Department of Performing Arts

Courses


Filter the courses by subject area

  • DA203 - Perspectives in World Dance (4 Credits)
    Focuses on learning to "see" and "hear" the form and music of the art of dance across world cultures. Students focus on specific dance ethnographies to understand cultural difference through a study of dance and human movement and to explore contemporary anthropological concerns about representation, globalization, history, and identity. Throughout their study, students focus on various theoretical models in anthropology for studying dance/performance. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective and the General Education Global Diversity requirements.
  • DA231 - Dance Composition I: Improvisation (4 Credits)
    Guides students in the discovery, development, and exploration of their own movement and imagery. The stimuli for dances include personal experiences, abstract ideas, relationships, emotions, and a variety of real or imagined materials. Prerequisite: permission of the dance area head.
  • DA231 - Dance Composition I: Improvisation (4 Credits)
    Permission of the Dance Coordinator required.
  • DA233 - Ballet I (2 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
  • DA233 - Ballet I (2 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
  • DA233 - Ballet I (2 Credits)
    Permission of the Dance Coordinator required.
  • DA234 - Modern Dance I (2 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
  • DA234 - Modern Dance I (2 Credits)
    Permission of the Dance Coordinator required.
  • DA235 - Tap Dance I (2 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
  • DA237 - Jazz Dance I (2 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
  • DA237 - Jazz Dance I (2 Credits)
    Permission of the Dance Coordinator required.
  • DA333 - Ballet II (2 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
  • DA333 - Ballet II (2 Credits)
    Permission of the Dance Coordinator required.
  • DA335 - Tap Dance II (2 Credits)
    Students at the intermediate level concentrate on exploring more sophisticated levels of technique, style, and rhythmic structure of tap dancing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of the Dance faculty.
  • DA337 - Jazz Dance II (2 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
  • DA337 - Jazz Dance II (2 Credits)
    Permission of the Dance Coordinator required.
  • MU137 - Listening to Music (4 Credits)
    Intended for students with little or no experience in music who want to develop their listening skills and musical understanding. Emphasis is on a non-theoretical study of the elements and compositional principles of music, and careful listening to selected works of master composers in the context of a brief survey of classical music in its historical and social context. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
  • MU139 - History of Jazz (4 Credits)
    A study of the evolution of jazz, a continuously evolving form synthesizing many different music styles. Attention is given to its African American origins, historical identifications, antisocial tendencies, political aspects, and subjective effects that have effected cultural change. Emphasis is placed on listening to the works of Armstrong, Ellington, Davis, Gillespie, Parker, Monk, Coltrane, and Mingus. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective and the General Education U.S. Diversity requirements.
  • MU202 - History of Music: American (4 Credits)
    A survey of American music from the first American settlers to the present including the development of such forms as folk, regional, religious, ethnic, jazz, musical theater, and various popular styles. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
  • MU203 - Perspectives in World Music (4 Credits)
    Investigates music-making within a variety of cultures, including societies from Africa, the Caribbean, India, the Far East, and Native Americans. Musical experience is examined from both the sonic and social perspectives, including musical form, instruments, and style, as well as music's role as a vehicle for defining and representing social values. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective and the General Education Global Diversity requirements.
  • MU204 - Music Analysis I (2 Credits)
    An introduction to the analysis of music, especially as it appears in musical theatre. Topics include song structure, dance forms, and identification of the features in various genres and historical styles. Required for BFA Musical Theatre majors.
  • MU205 - Music Analysis II (2 Credits)
    A continuation of Music Analysis I, this course focuses on the music and lyrics of songs and shows in the musical theatre repertoire. The focus moves from basic terminology to a more detailed connection between analysis and performance. Other topics include the structure of entire shows, detailed analysis of duets and other ensemble pieces, and an increased focus on recent musical theatre repertoire. Required for BFA Musical Theatre majors.
  • MU220 - History of American Popular Music (4 Credits)
    This survey of American popular music from 1950 to the present traces the development of rock & roll, soul, disco, punk, metal, rap, hip-hop and other popular genres from their multicultural roots to the digital world of the 21st century. Students examine the cultural, social, political, and economic dimensions of these genres along with their impact on the global population and marketplace. Students also connect developments in technology (recording, production, etc.) with the enormous growth of the music industry and its effect on the consumer via means of production, distribution, and promotion. Students also address the work of female musicians, songwriters, producers, etc., and the obstacles they face in the commercial music industry.
  • MU253 - Applied Music: Voice (0 Credit)
    Permission of Department required to register
  • MU253 - Applied Music: Voice (0 Credit)
    Studio course consists of ten 60-minute lessons with a private instructor. Students may pursue this course on a non-credit basis by payment of a course fee. Available for BFA Musical Theatre majors only.
  • MU254 - Applied Music: Piano (0 Credit)
    Permission of Department required to register
  • MU254 - Applied Music: Piano (0 Credit)
    Studio course consists of ten 60-minute lessons with a private instructor. Students may pursue this course on a non-credit basis by payment of a course fee.
  • MU353 - Applied Music: Voice (2 Credits)
    Advanced work in vocal technique and development of a repertoire, consisting of ten weekly 60-minute lessons with a private instructor. Required for BFA Musical Theatre majors. No more than 8 credits of Applied Music: Voice may be counted toward credits required for graduation.
  • MU353 - Applied Music: Voice (2 Credits)
    Permission of Department required to register
  • MU354 - Applied Music: Piano (2 Credits)
    For students for whom the study of piano is relevant to their professional goals. Students have a weekly 60-minute individual lesson. No more than 8 credits of Applied Music: Piano may be counted toward credits required for graduation.
  • MU354 - Applied Music: Piano (2 Credits)
    Permission of Department required to register
  • PA101 - Languages of the Stage (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to the various means of expression available to the art of the stage. In addition to an exploration of the techniques of the written script, students are introduced to the visual forms of artistic communication, their history, and the conventions of all theatrical forms. (Performing Arts students only)
  • PA125 - Performing Improv Comedy (4 Credits)
    Explores the fundamentals of improvisation for comedic performance through the use of games and exercises in a fast-paced, challenging learning environment. Guides students through the fundamentals of short form improvisation, focusing on building trust and spontaneity, and exploring aspects and techniques of storytelling, ensemble playing, movement, developing characters (status and emotion) and using space. Students will explore other forms of improvisation, including solo performance improvisation, structured audience interactive improvisation, and longer forms of improvisation.
