Course Descriptions


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  • CC100 - Fundamentals of Speech Communication (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic concepts, theories, and principles of oral communication applied to speaking situations. Develops competence in oral communication through performance and critical analysis of student skills in a variety of speaking formats. Audience analysis, content discovery, communication strategies, arrangement of ideas, use of evidence and reasoning to support claims, language and style, voice and other delivery skills and ethical considerations are covered.
  • CC150 - Radio Programming & Operations (4 Credits)
    An in-depth exploration into the art and science of programming terrestrial, internet, and satellite radio entities, in both the commercial and public sectors. This course focuses on the evolution of broadcasting an audio product for entertainment and informational purposes. It examines the effects of cultural, governmental, technological, and market forces on the radio industry as a whole as well as on individual radio stations throughout North America.
    Instructor: Jack Casey
  • CC160 - Interpersonal Communication Skills (4 Credits)
    Introduces the practices and principles of interpersonal communication. Focuses on perception, creative/critical listening, nonverbal communication, emotions, power, and self-disclosure. Issues of ethics, technology, and culture are woven throughout class content and discussions. Stages of relationships are explored as well as the influence of communication within and between those stages. Numerous applications to a variety of situations, including those in the family, workplace, and romantic context are undertaken as students draw from their own experiences.
    Instructor: Richard West
  • CC201 - Evolution of Expression (4 Credits)
    Covers the development of human communication from orality to literacy to "electracy," or electronic orality, as a foundation for the exploration of issues and problems in contemporary culture concerning effective participation in society. Students learn how such development continues to revolutionize human consciousness, communication, and culture. They consider central concepts of voice and expression in forms ranging from embodied speech to dialogue to new media and technologies.
  • CC203 - Intercultural Communication (4 Credits)
    Analyzes readings in intercultural communication focusing on verbal and nonverbal customs of various cultures as information from both cultural and language perspectives. Each semester focuses on specific topics or cultures. Background in other cultures is helpful but not essential.
  • CC220 - Public Discourse in U.S. (4 Credits)
    Examines how Americans in the United States talk about important public issues including race, class, work, and foreigners. Applies theories of discourse to case studies of political communication.
    Instructor: Michael Weiler
  • CC221 - Global Political Communication (4 Credits)
    Provides students with a critical understanding of the role of communication in national politics in non-Western contexts as well as the increasingly important role of mediated communication in contemporary international relations and public diplomacy.
  • CC262 - Professional Communication (4 Credits)
    Study and practice of rhetorical argument, proof, ethics, style, and delivery in performance and analysis of speeches. Projects include use of professional communication situations and video/audio aids and new technology to enhance rhetorical effectiveness in message preparation, development, and delivery.
    Instructor: Ted Hollingworth
  • CC263 - Argument and Advocacy (4 Credits)
    Studies the art of advocacy. Students develop logical, organizational, and research skills that debate and other forms of oral and written advocacy require. They participate in debates about current political and legal controversies and learn how critical thinking skills are used as tools both for advocates and audiences.
  • CC264 - Oral Presentation of Literature (4 Credits)
    Oral performance of literature (poetry, prose, and drama) is used as the art of understanding and communicating a text's meaning to an audience. Explores the aesthetic dimensions of literature and its performance. Students develop critical skills interpreting texts and evaluating performed literature.
  • CC265 - Professional Voice and Speech (4 Credits)
    Trains voice to develop wide range of controls in pitch, volume, and quality to meet voice and speech needs of journalism, public speaking, and interpretation. International students are encouraged to enroll if interested in accent reduction.
  • CC266 - Conflict and Negotiation (4 Credits)
    Studies conflict theory and principles and practices of dispute resolution. Includes everyday conflict, negotiation, mediation, arbitration, and alternative dispute resolution systems. Emphasizes interpersonal skills development.
    Instructors: Israela Adah Brill-Cass, Robert Kubacki
  • CC280 - Communication Theory (4 Credits)
    Investigates classical and contemporary theories of political communication with an emphasis on utility of theory in mass- and multi-mediated communication contexts. Discusses application of theory to these domains, including examination of how conceptions of the citizen, democracy, aesthetics, morality, and culture are established and maintained vis-a-vis different modes of communication.
  • CC303 - Politics, Advocacy, and Public Opinion (4 Credits)
    Studies the research process from problem definition to survey design, sampling, data analysis, and interpretation of results. Students develop skills in reading and interpreting social scientific research and conducting forms of research pertinent to public and political communication needs.
    Instructor: Spencer Kimball
  • CC304 - Communicative Informatics (4 Credits)
    Studies social-shaping communication technologies. Explores central role of communication in creating and sustaining social communities online and examines web-based technology and use by people in building social networks and organizational structures. Analyzes optimal use of information technology to create social presence and cohesion in multiple contexts. Individual and/or team projects explore human communication and intersection of information technologies.
  • CC305 - Communication Research Methods (4 Credits)
    Teaches the use of social scientific methods of empirical research to investigate communication phenomena. Students learn how to become critical consumers of research and how to conduct empirical communication research. This course fuses basic research principles with theory and practice.
    Instructor: Richard West
  • CC310 - Campaign Management (4 Credits)
    Focuses primarily on electoral campaigns with attention to persuasive campaigns in general. Includes political advertising.
    Instructor: Spencer Kimball
  • CC330 - Management and Communication (4 Credits)
    Introduces fundamental principles of management in profit, nonprofit, and government settings. Special emphasis is placed on humanistic and systems approaches, communication skills and theory, and national and global trends. Sample topics include planning, organizing, staffing, decision making, and leading. Case method is applied.
    Instructor: Ted Hollingworth
  • CC344 - Rhetoric of Social Movements (4 Credits)
    Critically examines prominent rhetorical texts and events that shaped political processes and relationships. Applies insights to contemporary contexts and issues.
    Instructor: Michael Weiler
  • CC345 - Public Affairs Matrix: Media, Politics, and Advocacy (4 Credits)
    Advanced study of interplay of media, politics, policy, and advocacy. Through historical and contemporary case studies and research, students examine a variety of constituencies affecting politics and public policy and the role the media play in political, public policy, and advocacy debates. Propaganda is defined and its role in affecting public opinion is discussed. Studies the relationship between communicator, media, and key constituencies with a focus on ethical, effective use of public affairs.
  • CC350 - Media Broadcast Vocal Presentation (4 Credits)
    Course is designed to complement CC 265, Professional Voice and Speech by focusing on voice training for broadcast media specifically, including microphone technique and practice and understanding of audio and video technology.
  • CC356 - Crisis Communication (4 Credits)
    Details the importance of managing communication in crisis situations. Topics include definitions, types, classifications, phases, planning, publics, contingency events, time estimating, crisis teams, control centers, working with media, training, and follow-through. Crisis scenarios cover profit, nonprofit, and government organizations at the local, regional, national, and/or global level. Case examples are employed.
    Instructor: Vincent Raynauld
  • CC357 - Leadership (4 Credits)
    Analyzes theory and practice of effective ethical leadership in contemporary political and organizational settings; theories for organizing and motivating people; cross-cultural applications; and issues of diversity and communication skills for leadership.
    Instructor: Alexis Fox
  • CC360 - Politics and Emerging Communication Technologies (4 Credits)
    Modern politics is heavily shaped by communication technologies that have influenced political audiences by framing the presentation of political debates. This class focuses on how a move from broadcast media to narrowcasting media such as cable television and the Internet affect political communication. Political messages and strategies must consider the reaches of old and new media. Traditional media are passive one-way communication from a message creator to an audience. In new media, interactivity between message creators and audiences is normative, especially in social media. How do these shifts in media change political power relationships? How do the changes in media influence political communication strategies?
  • CC372 - Topic in Communication Studies (4 Credits)
    Topics announced prior to each term in the areas of Communication Studies.
  • CC415 - Mediation, Facilitation, and Dialogue (4 Credits)
    Considers theory and practice of various forms of third-party-guided dispute resolution. Students learn to mediate conflicts, facilitate discussions, and promote dialogue among parties in conflict. Emphasis is on developing skills in leading groups.
  • CC471 - Topics in Leadership, Politics (4 Credits)
    Special topics in political communication. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Owen Eagan
  • CC472 - Topics in Comm Studies (4 Credits)
    Special topics in communication studies. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Grayson Kimball
  • CC475 - Capstone in Leadership, Politics, and Social Advocacy (4 Credits)
    Advanced theory, research, and practice in political communication. Students develop and enhance portfolios of political communication materials, including development of two communication campaigns.
  • CC476 - Capstone in Communication Studies (4 Credits)
    Advanced theory, research, and practice in communication studies. As a key feature of the course, students complete a senior thesis or project.
    Instructor: Spencer Kimball
  • CC608 - Public Affairs (4 Credits)
    Students gain the knowledge and skills necessary to identify, analyze, and communicate with internal and external stakeholder groups for the purpose of persuasion. Rhetorical strategies are developed for ethical, effective issue advocacy campaigns and campaigns to build identity, and enhance and protect reputation of individuals and organizations. New media developments, diverse and global stakeholder groups, and the 24/7 media environment will be addressed. Students design and produce at least one original communication campaign for a client in the private or public sector.
