Department of Visual & Media Arts

Courses


  • VM100 - History of Media Arts I (4 Credits)
    This is the first of a two-semester course that explores the historical development of the media arts, including the film, broadcasting, and sound recording industries until 1965. Investigates the relationships between economics, industrial history, and social and political systems, and the styles and techniques of specific films and broadcast programs. Special attention is given to the diversity of styles of presentation in the media.
  • VM101 - History of Media Arts II (4 Credits)
    This is the second of a two-semester course that explores the historical development of the media arts, focusing on the continuing development of the film, broadcasting, and sound recording industries after 1965, as well as the development of video and digital technologies. Investigates the relationships between economics, industrial history, and social and political systems, and the styles and techniques of specific films and videos, broadcast programs, and digital media products.
  • VM105 - Introduction to Visual Arts (4 Credits)
    Investigates the visual language of communication shared among all of the visual arts, emphasizing visual analysis, understanding of materials, the history of style and techniques, and the functions and meanings of art in its varied manifestations. Provides a foundation for subsequent studies in the visual and media arts.
  • VM110 - Production Safety Workshop (0 Credit)
    A one-time lecture that empowers students to safely navigate student productions and more fully understand production safety procedures. Course is pass/fail and a passing grade is required to enroll in all 200-level production courses.
  • VM120 - Foundations in Visual and Media Arts Production (4 Credits)
    Seats held for new students
  • VM120 - Foundations in Visual and Media Arts Production (4 Credits)
    A combination of lectures and hands-on workshops examines the relationships among photography, graphics, audio, film, video, and digital media within the context of cross-media concepts, theories, and applications. Traces the creative process from conception and writing through production and post-production. Students proceed through a series of exercises that lead to completion of a final project, establishing a foundation for advanced production coursework.
  • VM200 - Media Criticism and Theory (4 Credits)
    Explores theoretical and critical approaches to the study of photography, film, television and video, audio, and digital culture. Theories and methods examine issues relating to production and authorship in the media arts, audience reception and effects, political ideology, ethics, aesthetics, cultural diversity, and schools of thought within the liberal arts. Extensive critical writing and reading in media criticism and theory.
  • VM202 - Critical Listening (4 Credits)
    Provides a study of the psycho-acoustic perception and analysis of classical and contemporary use of sound in the media. Students identify and define acoustic variables, comparing past and present recordings in all media.
  • VM203 - History of Photography: 19th Century to the 1970's (4 Credits)
    Surveys the aesthetic and technical development of photography from its invention to the 1970's with emphasis on the 20th century. A critical analysis of the medium develops an understanding of the influence and appropriation of photography today.
  • VM204 - Top: Intro to Documentary Prod (4 Credits)
    Introduces the art and technology of nonfiction storytelling through a series of workshops, screenings and hands-on production projects. Emphasizes content development, storytelling strategies and production skills in the context of relevant ethical, aesthetic and social issues.
  • VM204 - Top:Intro to Narrative Fiction (4 Credits)
    This course introduces students to the crew and the techniques of single camera narrative fiction production. Emphasis will be placed on organization and the translation of the script into a visual narrative. Students will have the opportunity to hone their production skills on a variety of creative projects. The class is intended to prepare students for advanced-level course work in narrative fiction.
  • VM204 - Top:Intro to Nattative Fiction (4 Credits)
    This course introduces students to the crew and the techniques of single camera narrative fiction production. Emphasis will be placed on organization and the translation of the script into a visual narrative. Students will have the opportunity to hone their production skills on a variety of creative projects. The class is intended to prepare students for advanced-level course work in narrative fiction.
  • VM204 - Top: Intor to Video Production for Non-MVA Majors only (4 Credits)
    This course is not open to Visual and Media Arts Majors. Introduces students to single camera video production. Topics will include the operation of equipment, the principles underlying shooting, and online distribution. Emphasis will be placed on the traditional stages of preproduction, production and postproduction, but you will also examine how video is used in other environments (such as desktop and smartphone platforms). Students will complete several individual and group projects.
  • VM204 - Topics in Media Arts: Practice (4 Credits)
    Explores various aspects of media arts practice. May be repeated for credit it topics differ.
  • VM205 - History Of Photography: 1970's to the Present (4 Credits)
    From documentary and documents of performances to the highly constructed imagery utilized by contemporary artists, students explore diverse subjects, styles, and methods that cover portrait, object, city, memory, appropriation, landscape, and narrative. The course combines weekly slide talks with theory and criticism reading discussions, field trips to exhibitions, visiting artists, research papers, and a final production project and exhibition.
  • VM208 - The Evolution of Comedy (4 Credits)
    Comedy has the broad ability to both illuminate and shape the human experience, and as times change so have the ways we apply this agent of laughter. This class explores the various forms of comedy from ancient Greece to modern 21st century America. Students learn about the role comedy plays in society, and how it evokes dialogue and social change through literature, plays, film, television and performance. "Good taste" and ethics of comedy are also considered and discussed. As a final project, students are required to complete a research paper in conjunction with the American Comedy Archives.
  • VM210 - History of Western Art I: Renaissance and Baroque (4 Credits)
    Explores Renaissance and Baroque art, beginning with Proto-Renaissance works in the 14th century, and concluding with the Late Baroque in the later 17th/early 18th century. Students study major works and artists characterizing these movements, and the critical treatment they received over the centuries.
  • VM213 - History of Western Art IV: Post World War II (4 Credits)
    Chronological study of Western contemporary art after World War II, starting with Abstract Expressionism. Considers the major styles, works, and artists, investigating numerous forms of European and American contemporary art, and their attendant criticism, in a broad contextual framework. Among the movements studied are: Pop Art, Minimalism, New Realism, Postmodernism, Conceptualism, Neo-Expressionism, Graffiti, Photorealism, Earth Works, and Performance Art.
  • VM214 - History of Non-Western Art I: East Asian Arts (4 Credits)
    Investigates arts of the East Asian region, particularly the areas of present-day China, Korea, and Japan. Artworks are contextualized within indigenous traditions such as Confucianism and Chan/Zen and examined from a diversity of critical perspectives. Considers issues of identity, religion, politics, and modernization, as well as contemporary artworks such as installation and performance.
  • VM217 - History of Non-Western Art IV: Arts of the Americas and the Pacific (4 Credits)
    Investigates arts of indigenous civilizations of the North, Central, and South Americas and the Pacific before and after the arrival of Europeans. Addresses the role of art in both indigenous and adapted European traditions, and from political, religious, and economic viewpoints. Considers issues of conquest, cultural hybridity, and contemporary artistic and museum practices. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective and Global Diversity requirements.
  • VM220 - Writing the Short Subject (4 Credits)
    Studies the writing of the short subject within the genres of fiction, nonfiction, and experimental concepts and scripts (including animation). Scripts range from 3 to 15 minutes and are suitable for production within the budget and time constraints of an Emerson College class. Students complete comprehensive revisions of their work.
