a PDF version of a writing sample - play, screenplay or teleplay up to 15 pages in length for consideration. Students from every department, who are interested in writing, are invited to apply.
  • VM420 - Top: Studio Independents: Navigation the Motion Picture Industry (4 Credits)
    This course provides an in-depth examination of the mechanics of the motion picture industry and is ideally suited for students prior to taking a semester in LA.. Topics covered include exploring the organizational structures and hierarchies of studios and production companies, how executive and staff positions function and what projects are acquired, developed, created and distributed; understanding customary terminology and references; working with talent and literary agencies, management companies and entertainment attorneys; and examining the role of guilds for above-the-line talent. The course will also explore how opportunities within the industry are expanding and changing --particularly in the form of theatrical film finance--and will help to prepare students for the landscape which is continually evolving.
  • VM420 - Top: Research and Creative Production in Virtual and Agumented Reality Public Art (4 Credits)
    This course provides students with hands on experience in project based research and creative production. Students join a faculty led˙research and creative production team based on an active˙Virtual and Augmented Reality Public Art project˙at the˙Los Angles County Museum of Art, through its˙Art + Technology program. This project is inherently interdisciplinary. Student's skills and interests will be˙assessed and an appropriate role will be assigned accordingly. Co-enrolment in VM261 Computer Animation is recommended. Course is co-taught in Los Angeles. Students will be accepted to this course by application only. Please send a resume and one page statement of interest to˙John_Craig_Freeman@emerson.edu.
  • VM420 - Top: Technical Craft of the Narrative Motion Picture (4 Credits)
    Explores various aspects of media arts practice. Course may be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM423 - Writing Television Pilots (4 Credits)
    Examines how to create a television series, including developing an original premise, and writing convincing, multi-dimensional characters, and intriguing, character-specific dialogue. Students write an entire television pilot script to be workshopped in class, along with a pilot package that includes a logline, series synopsis and a 13-week episode guide with character and story arcs.
  • VM428 - Feature Writing Workshop (4 Credits)
    Working from detailed outlines developed in VM 320 Writing the Feature Film, students complete a first draft of a feature-length screenplay. Students read each other's work, write a critical analysis of each segment, and engage in discussion of aesthetics, craft, and form.
  • VM429 - Comedy Writer's Room (4 Credits)
    Emulates a Hollywood comedy writing room. Students collectively create and write an original pilot script for a TV comedy. Students write character sketches, a comprehensive story outline, the first draft of the script and all subsequent drafts, and participate in an extensive punch-up. Participants gain a keen understanding of how a Hollywood comedy writers' room works, how to write under deadline, how to pitch jokes, and how to write comedy as a team.
  • VM440 - Advanced Studio Production: Fiction (4 Credits)
    Provides the opportunity for specialized work in fiction television genres that include a studio component, such as drama series, soap operas, and situation comedies. Students create projects and produce, direct, light, and crew them.
  • VM441 - Advanced Studio Production: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Provides the opportunity for specialized work in nonfiction multi-camera television genres, including talk shows, live performance, and public affairs programming. Emphasis is on designing, producing, directing, lighting, and studio crewing.
    Instructor: Eric Handler
  • VM450 - Advanced Sound Design (4 Credits)
    Advanced studies in audio post-production, with emphasis on expanding students' conceptual framework and refining creative audio post-production skills in surround sound mixing and applications in film, video, and digital media.
    Instructor: Elizabeth Fausak
  • VM465 - Documentary Photography (4 Credits)
    Provides the foundation for an intense photographic investigation of an issue-cultural, political, ideological, or personal. Develops greater competence in negative making and black-and-white printing, with emphasis on strongly informative images. Assignments require the student to discover narrative possibilities while creating strong individual images. The course's technical components are supplemented by considerations of the history of documentary photography.
    Instructor: Lauren Shaw
  • VM470 - Advanced New Media Projects (4 Credits)
    Provides an opportunity for senior VMA students working in computer animation, interactive media, motion graphics, digital photography, networked performance, audio, or other forms of new media to create advanced portfolio work. Projects, both collaborative and individual, are developed in the context of peer-based critique and analysis. The focus is on using new technologies for creative self-expression. Students complete the course with an original portfolio-ready project. May be repeated once for credit if projects differ.