  • CC609 - Political Communication (4 Credits)
    Political Communication explores fundamental theories, such as agenda setting, framing, and branding. The balancing of ethical implications confronting many political communication situations is discussed through case studies. Practical communication strategy is evaluated, looking at how the media works in general, including the news (hard and soft), entertainment programs, and advertising, in order to shape political perceptions, change attitudes, and effect behavior. Students are introduced to the latest in grassroots activism and mobilization efforts, including mobile and online communication techniques, to better shape civic life, elections, and policy decisions.
    Instructor: Vincent Raynauld
  • CC610 - Conversational Communication for International Professions (2 Credits)
    Students develop oral communication skills that will support their areas of professional development with an emphasis on critical thinking as expressed through dialogue.
  • CC611 - Group Dynamics for International Professionals (2 Credits)
    Students learn group theory that leads to direct application of the use of groups for problem solving, with discussion centering on the intersection between theory and practice and the relevancy of group behavior to professional experience.
  • CC612 - ELL Academic Writing (2 Credits)
    Focuses on developing academic writing skills: grammar, paragraph structure, paraphrasing, and using appropriate citation styles and research sources.
    Instructor: Jeremy Heflin
  • CC613 - ELL Academic Speaking (2 Credits)
    Focuses on improving speaking skills: fluency, pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and use of idioms.
    Instructor: Jeremy Heflin
  • CC626 - Crisis Communication (4 Credits)
    Students learn about the development of organizational and marketing communication strategies in crisis situations. Using case studies and fieldwork, students focus on the importance of internal communication and media relations during a crisis. Students also investigate preventive strategies that organizations should employ to avoid crises.
    Instructor: Owen Eagan
  • CC643 - Global Communication (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the management of communication with stakeholders in a world defined by globalization. Case studies, role-play workshops, and ethnographic inquiry are employed to enhance and update the student's knowledge and awareness of best-practices in contemporary business negotiations and transactions, public diplomacy initiatives, and cross-sector partnerships. Examples from small business to multinationals and from local nonprofits to global NGOs are used.
    Instructor: Mohamed Khalil
  • CC645 - Public Opinion Research and Practice (4 Credits)
    Students engage in applied research in communication management. Students develop skills in assessing and formulating problems; designing research; gathering, synthesizing, analyzing, and interpreting data; and applying the results to comprehensive communication strategies. Students learn to apply the most appropriate quantitative and qualitative research methods to particular research problems in an effort to effectively address stakeholder audiences, oversee information management systems, and cultivate and manage intellectual capital. Students gain experience in surveys, polling, focus groups, interviews, communication audits, and learn how to optimize research conducted through the Internet-based research.
  • CC648 - Public Relations (4 Credits)
    Addresses in-depth the development of stakeholder relations and communication in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Topics covered include corporate relations, reputation management grassroots organizing, public policy and the media, political communication, social advocacy campaigns, and public diplomacy. Case studies of communication campaigns at the local, state, regional, national, and international levels are used. Students produce and present at least one communication campaign to affect behavior in diverse stakeholder groups.
    Instructor: Ted Hollingworth
  • CC651 - Persuasion (4 Credits)
    Examines how communicators in businesses, nonprofits, and government employ principles and techniques of persuasion to serve organizational goals. Uses persuasion theory, both classical and modern, to illuminate how strategic messages, both within organizations and to external stakeholders, are planned, composed, delivered, and evaluated. Surveys different forms and contexts of strategic communication and illustrates them with case studies.
  • CC652 - Emerging Communication Technologies (4 Credits)
    Surveys the political, social, and economic trends of the 21st century with an eye on the effects and uses of information technology in the shaping and reshaping of institutions. Students develop a media literacy that informs their own consumption of mediated content. Through a series of exercises and collaborative projects, they use this literacy to guide their strategic use of media formats, applications, and technology in developing every aspect of organizational communication--from the narrowest internal communication to the broadest public communication campaigns.
    Instructor: Linda Gallant
  • CC655 - Project Management and Communication (4 Credits)
    Develops skills in understanding, applying, and assessing the process known as project management in a variety of environments. This is accomplished by introducing and applying the following: systems theory and its philosophical underpinnings; project management theories, methods, vocabularies, and skills; organizational communication theories; team building theory, application, and trends; and global workplace implications and trends.
  • CC692 - Capstone Course in Communication Management (4 Credits)
    Students synthesize prior coursework and new learnings to address an important need in public or organizational life. Calling upon competencies in strategic communication planning and design, students produce and present a final professional-level project as the culmination of their course of study. Readings, case studies, and in-class activities support continued inquiry into the most current theoretical dimensions of the discipline.
    Instructor: Phillip Glenn
  • CC695 - Seminar Topics in Comm Mgmt (4 Credits)
    Students have the opportunity to enroll in special topics courses that are offered by the Department of Communication Studies when contemporary ideas or new research findings in a chosen area of program study emerge in the field of communication. This course number represents a new course offering that, if successful, will become a permanent course in the course roster.
  • CD153 - Images of the Disabled (4 Credits)
    Studies how the disabled are portrayed in film, theatre, and literature in contrast with the realities of society. Examines the issue of disability as a culture.
    Instructor: David Kociemba
  • CD162 - American Sign Language 1 (4 Credits)
    Introduces American Sign Language and American deaf culture. Students learn commonly used signs and basic rules of grammar. The course also explores information related to the deaf community, interaction between deaf and hearing people, and deaf education.
  • CD193 - Introduction to Communication Disorders (4 Credits)
    Introduces the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology, and the variety of communication disorders affecting children and adults. Students learn to use clinical terminology to describe treatment sessions during in-class guided observations. Guest speakers include speech-language pathologists and audiologists who describe their various work experiences.
    Instructor: Joanne Lasker
  • CD201 - Language Acquisition (4 Credits)
    Explores the theoretical and practical aspects of the language learning process and its relation to other aspects of cognitive and social development. Includes discussion of the development of speech and language skills throughout the life span, from birth to adulthood.
    Instructor: Mary Hughes
  • CD208 - American Sign Language 2 (4 Credits)
    Continues to expand on receptive and expressive skills in ASL with emphasis on developing use of classifiers and the role of spatial relationships.
  • CD233 - Phonetics (4 Credits)
    Studies the various aspects of speech sounds and their production with a focus on articulatory, acoustic, and linguistic bases. Students learn to discriminate, analyze, and transcribe speech sounds using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). The relevance of course content to clinical and other applications is discussed as students learn to use the IPA to transcribe the speech of individuals with communicative impairments and different social dialects and accents. This course may be of special interest to students interested in acting, radio, and/or television broadcasting.
    Instructor: Lisa Lavoie
  • CD234 - Speech and Hearing Anatomy and Physiology (4 Credits)
    Studies the structure of the biological systems that underlie speech, language, and hearing with an emphasis on the processes and neural control of respiration, phonation, resonance, and articulation. Clinical disorders are used to elucidate dysfunction of these normal processes as substrates for human communication.
    Instructor: Alisa Ruggiero
  • CD309 - American Sign Language 3 (4 Credits)
    A continuation of American Sign Language II. Students continue to expand different grammatical features of time signs and some different forms of inflecting verbs. In addition, students continue to develop conversational strategies in asking for clarification, agreeing, disagreeing, and hedging.
  • CD312 - Survey of Speech Disorders (4 Credits)
    Provides students with a basic understanding of speech disorders including articulation and phonology, voice, fluency, neurogenic disorders, and dysphagia. Issues related to assessment and intervention are addressed. Integration of information from the literature into class discussion and written assignments is expected. Students observe diagnostic and therapy sessions toward completion of the 25 hours required by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. They become familiar with clinical terminology and its use in written assignments.
    Instructor: Alisa Ruggiero
  • CD313 - Survey of Language Disorders (4 Credits)
    Provides students with a basic understanding of disorders of human communication associated with developmental and acquired language disorders in children and adults. Assessment and intervention are addressed. Students observe diagnostic and therapy sessions toward completion of the 25 hours required by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. This is a writing-intensive course in which students write a major term paper with revisions and learn to use the APA writing conventions.
  • CD400 - Clinical Foundations (4 Credits)
    Introduces the clinical process and methodology that underlie observation, assessment, and treatment of communication disorders in children and adults. Students learn to plan and execute a therapy session with a selected client. Clinical writing skills are developed through a variety of written assignments such as treatment plans, data collection and analysis, and progress notes.
  • CD403 - Speech Science (4 Credits)
    Examines the physiological, acoustic, and perceptual processes involved in speech production and perception. Students get exposure to instrumentation for the display and acoustic analysis of speech sounds. This course may be of special interest to students in radio and television broadcasting who want to better understand properties of speech.
  • CD409 - American Sign Language 4 (4 Credits)
    A continuation of American Sign Language III. Students continue to expand knowledge and use of advanced grammatical features and further develop conversational abilities.
  • CD467 - Introductory Audiology (4 Credits)
    Includes detailed anatomy of the ear with an overview of the physics of sound and current medical and audiologic management of hearing loss. Covers pure tone and speech audiometry, site-of-lesion testing, and audiogram interpretation.