  • PA472 - Production Projects (2 Credits)
    Contract Required - See Department for Information
  • PA472 - Prod Proj: Acting (2 Credits)
    Students with senior standing may define project work in acting, directing, design technology, stage and production management, arts and business management, musical theatre, theatre education, dance or dramaturgy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.
  • PA472 - Prod Proj: Design Technology (2 Credits)
    Students with senior standing may define project work in acting, directing, design technology, stage and production management, arts and business management, musical theatre, theatre education, dance or dramaturgy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.
  • PA472 - Prod Proj: Design/Technology (2 Credits)
    Students with senior standing may define project work in acting, directing, design technology, stage and production management, arts and business management, musical theatre, theatre education, dance or dramaturgy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.
  • PA472 - Prod Proj: Directing (2 Credits)
    Students with senior standing may define project work in acting, directing, design technology, stage and production management, arts and business management, musical theatre, theatre education, dance or dramaturgy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.
  • PA472 - Prod Proj: Dramaturgy (2 Credits)
    Students with senior standing may define project work in acting, directing, design technology, stage and production management, arts and business management, musical theatre, theatre education, dance or dramaturgy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.
  • PA472 - Prod Proj: Stage/Prod Mgmt (2 Credits)
    Students with senior standing may define project work in acting, directing, design technology, stage and production management, arts and business management, musical theatre, theatre education, dance or dramaturgy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.
  • TH121 - Introduction to Acting 1 (4 Credits)
    Introduces the acting process to the non-performance major. Group and individual exercise work develops a relaxed instrument able to respond freely, in the body and the voice, to emotional and external stimuli. The course moves from fundamental explorations through improvisation to work on scripted material.
  • TH122 - Introduction to Acting 2 (4 Credits)
    Building on the work of TH 121, this course proceeds to careful study of acting craft through the vocabulary of intentions, actions, obstacles, subtext, and objectives.
  • TH123 - Acting 1: Movement (4 Credits)
    An intensive exploration of movement and improvisation. A variety of improvisatory approaches are employed to tap into individual creativity and to discover the power of group creation. Physical demands increase as the body is emphasized as the instrument of communication. The work includes exploration of space, energy, dynamics, rhythm, and sensory response. Actors learn to channel their physical and emotional energy into dramatic action. Prerequisite: by audition only.
  • TH124 - Acting 2: Voice and Text (4 Credits)
    Bases the actor's work in the experience of voice and language. The goal is a free voice in a free body and the ability to express thought and emotion with openness and truth. The course guides students through awareness of and release from habitual tensions and into body alignment, breathing, resonators, sound and movement, group interaction, and the exploration of individual and group creativity. Students use both scripted and improvised material as they discover the two to three octaves of the speaking voice and its connection with thoughts and words. Prerequisite: by audition only.
  • TH130 - Improvisation I (2 Credits)
    Introduces performance majors to improvisation, developing listening skills, spontaneous playing, and the art of presence. Required for all students enrolled in the Actor Training Program. Prerequisite: by audition only.
  • TH131 - Acting Fundamentals (2 Credits)
    Introductory course intended to provide the acting foundation necessary for more advanced scene study. Students apply fundamental concepts explored in first-year voice, movement, and improvisation into written scenes. The emphases are on experiential exercises: improvisations, open scenes, and basic contemporary scene work.
  • TH140 - Rendering (2 Credits)
    Structured to develop fundamental skills in observation, drawing, painting, and modeling, with an emphasis on the application of these skills to the theatrical design process. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. This is the first course required of students in the Design/Technology concentration.
  • TH140 - Rendering II (2 Credits)
    Structured to develop fundamental skills in observation, drawing, painting, and modeling, with an emphasis on the application of these skills to the theatrical design process. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. This is the first course required of students in the Design/Technology concentration.
  • TH141 - Stagecraft: Special Topics (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
  • TH142 - Stagecraft: Electrics (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
  • TH143 - Stagecraft: Properties Construction (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
  • TH144 - Stagecraft: Costume Construction (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
  • TH145 - Stagecraft:Scenic Construction (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
  • TH146 - Stagecraft: Scene Painting (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
  • TH147 - Stagecraft: Crafts (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
  • TH148 - Stagecraft: Masks (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
  • TH150 - History of Fashion & Décor: Design Research (4 Credits)
    Explores the development of styles of Western architecture, furniture, and clothing as a demonstration of the human need to express the social, cultural, and psychological ideals of the period in which it occurs. From the Greeks to the 17th century, the period is presented within its historical-sociological context. The period visual elements are examined according to shape, style, construction, function, and evolution of appearance.
  • TH203 - Perspectives in World Theatre (4 Credits)
    Looks at theatre and performance as an essential component and expression of culture. Surveys material in select time periods and global settings to demonstrate how the various elements of theatre work to reflect and shape culture on issues such as nationality, ethnicity, race, religion, gender, sexuality, class, and age. In order to do so, this course examines the roles and practices of directors, designers, dramaturges, and playwrights throughout the world from the classical to the postmodern period, and of varying theatrical styles. Readings include plays and historical material, as well as dramatic theory and criticism. Students attend lectures, participate in group work, view theatrical performances and videos, and talk to professionals in the field. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements. Performing Arts majors are not permitted to ernoll in this course.