  • VM222 - Writing for Television (4 Credits)
    Examines writing for television in a variety of formats, with a predominant emphasis on situation comedies and drama. The elements of each genre are analyzed, challenging students to find their own unique "voice," and new and innovative ways to write stories within established formats. Also covered are reality television and children's television, story outlining, and script formatting. Each student writes a first-draft script of an existing sitcom or drama.
  • VM230 - Introduction to Film Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces the basics of non-synchronous 16mm filmmaking, including camera operation, principles of cinematography and lighting for black-and-white film, non-sync sound recording and transfers, and picture and sound editing.
  • VM231 - Intermediate Film Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces the technical, conceptual, and procedural skills necessary to successfully complete a short double-system sync-sound 16mm film, including pre-production, production, and post-production procedures and techniques.
  • VM240 - Introduction to Video Field Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces single-camera video production. Students learn the equipment and techniques used in single-camera field production and post-production, writing, and producing a variety of projects, edited in digital non-linear mode.
  • VM241 - Introduction to Studio Television Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces studio television practice. Students learn the principles of pre-production, production, and post-production for the studio as well as control room procedures. Students prepare their own multi-camera, live-on-tape studio productions.
  • VM241 - Introduction to Studio TV Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces studio television practice. Students learn the principles of pre-production, production, and post-production for the studio as well as control room procedures. Students prepare their own multi-camera, live-on-tape studio productions.
  • VM250 - Introduction to Sound Principles and Audio Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces audio physics, sound principles,and the theory and practice of audio recording and mixing. Emphasis is on concept development for sound production, signal routing and the mixer console, analog and digital audio recording, and editing techniques.
  • VM251 - Location Sound Recording (4 Credits)
    Intensive study in the theory and practice of field/location and studio audio recording for film, video, and television. Covers techniques in the use of field/studio recorders and mixers, microphones, boom poles, and shot blocking. Also covers tape-based and hard-disk digital recorders, and time-code synchronization management.
  • VM260 - Introduction to Interactive Media (4 Credits)
    Introduces the theory and practice of interactive media. Stresses the conceptual, aesthetic, and technical concerns of interactivity. Technologies covered are HTML, CSS, and Javascript. Additional topics include semantic web design and development, graphics and imaging, interface design, user experience, project management, and the mobile web. Emphasis is on making creative works.
  • VM261 - Computer Animation (4 Credits)
    The first course of a two-course sequence, introducing students to the fundamentals of three-dimensional modeling and animation, and preparing them for the second course, VM 363 Advanced Computer Animation. Students learn to model, texture objects, compose and light scenes, animate, and add dynamics, as well as render animations into movies and compositing audio, titles, and credits in post-production.
  • VM262 - Drawing (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic techniques in drawing, exploring the use of line and image in contemporary art. The language of drawing in contemporary art and architecture will inform the practice of drawing.
  • VM263 - Drawing For Time-Based Media (4 Credits)
    Imparts key drawing skills required in pre-visualization, concept art creation, set design, storyboarding, two-dimensional media production, and post-production. Develops students' abilities to think spatially, whether constructing a plan for a set or depicting a character in action. Also focuses on anatomy, locomotion, and communication possibilities of the human form.
  • VM265 - Introduction to Photography (4 Credits)
    Hybrid section of Introduction to Photography. This course introduces the fundamentals of black-and-white photography by combining darkroom techniques with the latest digital processes. Essential comparisons between the two methods will be explored by learning camera controls, film development to darkroom printing, digital capture to print workflow, and through hybrid techniques such as making digital negatives for darkroom use. Critiques of student work will develop ¨the critical eye.¨ Students must use cameras with adjustable speed and aperture.
  • VM265 - Introduction to Photography (4 Credits)
    Introduces the fundamentals of black-and-white photography by combining darkroom techniques with the latest digital processes. Essential comparisons between the two methods are explored by learning camera controls, film development to darkroom printing, digital capture to print workflow, and through the hybrid combination of these techniques. Critiques of student work develop an aesthetic and conceptual understanding of the creative process. Students must use cameras with manually adjustable speed and aperture.
  • VM270 - Introduction to Game Design (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to game creating that explores the fundamental elements of games, emphasizing non-digital methodologies and rapid prototyping in a hands-on environment. Students engage with and make games as entertainment and communication tools, developing an understanding of play and how to induce it in others.
  • VM300 - Top: Media Law & Entertainment (4 Credits)
    This course will examine all matters related to Media and Entertainment Law including, issues in the Music Business Industry, Intellectual Property, and Copyright and Trademark counseling and representation. It will also handle issues regarding Strategic planning and Marketing in a growing Social Media and Technology-related industry, controlling the use of an Artist's image including the Right to Privacy and Right of Publicity, Consultation on IP rights and clearances in the development of motion pictures, Corporate formations and planning as they pertain to the industry, and all general business contracts and matters related therein.
  • VM300 - Topics in Vis & Med Arts: Stud (4 Credits)
    Explores various aspects of media arts history, theory, and criticism. May be repeated for credit it topics differ.
  • VM301 - Post Colonial Cinema (4 Credits)
    An examination of the historical, socioeconomic, and ideological contexts of film production, distribution, and exhibition of post-colonial films that explore and challenge Hollywood and Western notions of identity, narrative, history, and oral traditions. Films viewed are from Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, the United Kingdom, and the United States.
  • VM303 - Studies in Digital Media and Culture (4 Credits)
    Examines the dramatic shift in meaning and processes of contemporary communication by investigating the social, artistic, economic, and political implications of using digital ways of working. Topics include the Internet and the web, cyberspace and censorship, games, digital film and video, multimedia and interactivity, virtual reality, person-machine interfaces, and globalization considerations.
  • VM304 - History of Documentary (4 Credits)
    Examines the history and theory of documentary media production, with attention to the economic, technological, ethical, and aesthetic concerns of documentarians.
  • VM305 - History of Experimental/Avant-garde (4 Credits)
    Examines the history and theory of experimental and avant-garde film, video, and other moving image practices and their connections to broader art and social movements. Through extensive reading and viewing, students investigate avant-garde and experimental cinema form, style, and content as well as historical and contemporary filmmakers' production methods and distribution networks in film communities and the art world.
  • VM308 - Cinema and Social Change (4 Credits)
    Throughout cinema's history, numerous filmmakers have sought to harness the power of the medium and to channel it in the service of political and social change. Have they made a difference and by what measure and what strategy: Surveying fiction and documentary, commercial and independent cinema, features and shorts, this course aims to offer a wide-ranging examination of the ways directors around the world have employed their art and their craft in the pursuit of fostering social justice.
  • VM315 - Top: Rediscovering Downtown Boston (4 Credits)
    The focus of the course is area of Boston's 19th-century commercial and cultural center -- now in Emerson College's backyard -- and depicted in a series of strip views. Following the footsteps of a cast of historic figures that include a prominent artist, an editor, an emigr‚ architect, an Irish politician, an actress, and an African-American abolitionist, we will animate these streetscapes with 19th century images, advertisements, and written accounts to show Boston as a dynamic center of culture and consumption. Final projects will include websites and walking tours that show what these men and women experienced in this section of the city, primarily with their eyes, but to the extent possible, with their other senses as well.