    Instructor: Stephane Maison
  • CD468 - Aural Rehabilitation (4 Credits)
    Examines theories underlying habilitation and rehabilitation procedures for deaf and hard-of-hearing children and adults. Covers the effects of hearing loss on an individual and family, education of children with hearing loss, use of sensory aids, and design of aural rehabilitation programs for various populations.
  • CD600 - Intro to Clinical Methods (1 Credit)
    Required for graduate students from undergraduate fields other than communication disorders and introduces them to clinical practice. Through class discussion, required observation of clinical work, and community screenings, students begin to understand the dynamic interactions between clients and clinicians.
    Instructor: Betsy Micucci
  • CD601 - Clinical Methods I (1 Credit)
    Following the completion of prerequisite coursework and observation hours, students are taught assessment procedures, treatment strategies, and clinical writing skills. The course covers policies and procedures required for on-campus clinical performance as part of pediatric group treatment experiences and/or individual treatment for persons of all ages. This course must be passed prior to enrolling in CD 602.
    Instructor: Betsy Micucci
  • CD602 - Clinical Methods II (1 Credit)
    Focuses on assessment, intervention, documentation, and legislation related to work with school-aged children. This course must be passed prior to enrolling in CD 603.
    Instructor: Sandra Cohn Thau
  • CD603 - Clinical Methods III (1 Credit)
    Students learn about the role of the speech-language pathologist in clinical work with adults and issues pertinent to conducting effective assessment and treatment sessions with various communication disorders in this population. Additional topics include health care reimbursement and regulation, health literacy, and the role of other team members in adult settings. This course must be passed before enrolling in CD 604.
  • CD604 - Clinical Methods IV (1 Credit)
    Focuses on professional issues and the transition into professional practice.
  • CD605 - Clinical Practicum (1 Credit)
    As students progress through the program, they will be assigned to a variety of clinical opportunities both on and off campus. Students enroll in CD 605 for a minimum of five semesters.
    Instructor: Sandra Cohn Thau
  • CD609 - Research Methods and Measurements (3 Credits)
    Teaches fundamentals of data collection and interpretation in a clinical context. Students will learn about psychometric and normative data supporting diagnostic measures, how to select appropriate diagnostic tools and interpret the resulting data. Students will collect their own data sets, select and conduct statistical tests, and interpret results. A key component of the class is to understand what questions are clinically relevant to ask, what measures are appropriate to answer those questions, how to collect the relevant data, and the applications and limitations of statistical tests to interpret the results.
  • CD623 - Fluency Disorders (3 Credits)
    Explores the nature of stuttering from theoretical and empirical perspectives. Cluttering and neurogenic and psychogenic stuttering are also examined. Procedures for evaluating and treating/managing stuttering among children and adults are emphasized.
    Instructor: Amit Bajaj
  • CD635 - Speech Sound Disorders (3 Credits)
    Presents normative and theoretical perspectives on speech sound development as well as assessment and treatment of the disorders of articulation and phonology. General treatment strategies and specific treatment programs are emphasized. Research in evidence-based practice is highlighted.
  • CD641 - Dysphagia (3 Credits)
    Addresses feeding and swallowing mechanisms and processes, as well as current assessment procedures and management options that occur from infancy through adulthood.
    Instructor: Gary D. Gramigna
  • CD645 - Language and Literacy Disabilities (3 Credits)
    Focuses on the relationship between spoken and written language and its role in language-based learning disabilities in school-age students. It addresses the characteristics of language, reading, and spelling impairments; the subtypes of these disorders; and the different intervention approaches used with them. Various models of language and reading development and their disorders are reviewed.
  • CD650 - Motor Speech Disorders (3 Credits)
    Students learn the etiology, assessment, diagnosis, and principles of rehabilitation of speech production disorders in individuals with acquired neuropathologies. Information is presented in the context of speech production theory and (where appropriate) of the neurological disease of which the speech disorder is a symptom.
    Instructor: Alisa Ruggiero
  • CD651 - Autism (1 Credit)
    This seminar provides a framework for determining appropriate speech and language assessment techniques, therapeutic objectives, and intervention strategies for children with autism and pervasive developmental disorders. It includes a review of current perspectives on differential diagnosis, etiology, and core challenges faced by this population of children at various developmental stages. The unique learning style characteristics of children with autism and pervasive developmental disorders are reviewed along with appropriate intervention/educational models and tenets of "recommended practice."
  • CD652 - Craniofacial Anomalies (1 Credit)
    This seminar reviews failures in craniofacial growth and development and the subsequent associated speech and language disorders. Communication and speech issues related to cleft lip and palate, dental malocclusions, and neuromuscular dysfunctions of the head and face are included. The role of speech-language pathologists in diagnosis and treatment within interdisciplinary models of case management is emphasized.
  • CD653 - Counseling and Family Systems (1 Credit)
    This seminar provides a survey of approaches to counseling with emphasis on application of counseling theories to persons with communication disorders and their families. Exploration of strategies for assessing and working with the family system are also included.
  • CD654 - Early Intervention (1 Credit)
    This seminar provides information regarding early intervention context. Emphasis is placed on understanding this population, the service delivery system, its consumers, and their special needs. The speech-language pathologist's role in providing direct assessment, treatment, and advocacy for children and their families is integrated into each topic area.
  • CD659 - Special Topic Seminars (1 Credit)
    A range of current topics in the field will be selected and scheduled.
  • CD677 - Voice Disorders (3 Credits)
    Addresses the characteristics, etiology, evaluation, and clinical management of voice disorders and associated pathological conditions in both children and adults. Neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of voice and speech production are reviewed.
    Instructor: Daniel Kempler
  • CD680 - Neurologic Bases of Communication (3 Credits)
    Outlines the anatomy and functional neurophysiology of human communication and provides an overview of neurodevelopment and its processes and disorders. Although the organization of the human nervous system is presented, emphasis is placed on the relationship of this organization to the components of the various communicative, cognitive, linguistic, sensory, and motor processes that are central to human communication and to the treatment of its disorders.
    Instructor: Ruth Grossman
  • CD682 - Foundations of Language Acquisition (3 Credits)
    Surveys language learning and its neuropsychological underpinnings. Current theoretical perspectives are introduced and analyzed with respect to their clinical and educational implications. Selected methods for evaluating developing language are also reviewed, with special emphasis on the influence of cultural and linguistic diversity on language learning outcomes.
  • CD684 - Augmentative and Alternative Communication (3 Credits)
    Provides an overview of augmentative and alternative communication systems (AAC) and the process of selecting and implementing these systems for children and adults. The first section of the course concerns the basic processes of AAC: messages, symbols, alternative access, assessment and intervention planning. The second section describes issues related to people with developmental disabilities who require AAC services. The third section focuses on AAC for people with acquired communication disabilities.
    Instructor: Joanne Lasker
  • CD686 - Preschool Language Disorders (3 Credits)
    Examines current perspectives in defining, assessing, and intervening with children with language disturbances from infancy through the preschool years. In addition, issues surrounding older individuals with language functioning in the preschool developmental age range are described. Particular attention is given to assessment and intervention techniques for children and individuals at pre-linguistic, emerging language, and conversational language levels. Additional considerations include multicultural issues, working with caregivers and peers, non-speech communication alternatives, and the diverse roles played by speech-language pathologists.
    Instructor: Kelly Farquharson
  • CD689 - Audiology in Speech-Language Pathology (3 Credits)
    Provides students with audiological information relevant to the scope of practice for speech-language pathologists. Basic testing and screening techniques, interpretation of audiometric results, and habilitative and rehabilitative methods are discussed with reference to the current literature.
  • CD690 - Aphasia (3 Credits)
    Pathophysiology, epidemiology, and prevention of aphasia, its nature, assessment, and diagnostic procedures, and approaches to intervention are presented. Issues surrounding recovery and prognosis, and treatment efficacy and outcome are also included. All areas are presented with reference to the current literature in the field and to its clinical application.
  • CD692 - Cognitive Communicative Disorders (3 Credits)
    Communication disorders consequent to dementing processes, closed head injury, and damage to the right cerebral hemisphere are covered. Pathology, assessment, differential diagnosis, and treatment are addressed with reference to the current literature.
    Instructor: Daniel Kempler
  • DA203 - Perspectives in World Dance (4 Credits)
    Focuses on learning to "see" and "hear" the form and music of the art of dance across world cultures. Students focus on specific dance ethnographies to understand cultural difference through a study of dance and human movement and to explore contemporary anthropological concerns about representation, globalization, history, and identity. Throughout their study, students focus on various theoretical models in anthropology for studying dance/performance. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective and the General Education Global Diversity requirements.
    Instructor: Kathy Hassinger
  • DA231 - Dance Composition I: Improvisation (4 Credits)
    Guides students in the discovery, development, and exploration of their own movement and imagery. The stimuli for dances include personal experiences, abstract ideas, relationships, emotions, and a variety of real or imagined materials. Prerequisite: permission of the dance area head.
    Instructor: Marlena Yannetti
  • DA233 - Ballet I (2 Credits)
    Explores the fundamentals of ballet technique for beginning students. Through the traditional class sequence, students become familiar with ballet terms and technique. The class begins at the barre and progresses to center combinations, which emphasize the development of musicality, flexibility, strength, and control. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of the dance area head.