  • TH204 - Theatre into Film (4 Credits)
    Explores the artistic languages of theatre and film. Dramatic material written for the stage is read and analyzed and the process of adaptation of that material is explored. Texts include the works of such playwrights as Shakespeare, Strindberg, Williams, and Albee. Film texts include the work of directors such as Lumet, Cukor, Solberg, and Nichols. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
  • TH205 - Dress Codes: American Clothes in the Twentieth Century (4 Credits)
    Examines American clothes and fashion in the 20th century, with a primary focus on the visual elements of everyday dress. Six distinct periods are studied according to the silhouette and decorative details of each. Further, each fashion period is studied within the context of its indirect influences (social, cultural, historical, technological, economical). Particular focus is given to concepts of masculinity and feminity, and gender ambiguity; challenges to gendered clothes (such as trousers on women, long hair on men); and anti-fashion (zoot suits, beatniks, hippies, punk, goth). Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
  • TH205 - Dress Codes: American Clothes in the Twentieth Century (4 Credits)
    Examines American clothes and fashion in the 20th century, with a primary focus on the visual elements of everyday dress. Six distinct periods are studied according to the silhouette and decorative details of each. Further, each fashion period is studied within the context of its indirect influences (social, cultural, historical, technological, economical). Particular focus is given to concepts of masculinity and feminity, and gender ambiguity; challenges to gendered clothes (such as trousers on women, long hair on men); and anti-fashion (zoot suits, beatniks, hippies, punk, goth). Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
  • TH215 - World Drama in Its Context 1 (4 Credits)
    Surveys theatre and drama from the Greeks through the Restoration, with a focus on the major periods of Western theatre and dramatic literature: the Greeks, Roman theatre and drama, Medieval theatre, Elizabethan drama, Italian Commedia Dell'arte, Spanish Golden Age, French Neo-Classicism, and Restoration. In addition, students survey Eastern classical theatre and drama with a particular emphasis on the Sanskrit theatre, the Chinese drama and the Peking Opera, and the classical theatre of Japan, including Kabuki, No, and the puppet theatre. There are selected readings of plays in their historical context with particular attention paid to theatrical styles of plays and production.
  • TH216 - World Drama in Its Context 2 (4 Credits)
    Surveys theatre and drama from the late 17th century to the present. The major periods of world theatre and drama, Romanticism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism are studied with particular emphasis on 20th-century theatre and drama throughout the world, including Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Attention is given to the work of both women and men. Theatrical conventions, innovations, and techniques developed in the Western and non-Western theatres are explored.
  • TH221 - Musical Theatre Scene Study I (4 Credits)
    This intensive acting class builds on the first-year acting courses to ensure a personal commitment in the way students approach and experience scene work and acting technique. Through exercises and improvisations, students increase awareness, strengthen the ability to talk and listen, and practice recognizing and experiencing moment-to-moment acting. They then apply these skills to dramatic scripts. Students learn how to read a play from the actor's perspective and how to break down and explore a scene in terms of given circumstances, relationships, and character needs.
  • TH221 - Scene Study 1 (4 Credits)
    This intensive acting class builds on the first-year acting courses to ensure a personal commitment in the way students approach and experience scene work and acting technique. Through exercises and improvisations, students increase awareness, strengthen the ability to talk and listen, and practice recognizing and experiencing moment-to-moment acting. They then apply these skills to dramatic scripts. Students learn how to read a play from the actor's perspective and how to break down and explore a scene in terms of given circumstances, relationships, and character needs.
  • TH221 - Scene Study I (4 Credits)
    This intensive acting class builds on the first-year acting courses to ensure a personal commitment in the way students approach and experience scene work and acting technique. Through exercises and improvisations, students increase awareness, strengthen the ability to talk and listen, and practice recognizing and experiencing moment-to-moment acting. They then apply these skills to dramatic scripts. Students learn how to read a play from the actor's perspective and how to break down and explore a scene in terms of given circumstances, relationships, and character needs.
  • TH222 - Scene Study II (4 Credits)
    Strengthens and deepens the work begun in TH 221. Students are now ready to codify their experience into a meaningful acting vocabulary. Terms such as action, objective, super-objective, obstacle, and subtext are layered into scene work from American and British realism. Students begin to use imagery in order to more fully encounter and receive the imaginary world of the play.
  • TH222 - Scene Study II-Mus Theatre (4 Credits)
    Strengthens and deepens the work begun in TH 221. Students are now ready to codify their experience into a meaningful acting vocabulary. Terms such as action, objective, super-objective, obstacle, and subtext are layered into scene work from American and British realism. Students begin to use imagery in order to more fully encounter and receive the imaginary world of the play.
  • TH240 - Drafting (2 Credits)
    Through weekly projects, students learn graphic techniques in drafting for theatrical production. The focus is on conventional symbolization, development of ground plans, sections, elevations, orthographics, isometrics, and construction drawings. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH240 - Drafting II (2 Credits)
    Through weekly projects, students learn graphic techniques in drafting for theatrical production. The focus is on conventional symbolization, development of ground plans, sections, elevations, orthographics, isometrics, and construction drawings. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH242 - Lighting Design I (4 Credits)
    Basic principles of stage lighting design are introduced, including the mechanics and optics of lighting instruments, electrical theory and practices, control systems, basic design concepts, and color theory. Controllable qualities of light are investigated and demonstrated through students' participation on a lighting crew for a department production. Design techniques are developed through a complete lighting design project. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH243 - Sound Design (4 Credits)
    Introduces the basic principles of theatrical sound design and the practices and skills required to develop a production's sound design and supportive technical documentation. Students are introduced to script analysis, system layout, effects development, source researching, and organization. The combined hands-on presentations and class assignments allow students to develop a working knowledge of the sound designer's responsibilities and skills. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH244 - Costume Construction (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic costume patterning and construction methods. Students not only study draping, drafting, and flat-patterning, but also learn terminology, equipment usage, and the skills necessary to the entire costuming process. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH245 - Scene Design 1 (4 Credits)
    Introduces the fundamental principles of design. Students learn how proficiency in a core set of design skills can lead to effective performance in a variety of theatrical and commercial production situations. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH247 - Make-Up: Theatre (2 Credits)
    Presents a comprehensive study of the art of traditional make-up for the stage. Through the use of cosmetics and prosthetics, students learn to execute corrective, character, and age make-up. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Co-requisite: TH 347.