  • VM315 - Top: American Sixties (4 Credits)
    Studies a selected topic in art history. Emphasizes critical analyses of artworks with respect to their aesthetic, historical, sociocultural, philosophical and/or political contexts. Image lectures, museum and/or gallery visits, reading, class discussion, and project activities may be utilized to engage students in the material. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM315 - Top: Japanese Woodblocks (4 Credits)
    Studies a selected topic in art history. Emphasizes critical analyses of artworks with respect to their aesthetic, historical, sociocultural, philosophical and/or political contexts. Image lectures, museum and/or gallery visits, reading, class discussion, and project activities may be utilized to engage students in the material. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM315 - Top: Modern Chinese Art (4 Credits)
    Studies a selected topic in art history. Emphasizes critical analyses of artworks with respect to their aesthetic, historical, sociocultural, philosophical and/or political contexts. Image lectures, museum and/or gallery visits, reading, class discussion, and project activities may be utilized to engage students in the material. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM320 - Writing the Feature Film (4 Credits)
    Examines the fundamentals of writing for narrative feature-length film. Investigates structure, character, conflict, scene writing, and dialogue, taking students from ideation through to the development of a detailed outline. Students write the first 25-30 pages of a screenplay.
  • VM322 - Comedy Writing for Television (4 Credits)
    Examines writing television comedy with an emphasis on sitcoms. Areas of study also include sketch writing and writing for late-night TV. Students learn how to writie physical comedy, how to write for existing shows and characters, sitcom structure, format, and joke writing. Each student writes a script for an existing sitcom that will be workshopped.
  • VM323 - Writing Primetime Drama (4 Credits)
    Examines writing for primetime television drama, including study of the history of television drama and the difference between plot-driven dramas and character-driven dramas, writing effective protagonists and antagonists, and writing for existing dramas and characters. Students write a script for an existing primetime television drama that will be workshopped in class.
  • VM324 - Top: Writing Primetime Drama (4 Credits)
    Examines writing for primetime television drama, including study of the history of television drama and the difference between plot-driven dramas and character-driven dramas, writing effective protagonists and antagonists, and writing for existing dramas and characters. Students write a script for an existing primetime television drama that will be work shopped in class.
  • VM324 - Top: Thriller! Mystery! Suspen (4 Credits)
    From Fritz Lang's M to Strangers On A Train, to Se7en and Black Sawn, thriller, mystery and suspense movies continue fall among the most popular genres. This class will trace genre commonalities, studying theory, form and content as well as narrative strategies. In this course, we will move beneath the surface of writing technique to study and explore the underpinnings and the expectations of the thriller, mystery and suspense genres. Issues of pacing, timeline, antagonist and protagonist psychology and dramatic tension will be considered. Students will learn how to write with high stakes stories with maximum tension and to take your audience to their emotional and psychological edge. An original outline for a feature film, character bios and a minimum of thirty pages of the screenplay will be written.
  • VM324 - Topics in Screenplay Genres (4 Credits)
    This class will be taught from the Los Angeles Campus by Diane Lake and available to Boston via teleconferencing - 1/2 the students for the lcass will be in LA and 1/2 in Boston.
  • VM324 - Topics in Screenplay Genres (4 Credits)
    Studies a given genre from the perspective of the screenwriter. Working in a specific genre, students write a treatment, an original outline for a feature film, and up to the first half of a script in the specific genre. Honing critical skills, students engage in analytical and aesthetic discourse about their own work, as well as material written by others. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM325 - Writing the Adaptation (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the process of analyzing material from another medium (e.g., novels, plays, comic books) and translating into a screenplay. Students write one original first act of a public domain property, as well as one analytical paper.
  • VM329 - Topics in Television Writing (4 Credits)
    Examines how to write comedy for late night television, with a heavy emphasis on joke writing, monologue writing, sketch writing, current events and satire. In addition to working on individual assignments, students with also learn how to write effectively as a team. The final project will require students to collectively create and write an innovative show designed for late night television.
  • VM329 - Topics in Television Writing (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in varying areas of television writing. Topics may include webisodes, reality television, and comedy writing for late night. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM331 - Top: Behind the Screen (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to the elements of running a successful art house cinema. This course will offer a combination of lectures, opportunities to shadow various cinema agents (working in projection, programming, print traffic and promotion) and article readings on the current and constantly changing field of cinema exhibition. Students will be spending one night per week working in the cinema and experiencing the challenges and rewards of creating a communal movie viewing environment. Course work includes weekly journals including reading responses, a short research paper and will culminate in a project proposed by the student according to their area of interest. Experiential hours will be scheduled on Tuesday's and/or Thursday's form 6:00-10:00 pm. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor required, e-mail anna_feder@emerson.edu.
  • VM331 - Top: Production Design (4 Credits)
    This course introduces students to the work of the production designer, the creative individual responsible for the overall "look" of a production. Topics include: developing and implementing the design concept; developing strategies for working on location and in a studio or sound-stage; and creating or obtaining sets, props and other design elements.
  • VM331 - Top: Video Shorts Competition (4 Credits)
    This is an intense workshop in producing video shorts of 30-60 seconds. Students will learn to produce compelling stories in very short form - stories that connect emotionally with their audience and cover topics of contemporary importance: the environment, alternative energy, sustainability. Students will research what makes the short format work, how and why some videos succeed and others don't, and will come up with a social marketing plan. Working in small teams, students will compete for a $25,000 scholarship that comes from NRG eVgo, a corporation partnering with Emerson to explore how to best communicate to a new, green-oriented audience: early adopters of electric vehicles, millennials -- young people brought up on YouTube and GoPro videos. The competition deadline is December 1, 2015.
  • VM331 - Topics in Vis & Med: Practice (4 Credits)
    Explores various aspects of media arts practice. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM332 - Production Management (4 Credits)
    Introduces the budgeting and logistical organization of film and television productions, reviewing the roles of Associate Producer, Production Unit Manager, First Assistant, Second Assistant Location Manager, and other members of the producer's and director's teams.
  • VM335 - Alternative Production Techniques (4 Credits)
    Intermediate-level 16mm production workshop in the use of unorthodox, non-computer driven methods and processes for developing and producing motion pictures. Provides an overview of historical methods of formal exploration of the basic materials of film as a projection medium, including camera-less filmmaking, direct animation, and loop projections, as well as alternative mechanical processes such as xerography, hand-process, and alternative-camera tools and techniques. Primary emphasis is on creative invention and exploration.