    Instructor: Shawn Mahoney
  • DA234 - Modern Dance I (2 Credits)
    Presents the fundamentals of the concert dance form exemplified in the styles of Graham, Limon, and Cunningham for beginning students. It focuses on the development of technique, including floor work, center, and traveling components. Students explore a wide range of axial and spatial movement while developing flexibility, placement, control, and a concept of dance as a performing art. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of the dance area head.
    Instructor: Nicole Pierce
  • DA235 - Tap Dance I (2 Credits)
    Explores the technique, style, and rhythmic structure of tap dancing. Students work toward expanding the movement vocabulary. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of the dance area head.
  • DA237 - Jazz Dance I (2 Credits)
    An introduction to the American dance form of jazz, including blues and musical theatre dance. Utilizing East Indian and African-Cuban rhythms, this technique is based on exercises and movement developed by choreographer Jack Cole. Classes focus on the development of strength, flexibility, isolation, and control through a series of stretches, strengthening exercises, and center floor combinations. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of the dance area head.
  • DA333 - Ballet II (2 Credits)
    Students at the intermediate level are encouraged to explore the technical and artistic aspects of classical ballet. Each class begins with a series of exercises at the barre and continues into center floor combinations, which may include pirouettes, beats, and jumps. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of the dance area head.
    Instructor: Marlena Yannetti
  • DA335 - Tap Dance II (2 Credits)
    Students at the intermediate level concentrate on exploring more sophisticated levels of technique, style, and rhythmic structure of tap dancing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of the Dance faculty.
  • DA337 - Jazz Dance II (2 Credits)
    Training in American jazz dance integrates a number of jazz styles, including Jack Cole, Fosse, and African-Cuban, which are performed today in the musical theatre and in concert. Students work to develop control, strength, and speed, with an emphasis on movement isolation and a clear jazz style. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of the dance area head.
    Instructor: Marlena Yannetti
  • EC203 - Principles of Economics (4 Credits)
    Introduces and focuses on the essential concepts and principles of microeconomics. Studies the allocation of resources under scarcity through decisions made by individual consumers, firms, and business. Students will examine, understand, and prioritize decisions and behaviors that affect many resources, whether financial, environmental, or human.
    Instructor: Nejem Raheem
  • GM601 - Marketing Management in a Global Environment (4 Credits)
    Introduces the economically integrated global marketplace that addresses the global economic environment, social and cultural environments, legal and regulatory considerations, foreign exchange and financial decision-making, marketing research, strategic alternatives for global market entry and expansion, and cooperative global strategies and strategic partnerships. Emphasizes differences between domestic and global strategies when applied to product development, pricing, and distribution, and focuses on the unique role of promotion within a global marketing framework.
    Instructor: Cathy Waters
  • GM603 - Global Multicultural Consumer Behavior (4 Credits)
    Grounded in theories of behavioral economics, this course examines human and consumer behavior within cultures, how members of diverse cultures differ, and the criteria upon which cultural members can and cannot be compared. Cultural value systems are highlighted as they provide insight into the impact of cultural differences on individual and group processes such as decision-making, verbal and nonverbal communication styles, and organizational structure. Models of decision-making and information processing are also explored.
  • GM604 - Research Methods for Global Marketing Communication and Advertising (4 Credits)
    Provides students with an in-depth understanding of the research process, including formulation of research questions and determination of research design including data collection methods, sampling, data analysis, and interpretation. Introduces students to the world of networked information as well as the application of information technology to decision-making in a global business context.
    Instructor: Seounmi Han Youn
  • GM605 - Financial and Strategic Context of Global Market Planning (4 Credits)
    Examines the financial environment surrounding marketing decisions in global enterprises. Financial and strategic tools essential in planning and evaluating marketing activities are examined in an overview of financial aspects of marketing decision-making such as forecasting, budgeting, optimizing, valuing, evaluating, and auditing results. Students apply these tools to marketing and communication decisions in strategic planning that addresses challenges of designing and implementing plans across a global enterprise.
    Instructor: Alan Gonsenhauser
  • GM606 - Global Marketing Communication Planning (4 Credits)
    Introduces disciplines within marketing communication and the concept and practice of integrated marketing communication planning. Describes fundamental theory and practice within advertising, public relations, sales promotion, direct marketing, e-commerce, event planning, and sponsorships. Reviews global issues and institutions in the practice of these disciplines in multinational organizations.
  • GM612 - Global Public Relations (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the role of public relations in a global setting, application of market research to public relations, the benefits and limitations of analytical frameworks applied to strategy development, and models of roles and ethical responsibilities of corporations engaged in public relations. Attention is given to the evolution and practice of public relations in major global markets.
  • GM614 - Global Advertising (4 Credits)
    Examines organizational and external environments surrounding global advertising decisions. The impact of business trends, regulatory environment, media management, agencies, and advertisers in global communication planning are discussed. Challenges such as standardizing communication strategy, choosing an agency, allocating decision responsibilities, localizing creative executions, assessing foreign buyers and media audiences, and media planning in multiple markets are examined.
  • GM620 - Global Brand Management (4 Credits)
    Examines the challenge of branding in a worldwide context and provides a systematic approach to all aspects of creating and managing brands. Students are given a comprehensive framework regarding branding alternatives, issues for segmentation and brand research, communicating brand and corporate identities, managing the mix, and organizational and legal issues. Students explore the opportunities offered through line and brand extensions using case studies.
  • GM630 - Interactive and eCommunication in Global Environments (4 Credits)
    Students learn how organizations use the Internet and other interactive technologies to communicate with consumers and the public in global environments, and to examine the differences between traditional media vehicles and the Internet within the context of strategic communication. Students explore how communication has changed given media and delivery system convergence as well as market democratization. Ethical and legal parameters of technology-based communication are also covered.
  • GM636 - Creative Thinking and Problem Solving in a Global Environment (4 Credits)
    The abundance of choices available to consumers for products and services, coupled with messages about them, necessitates that companies differentiate themselves creatively in global markets. Creativity and innovation are becoming cornerstones of business--qualities managers seek in employees and skills graduates must have to excel. This course explores the nature of creativity, creative thinking, and problem solving in a global environment. Interactive exercises, case analyses, discussions, and projects foster and enhance creativity.
    Instructor: Thomas Vogel
  • HC200 - Principles and Practices of Health Communication (4 Credits)
    Introduces the study and application of principles and practices of health communication. This is a foundation for students in exploring what we know about our health due to the different components of communicating about health. Specifically, topics cover doctor-patient communication, the role of culture, social support, family health history, varied communication channels, technology, health campaigns, risk communication, and government policies. Case studies of health practices are used to illustrate these different topics.
    Instructor: Nancy J. Allen
  • HC250 - Topics in Health Communication (4 Credits)
    Focuses on current topics in health communication such as those related to culture, diversity, and communication. May be repeated for credit it fopics differ.
    Instructor: Nancy J. Allen
  • HC400 - Health Communication Campaigns (4 Credits)
    "Just Say No." "This is your brain on drugs." "Live Strong." "Race for the Cure." Health campaigns have influenced our perception of issues related to health and health behaviors for decades. Students learn the process of health campaigns to obtain the skills to develop, implement, and evaluate their own health campaign for a community effort. The course also discusses the role of public health, perceptions of health, and the variety of communication channels available when creating these campaigns. Cross-listed with CC 420.
  • HC601 - Applications of Communication Theory for Health Communication (4 Credits)
    Explores the role of theory, research, and practice in health communication. Investigates provider-patient interaction, social support networks, medical ethics, mass media, and health promotion and disease prevention. Covers the role of communication in health, including the role it plays in individuals' social and cultural expectations and beliefs about health, how such information influences people to think about health and effect behavioral change, and how communication may be used to redefine and change public health policy. Includes readings, projects, exams, and class interaction.
    Instructor: Timothy Edgar
  • HC602 - Media Strategies for the Health Professional (4 Credits)
    Students develop an understanding of the strategic use of the media by health communicators in message development and communication strategy execution. Students also explore the ethical concerns of healthcare professionals who utilize the media. Students learn how to develop effective health communication campaigns that bring about behavioral change among target audiences and influence health policy issues at the local, state, national, and international level. In addition, students learn how to develop evaluation techniques for health communication strategies.
  • HC603 - Research Methods (4 Credits)
    This course is organized around the research process in which students learn how to formulate a research question and define a research problem, decide upon a research design, assess data collection methods, define a sampling frame, determine types of data analyses, interpret data appropriately, and prepare a research report. Topics in both qualitative and quantitative research methods are included. Further, students gain an understanding of the importance of research in the development of health communication strategies.
    Instructor: Christine Skubisz
  • HC605 - Special Topics in Health Communication (4 Credits)
    Occasionally, courses are offered that capitalize on trends in health communication or which address topics not covered in other courses in the program. May be repeated when topics vary.
  • HC610 - Applied Learning Experience (4 Credits)
    A capstone experience for students completing the Health Communication program. Students conduct research and develop and implement a communication plan to address the needs of a health-related organization in the Boston area. Projects may include the creation of training modules for health professionals, patient education, health information dissemination, policy advocacy, and the like. Students produce a final report.