    Instructor: John Craig Freeman
  • VM471 - Top: Documentary for Social Action (4 Credits)
    Documentary for Social Action combines hands-on video production with service learning. Students produce short content-driven documentaries for multiple platforms, all framed by the goal of achieving positive change. Our class collaborates with community-based organizations representing interests in critical areas: environmental justice, science education for girls, prison reform, and others. Students gain deep insight into production and story-telling skills as well as direct experience in working with clients in a real-world process.
    Instructor: Robert Nesson
  • VM475 - Creative Producing for Film (4 Credits)
    Explores the ways in which a creative producer engages with a project from conception through completion with a focus on the development process. It will discuss original ideas, source material (books, stories), pitching, creating log lines, script coverage, the notes process and assembling the creative team. It will cover customary business affairs including chain-of-title, copyright, talent and option agreements. Key issues in finance, marketing and distribution will also be examined.
    Instructor: Linda Reisman
  • VM476 - Editing for Advanced Film and Video (4 Credits)
    This advanced-level 16mm film and video post-production workshop is designed to assist in the editing and completion of students' advanced-level projects. Technical procedures as well as aesthetic and conceptual issues endemic to post-production of motion picture projects are examined with an eye to their practical application to students' work on their projects.
  • VM478 - Advanced Cinematography and Videography (4 Credits)
    Offers advanced-level exploration of aesthetics, technology, and craft of cinematography and videography. Students gain a working knowledge of the advanced level of cameras in the department and are expected to develop complex lighting and shot designs. Emphasis is on aesthetic use of the technical elements of motion picture acquisition. Includes significant collaboration with other courses in the curriculum including BFA and BA Production Workshop.
  • VM490 - BFA Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Note: Registration for this course requires completion of one specialization-level production course and approval by the faculty BFA committee based on application.
  • VM490 - BFA Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Provides the means for students to produce portfolio work. BFA students are required to take two consecutive semesters of the workshop, 4 credits per semester. Work may be produced in teams, partnerships, or individually. Projects must be proposed in the semester preceding the semester in which the work is to be produced (see section on BFA requirements above). Students may also apply to serve as non-BFA participants for a single semester and for 4 credits only, serving as crew members or staff on another student's project. Prerequisites: Completion of one specialization-level production course, and approval by the faculty BFA committee based on application.
  • VM491 - BA Capstone Project (4 Credits)
    Students are admitted by application to produce portfolio work as a Capstone Project. Applications must include a detailed description of the proposal for consideration by a faculty panel. The proposal can be for either a creative project based in any area of the program, including film, TV, animation, sound design, or digital art and games; or a significant research project in media studies. Provides an opportunity to produce a significant piece of creative or scholarly work.
  • VM492 - Photo Practicum (4 Credits)
    Designed to integrate, enrich, and solidify a student's photographic skills building on past productions. Emphasis is placed on developing a portfolio representative of a personal vision.
    Instructor: Lauren Shaw
  • VM600 - Business of Modern Media (4 Credits)
    Focuses on strategic thinking and implementation of media projects from conception (pre-production) through release/distribution/exhibition. Material covered includes business plans; grant resources, writing, and package preparation; acquiring rights associated with production; preparing for feature production (optioning literary property, pitching ideas, offerings, prospectus); legal issues (rights, copyright, and intellectual property); insurance considerations; advertising; and marketing. Students are required to conduct database web research on the industry and festivals in addition to following current trends in global markets, financing, advertising, and marketing.
  • VM602 - Media Production Ethics and Cultural Diversity (4 Credits)
    Ethical and diversity issues, including deception, privacy, pornography, racism, discrimination, defamation of character, sexism, stereotyping, piracy, censorship, obscenity, ethnocentricity, confidentiality, fairness, and hate speech are investigated as they apply to the production process of film, video, new media, audio, and photography.
    Instructor: Thomas Cooper
  • VM604 - Top: Writing for Television (4 Credits)
    Examines how to create a television series, including developing an original premise, and writing convincing, multi-dimensional characters, and intriguing, character-specific dialogue. Students write an entire television pilot script to be workshopped in class, along with a pilot package that includes a logline, series synopsis and a 6-week episode guide with character and story arcs. Students will also be introduced to writing scripts for existing TV sitcoms and dramas.