  • VM337 - The Emerson Channel (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM337 - The Emerson Channel (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
  • VM340 - SPEC (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM340 - SPEC (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
  • VM341 - Emerson Records (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM341 - Emerson Records (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
  • VM342 - Frames Per Second (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM342 - Frames Per Second (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
  • VM343 - WERS (FM)/WECB (AM) (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM343 - WERS (FM)/WECB (AM) (0 Credit)
    Specified assignments in the College radio stations. The instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
  • VM344 - National Broadcasting Society/AERho (0 Credit)
    National organization bridging the gap between student and professional, supporting student work in all areas of television, radio, and film. AERho is the Honors Level of NBS, available to seniors with a high grade point average. Instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
  • VM344 - National Broadcasting Society/AERho (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM345 - Film Arts Society (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM345 - Film Arts Society (0 Credit)
    Student publication Latent Image and the cinema-the-que Films from the Margin. The instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
  • VM346 - Women in Motion (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM346 - Women in Motion (0 Credit)
    Student-operated film production group with an emphasis on activities and creative work related to women. The instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
  • VM347 - Emerson Independent Video (0 Credit)
    Modeled on a professional television station, students learn all aspects of television production ranging from concept development to post-production. Instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
  • VM347 - Emerson Independent Video (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM348 - EVVYs (0 Credit)
    Preparation and staging of Emerson's annual awards show in conjunction with other end-of-year events and presentations. Instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
  • VM348 - EVVYs (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM349 - Developed Images (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM349 - Developed Images (0 Credit)
    Student-organized and -produced photography magazine. Work is submitted, reviewed, and selected by students for annual publication. Instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
  • VM350 - Sound Design (4 Credits)
    Introduces the art of inventing sounds and composing soundtracks for visual media such as film, video, computer animation, and websites. Focus is on audio post-production and the roles of the supervising sound editor and the sound designer. Post-production techniques include sound recording, sound editing, and sound mixing in stereo and surround sound.
  • VM352 - Studio Recording (4 Credits)
    Explores the principal tools of the professional audio production studio and how they can be used for creative productions. Includes instruction in multi-track recording and sound processing equipment.
  • VM360 - Film Animation (4 Credits)
    Introduces film animation in which short animated exercises and individual sequences are located within a survey of animation as an art form and commercial product. Students employ a range of media, exploring and developing ideas and skills in producing 16mm animated sequences, culminating in a final project.
  • VM362 - Motion Graphics (4 Credits)
    Covers the practice and art of motion graphics and visual effects, including the design process, artistic concepts, and technologies. Production techniques range from title sequences for film, to compositing of real and virtual worlds and a myriad of digital time-based art forms. Students make a series of projects using post-production and compositing software.
  • VM363 - Advanced Computer Animation (4 Credits)
    The second course in the two-course computer animation sequence, introducing students to advanced three-dimensional modeling and animation techniques and preparing them for independent computer animation production work. Continues to develop skills acquired in computer animation, including modeling, texturing objects, composing and lighting scenes, animating, dynamics, rendering, and post-production compositing.
  • VM364 - 3D Computer Gaming (4 Credits)
    Provides students with the fundamentals of game design and theory. Students learn to create and import assets, develop objectives, script behaviors and action, and build game levels. Students complete the course with an original portfolio-ready single player game.
  • VM365 - Darkroom Photography (4 Credits)
    An intermediate-level course in black-and-white photography designed to explore a variety of "ways of seeing" as well as demonstrate techniques that further enhance the photographic image. Assignments build on one another (tone, time, frame, point of view, scale, and sequence). Critical viewing and seeing as well as guest artists and gallery visits are encouraged as students begin to form their personal photographic vision.
  • VM366 - Digital Photography (4 Credits)
    A hands-on production class created especially for the photography student who is interested in the digital darkroom. It is designed to give students a basic introduction to the elements of digital capture, manipulation, and output. The course addresses the digital tools within the context of the aesthetics of photography. Photoshop is used as another photographic tool.
  • VM370 - Business Concepts for Modern Media (4 Credits)
    Focuses on strategic thinking, planning, organization, and implementation of media projects from conception (pre-production) through release/distribution/exhibition (theatrical, non-theatrical, digital, web). Includes acquiring fundamental skills and a working knowledge of business math, business plans, intellectual property and copyright basics, grant writing and resources, and current trends in advertising, marketing, and press package materials.
  • VM371 - Alternative Media Production: Out of the Box (4 Credits)
    Fosters an exploratory approach to making media projects by providing unorthodox conceptual frameworks in which students conceive and execute short projects using both conventional and unconventional acquisition devices in a variety of media. Students work individually or collaboratively throughout the course to develop ideas and acquire material for assignments.
  • VM372 - Directing Image and Sound (4 Credits)
    Department Permissin Required
  • VM372 - Directing Image and Sound (4 Credits)
    Examines a director's preparation in detail, with particular emphasis on forming creative approaches to the script, as well as image and sound design. Production and postproduction strategies are also addressed.
  • VM373 - Directing Actors for the Screen (4 Credits)
    Develops skills in directing actors in dramatic performances for the screen. Students are taken step by step through the directing process with a particular emphasis on research and visualization, as they learn how to plan and direct narrative sequences. Classes will be offered in conjunction with Acting for the Camera classes in Performing Arts.
  • VM375 - Advanced Interactive Media (4 Credits)
    Continues to explore interactive media, including consideration of conceptual, aesthetic, and technical concerns. Technologies covered include interactive web elements, databases, mobile development, and an introduction to programming. Emphasis is on making creative works.
  • VM376 - Editing for Film and Video (4 Credits)
    Furthers understanding of and ability to work with medium- to long-format post-production processes through editing assignments in film and video, along with critical examination of completed motion pictures.
  • VM377 - Documentary Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Develops skills necessary to produce documentary productions in video or film. Covers production processes from story development through all the production phases. Practical considerations of production are balanced with theoretical debates on the legal and ethical responsibilities of those who document others.
  • VM378 - Basic Cinematography and Videography (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic elements of the aesthetics, technology, and craft of cinematography and videography. Students gain a working knowledge of 16mm and digital video cameras, as well as basic lighting design and equipment, with an emphasis on crew relations and organization. Includes a comprehensive exploration of the work of significant cinematographers.
  • VM378 - Basic Cinematography and Videography (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic elements of the aesthetics, technology, and craft of cinematography and videography. Students gain a working knowledge of 16mm and digital video cameras, as well as basic lighting design and equipment, with an emphasis on crew relations and organization. Includes a comprehensive exploration of the work of significant cinematographers.
  • VM380 - Media Copyright and Content (4 Credits)
    Copyright is the legal foundation that gives value and property rights to any creative work. This includes music as well as books, films, television shows, choreographed work, architectural designs, plays, paintings, maps, photographs, video games, and computer software. Students look at the history, development, and purpose of copyright and other intellectual property law. They also explore the purpose and value of fair use and of the public domain, and alternative views of copyright such as the "Creative Commons."