  • HI102 - Western Civilization and Culture (4 Credits)
    Studies the rise of civilization from its beginnings in the Neolithic Revolution through the classical empires, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the hegemony of European and American civilization throughout the world. Explores in greater detail the influence of Judaism and Christianity in this process.
  • HI201 - Non-Western World History (4 Credits)
    Examines history in a variety of non-Western contexts. The content will vary based upon the non-Western context selected for the semester. Students will focus upon historical events and the impact of these events for civilization in Asian, African, or Middle Eastern contexts.
  • HI203 - Social Movements in the U.S. (4 Credits)
    Examines political movements of industrial and agricultural workers, the unemployed, and the poor to gain power and economic rights since the Great Depression. Chronicles movements that shaped the policies of the New Deal and the Great Society, and analyzes the ways in which these movements fostered a conservative response late in the century. Explores history in the context of the ideals of democratic liberalism, the emerging power of corporate capitalism, and the modern conservative political coalition. Students study historical texts and a variety of cultural sources (literature, films, photographs, songs, and museum exhibitions).
    Instructor: Roger House
  • HI204 - Islam in the World (4 Credits)
    Pursues an interdisciplinary study of the origins of Islam and the role of Mohammed, the global expansion of the faith, the theology and thought of the Koran and Moslem traditions, and forms of art and architecture generated by the teachings of the prophet. Explores the impact of the renewal of Islam and its increasing role in the modern world.
    Instructor: M. Chloe Mulderig
  • HI208 - The World Since 1914 (4 Credits)
    Explores and develops an understanding of modern history by focusing on an examination of the Russian Revolution, Nazi Germany, Fascist Italy, the origins and events of World War II, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War.
  • HI211 - African-American History (4 Credits)
    Survey sub-Saharan history of the pre-colonial era, and the history of African Americans from the slave trade through the Civil War to the present.
  • HI235 - History of the United States (4 Credits)
    Studies the history of the United States from its colonial beginnings to the present, focusing on the Civil War and its consequences.
    Instructor: Roger House
  • HS101 - First-Year Honors Seminar 1 (4 Credits)
    Introduces the interdisciplinary study of literature and cultural theory, addressing issues of power and ideology in various multicultural contexts.
  • HS102 - First-Year Honors Seminar 2 (4 Credits)
    Introduces the interdisciplinary study of literature and cultural theory, addressing issues of power and ideology in various multicultural contexts.
  • HS103 - Honors Writing Symposium (4 Credits)
    Taken in conjunction with HS 102, develops skills in research, critical thinking, and writing. Stresses revision, relies on frequent workshops of student writing, and aims to sharpen ability to research, evaluate, and use evidence in a reasonable and convincing way. Write an extended research paper on a topic related to HS 102.
  • HS201 - Sophomore Honors Seminar 3 (4 Credits)
    Engages critical thinking and research about philosophical, cultural, and scientific methods of generating knowledge and their ethical implications. Different areas of inquiry are examined each year. Recent topics include environmental ethics, evolution, astronomy, and epistemology.
    Instructor: Diana Sherry
  • HS202 - Sophomore Honors Seminar 4 (4 Credits)
    Engages critical thinking and research about philosophical, cultural, and scientific methods of generating knowledge and their ethical implications. Different areas of inquiry are examined each year. Recent topics include environmental ethics, evolution, astronomy, and epistemology.
  • HS490 - Honors Thesis (4 Credits)
    At the end of junior year or after completing the Junior Honors Seminar, students file an Honors Thesis Proposal with the Honors Program director. The proposal includes a description of the overall topic in terms of the general issue or project, the specific question or questions formulated, and the general ways in which the student will address the question(s) and accomplish the project. After a successful defense of their proposal, Honor students produce an Honors thesis in their senior year. Students work independently, but consult regularly with the thesis faculty advisor to evaluate and revise the work in progress. The final thesis represents the student's abilities and a commitment to serious intellectual work. At the time the student writes the thesis, he/she will be enrolled in and have previously taken the Honors Program Colloquia.
  • IN107 - Forbidden Knowledge (4 Credits)
    Addresses basic philosophical questions posed by Western civilization accustomed to unshakable faith in power of knowledge to provide solutions to fundamental challenges facing humanity. Addresses problem equating knowledge with power from its origins in Greek Judeo-Christian cultures to the quintessential modern story of Frankenstein. Sources drawn from poetry (Goethe and Shelley), drama (Aeschylus), literature (Mary Shelley and Voltaire), and philosophy (Descartes and Rousseau) provide an introduction to the heritage of textual and visual material for contemplating the meaning of knowledge for human existence.
    Instructor: Roseanne Montillo
  • IN108 - Love and Eroticism in Western Culture (4 Credits)
    Love and eroticism were once the epicenter of philosophy. Yet, since the 19th century, love and eroticism have been secondary to "desire," which suggests more of a structure than an individuated experience. Many theorists repeatedly state that one cannot know desire. Course explores the relationship between this alienating structure and the ego-validating interpersonal encounters we call love so as to rethink the roles that love, desire, and eroticism play in our lived experiences.
    Instructor: Roseanne Montillo
  • IN111 - The City (4 Credits)
    Explores the development of the modern city and the impact of urbanization on politics, perception, and spiritual dimension of human life. Examines conceptions of the postmodern city that emerged in the late 20th century and collapse of modernist ideals of architecture and urban life. Primary texts from sociology, urban planning, and architecture are explored.
    Instructor: David Kishik
  • IN117 - Women Artists in Cultural Contexts (4 Credits)
    How has the cultural construction of gender difference placed women at the margins of artistic practice? To what extent have philosophies of art and aesthetics sustained the paradox by which women are simultaneously doubted as artists and represented as muses? Occupying a position inside and outside the domain of artistic practice, the woman artist compels us to challenge both the meaning of gender and the nature of creativity. By engaging text drawn from feminist theory, literature, philosophy, cultural studies, memoir, and visual media, we will explore how women artists register, protest, and subvert the tension arising from pairing “women” and “artist.”
    Instructor: Erika Williams
  • IN123 - Visiting Scholar Topics (4 Credits)
    Topics address the expertise of visiting scholars-in-residence in the Institute. These topics are offered on a rotating basis. Past topics include: American Popular Culture, Blook Rites, Ethics and Communication, and Shakespearean Exclusion.
  • IN126 - Literature of Extreme Situations (4 Credits)
    How are human identities shaped, transformed, distorted, and annihilated, or transformed by extreme personal and social experiences? How and why do people make meaning of such experiences through the creation of art, film, and literature? Reading/viewings include tales of obsession, addiction, and adventure, as told through memoir and fiction. Historic and journalistic accounts of genocide, natural disasters, cults, and other mass experiences are also explored. Primary thematic emphasis is on the integrity of the individual and the continuity of the community. Perspectives from the disciplines of psychology, sociology, and philosophy provide the conceptual framework for discussion.
    Instructor: Jason Roush
  • IN127 - The Politics of the Past: History, Memory, and the Arts (4 Credits)
    Moving from the micro-history of the family to the global history of war, this course examines multiple ways societies remember the past. While public memorials and monuments may tell national stories about Civil War battles, the trauma of the Holocaust, or Vietnam, students also study how personal memoirs, graphic novels, or poetry create counter-memories. Students approach these and other questions using the rich historical resources of Boston, looking for material history. Explores emergent new technologies of memory, asking how they may shape a future archive. Students produce their own creative historical projects at the end of the course
  • IN130 - Exoticism in Literature and Art (4 Credits)
    Explores the history of exoticism, the "charm of the unfamiliar" in literature and art, the specific relationship between the artist or author, the subject, and the intended audience that creates the essence of the "Other" and the fascination with the foreign. Explores colonial fascination with the exotic -- foreign landscapes, customs, cultures -- in 18th- and 19th-century fiction, nonfiction, painting; contemporary representations of exoticism, including photography and auto exoticism. Students discuss film, television, pornography, and performance art through interdisciplinary written and visual media (literature, painting, photography, advertising).
  • IN135 - Ways of Seeing (4 Credits)
    Investigates how we see and how to look. The aim of the course is to provide an interdisciplinary platform for exploring and examining visual language and visual culture. Explores the techniques used by the artist/producer to communicate meaning through visual means and the way images are received by the spectator in various cultural contexts. Focuses on how we apprehend and process visual information from our interior and exterior experience, from images as they appear in our dreams and through the lens of memory, to the kinds of images we are confronted with every day, from graffiti to photography, fine art to advertising. Students are encouraged to think critically about what makes up their visual world through mindful looking, reading, writing, and creative projects.
    Instructor: Mirta Tocci
  • IN138 - Staging American Women: The Culture of Burlesque (4 Credits)
    Investigates and traces roles and images of women in vaudeville and burlesque of the late 19th and early 20th centuries and their offshoots. Cultural contexts, performance contents, ideas about gender performed in burlesque genre and powerful role they played in shaping dominant ideologies. Parodies, gender roles and relationships, and the highly controlled social and cultural power of the female form and demeanor forecasted a range of interwoven performative and visual arts designed to elaborate, explore, and exploit American ideologies of sex and gender. Ziegfeld girls, pin-up art of Alberto Vargas, early sexploitation films of Sonney and Freidman.