  • VM604 - Top:Space, Place, Image, Sound (4 Credits)
    Examines the development of image-and-sound-based installation art from the late 20th century through the contemporary period. Multimedia installation-expressed in site-specific public works, artist films, single and multichannel video, sculpture and performance, and new media and interactive forms-has become a vital art form in the 21st century. You will have an opportunity to produce multi-media installed works of your own design and will be introduced to the unique properties and parameters of the form. The culmination of the course will be a collaborative multi-site presentation of the work created in the class, staged as a 21st-century "Happening." No prerequisites
  • VM604 - Top: Way's of Seeing (4 Credits)
    The aim of this course is to provide a solid foundation in the defining characteristics of the still image. Ways of Seeing is designed to explore creative possibilities inherent in different photographic formats and materials. The focus is to understand the single frame and how that influences other time-based media. Ways of Seeing builds on constructing the image through: frame, time, palette, point of view, scale, and sequence. Use of both b/w and color will be explored as well as analog and digital capture. This course will also include the study of photographic theory as it relates to the practice of photography today. Class field trips to museum collections, galleries, and lectures will serve as an integral part of this class.
  • VM604 - Top: Fundamentals of Fiction Film Directing (4 Credits)
    This class provides an overview of the role of the fiction film director from script development through post-production. It will examine each phase of the director's process with emphasis on the methodologies necessary to realize the dramatic possibilities of a cinematic story. Students will create several short exercises and analyze the works of master directors.
  • VM604 - Top: Writing the Feature Film (4 Credits)
    This class will take students through various stages of conceptualization for long-form film stories through to the finished feature script. Storytelling methods and techniques for both classic three-act structure and non-linear structure will be examined. Feature script analysis, pacing, momentum, character development, conflict and dialogue will be learned. The course will examine strategies for entry into the Hollywood market, as well as the independent film market. Completion of a treatment, a detailed outline, and a minimum of 60 screenplay pages will be completed (students will be encouraged to finish). To maximize class time, students may be asked to informally convey feature story ideas to the instructor over the winter break.
  • VM605 - Graduate Writing Short Subject (4 Credits)
    Introduces the three genres of short form--nonfiction, experimental, and fiction. Students learn the differences and components of each genre and acquire an understanding of the art, craft, and discipline of each process from a writer's point of view. Emphasis is on developing the writer-s individual personal vision.
  • VM611 - Principles of Sound Production (4 Credits)
    An introductory course in audio physics, sound principles, and the theory and practice of audio recording and mixing. Emphasis is also placed on concept development within sound production concurrent to the study of signal routing and the mixer console, analog and digital audio recording and editing techniques.
    Instructor: Pierre Archambault
  • VM612 - Graduate Sound Design (4 Credits)
    An introductory course on the art of the sound designer and the processes and theories applied to composing and editing sound tracks for visual media such as film, video, computer animation, and websites. Areas of focus are in audio postproduction techniques and in the roles of the supervising sound editor and the sound designer. Postproduction techniques include dialog correction and automated dialog replacement (ADR), Foley session recording, sound effects acquisition and editing, and the mixing and localization theories and practices for stereo and surround-sound. The theoretical focus of the course is on the voice in film and visual media, as speech, as song, and everything that remains afterward with an ongoing theoretic investigation into the relationship between sound and image.
    Instructor: Pierre Archambault
  • VM613 - Foundations of Image and Sound Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces the aesthetics and practice of image and sound production. Topics include visual composition, preproduction skills, lighting, basic directing, camera operation, lens theory, and editing. Students create projects using digital still photography and video.
  • VM614 - Graduate Studio Production (4 Credits)
    An introduction to the fundamentals of studio video production. Students produce, direct, and work crew for productions. Lectures, production analyses, and critiques of work are included.
    Instructor: Michael Goodman
  • VM621 - Documentary Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Introduces the practice of documentary video production. Emphasizes documentary strategies, research, budgeting, production, and postproduction. Students produce a documentary short.
    Instructor: Marc Fields
  • VM624 - Graduate Directing Actors for the Screen (4 Credits)
    This is a workshop-style class that focuses on the director-actor interaction. John Cassavetes said that acting is the essential discipline for moviemakers, and in this intensive course, students learn the language of acting and the techniques of directing actors in dramatic productions.