  • VM400 - Top: Film on the Margin (4 Credits)
    Over the past few years, a number of online platforms have emerged for the digital distribution and theatrical exhibition of independent films. Some of these are crowdsourcing sites-like Gathr, Tugg and Open Indie-for what is being called theatrical-on-demand viewing. Other sites, like NoBudge and Simple Machine are curation platforms for digitally archiving, promoting and distributing (primarily for non-theatrical viewing) independent films, most of which are never screened for public audiences after they play at festivals. These and many other platforms, like Indies Lab, Distribber, Vyer, Fandor and others represent a growing and potentially thriving network of alternative outlets for the digital exhibition, distribution and curation of independent film. This course includes an examination of such platforms/networks and the filmmakers who have exploited them in recent years to create what independent film producer Ted Hope calls a "truly free film culture." An examination of American independent film history, including the evolution of the label-from "independent," to "indie" to "indiewood"-provides crucial context for understanding the current crisis in film distribution and why such platforms have arisen in the first place.
  • VM400 - Top: Understanding the Whedonesque (4 Credits)
    This course will use the career of Joss Whedon to introduce students to the variety of positions in the entertainment industry and their potential for fulfilling and creative work. Whedon's career spans the many production lines in the American Dream Factory: TV series staff writer, script doctor, film screenwriter, TV creator in a wide variety of genres, Internet series creator, comic book writer and creator, niche genre film director, and blockbuster filmmaker. By examining his work at various stages, students will better understand auteur theory, modern industrial entertainment production, and artistic production across media. Works covered include: Roseanne, Alien: Resurrection, Buffy the Vampire Slayer as a film and TV series, Angel, Firefly and Serenity, Dollhouse, The Cabin in the Woods, The Avengers, Much Ado About Nothing, Buffy: Season Eight, and Astonishing XđMen.
  • VM400 - Topics in Visual and Med Arts (4 Credits)
    Explores various aspects of visual and media arts history, theory, and criticism. Course may be repeated for credit if topics vary.
  • VM402 - Sem: Global Television (4 Credits)
    Although we like to call it American TV, television is global. We need rethink the dominance of American TV in an international context. For example The Voice, American Idol and Big Brother are not American programs. They are Americanized versions of international formats. National and regional distinctions exist but television companies must have an international focus in order too survive. The first objective of this course is that the students become global citizens by exploring what globalization means. The second objective is to acquaint students with television across the world and how it inter works. Third we will come to understand how systematically different national networks such as China's CCTV, Britain's BBC, and US's ABC are. And last analytical tools will be introduced to help students to think about the media and their social and economic contexts on a conceptually complex level. Finally, the course aims to help students think and write logically and clearly about the media.
  • VM402 - Sem: The Hollywood Renaissance (4 Credits)
    Amid the death of the sunny idealism of the 1960s counterculture and the decline of the studio system, a new age of Hollywood filmmakers led an awakening of cinema culture. These artists assaulted, revised and reexamined the genres that formed the bedrock of Hollywood's economic and aesthetic success. This course will explore this "Hollywood Renaissance" through the works of filmmakers like Arthur Penn, Robert Altman, Martin Scorsese and many others, and how the radical ideas of this era became mainstreamed into American life and culture.
  • VM402 - Sem: (4 Credits)
    Explores the complex history of sexually oriented moving images in the United States from Thomas Edison's "The Kiss" to contemporary mobile media culture in forms ranging from simple loops and cheesecake films, to Hollywood narratives, to educational films, to sexploitation and pornography. Among the issues we will address are how sexuality and gender have been represented on screen, the ways in which sexuality and "power" have been historically intertwined, how sexual minorities have been portrayed, how censorship, self-regulation and politics have influenced image making, the ways in which content has created controversy and, conversely, how controversy has changed content. With a special focus on the "sexual revolution" of the 1960s and '70s, this seminar will invite students to engage with a wide range of historical, social, political and ethical issues surrounding moving images that have had a direct impact on the lives of Americans for over a century.
  • VM402 - Sem: (4 Credits)
    Focuses upon ethical issues in media such as privacy, exploitation, deception, security, pornography, and issues of cultural diversity such as discrimination, racism, gender bias, homophobia, and myth-representation. As a media seminar the course includes much discussion, debate, screening, and case studies. While philosophical classical ethics forms a back-bone, emphasis is upon more contemporary applied ethical issues in all primary media including film, television, Internet, audio, and photography and in several career areas including production, entertainment, journalism, advertising, and documentary.
  • VM402 - Sem: Gangster Films (4 Credits)
    From "The Musketeers of Pig Alley" (1912), to the classic Warner Bros. movies of the 1930s, to The Sopranos and recent releases such as Gangster Squad (2013), the gangster film has been one of the American entertainment industry's most enduring genres. This course will track the development of the gangster film in the United States from its inception in the 1910s to the present. In addition to exploring a variety of classic and lesser-known films and television shows, we will examine how the genre has contributed to the discourse on a variety of issues including crime and punishment, race and ethnicity, the changing urban landscape, immigration policy, and representations of the "American Dream." All students will engage in an in-depth research project.
  • VM402 - Sem: (4 Credits)
    From the late 1910s until the coming of sound in the late 1920s, the Hollywood film industry reached unprecedented commercial and artistic success. SILENT HOLLYWOOD chronicles the development of the industry during x this crucial ten-year period and examines the careers of many of its key filmmakers
  • VM402 - Sem: Cinephilia & the Auteurs (4 Credits)
    In his review of Bitter Victory (1958), Jean-Luc Godard declared: "the cinema is Nicholas Ray." In his study The American Cinema: Directors and Directions 1929-1968, Andrew Sarris placed Ray beneath the "Pantheon Directors" in a lovely named but secondary grouping he called "The Far Side of Paradise." This course will dive into just such nuances from this fascinating period of film criticism and cinephilia (the 1950s and 1960s). By examining the French response (Bazin and Cahiers) to the American cinema (mainly of the 1940s and 1950s), and by looking at films by directors like Ray and Howard Hawks, we will explore the French influence on American and British critics.
  • VM402 - Sem: Sound as Fine Art (4 Credits)
    Surveys the world of auditory art from the oral tradition to contemporary art works of sound and noise/music composition. The course examines the influences of culture, society, and the arts and sciences on the movements and conceptual constructs existing within the culture of sound art. The seminar's focus is on Post World War I, Twentieth & Twenty-First Century experiments and explorations into sound, noise and radio; the avant-garde in sound & experimental music; aleatory forms of composition & performance; computer generative works; visual elements in sound performance; installation art; and the aesthetics of silence.
  • VM402 - Sem: (4 Credits)
    The Western genre was once a staple of the American motion picture industry and the most popular programming in the first two decades of American television. The Western has all but disappeared as a predominant story type, but the impact of the genre's representation of American westward expansion, American masculinity, and race and gender continue to be felt in public discourse and in public life. This course will investigate the history of the Western in film and television, its conventional formulation, and various innovative instances of the genre. Conducted as a seminar, discussion and student presentations of material will be the format for the class.