  • TH250 - Design Essentials (4 Credits)
    Introduces the theatrical design process and personnel within the regional theatre model. Emphasis is placed on the interconnection between the various design areas and their function in the process of making theatre. Students explore script analysis from the designer's point of view, review various production styles and venues, and experience current production design approaches. This course exposes students to some of the basic skills and processes employed by theatrical designers. Students are expected to supply appropriate materials as needed and attend selected theatrical productions.
  • TH252 - Master Electrician (4 Credits)
    Studies the tools of lighting, principles of electricity, and the technical electrical skills required to become safe and proficient as a theatrical electrician as well as the process of creating paperwork, budgeting shows, and leading crews as a master electrician.
  • TH265 - Foundations of Education (4 Credits)
    Examines the basis of public education and the teaching process from a theoretical and methodological viewpoint. Multiple perspectives are employed to investigate these issues, including, but not limited to, the philosophical, historical, sociological, psychological, economic, and political. Required course for initial licensure as a Teacher of Theatre.
  • TH275 - Arts Management I (4 Credits)
    Explores the theory and practice of arts management, with particular focus on theatre management. Extensive readings in arts management provide a foundation for further work in the field.
  • TH277 - Stage Management I (4 Credits)
    The fundamentals of stage management explored through readings, discussion, written exercises, and appropriate hands-on experience.
  • TH313 - African-American Theatre and Culture (4 Credits)
    African-American drama and theater in Africa and America are studied from their origins in African ritual and in early 19th-century America to the present. Lectures and discussions focus on traditional and modern drama and theater, as well as significant periods of dramatic activity such as the Harlem Renaissance, the Federal Theatre Project, and the Black Arts Movement, and on representative works by major contemporary African and African-American dramatists. Fulfills the General Education U.S. Diversity requirement.
  • TH315 - Topics in Contemporary Theatre (4 Credits)
    Covers various topics in the aesthetics of contemporary theatre with particular focus on the history, theory, and criticism of selected contemporary performers and directors, such as Robert Wilson, Richard Foreman, Anne Bogart, Tadeusz Kantor, Jerzy Grotowski, Peter Brook, Julie Taymor, and Tadashi Suzuki, and groups such as Open Theatre, Living Theatre, and Mabou Mines. May be repeated for credit if topics differ. Prerequisite: junior standing. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
  • TH320 - Stage Com:Close Quarter Combat (4 Credits)
    Unarmed theatrical combat techniques suitable for both stage and screen are taught, including: shared-weight illusions and grappling, contact and non-contact strikes, and falls and rolls. Another unit focuses on incorporating combat props such as knives and found objects. Scene work ranges from classical to modern to self-scripted. This is an acting class using physical lines of dialogue; students bring all of their acting, voice, and movement skills to bear on this work.
  • TH322 - Acting for the Camera (4 Credits)
    Prepares acting students for work on camera. Students explore the actor's relationship both to the camera and to the medium. Coursework includes improvisation, monologue, and scene work. A portion of the course is devoted to "the business of acting" with special attention to film and television auditioning. Technical skill for film and television performance and an introduction to the element of film production (script/story structure, editing, lighting, and cinematography) are components of the course.
  • TH324 - Dialects (4 Credits)
    Continues the actor's work of experiencing voice and language in a free body as a means to develop versatile and intelligible speech. Using specific Linklater Sound and Movement exercises as a bridge to text and as a physical connection to phonetics, students explore and expand the actor's range, stamina, and expressive ability. Students use these tools, along with Paul Meier's textbook, Accents and Dialects for Stage and Screen, to acquire British Standard (RP), Cockney, Irish, German, Russian, New York, and American Southern dialects as well as other specialty dialects as time allows. The goal of the class is to expand the actor's choices of speech and vocal expression and to acquaint her/him with the resources necessary to learn dialects.
  • TH325 - BFA Acting Studio 1 (4 Credits)
    Intensive discovery of acting technique that builds on the first two years of voice and movement/improvisation work to ensure a personal commitment in the way a student studies and experiences scene work through the vocabulary of intentions, actions, obstacles, subtext, and objectives. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: BFA Acting majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 326.
  • TH326 - BFA Acting Studio 2 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 325 students in the BFA program in Acting. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: BFA Acting majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 325.
  • TH327 - Advanced Musical Theatre Technique I (4 Credits)
    Intensive technique work in acting and musical theatre repertoire. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class. Semester includes specific instruction in "clean singing." Prerequisite: BFA Musical Theatre majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 329 or TH 429.
  • TH328 - Advanced Mus Th Technique II (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 327 for students in the BFA program in Musical Theatre. Scenes from musical theatre and plays as well as advanced musical solo work are considered. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class. Semester includes specific work in dialects. Prerequisite: TH 327. Co-requisite: TH 329 or TH 429.
  • TH329 - Musical Theatre Dance Repertoire I (2 Credits)
    Students are assigned to class by skill level as determined by musical theatre and dance faculty. Students explore various styles of musical theatre dance and hone their audition and performance skills. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: BFA Musical Theatre majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 327, TH 328, TH 427, or TH 428.
  • TH340 - AutoCAD (4 Credits)
    Students learn to use the technology of computer assisted drafting (CAD) to communicate common graphical information required in theatre design and technology. This includes the creation of ground plans, elevations, section views, orthographic views, technical details, and light plots. Students produce both electronic files and printed documents that conform to accepted theatre graphics standards. The techniques of 3D modeling and rendering are also introduced.
  • TH342 - Lighting Design II (4 Credits)
    Presents approaches to lighting design and poses specific design problems for students to solve. Attention is also given to color, composition, cueing, and production through presentations and discussions in class. Students participate in department productions as assistant designers and electricians. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH345 - Scene Design 2 (4 Credits)
    Builds on the experience of fundamental level coursework. Students develop methods for solving the practical and aesthetic problems that a professional designer, working in theatre and allied fields, will encounter. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH347 - Make-Up Effects for Film and Television (2 Credits)
    2 credits This basic course in the art of film and television make-up effects includes the use of refined cosmetics and prosthetic techniques to execute character, age, and casting molds to create appliances for extreme stylistic character make-up on a studio partner. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.Corequisite: TH247.