  • VM625 - Computer Animation 1 (4 Credits)
    This is the first course in the two-course computer animation sequence, introducing students to the fundamentals of three-dimensional modeling and animation and preparing them for the second course, Computer Animation II. Students learn to develop concepts, produce storyboards, model, texture objects, compose and light scenes, animate, and add dynamics. Finally, they learn to render their animations into movies and to composite movies, audio, titles, and credits in postproduction. In addition to these production skills, students develop their conceptual understanding as well as their critical and creative thinking about the practice of computer animation.
    Instructor: Anya Belkina
  • VM628 - Experimental Media Production (4 Credits)
    This is a project-based course for students who are interested in experimental analog and digital media. Along with project assignments open to a wide range of processes in various media, students examine ways that audiovisual media can be used to question mainstream genres, either through the invention of new forms or by subverting and hybridizing those forms. Students also look at how alternative venues and audiences shift the meaning and orientation of production. Technical topics include innovative uses of film, video, audio, and software, for example, direct animation or contact recording. Other topics include: the medium as metaphor, alternative representations of politicized subject matters, ordering systems other than the narrative, non-camera-based visual production, installation art and media as object, media's use of performance and anti-performance, image appropriation, the macro and the miniature within the frame, the long take, repetition and feedback loops, and other generative strategies for media makers.
    Instructor: Robert Todd
  • VM631 - Graduate Cinematography (4 Credits)
    Introduces the art of cinematography on both an aesthetic and technical level. Students learn how to shoot on both film and digital formats. They also learn fundamental lighting skills using an array of professional lighting units. Emphasizes the learning of creative techniques for visualizing narrative scripts and exploring the emotional subtext of the cinematic image.
    Instructor: Harlan Bosmajian
  • VM632 - Advanced Editing (4 Credits)
    Provides a framework for advanced digital editing skills like large-scale media management, off-beat and innovative cutting techniques, emerging individual editing styles, and cutting long-form projects.
    Instructor: Daniel Gaucher
  • VM640 - MFA Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    MFA students only.
  • VM640 - MFA Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    This is an intensive workshop for second-year MFA students to concentrate on the main body of their artistic output. Students present their own work and critique the work of others, as well as work on their current projects. Centered on the self-directed production schedule and the collaborative nature of critique in an MFA program, this course prepares students to become lifelong artists. Course to be repeated three times during matriculation.
  • VM651 - Studies in Narrative and Media History (4 Credits)
    Offers a historical survey of media art from the perspective of narrative studies. Exposes students to a wide array of narrative structures historically evident in media art, including conventional and unconventional fictional narrative forms, as well as varying types of narrative evident in documentary and experimental media works. In addition, students are introduced to the role of visual images in media narratives, as well as the impact of digital technologies on narrative forms. Students are expected to develop an understanding of the role of narrative structure in effecting emotion and in communicating ideas.
    Instructor: Jane Shattuc
  • VM652 - Theories of Integrated Media (4 Credits)
    MFA students only.
    Instructor: Jane Shattuc
  • VM652 - Theories of Integrated Media (4 Credits)
    Media are no longer discreet forms of expression. Digital technology has created an integrated environment where even analog media are most often produced and/or viewed in a digital context or with digital tools. This course is an intensive introduction to theories of producing and consuming film, video, photography, and sound, both in isolation and couched within digital technologies. Students are given a background in traditional approaches to media criticism and encouraged to question how the new digital context has altered those approaches and changed the conditions under which the creative expression and consumption of media takes place.
    Instructor: Jane Shattuc
  • VM655 - Top: Crossing Over: Globalization and Asian Cinemas (4 Credits)
    Examines theories of globalization through the study of transnational Asian cinemas. It will in particular look at the changing dynamics of media production and circulation in a global environment and how these developments have challenged and redefined "national cinemas." The first part of the course will draw on theories of globalization and post-colonial studies, followed by in-depth understanding of key auteurs vis-a-vis the politics of global film circulation. Finally the course will explore the politics of crossover films and genres.
    Instructor: Shujen Wang
  • VM664 - Studies in Documentary History and Theory (4 Credits)
    A historical investigation of the theories and practice of documentary representation in film, television, video, and new media.
    Instructor: Michael Selig