  • VM402 - Sem: "D" is for Desire: Video Art and Theory (4 Credits)
    The objective of this course is to survey the politics and aesthetics of the moving image in order to gain a better understanding of contemporary art strategies and methods. In this course students will have the opportunity to analyze influential art videos, films and theory, in order to learn new ways of seeing and enhancing their visual literacy. Students will also have the opportunity to work on short video projects to define and express their own desired aesthetic.
  • VM402 - Sem: (4 Credits)
    This course will survey queer film and video from social-historical, aesthetic, and theoretical perspectives. Subjects include: Weimar German films (among the first lesbian and gay films); classical Hollywood and queer fandom, authorship, and stereotyping; subcultural coding and camp sensibility; the 1960s Underground cinema movement; network television and Hollywood films of the 1960s and 1970s; lesbian and gay liberation cinema of the 1970s; the AIDS activist video movement and the New Queer Cinema and Video movement of the 1980s and 1990s; LGBTQ representations on television in the 1990s and 2000s; and transgender films and television programs of the 2000s.
  • VM402 - Sem: (4 Credits)
    This seminar focuses on the historical, cultural, and critical analysis of animated films and Directors. The seminar will study five films produced or co-produced on the West Coast: Walt Disney's Fantasia; United Production America's Gerald McBoing Boing; Tim Burton and Henry Selick's, Nightmare Before Christmas; Pixar's Toy Story; and Hayao Miyasaki's Spirited Away. A participation-intensive, research-intensive and writing-intensive seminar to identify, study, and critically analyze the historical and cultural threads that weave the fabric of these five cinematic cartoons, the animated mode as an experimental art form, the animation industry, and the Directors who gave rise to their genesis. The seminar will also take a tertiary look at the influences of higher educational institutions that fostered a culture of innovation for the Directors being researched, discussed and critically analyzed.
  • VM402 - Sem: Animation Histories: Jules Engel and Experimental Animation (4 Credits)
    Through lectures, screenings, research and critical writing, we will study the European roots of experimentation in animation history leading to Walt Disney's Fantasia. Jules Engel (1909-2003), an historical linch-pin inside early animation industry in America, substantially changed the lens for understanding a cinematic history in animation, the role of higher education in fostering critical art histories, and the development of a singular mode of cinematic art in America, experimental animation. This is a research-intensive, critical writing-intensive and critical thinking-intensive seminar in animation history that culminates in the development.
  • VM402 - Sem: (4 Credits)
    explores the life, work, and legend of Alfred Hitchcock whose films remain as popular as ever with critics, film historians, and the public. We will approach his career in four phases: as a director in the beleaguered British film industry in the 1920s and '30s, as a contract director in Hollywood in the 1940s, as an independent producer/director from the late 1940s into the 1970s, and as a force in a wide range of media from the 1950s until his death in 1980. Hitchcock's ability to negotiate different modes of production while "branding" and marketing himself in the changing entertainment landscape will be assessed. His films will be considered from a formal standpoint, with emphasis on how suspense is created through cinematography, editing, and sound; they will be examined through various theories that have been brought to bear on the work. Question of authorship and biography will be explored as will Hitchcock's continuing legacy as the "Master of Suspense".
  • VM409 - Sem: Revolution to Renaissance: African-American Art (4 Credits)
    This course surveys African-American visual artists from the American Revolution to the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, examining slave crafts, the influence of the slave system on early African-American portrait painters, the blossoming of African-American art with Abolitionist patronage, and the response to pervasive racial discrimination following Emancipation.
  • VM409 - Sem: New Media: From Postwar New Technology to Digital Media (4 Credits)
    This course will survey the development of new media art surveying the historical new technology art work in the early twentieth century, then focusing on the post-World War II period through to contemporary multimedia and digital visual art. This course will be divided into two parts. During the first half we will learn about historical new media art from the early twentieth century through the post-World War II period, the so-called Art & Technology movement. Then, the second half will be an extended research project on contemporary new media and digital art.
  • VM409 - Sem: New Media: From Postwar New Technology to Digital Media (4 Credits)
    Provides a study in a selected area of art and art history with emphasis on the development of analytical and theoretical approaches to the understanding of works of art. Presentation of independent research and participation in the evaluation of the research work of seminar members is expected. Fulfills the Aesthetics perspective of the General Education requirements. Course may be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM410 - Sem: (4 Credits)
    An exploration of modern and contemporary Latin American Art in its political, social and cultural contexts. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Reality, Politics and Culture: The Mexican Muralists; 2) The Fantastic and Beyond; 3) Archetypes: Icons, Images and Symbols in Latin American Art; and 4) Contemporary Visions and Border Crossers. Our study centers on the work of important artists who represent identity, culture, and politics as the complex and multifaceted expression of the experience of living within and between nations and cultures in an age of globalization. Through lectures, videos, slide presentations, artist talks, discussions, student research presentations and workshops, we will explore the common themes, disparate perspectives and changing visions of artists from the "other" Americas.
  • VM412 - American Film Comedy (4 Credits)
    A historical approach to the development of American film comedy explores theories of comedy and their value to the critical interpretation of comic films. Also considers the varying ways spectators are addressed, and the impact of performers and directors on various comedy styles.
  • VM418 - Transnational Asian Cinemas (4 Credits)
    Asian "national" cinemas are examined and problematized in the contexts of media and economic globalization, including: the politics of transnational film practices; issues surrounding filmic representation and diasporic identities; the construction and negotiation of national, gender, and genre differences; local-regional-global dynamics; and questions of the postcolonial in Asian contexts.
  • VM420 - Top: Writing the Film Musical (4 Credits)
    The course will allow students to study the screenplays of a variety of film musicals from the beginning of the genre to the present. In addition to focusing on the writing of the musical film, the manner in which song assists in telling the story will be of particular interest. Working in teams of two, students from Emerson will complete an outline and first act of an original screenplay, and music students from Berklee will compose the songs that will help tell that story. The semester will culminate in a staged reading, with music, performed by students from both Berklee and Emerson. Prequesites: Junior standng and permission of the instructor. Students must email Diane_lake@emerson.edu a PDF version of a writing sample - play, screenplay or teleplay up to 15 pages in length for consideration. Students from every department, who are interested in writing, are invited to apply.
  • VM420 - Top: Studios and Independents: Navigation the Motion Picture Industry (4 Credits)
    This course provides an in-depth examination of the mechanics of the contemporary motion picture industry and is ideally suited for seniors prior to graduation or prior to attending the LA program. Topics covered include exploring the organizational structures and hierarchies of studios and production companies, examining how executive and staff positions function and what projects are acquired, developed and distributed; understanding customary industry terminology and references; how to work with talent and literary agencies, management companies and entertainment attorneys; and examining the role of guilds for above-the-line talent. The course will also explore how opportunities within the industry are expanding and changing --particularly in the form of theatrical film--and will help to prepare students for the landscape which is continually evolving.