  • TH348 - Costume Design 2 (4 Credits)
    Explores advanced design principles and processes in all areas of costume design. Students experience the complete process of designing costumes for a given project, including (a) creating and presenting the design concept; (b) developing appropriate paperwork for counting, building, and running costumes; and (c) budgeting specs and rendering final sketches. Students produce a portfolio of work and learn to communicate professionally with other members of the theatrical production team. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH372 - Topics in Stage Management (4 Credits)
    In depth exploration of Actors Equity Association agreements and practical application in the rehearsal process and performance. Cue calling theory and techniques for dramatic productions and musicals.
  • TH372 - Top: Creative Producing I (4 Credits)
    This course will focus on all of the elements necessary for being a successful producer in the context of our current opportunities and challenges for making art in our contemporary moment.We will work in the context of the artistic programming at Emerson College in the Office of the Arts, particularly as pertains to ArtsEmerson: The World on Stage, and HowlRound: A Center for the Theater Commons.
  • TH375 - Arts Management II (4 Credits)
    A detailed exploration of the theory and practice of arts management using current case studies from within the field. Exploration will include extensive readings, guest speakers, research, group discussions and writing exercises.
  • TH376 - Production Management (4 Credits)
    Explores professional production management in theatre, ranging from commercial and nonprofit regional theatre models to touring and special events management.
  • TH377 - Stage Management II (4 Credits)
    Addresses the students' needs for comprehensive intermediate instruction, primarily focusing on the position of the assistant stage manager and how he or she functions not only within the stage management team but also as a collaborator/facilitator on plays and musicals.
  • TH381 - Directing I: Fundamentals of Directing (4 Credits)
    Major principles of play directing are studied. Through comprehensive script analysis, students become familiar with the structure of a play as a basis on which the various elements of theatre can be organized to achieve dramatic unity. Laboratory application of directing practices introduces students to the techniques employed by a director to communicate with actors and audience, including principles of composition, movement, stage business, and rhythm.
  • TH388 - Playwriting I (4 Credits)
    Working from the reading and analysis of contemporary plays, from discussions of contemporary theatrical techniques, and from exercises through which the student writer gains access to personal material, the major focus of the semester is the writing and revision of several drafts of at least 1 one-act play suitable for production on stage. Pieces, scenes, and whole plays are read in class and active participation in the workshop process is a required component of the course.
  • TH402 - Living Art in Real Space: Multidisciplinary Art and the Collaborative Process (4 Credits)
    Examines the development and language of multidisciplinary art from the 20th century to the present day, with reference to specific artists, trends, and movements. Lectures, slide and video presentations, museum visits, student research, reading, writing, and in-depth experiential processes address how different artistic disciplines inform one another and come together in visual art performance and installations. Culminates in final presentations of multidisciplinary work by student groups documenting and mapping sources, methods, and process of their collaborations.
  • TH410 - Principles of Dramaturgy (4 Credits)
    Provides theoretical and critical background to the profession of dramaturgy. Explores the history of dramaturgy as well as different professional venues and the variety of tasks that dramaturges perform within a particular venue. Introduces students to the areas of dramatic criticism (theatre critics and scholars, translators, script analysts, and editors), literary office dramaturgy (new script analysis, season planning, literary management of the theatre, etc.), and production dramaturgy (working with the director, audience outreach, new play development, etc.).
  • TH411 - Top: (4 Credits)
    Various offerings in dramatic literature, theatre history, and/or criticism including, but not limited to, modern American drama, contemporary European and American drama, contemporary women playwrights, gay and lesbian drama, Shakespeare and the Greeks, the history of acting, the history of the physical theatre, and performance studies. All courses are reading, research, and writing intensive. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • TH412 - Play Analysis (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to the art and skill of play analysis, with an eye toward production and cultural significance. Students learn building blocks of dramatic structure and analyze how structure contributes to the understanding of a play. They study plays, critical essays, and performances spanning 25 centuries of Western theatrical practice. Part of the class time is devoted to mapping the structures of the plays and analyzing how these structures may be used to create textually supported interpretations both on stage and in writing. Students explore the material through lecture, discussion, videos, and group activities.
  • TH420 - Stage Combat: Historical Weaponry (4 Credits)
    Introduces three weapons commonly found in plays and films: broadsword (for example, from Richard III or The Lord of the Rings); quarterstaff (such as in Robin Hood or Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon); and rapier and dagger (think Romeo and Juliet or The Three Musketeers). Students explore the fundamentals of creating safe illusions of violence using footwork, distance, targeting, blocks, strikes, and simulated wounds and kills. Scene work focuses on classical material. This is an acting class using physical lines of dialogue; students bring all of their acting, voice, and movement skills to bear on this work.
  • TH421 - Advanced Acting Topics: Musical Theatre for Actors (4 Credits)
    An immersion into Musical Theatre singing in both classic and contemporary repertoire. The first half of the semester will cover "classic" musical theatre (40s, 50s and 60s), and the second will bring us up to the latest era of pop music and contemporary musical theatre that audiences are experiencing today.
  • TH421 - Advanced Acting Topics: Performance Project (4 Credits)
    This class is a joint venture with VM 440 - Advanced Studio Production: Fiction (Regge Life, Instructor). In the spirit of Masterpiece Theatre, students will mount and perform an excerpted version of Frank Higgins' Gunplay first as a stage play and then capture the performance as a television production, giving students practice in the adjustments needed to play in both mediums. Students will learn about the technical side of television production. Students will also walk away with a reel upon providing a DVD. An ensemble company of twelve to fourteen versatile, bold, chameleon-like character actors are sought to play numerous different people. Selected by interview.
  • TH421 - AdvAct: Adv Improvisation (4 Credits)
    This course builds on the fundamentals of improvisation- listening skills, saying "yes", taking risks, spontaneity, narrative, status- and explores advanced styles and forms of improvisational theatre. From Keith Johnstone's Theatresports and comedy club style improv to Mask, Story Theatre and dramatic improvisation. The course will culminate with in-house and outside performances at a public venue.