  • IN146 - Making Monsters (4 Credits)
    From origins of Western literature to contemporary blockbuster films, the monster has been a cross-genre mainstay of storytelling. Monsters represent culturally specific fears in forms from prehistoric beasts running rampant in the modern world to the terrifying results of scientific experiments gone wrong. Through a broad sampling of fiction, poetry, academic writing in anthropology, history, cultural studies, and narrative and ethnographic films, students develop the understanding that monsters do not emerge from thin air, but are manifestations of racial, sexual, and scientific anxieties. Discusses cultural and historical roots of monsters from Beowulf to Frankenstein.
    Instructor: Cynthia Miller
  • IN150 - Creativity in Context (4 Credits)
    Why do people create? Literature, film, art, and psychology provide the conceptual framework for solving the mystery of the creative impulse. What are the hallmarks of the creative personality? Is there a causal relationship between mental illness and artistry? How does the larger community of artists -- muses, collaborators, and competitors -- inspire an individual creator? Must artists be motivated by a sense of duty to society? Orwell's Why I Write, Hemingway's A Movable Feast, Plath's journals, and interviews with artists from the Beatles to Joan Didion to Francis Ford Coppola further illuminate the inspirations, motives, and processes of great artists.
    Instructor: Meta Wagner
  • IN152 - Cultural Constructions of Identity (4 Credits)
    Explores the complex relations among different modalities of identity, focusing on race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, religion, and nationality. Many individual groups assert their identities without articulating convincing arguments. Indeed, it is often assumed that such individuals need not defend their rights; that one's own identity is a private matter that does not tolerate any intrusion. Bases of belief systems are examined through a variety of interdisciplinary texts that span the fields of literature, cinema, history, sociology, philosophy, and popular culture.
  • IN154 - Power and Privilege (4 Credits)
    What forms does privilege take, and what is its relation to power and oppression? How can we identify the ways that we may benefit from privilege? What responsibility do people in positions of privilege bear with regard to the benefits they enjoy? Why might people in positions of privilege want to work against it, and what can they do? This course provides students with the tools and resources to identify and address questions of privilege and power as they arise in relation to social categories such as race, class, gender, sexuality, and physical ability.
    Instructor: Claudia Castaneda
  • IN155 - Rethinking Race (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to the multidimensional aspects of race in the contemporary United States. It has three main interrelated objectives: exploring the history of race and racism in the world and the United States; introducing students to concepts and theories of race; and analyzing race and racism in the contemporary United States. Using examples from the media, popular culture, and everyday life, students will investigate the different ways race and racism work with gender, sexuality, class, ethnicity, space, and nation.
    Instructor: Yasser Munif
  • IN200 - Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies (4 Credits)
    Introduces the interdisciplinary field of women's and gender studies. Topics include "common differences" uniting and dividing women and men; how womanhood has been represented in myth, literature, and media; how gender inequalities have been both explained and critiqued; how gender acquires meaning when connected to race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality; and how to address feminism's historical role in promoting gender studies. Explores central paradox of contemporary thinking: the necessity to make gender both matter and not matter.
  • IN203 - Post-Colonial Cultures (4 Credits)
    Investigates the historical, socioeconomic, and ideological contexts within which 20th-century post-colonial cultures have been produced and are negotiated. Providing geographical coverage and theoretical frameworks, it examines cultural production from formerly colonized nations. Analyzes primary material and critical contexts within which these materials can be read and understood.
    Instructor: Nigel Gibson
  • IN206 - Introduction to Digital Media and Culture (4 Credits)
    Helps students develop an informed and critical understanding of how interactive media shape and influence society and communication. Student are exposed to ideas around participatory technologies, collaborative media, social networks, mobile platforms and digital culture. The course looks at the evolution of communication and media industries in the interactive age and explore how the future of digital culture will influence daily civic life, national agendas, and global ideas.
  • IN208 - Rainbow Nation? Race, Class & Culture in South Africa (4 Credits)
    With the end of apartheid and the inauguration of Nelson Mandela as president, South Africa became known as a "rainbow nation." While this "new" South Africa became a symbol of hope for the possibilities of racial reconciliation around the world, more than 15 years after the first multiracial election inequality remains a stark reality. This course examines the intersection of economic, political, social, and cultural forces shaping contemporary South African society. Through engagement of a variety of texts (including literature, memoir, and film), students explore topics such as apartheid and Afrikaner cultural identity; black intellectual, cultural and political resistance movements; the Truth and Reconciliation Commission; and, hope and disillusionment in post-apartheid South Africa.
    Instructor: Cara Moyer-Duncan
  • IN210 - Topics in Global Studies (4 Credits)
    Providing geographical and historical coverage as well as theoretical frameworks, these interdisciplinary courses examine contemporary issues in post-colonial and global studies through local, national, and regional contexts. Courses focus on such issues as globalization, cultural production, politics and power, multiculturalism and identity, and migration and immigration. Past topics include: Arab Uprisings; Race, Class, and Culture in South Africa; and Borders in Contemporary Latin America. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • IN212 - Topics in Interdisciplinary St (4 Credits)
    Rotating topics explore interdisciplinary fields such as cultural studies, women's and gender studies, and urban studies/civic engagement. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Murray Schwartz
  • IN216 - Topics in Dig Media & Culture (4 Credits)
    Rotating topics examine one or more of the following: questions of digital citizenship, the networked public sphere, online communities, the history and aesthetics of new media, and how emerging media and technologies inform and reinvent social processes. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • IN223 - Blacks, Whites, and Blues (4 Credits)
    Looks at U.S. social history, race relations, and blues culture as a reflection of social change. Explores historical and literary materials relevant to African American social and economic development and white American cultural and oral-expressive nature of African American culture, relationship to social experience, and influence on mainstream American culture. Topics include American social/musical culture, the plantation South, migration, urban adaptation, experience of women, New Deal and 1960s counterculture politics, and influence of blues culture internationally.
    Instructor: Roger House
  • IN235 - The Arab Uprisings (4 Credits)
    What are the origins of the spectacular Arab uprisings that millions of Americans followed closely, and which led to the toppling of authoritarian regimes in several countries? Are we witnessing real revolutions or simple regime change? What are the implications of these revolts on the Western world, U.S. foreign policy, and representative liberal democracy? This course explores the modern history of the Arab world to investigate the origins and significance of the recent uprisings. It examines the interplay of culture, political economy, and history to help us contextualize the ongoing Arab revolts. Drawing on interdisciplinary fields, it engages with debates and controversies about the changing contours of the Middle East and North Africa in a world fraught with an economic crisis.
    Instructor: Yasser Munif
  • IN319 - Feminist Cultural Theory (4 Credits)
    Considers feminist theoretical engagements with culture. Addresses issues that have become central to feminist theorizing, including "the body," "identity and difference," "technoscience," and "the gaze." Through close readings of key texts paired with uses in further theoretical work of these texts, students become familiar with feminist cultural theoretical work, learning how to read and understand it, as well as how to make use of its interdisciplinary and diverse offerings. The reading, discussion, and writing practices incorporated into the course provide students with a feminist theoretical "toolkit" for engaging with different aspects of culture -- from popular culture to technoscience to everyday life.
  • IN322 - Global Identity, Local Consumption (4 Credits)
    Globalization is a universal topic of discussion in contemporary politico-economic issues, but it is often one of the most misunderstood terms in debate on an almost daily basis. Students question what globalization means' a more prosperous lifestyle and the spread of Western commodities, culture, and values or "cultural imperialism"-through a discussion of foods, identity, society, and migration. How does the food we eat shape our understandings of the global and the local? What is politico-economic solvency in such a globalizing world?
  • IN324 - Documenting Visual Culture (4 Credits)
    Examines art, performance, films, and television produced by minority and under-represented peoples from local and international contexts through the lens of anthropological and social theory to see how these acts of visual communication are also sites of cultural and social reproduction. Students are also encouraged to take ethnographic methodology, specifically participant observation and field writing, and incorporate it into their research practices and artistic production in their major.
    Instructor: Kathryn Ramey
  • IN326 - The Dammed Shawsheen: Blending Ecology and Economics in the Real World (4 Credits)
    Examines how to integrate ecological and economic perspectives to inform public decision-making related to natural resource management. Focuses on a proposed dam removal project on the Shawsheen River in northeastern Massachusetts. Students study the project background in the context of the history of New England, visit the current dams, and hear from different stakeholders. The course concludes with student mastery of a cost-benefit analysis that assesses the project from ecological, social-welfare, economic, and historical perspectives.
  • IN331 - Key Contempory Thinkers: Marx (4 Credits)
    This course is about Marx’s theory through the writings of Karl Marx, introducing students to Marx’s thought through close readings and discussions of Marx’s texts. The course engages key concepts in Marx's thought, such as alienation, ideology, class struggle as well as his critique of capitalism.