  • VM420 - Top: Brand Films: Video Production for the Web and Broadcasting (4 Credits)
    This course will provide students a hands-on opportunity to understand and participate in new forms of commercial storytelling that are emerging in the digital media world. You'll learn the business dynamics and requirements that are essential to profitability and how marketing, creative, production and post-production work collaboratively to bring great work to life. We'll examine the work created by today's leading digital media producers and we'll put what we discover to use as you work collaboratively to create and produce branded narratives of your own. Cross-listed with MK371-01.
  • VM420 - Topics in Media Arts: Practice (4 Credits)
    Explores various aspects of media arts practice. Course may be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM423 - Writing Television Pilots (4 Credits)
    Examines how to create a television series, including developing an original premise, and writing convincing, multi-dimensional characters, and intriguing, character-specific dialogue. Students write an entire television pilot script to be workshopped in class, along with a pilot package that includes a logline, series synopsis and a 13-week episode guide with character and story arcs.
  • VM428 - Feature Writing Workshop (4 Credits)
    Working from detailed outlines developed in VM 320 Writing the Feature Film, students complete a first draft of a feature-length screenplay. Students read each other's work, write a critical analysis of each segment, and engage in discussion of aesthetics, craft, and form.
  • VM429 - Comedy Writer's Room (4 Credits)
    Emulates a Hollywood comedy writing room. Students collectively create and write an original pilot script for a TV comedy. Students write character sketches, a comprehensive story outline, the first draft of the script and all subsequent drafts, and participate in an extensive punch-up. Participants gain a keen understanding of how a Hollywood comedy writers' room works, how to write under deadline, how to pitch jokes, and how to write comedy as a team.
  • VM440 - Advanced Studio Production: Fiction (4 Credits)
    Provides the opportunity for specialized work in fiction television genres that include a studio component, such as drama series, soap operas, and situation comedies. Students create projects and produce, direct, light, and crew them.
  • VM441 - Advanced Studio Production: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Provides the opportunity for specialized work in nonfiction multi-camera television genres, including talk shows, live performance, and public affairs programming. Emphasis is on designing, producing, directing, lighting, and studio crewing.
  • VM450 - Advanced Sound Design (4 Credits)
    Advanced studies in audio post-production, with emphasis on expanding students' conceptual framework and refining creative audio post-production skills in surround sound mixing and applications in film, video, and digital media.
  • VM465 - Documentary Photography (4 Credits)
    Provides the foundation for an intense photographic investigation of an issue-cultural, political, ideological, or personal. Develops greater competence in negative making and black-and-white printing, with emphasis on strongly informative images. Assignments require the student to discover narrative possibilities while creating strong individual images. The course's technical components are supplemented by considerations of the history of documentary photography.
  • VM470 - Advanced New Media Projects (4 Credits)
    Provides an opportunity for senior VMA students working in computer animation, interactive media, motion graphics, digital photography, networked performance, audio, or other forms of new media to create advanced portfolio work. Projects, both collaborative and individual, are developed in the context of peer-based critique and analysis. The focus is on using new technologies for creative self-expression. Students complete the course with an original portfolio-ready project. May be repeated once for credit if projects differ.
  • VM471 - Topics in Documentary:Practice (4 Credits)
    Advanced documentary production workshops in varying areas of professional practice. Topics may include personal documentary, filmmaking and the environment, or social and community action; there may be future offerings proposed under this designation (subject to review of the curriculum committee)- for example, a course in Developing Cross-Platform Documentary. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM475 - Creative Producing for Film (4 Credits)
    Explores the ways in which a creative producer engages with a project from conception through completion with a focus on the development process. It will discuss original ideas, source material (books, stories), pitching, creating log lines, script coverage, the notes process and assembling the creative team. It will cover customary business affairs including chain-of-title, copyright, talent and option agreements. Key issues in finance, marketing and distribution will also be examined.
  • VM476 - Editing for Advanced Film and Video (4 Credits)
    This advanced-level 16mm film and video post-production workshop is designed to assist in the editing and completion of students' advanced-level projects. Technical procedures as well as aesthetic and conceptual issues endemic to post-production of motion picture projects are examined with an eye to their practical application to students' work on their projects.
  • VM478 - Advanced Cinematography and Videography (4 Credits)
    Offers advanced-level exploration of aesthetics, technology, and craft of cinematography and videography. Students gain a working knowledge of the advanced level of cameras in the department and are expected to develop complex lighting and shot designs. Emphasis is on aesthetic use of the technical elements of motion picture acquisition. Includes significant collaboration with other courses in the curriculum including BFA and BA Production Workshop.
  • VM490 - BFA Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Note: Registration for this course requires completion of one specialization-level production course and approval by the faculty BFA committee based on application.
  • VM490 - BFA Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Provides the means for students to produce portfolio work. BFA students are required to take two consecutive semesters of the workshop, 4 credits per semester. Work may be produced in teams, partnerships, or individually. Projects must be proposed in the semester preceding the semester in which the work is to be produced (see section on BFA requirements above). Students may also apply to serve as non-BFA participants for a single semester and for 4 credits only, serving as crew members or staff on another student's project. Prerequisites: Completion of one specialization-level production course, and approval by the faculty BFA committee based on application.
  • VM491 - BA Capstone Project (4 Credits)
    Students are admitted by application to produce portfolio work as a Capstone Project. Applications must include a detailed description of the proposal for consideration by a faculty panel. The proposal can be for either a creative project based in any area of the program, including film, TV, animation, sound design, or digital art and games; or a significant research project in media studies. Provides an opportunity to produce a significant piece of creative or scholarly work.
  • VM492 - Photo Practicum (4 Credits)
    Designed to integrate, enrich, and solidify a student's photographic skills building on past productions. Emphasis is placed on developing a portfolio representative of a personal vision.
  • VM600 - Business of Modern Media (4 Credits)
    Focuses on strategic thinking and implementation of media projects from conception (pre-production) through release/distribution/exhibition. Material covered includes business plans; grant resources, writing, and package preparation; acquiring rights associated with production; preparing for feature production (optioning literary property, pitching ideas, offerings, prospectus); legal issues (rights, copyright, and intellectual property); insurance considerations; advertising; and marketing. Students are required to conduct database web research on the industry and festivals in addition to following current trends in global markets, financing, advertising, and marketing.
  • VM604 - Topics in Media Production (4 Credits)
    Examines the development of image-and-sound-based installation art from the late 20th century through the contemporary period. Multimedia installation-expressed in site-specific public works, artist films, single and multichannel video, sculpture and performance, and new media and interactive forms-has become a vital art form in the 21st century. You will have an opportunity to produce multi-media installed works of your own design and will be introduced to the unique properties and parameters of the form. The culmination of the course will be a collaborative multi-site presentation of the work created in the class, staged as a 21st-century "Happening." No prerequisites
  • VM604 - Top: Fundametnals of Fiction Film Directing (4 Credits)
    This class provides an overview of the role of the fiction film director from script development through post-production. It will examine each phase of the director's process with emphasis on the methodologies necessary to realize the dramatic possibilities of a cinematic story. Students will create several short exercises and analyze the works of master directors.