  • TH421 - Advanced Acting Topics: Voice and Text (4 Credits)
    This course is an in-depth exploration of the voice work of Kristin Linklater and her progression of exercises designed to free the natural voice. Complimentary voice exercises, such as Kristin Linklater's Sound & Movement sequence, will also be introduced to encourage the actor's ability to speak with her/his whole body and to open up all the communication channels for breath, voice, and listening. The goal of the voice work is a free voice in a free body that is able to respond to a full range of emotional and imaginative demands with openness and truth. The goal of this course is to reinforce the actor's confidence in bringing Linklater Voice work to the exploration of text.
  • TH421 - Advanced Acting Topics: Theatre of the Oppressed (4 Credits)
    This course provides an introduction to some of the sociopolitical practical techniques that make up the arsenal of the Theatre of the Oppressed. Pioneered by Brazilian artist and activist Augusto Boal, these forms were inspired by the pedagogical theories of Paulo Freire. Now they are used internationally and have been developed an adapted to countless settings around the world. This introductory level course will engage students with some of the foundational theories, as well as focus on the interactive games and exercises that form the foundation of this work. The class will focus on Games, Image Theatre, Forum Theatre, and Newspaper Theatre.
  • TH423 - Action Theater (4 Credits)
    Action TheaterT is a training system in physical theater improvisation that integrates vocal, physical, and verbal skills while connecting to the agility of the imagination. Exercises isolate the components of action -time, space, shape, and energy- so they can be examined, experienced, and altered in order to expand the expressive range and palette. The work provides tools to examine one's perceptive and responsive process, and address habits that limit one's ability to remain embodied, engaged, and in the moment. Students apply these skills to structured solo and ensemble improvisational performance.
  • TH425 - BFA Acting Studio 3 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 325 and TH 326 for students in the BFA program in Acting. Scene study problems move toward issues of style, including a range of aesthetic and acting style issues. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, stage combat (including unarmed and Elizabethan rapier), and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. Co-requisite: TH 426.
  • TH426 - BFA Acting Studio 4 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 425 for students in the BFA program in Acting. Beyond continued scene work, significant attention is paid to audition technique and to a thorough orientation to the profession and the business of acting. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. Co-requisite: TH 425.
  • TH426 - BFA Acting Studio 4: Showcase (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 425 for students in the BFA program in Acting. Beyond continued scene work, significant attention is paid to audition technique and to a thorough orientation to the profession and the business of acting. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. Co-requisite: TH 425.
  • TH427 - Musical Theatre Styles I (4 Credits)
    An intensive investigation of pop-rock styles, both in pure pop repertoire and contemporary musical theatre repertoire, in solo work and scenes. The semester culminates in individual cabaret performances, created by the students themselves. Co-requisite: TH 329 or TH 429.
  • TH428 - Musical Theatre Styles II (4 Credits)
    Senior-level BFA Musical Theatre majors continue the exploration of musical theatre genres and styles as they spend the semester working strictly on works by emerging composers. The composers are invited to visit and participate in classes, creating opportunities for networking and connecting with the artists who are creating new works of musical theatre. In addition, one class per week is devoted to preparations for the Senior Showcase, which is performed for students, families, and industry professionals during commencement weekend. Co-requisite: TH 329 or TH 429.
  • TH429 - Musical Theatre Dance Repertoire II (2 Credits)
    Students are assigned to class by skill level, as determined by musical theatre and dance faculty. Students explore various styles of musical theatre dance and hone their audition and performance skills. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: BFA Musical Theatre majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 327, TH 328, TH 427, or TH 428.
  • TH431 - Shakespeare Performance (4 Credits)
    Explores Shakespeare's poetry through the body and voice as a way not only of avoiding intellectual pitfalls but also as a path to nurture and experience this poetry through embodied vibration, sensation and image. Rhetorical structure and devices are explored as well in the manner, via the body rather than the brain.
  • TH440 - Technical Theatre Laboratory: Computer Graphics: Sketch up (4 Credits)
    SketchUp and Photoshop can be used in conjunction with each other to create quick and accurate 3-dimensional designs. This introductory class will start with SketchUp, a 3-D computer rendering program for designers and architects, then incorporate Photoshop, an image editing and painting program. Start in SketchUp by drawing lines and shapes. Push and pull surfaces to turn them into 3D forms. Stretch, copy, rotate, paint, import textures and images to make designed spaces.
  • TH441 - Topics in Technical Design (4 Credits)
    Permission of Instructor Required
  • TH460 - Drama as Education I (4 Credits)
    Examines the philosophy behind the teaching of theatre and the use of drama as an educational tool in classroom, workshop, and production settings. Students learn to assess the learning needs of their students, develop appropriate educational goals, and design and implement teaching strategies. There are 40 hours of pre-practicum work, including observations of area theatre and drama classes from grades pre-K through 12. Course is open to any Performing Arts major and others with permission of instructor. It is required for Theatre Education majors seeking initial licensure as a Teacher of Theatre.
  • TH461 - Drama as Education 2 (4 Credits)
    Students delve more deeply into the philosophy and practice of teaching through drama and theatre. Forty hours of pre-practicum work with students from grades pre-K through 12 is required. Course is required for Theatre Education majors seeking initial licensure as a Teacher of Theatre.
  • TH463 - Student Teaching Seminar (2 Credits)
    Students concurrently enrolled in TH 465, Student Teaching Practicum, also attend this weekly seminar to explore issues, resources, questions, problems, and solutions to the teaching/learning challenges they are facing in their practicum experience. Topics pertinent to beginning teachers, including classroom management strategies and curriculum and lesson plan development are explored. Students reflect on their teaching experiences and critically examine their current and future roles as classroom instructors. Students will understand the need for a community of teachers and gain a sense of confidence about their teaching skills. Co-requisite: TH465.
  • TH465 - Student Teaching Practicum (2 Credits)
    An 8- to 14-week practicum providing supervised student teaching activities at either the elementary, middle, or high school level. Students practice teaching in a school system, which permits them to interact with students and teachers in their area of concentration. Working closely with the on-site supervising practitioner, students develop instructional units and must be engaged in 300 hours of teaching. The practicum is open only to students who have completed their education program sequence. Co-requisite: TH463.