  • IN332 - Key Contemporary Thinkers: DuBois (4 Credits)
    Explores the intellectual, cultural, and political contributions of W.E.B. Du Bois, as examined through a broad selection of his writings, drawn both from his greater- known works of political thought, sociology, and critical race theory and his lesser-known works of literature, which encompassed the genres of fiction, nonfiction (essay and memoir), and drama. Beginning with his early life and work, students trace his development as a thinker and writer through the Niagara and New Negro Movements, the Harlem Renaissance, and the post-WWII contexts of American and Black Atlantic political and intellectual histories. Special attention is paid to the role played by literary production and criticism in the larger interdisciplinary projects of promoting equality for African Americans (and indeed, for all people of African descent) and critiquing American democracy. How might art—especially literature—best serve the demands of social and ethical praxis? Why did Du Bois turn, again and again, to imaginative discourse, even as he continued to work as a civic leader and political thinker?
    Instructor: Erika Williams
  • IN333 - Civic Media (4 Credits)
    This course not only explores the various goals that campaigns are using digital tools to meet, but also focuses on what type of citizen these tools are enabling and encouraging people to become. Students look at academic research surrounding citizenship and engagement in a digital era and cover research into many genres of civic media, from citizen journalism to hackathons. Additionally, it focuses on questions of design: How best can we, as media creators, encourage certain behaviors? What type of citizens are we building when we make design choices?
    Instructor: Russell Newman
  • IN374 - Topics in Interdiscipl Studies (4 Credits)
    Rotating topics explore interdisciplinary fields such as European studies, women's and gender studies, and urban studies/civic engagement. May be repeated for credit if topic varies.
  • IN402 - Living Art in Real Space: Multidisciplinary Art and the Collaborative Process (4 Credits)
    Examines the development and language of multidisciplinary art from the early 20th century to the present day, with reference to specific artists, trends, and movements. Lectures, slide and video presentations, museum visits, student research, reading, writing, and in-depth experiential processes address how different artistic disciplines inform one another and come together in visual art performance and installations. Culminates in final presentations of multidisciplinary work by student groups documenting and mapping the sources, methods, and process of their collaborations.
    Instructor: Mirta Tocci
  • IN403 - The Shock of the Old: Representations and Renaissance Culture (4 Credits)
    Themes of identity and difference, meaning and paradox, and accommodation and strife are traced through Renaissance drama, poetry, painting, music, other visual media, and the speculative essay. Explores "period" attempts within these media to formulate vocabularies of representation and affect. Relates one's own interpretive practices and assumptions to the thematics of Renaissance representation through written and oral exercises and examination of modern critical and artistic representations and (re)interpretations of Renaissance texts.
    Instructor: Robert Dulgarian
  • IN406 - Queer Dreams: Politics, Culture and Difference (4 Credits)
    Who or what is queer? How is the term being used to identify ways of living, political goals, social practices and cultural productions? Is queer a new identity, or does it question the terms of identity itself? How do questions of difference - of race, class, gender, sexuality, embodiment, and geo-cultural location - shift or inflect the meaning of this term, and the ways it is mobilized politically and culturally? Just as the term "queer" has been reclaimed from its negative usage, it has also been taken up and revised in a variety of ways that both extend and transform its meanings. Taking up of theory as a way of dreaming, this course focuses on theoretical work in queer studies, offering students the opportunity to explore new possibilities for thinking and living "queer."
    Instructor: Claudia Castaneda
  • JR101 - Discovering Journalism (4 Credits)
    Explains how journalism has changed America and the world. Considers the role of journalism as a public service in a democratic society. Students read, view, and listen to the finest and most influential stories. They chart the news in U.S. history, from the American Revolution to today's digital revolution. Students analyze how print, broadcast, and online news have evolved and examine media from other parts of the world. They also explore ethical issues confronting the contemporary journalist and develop knowledge of the First Amendment principles.
  • JR102 - Foundations of Journalism (4 Credits)
    Students appraise and apply the fundamentals of reporting, writing, and producing news. They cover stories in the Greater Boston community and learn how to develop story ideas, define the focus, and identify and evaluate sources. Students also examine and implement reporting strategies for print, broadcast, and online news stories. They incorporate journalistic standards and practices in all newsgathering and news story presentation. Students write and organize basic news stories with skill, accuracy, and clarity and develop a disciplined use of form and style in news writing.
  • JR103 - The Digital Journalist (4 Credits)
    Covers the use of audio and visual media to tell news stories. Examines modern media, analyzes still and moving images, sound, and best web practices. Students learn how to use photography, videography, and audio to tell compelling stories. They develop and report multimedia stories in and around Boston. Image and sound manipulation and other ethical challenges in the digital age are discussed.
  • JR202 - Beat Reporting Across Media (4 Credits)
    Students learn to cover a geographic or community beat, developing and producing stories in text, audio, and video about a community in Boston. Lectures emphasize the role and function of major institutions in public life, from courts to city hall to Congress; basic public records and research; interviewing; and story origination. Students are assigned to a neighborhood beat and must develop stories in specific areas of civic life, from public safety to demographics change and its impact on community.
  • JR211 - Law for Journalists (2 Credits)
    Examines the American legal system and its relationship to the press. Students gain an understanding of journalists' rights and legal responsibilities and study case law that sets legal limits for journalists. Examines ethical decision-making in gray areas. Covers basic structure and processes of federal and state courts.
    Instructor: Marc Cantor
  • JR212 - Ethics for Journalists (2 Credits)
    Considers journalists' ethical responsibilities, in relation to professional standards and legal limits. Examines ethical decision-making and current ethical questions using case studies.
    Instructor: Karen Bordeleau
  • JR216 - Advanced Audio-Video Journalism (4 Credits)
    Provides intense writing for visual and audio news. Students continue to develop news judgment as it relates to video and audio. They produce and write radio newscasts and reporter packages, as well as organize a video news brief and reporter packages. Students shoot, write, and edit video and audio voiceovers and soundbites for storytelling.
    Instructor: Stephen Iandoli
  • JR220 - Interactive News (4 Credits)
    Introduces the history and theory of the news media on the Internet and web and to the reporting, writing, and designing of online news. In the first half of the semester, students analyze best practices of online news publications and write their own blogs. In the second half, they report, write, and design a multimedia website.
    Instructor: Shannan Adler
  • JR221 - Photojournalism (4 Credits)
    Explores photography as a journalistic storytelling medium by teaching how to communicate news visually in a variety of situations. Develops skills such as shooting pictures on deadline, writing concise and compelling cutlines, and editing for impact. Through historical and contemporary examples, students learn about the power of photojournalism to document, inform, entertain, persuade, and provoke emotion. Examines the ethical and legal challenges of photojournalism.
    Instructor: Maria Stenzel
  • JR240 - Sports Reporting (4 Credits)
    Provides real-world basis for sports coverage in print, broadcast, and online media. Students produce a range of stories in each media, learn the basics of sports beat reporting, learn the necessity of research and reporting for sports stories, deepen knowledge of sports as it appeals to media consumers, and learn how to compete for positions in the job market.
  • JR241 - Radio Journalism (4 Credits)
    Students learn how to write, report, and produce radio news including international, national, and local news. They learn the process of developing story ideas and gathering and organizing information in a way acceptable for broadcast. Students learn how different types of news stories are reported on radio in short form, breaking news, long form, and podcasting. They identify newsmakers and develop further understanding of the broadcast news field. Professionalism, integrity, and accuracy are practiced at all times.
  • JR261 - Feature Writing (4 Credits)
    Students learn to research, organize, and write feature articles for newspapers, magazines, and online media. They develop techniques for finding and focusing stories, interviewing in-depth, improving observation, structure writing, and storytelling. Students understand the variety of feature writing approaches.
    Instructor: Thomas Gagen
  • JR292 - Public Affairs Reporting (4 Credits)
    Introduces the structure and functions of state, local, and federal government from a journalist's perspective. Students report and write in-depth stories on proposed legislation, campaign finance, and current issues in government. Students also become familiar with and make use of public records and open meeting laws, learn advanced reporting skills through readings and class lectures, and review and critique each other's stories.
  • JR318 - TV News Producing (4 Credits)
    Students experience deadline-driven television newsroom operations by producing newscasts and rotating through newsroom jobs such as tape editor, writer, producer, anchor, reporter, and videographer. They write news scripts, edit video to tell a news story, organize and produce a newscast, coordinate video elements for a newscast, and work together as a broadcast news team.
    Instructor: Dana Rosengard
  • JR320 - Enviornmental Journalism (4 Credits)
    Hands-on course in which students prepare multiple stories on environmental issues, learning the topic and the skills. It is both a discussion course and a working course, embracing science and doing reporting. The course has a special focus on the story of the century: the climate change that will affect every aspect of our society. But it examines a wide range of environmental topics, from local to national to global. Discussion touches on the history of environmental reporting from Rachel Carson to the current fireworks between those who dispute global warming and journalists who report on it. Students learn how to recognize and find good stories, how to approach environmental issues; how to deal with scientists; and how to research, report, write and produce from the field. Multimedia reporting is expected.
  • JR354 - News Editing and Design (4 Credits)
    Students develop and practice the craft of editing: refining news copy and choosing how and where it will run in a newspaper or on a website. They learn to edit stories for content, structure, word usage, and story flow. Students write headlines and learn appropriate software needed to design pages. Explores issues of style, bias, stereotyping, fairness, and taste.