  • VM604 - Topics in Media Production (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in the area of media studies and production.
  • VM605 - Graduate Writing Short Subject (4 Credits)
    Introduces the three genres of short form--nonfiction, experimental, and fiction. Students learn the differences and components of each genre and acquire an understanding of the art, craft, and discipline of each process from a writer's point of view. Emphasis is on developing the writer-s individual personal vision.
  • VM610 - Media Pedagogy (4 Credits)
    Explores approaches to teaching and learning in college level media production courses. Reviews key components of academia and an academic career: types of institutions, rank, tenure, teaching, service, scholarship, professional organizations, and compensation. Students analyze and design media production courses and investigate components of effective lecture, discussion, demonstration, and critique sessions as well as investigate ethical issues related to teaching. Each student leads a class session and produces a statement of his/her teaching philosophy.
  • VM611 - Principles of Sound Production (4 Credits)
    An introductory course in audio physics, sound principles, and the theory and practice of audio recording and mixing. Emphasis is also placed on concept development within sound production concurrent to the study of signal routing and the mixer console, analog and digital audio recording and editing techniques.
  • VM612 - Graduate Sound Design (4 Credits)
    An introductory course on the art of the sound designer and the processes and theories applied to composing and editing sound tracks for visual media such as film, video, computer animation, and websites. Areas of focus are in audio postproduction techniques and in the roles of the supervising sound editor and the sound designer. Postproduction techniques include dialog correction and automated dialog replacement (ADR), Foley session recording, sound effects acquisition and editing, and the mixing and localization theories and practices for stereo and surround-sound. The theoretical focus of the course is on the voice in film and visual media, as speech, as song, and everything that remains afterward with an ongoing theoretic investigation into the relationship between sound and image.
  • VM613 - Foundations of Image and Sound Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces the aesthetics and practice of image and sound production. Topics include visual composition, preproduction skills, lighting, basic directing, camera operation, lens theory, and editing. Students create projects using digital still photography and video.
  • VM618 - Interactive Media (4 Credits)
    Provides an introduction to the theory and practice of interactive media production. Stresses the conceptual, aesthetic, and technical concerns of interactive digital media, emphasizing creativity and familiarity with the material. Areas include introductions to web-based interaction, user input, animation, design and development, as well as project management, interface design, and user experience. Students produce creative works based on instruction in the technical aspects of the material.
  • VM621 - Documentary Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Introduces the practice of documentary video production. Emphasizes documentary strategies, research, budgeting, production, and postproduction. Students produce a documentary short.
  • VM623 - Advanced Documentary Production (4 Credits)
    Affords student documentarians the opportunity to examine in depth a broad array of "voices" or approaches to the documentary while developing their own voice through the production of a 20-25 minute project. In addition to the training on documentary production, students have the opportunity to develop substantive research and fundraising skills and deepen their understanding of the historical, social, and aesthetic framework within which documentary work is created.
  • VM624 - Graduate Directing Actors for the Screen (4 Credits)
    This is a workshop-style class that focuses on the director-actor interaction. John Cassavetes said that acting is the essential discipline for moviemakers, and in this intensive course, students learn the language of acting and the techniques of directing actors in dramatic productions.
  • VM625 - Computer Animation 1 (4 Credits)
    This is the first course in the two-course computer animation sequence, introducing students to the fundamentals of three-dimensional modeling and animation and preparing them for the second course, Computer Animation II. Students learn to develop concepts, produce storyboards, model, texture objects, compose and light scenes, animate, and add dynamics. Finally, they learn to render their animations into movies and to composite movies, audio, titles, and credits in postproduction. In addition to these production skills, students develop their conceptual understanding as well as their critical and creative thinking about the practice of computer animation.
  • VM628 - Experimental Media Production (4 Credits)
    This is a project-based course for students who are interested in experimental analog and digital media. Along with project assignments open to a wide range of processes in various media, students examine ways that audiovisual media can be used to question mainstream genres, either through the invention of new forms or by subverting and hybridizing those forms. Students also look at how alternative venues and audiences shift the meaning and orientation of production. Technical topics include innovative uses of film, video, audio, and software, for example, direct animation or contact recording. Other topics include: the medium as metaphor, alternative representations of politicized subject matters, ordering systems other than the narrative, non-camera-based visual production, installation art and media as object, media's use of performance and anti-performance, image appropriation, the macro and the miniature within the frame, the long take, repetition and feedback loops, and other generative strategies for media makers.
  • VM631 - Graduate Cinematography (4 Credits)
    Introduces the art of cinematography on both an aesthetic and technical level. Students learn how to shoot on both film and digital formats. They also learn fundamental lighting skills using an array of professional lighting units. Emphasizes the learning of creative techniques for visualizing narrative scripts and exploring the emotional subtext of the cinematic image.
  • VM632 - Advanced Editing (4 Credits)
    Provides a framework for advanced digital editing skills like large-scale media management, off-beat and innovative cutting techniques, emerging individual editing styles, and cutting long-form projects.
  • VM640 - MFA Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    MFA students only.
  • VM640 - MFA Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    This is an intensive workshop for second-year MFA students to concentrate on the main body of their artistic output. Students present their own work and critique the work of others, as well as work on their current projects. Centered on the self-directed production schedule and the collaborative nature of critique in an MFA program, this course prepares students to become lifelong artists. Course to be repeated three times during matriculation.
  • VM651 - Studies in Narrative and Media History (4 Credits)
    Offers a historical survey of media art from the perspective of narrative studies. Exposes students to a wide array of narrative structures historically evident in media art, including conventional and unconventional fictional narrative forms, as well as varying types of narrative evident in documentary and experimental media works. In addition, students are introduced to the role of visual images in media narratives, as well as the impact of digital technologies on narrative forms. Students are expected to develop an understanding of the role of narrative structure in effecting emotion and in communicating ideas.
  • VM652 - Theories of Integrated Media (4 Credits)
    MFA students only.
  • VM652 - Theories of Integrated Media (4 Credits)
    Media are no longer discreet forms of expression. Digital technology has created an integrated environment where even analog media are most often produced and/or viewed in a digital context or with digital tools. This course is an intensive introduction to theories of producing and consuming film, video, photography, and sound, both in isolation and couched within digital technologies. Students are given a background in traditional approaches to media criticism and encouraged to question how the new digital context has altered those approaches and changed the conditions under which the creative expression and consumption of media takes place.
  • VM655 - Top: Visual Ethnograph (4 Credits)
    The aims of this course are three-fold: to introduce students to the anthropology of visual communications through photography, films, documentation of performance, and texts; to help them evaluate how sites of exhibition (museums, theaters, television, cinema and the web) are also sites of cultural and social reproduction; and to help them incorporate ethnographic methodology, specifically participant observation and field writing into their artistic practice. To do this we will spend the first half of the semester analyzing ethnography in visual productions and scholarship and the second half conducting our own research projects.
  • VM655 - Topics in Media Studies (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in the area of Media Studies.