  • TH465 - Student Teaching Practicum (2 Credits)
    Instructor Permission required.
  • TH469 - Playmaking/Teaching/Playmaking (4 Credits)
    Provides an intensive introduction and exploration of playmaking with young people, ages 8-21. Offers a variety of approaches to developing original material with students, and identifies strategies for integrating curriculum topics and playmaking, as well as social, personal, and societal exploration. The role of playmaking as a culturally relevant curriculum is addressed.
  • TH470 - Design in Practice Topics (4 Credits)
    In this advanced course of study, students develop the required practical skills necessary for the design and execution of a theatrical production design. Students further develop the ability to analyze a script, song, or score and translate the ideas therein into visual images. They learn to move a design from concept to completion under the actual "in theatre" conditions, while still maintaining a safe, constructive learning environment. They put into actual practice the equipment, methods, procedures, and skills necessary to implement a successful design. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH475 - Topics in Arts Management (4 Credits)
    This course will focus on developing and producing for the commercial and nonprofit theater. Both verticals bring their own unique sets of challenges. Throughout the semester, you will explore how to bring an idea from page to stage, all while juggling acquiring the rights, putting together a team of creatives, raising money, planning your marketing and advertising campaign, presenting a reading and finding co-producers and partners that will help you realize your theatrical show. The course will provide each student with both theoretical and practical knowledge and guidelines to pursue a successful career developing theater. From what to do in the first 10 years out of college, to how to set yourself up for success for the next 10 years in the theater industry.
  • TH477 - Stage Management III (4 Credits)
    Provides students with the additional tools, techniques, and information to build the bridge from practicing stage management in an educational environment to the professional theatre or MFA program through in-depth study of the Actor's Equity Rules, creation of complex repertory rehearsal schedules of multiple productions, and hands-on training exercises of calling musical show cues with lighting, automation, and fly to music with cue lights.
  • TH479 - Topics in the Business of Theatre: Business of Design (4 Credits)
    A comprehensive course, encompassing organizational, business, legal, accounting, marketing and job execution strategies necessary to succeed in the business side of the design arena. Course will approach issues relevant to the requirements forming a business entity, admission to and interaction with professional trade unions, and exploration of producing organizations; issues of insurance, bookkeeping, licenses, and/or permits; preparing a professional resume and portfolio, job strategies using online sources for entry-level work; entrepreneurial opportunities and interaction with allied businesses and other topics as appropriate to the class.
  • TH482 - Directing II: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)
    Extending the experiences of Directing I, this course emphasizes the application and unification of stage directing techniques and theories leading to a concept for production. Through selected scenes and projects for class presentation, students continue the exploration of materials and methods of communicating the dramatic content of a script to an audience.
  • TH488 - Playwriting II (4 Credits)
    Includes, but is not limited to, the study of dramaturgical elements in the work of contemporary and classic playwrights, as well as continued study of story development, structure, and the use of dialogue. Students present a variety of work in class, their own and the work of others, looking at plays from the perspective of the actor, director, designer and, most importantly, the audience. By the end of the semester, students complete the first draft of a newly conceived full-length play or the third draft of the one-act play begun in Playwriting I.
  • TH514 - Theatre Studies Seminar: Digital and Social Media (4 Credits)
    As more and more dramaturgs across the globe engage in online digiturgy, the future of dramaturgical outreach lies in mobile and context-driven search and networking technology. Working in collaboration with theatre and performance social networks, and local institutions, the students will learn the basic of digital and social media dramaturgy, including: audience education and outreach, content curation and community building, and dramaturgical research, writing, and archivization. The students will also explore newest forms of digital theatre making, including Twitter plays, Second Life and Video Game dramaturgy, and transmedia dramaturgy. The students will also learn the basic coding skills and podcasting.
  • TH514 - Sem: Voices of the Theatre (4 Credits)
    Covers contemporary works of theatre with an emphasis on exploring intersections between social identities like race, ethnicity, gender and gender identity, sexuality, and class. The coursework includes selected readings of plays in their sociopolitical context with a focus on analyzing artists' aesthetic choices and innovations. Students will also engage in conversations with playwrights about their process.
  • TH514 - Theatre Studies Seminar: Contemporary Women Playwrights (4 Credits)
    Students in this course will engage in an investigation and exploration of plays written by contemporary women from various cultures and backgrounds. The course poses the following questions: 1) Is there a woman's aesthetic in playwriting? 2) If so, what is it? 3) Do women playwrights approach structure, character, and style "differently"? 4) What is the nature of critical response to plays written by women? In addition to reading material, students will also study a variety of critical responses to particular plays and to the work of women playwrights in general.
  • TH514 - Sem: (4 Credits)
    This course will examine how theatre can be used as a tool to address human rights issues and violations. Students will analyze how theatre in performance, both as an aesthetic product and as a creative process, has the potential to engage both audiences and production members in critical dialogues regarding human rights. We will critically examine dramatic literature, as text and through scene work, in an effort to develop an interdisciplinary vocabulary across human rights & theatre. Students will also have the opportunity to explore curriculum design and development in which dramatic activities are used to address diverse topics in human rights education. We will read both theoretical texts and plays to inform our study of the intersection between human rights and theatre.
  • TH521 - Ensemble Workshop Topics: Voice (4 Credits)
    Special Topics in Voice bases the actor-teacher's work in a fully embodied experience of voice and language. The goal of the course is to cultivate a free voice in a free body, and to learn how to express every subtly and nuance of thought and feeling with clarity, ease, and truth. The course guides students through an awareness of and release from habitual tensions into a more effective and economical use of the body as an instrument for human communication and expression. Additional focus will be on self-awareness, breathing, resonance, sound and movement, ensemble-building skills, and the actor-audience relationship. Classroom discussions will deal with the importance of voice training in theater education, as well as the challenges and pedagogical issues that arise when teaching the material.
  • TH540 - Puppetry (4 Credits)
    The art of puppetry and the basic methods of construction, operation, manipulation, and performance of puppets are examined. Emphasis is on the use of puppets as an educational tool. Projects include creating examples of each of the four major types of puppets: shadow, hand, rod, and marionette -- using a range of construction techniques and materials appropriate to an educational setting. The course culminates in the construction of puppets for in-class presentations. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH562 - Theatre for Young Audiences (4 Credits)
    Introduces the scope, purposes, and history of theatre experiences for children and adolescents. Topics include play reading and analysis, the examination of formal and participatory theatre, and theatre-in-education techniques.
  • TH584 - Directing the Musical (4 Credits)
    Building on the experience of one directing class, students are instructed in the particular challenges of directing a musical theatre production: from coaching singing and acting performance to staging complex scenes that involve music and dance, from learning the skills needed to create a collaborative atmosphere to understanding the communication skills needed to work well with designers, technicians, stage managers, and all other personnel involved in the production of musical theatre.
  • TH614 - Sem: Elma Lewis Center: Theatre and Community Conversations (4 Credits)
    Class meets Tuesday 4-5:45 and additional class/work hours are scheduled with the instructor. Building on the work of Performance: Theatre and Community, students will apply their explorations of community-based theatre practices and possibilities in collaboration with a local community organization and the Elma Lewis Center to develop and facilitate a theatre performance/process. Participation in these laboratory community sessions is required. The class will explore the issues, questions, and discoveries that arise throughout the experience.
  • TH614 - Sem: (4 Credits)
    This course will introduce students to the various approaches used in designing and conducting arts-based qualitative research projects in educational settings. Students will gain hands-on experience in various qualitative methods, analysis techniques, and writing exercises, while formulating a research project related to their areas of interest. The focus of the course is on the identification and creation of hypothetical research questions, the development of designs, data collection methods, and analysis procedures to address those questions.
  • TH621 - Special Topics in Acting: Theatre of Oppressed (4 Credits)
    This course is primarily a hands-on exploration of the theatrical techniques inspired by the revolutionary work of Augusto Boal (Theater of the Oppressed). We will experience acting as an essential social art, a tool for democratic education, a channel for personal transformation, and a means of artistic liberation. Exploring the connections between the theater practitioner's life and one's role within the larger community as an A.C.T.O.R. --artist, creator, teacher, organizer and researcher, we re-discover what it is to be human. Bring with you a desire to play, learn and grow with others. We must all do theater "to find out who we are, and to discover who we could become" - Augusto Boal.
  • TH621 - Special Topics in Acting (4 Credits)
    Involves intensive explorations of specific topics.
  • TH625 - Performance: Theatre and Community (4 Credits)
    Examines the relationships between theatre and culture, where culture is understood as a process of knowing the other, of looking and listening, of creating and maintaining connection in a community. An examination of theoretical texts in economics, history, sociology, cultural studies, politics, and performance provides a foundation for exploring and experiencing various techniques of making theatre in community.
  • TH650 - Design in Production (4 Credits)
    This course is a comprehensive survey of scene, lighting, and costume design as they relate to the work of the non-design specialist. Emphasis is placed on the interconnection among the various design areas and their function in the process of making theatre. Students are expected to supply appropriate materials.
  • TH660 - Drama as Education I (4 Credits)
    Students examine the philosophical foundations of theatre, speech, and the use of drama as an educational tool. They explore the uses of creative drama/improvisation in both formal and informal learning environments. Students learn to assess needs, develop appropriate educational goals and objectives, and design and implement teaching strategies using drama. This course is required for students seeking the Initial License in Massachusetts as a Teacher of Theatre (pre-K through grade 12). Readings, class participation, and participation in laboratory teaching sessions are required.
  • TH661 - Drama as Education II (4 Credits)
    Students explore the principles of educational drama and the teaching of drama and speech. A survey of various educational resources available to drama and speech teachers is included. The role of drama and speech within the wider context of the arts in education is discussed. This course is required for students seeking the Initial License in Massachusetts as a Teacher of Theatre (pre-K through grade 12).
  • TH663 - Student Teaching Seminar (2 Credits)
    Students concurrently enrolled in TH 665, Student Teaching Practicum, also attend this weekly seminar to explore issues, resources, questions, problems, and solutions to the teaching/learning challenges they are facing in their practicum experience. Topics pertinent to beginning teachers, including classroom management strategies and curriculum and lesson plan development are explored. Students reflect on their teaching experiences and critically examine their current and future roles as classroom instructors. Students will understand the need for a community of teachers and gain a sense of confidence about their teaching skills. Prerequisite: Permission of the Theatre Education Program Director. Co-requisite: TH665.
  • TH665 - Student Teaching Practicum (2 Credits)
    Instructor Permission Required
  • TH665 - Student Teaching Practicum (2 Credits)
    Permission of Graduate Program Director required.
  • TH665 - Student Teaching Practicum (2 Credits)
    This 8- to 14-week practicum provides supervised teaching activities at either the elementary, middle, or high school level. Students practice teaching in a school system that permits them to interact with students and teachers in their area of concentration. Working closely with the on-site supervising practitioner, students develop instructional units and must be engaged in 300 hours of teaching. The practicum is open only to students who have completed their program sequence. Requirements and prerequisites may be obtained from the Theatre Education program director. Co-requisite: TH 663.
  • TH667 - Special Topics in Theatre Education (4 Credits)
    Examines such topics as theatre-in-education, puppetry, playwriting with and for youth, theatre education outreach, and the teaching of dance and movement. Subject matter varies each semester. May be repeated for credit.
  • TH669 - Contemporary Issues in Education (4 Credits)
    Students examine the critical, philosophical, historical, and sociological issues facing education in general, and communication and performing arts education in particular. Students will also evaluate current research in communication and performing arts education and apply it to practice.
  • TH680 - Directing: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)
    The directorial process is examined, beginning with textual analysis of dramatic action, and covering such areas as ground plans, pictorial composition, movement, and stage action. The relationship of the director and other theater artists is also studied. Student work includes selected scenes and projects prepared for class presentation.