    Instructor: David Richwine
  • JR364 - Specialized Reporting (4 Credits)
    Develops background knowledge, understanding, and expertise in a specialized area of journalism. Topics may include politics, blogs and the media, the media and the presidency, war reporting, and impact and Pulitzer stories. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • JR365 - Topics in Cultural Afairs (4 Credits)
    Develops background knowledge, understanding, and expertise in a specialized area of culture, arts, entertainment, or sports. Topics may include music journalism, food/fashion reporting, or performing arts reporting. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • JR366 - Top in Science, Tech & Health (4 Credits)
    Develops background knowledge, understanding, and expertise in a specialized area of science, health, or technology. Topics may include environmental journalism, science reporting, health and medical reporting, or reporting on new technologies. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Melinda Robins
  • JR368 - Topics in Advanced Multimedia (4 Credits)
    Develops background knowledge, understanding, and expertise in a specialized area of advanced multimedia. Courses focus on producing journalism across media or the web. Topics may include investigative journalism, telling narrative or complex stories across platforms, computer-assisted reporting or multimedia editing, web design, and production. May be repeated for credit if topics differ. Students are encouraged to have completed JR 220 prior to enrolling in this class.
  • JR419 - ENG/TV News Reporting (4 Credits)
    Students work in the field to research, shoot, write, and edit video news stories. They develop reporting and interviewing skills, visual acuity, writing for the eye and ear, and general TV performance abilities. Students also learn and utilize the technical aspects of video shooting and editing.
    Instructor: Carol Yelverton
  • JR450 - Metro News Service: Collaborative Project (4 Credits)
    Students cover local news stories and a local news beat to produce on-deadline stories in all media, to be published in collaboration with the Our Town sections of the Boston Globe, a city news bureau, or some other college-professional collaboration.
  • JR485 - Journalism Topics (4 Credits)
    Develop background knowledge, understanding, and expertise in a specialized area of journalism. Topics vary from semester and year and explore various aspects of journalism theory and practice. This is reserved for courses being introduced on a one-time or developmental basis.
  • JR490 - Online Publishing Capstone (4 Credits)
    Students create a series of multimedia stories for a personal portfolio of online journalistic work. They use advanced tools for creating interactive stories to produce immersive journalistic stories. Text, video, audio, and photos are used to produce journalistic stories that are difficult to tell in print or broadcast alone.
    Instructor: Paul Niwa
  • JR491 - Broadcast Jour Capstone (4 Credits)
    Refines and further develops ENG or producing skills at an advanced level with the goal of putting together a professional portfolio by semester's end. In addition to completing a body of work, students are expected to engage in in-depth research and critical analysis.
  • JR492 - Deep Reporting Capstone (4 Credits)
    In this project-based course, students pitch, research, report, write, and revise a single long-form story or a series. Work might range from long-form narrative magazine articles or mini-documentaries to multiple-part series on a topic of public importance.
  • JR493 - Backpack Journalist Capstone (4 Credits)
    Students carry out a project from start to finish, learning skills of self-employment, multimedia, marketing, self-editing, and pitching stories. They learn the basics of budgets, taxes, benefit, and legal implications of freelance and sole-proprietor journalism. Students learn about the risks and benefits of practicing journalism without the shelter, and restrictions, of a newsroom. They discover how to juggle technology, reporting, and entrepreneurial skills.
    Instructor: Doug Struck
  • JR555 - Reporting Issues of Diversity (4 Credits)
    Develops the knowledge and critical thinking skills needed to function and thrive as a journalist in America's culturally diverse society. Analyzes media coverage of a wide spectrum of underrepresented groups, and challenges personal and societal stereotypes. Students learn from guest speakers, readings, and videos about the realities of different groups as well as the job of journalists trying to cover them.
  • JR561 - TV News Magazine & Documentary (4 Credits)
    Takes a behind-the-scenes look at TV news magazines and documentaries with a focus on research, reporting, and production techniques. Explores how to put together longer-form stories from the initial pitch to the final product. Examines the importance of character development and dramatic storytelling. Covers effective management practices from controlling budgets to directing personnel.
    Instructor: Marianna Edmunds
  • JR585 - Journalism Topics (4 Credits)
    Develops background knowledge and expertise in a specialized area of journalism. Topics vary from semester and year and explore various aspects of journalism theory and practice. Course category is reserved for courses being introduced on a one-time or developmental basis. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • JR602 - Critical Perspectives (4 Credits)
    Reflects on the shifting state of journalism and its ethical challenges in a historical context. Historical examples are used to show how journalists have facilitated and contributed to civic life and change. Students explore how journalists have helped build a more just society and reflect on how they might reinvent and reinvigorate journalism’s role in society.
    Instructor: Emmanuel Paraschos
  • JR607 - Reporting and Writing (4 Credits)
    Teaches students how to think and act like a journalist, developing the mindset, skillset, and toolset. Students practice reporting and writing skills to cover and produce stories in all media. They cultivate fundamental research and interviewing skills so that their stories are focused, adequately sourced, accurate, and thorough. Students learn to report stories quickly and ethically.
  • JR609 - Visual Storytelling and Reporting (4 Credits)
    Students develop an ability to tell stories in a visual language by studying and producing multimedia stories. They start by identifying a story focus and capturing it in a photograph. They then progress to slideshows, audio, video, and interactive works. This course discusses the rights and responsibilities of visual journalists and the emerging philosophies transforming digital media. Students build their social media audience and create an e-portfolio that is developed throughout the master's program.
  • JR612 - Advanced Reporting (4 Credits)
    Students cover communities bound by geography or common interest. Emphasis is on gaining a deeper understanding of groups largely neglected by traditional media. Students report and produce stories about issues, concerns, and events important to the communities. They build relationships and gather or analyze data about their communities. A panel of community members will give feedback on the students' journalism.
  • JR620 - Online Multimedia (4 Credits)
    Extends student learning of visuals in journalistic storytelling by developing a more sophisticated use of electronic newsgathering and presentation technologies. Students collaborate to produce news for television, web, mobile devices, and other visual media. They design graphics in ways that supplement, complement, and enhance journalistic storytelling.
  • JR623 - Data Visualization (4 Credits)
    Students organize information from existing databases and their own data collection to create graphics that help citizens explore their community, nation, and world with new depth. Using graphics software and basic programming code, students create both static and animated graphics that show proportions, visualize relationships, or display trends over time.
  • JR626 - Global Journalism (4 Credits)
    Studies the news media around the world and the history and implications of media globalization. What are the press systems like in other countries? How have the web and social media affected local as well as international news flow? How does shrinking international coverage influence American public opinion and policy? Students look at the development of today's international communication systems from the telegraph to social media. They examine issues of ownership and control, local culture and content, and media development: the continuing agenda to build media systems so that the disenfranchised can gain information and have a voice.
  • JR628 - Law and Public Policy for Journalists (4 Credits)
    Enables students to find, investigate, and navigate through government and research documents, court decisions and documents, and laws and regulations. Students examine the historic reasoning and debate relating to today's laws and regulations. They develop an understanding of the impact of law and public policy in society and within specific communities to inform their journalism.
  • JR629 - Media Theory & Research (4 Credits)
    Media is central to our lives, not only for the information that informs our decision-making - For whom should I vote? Should I bring an umbrella today? - but in ways that shape our culture and understanding of the nation and world at large. This class looks at the research conducted in the academy that interrogates the workings of the media in society in general, and the news media in particular. We cover both the social-scientific and critical/cultural studies schools of theory, and the quantitative and qualitative research that results from these two paradigms.
  • JR632 - Long-Form Storytelling (4 Credits)
    Students learn how to plan, report, draft, and revise a single long-form piece of text journalism, or an in-depth series designed primarily for text and based on depth or immersion reporting. This story or series is complemented with appropriate multimedia elements. The course serves as a foundation for the capstone experience and for other depth reporting classes. It emphasizes establishing long-form focus, planning, the writing process (from initial idea through revision), plotting, and executing multimedia elements and presentation, reporting for substance and story, writing and revision, and placing the story. At the end of the course, students prepare a proposal for a capstone project.
    Instructor: Jerry Lanson
  • JR635 - Long Form Docum & Multimedia (4 Credits)
    Students produce a long-form video or multimedia story as a class. The project is visually driven, including online video, an advanced data visualization, or the implementation of a community media program. Students practice researching a topic, setting objectives, capturing visual assets, and organizing media into a cohesive design to create a professional-level piece or series of pieces. At the end of the course, students prepare a proposal for a capstone project.
    Instructor: Marianna Edmunds
  • JR637 - Editing and Web Producing (4 Credits)
    Students learn to use language with precision and economy in journalism. A variety of stories are edited for accuracy, grammar, style, organization, fairness, and legal issues. Students work as web producers, editing copy, writing headlines and summaries, and editing photos and writing captions
  • JR660 - Feature Writing (4 Credits)
    Students research, organize, write, and market feature articles for publication in newspapers and magazines. They learn techniques for finding and focusing stories, interviewing in-depth, observation, and storytelling. Students analyze and apply a variety of approaches, from the personal essay to the dramatic narrative.
    Instructor: Melinda Robins
  • JR664 - Specialized Reporting (4 Credits)
    Print and broadcast students enroll in a variety of specialized and beat-reporting classes such as sports reporting, investigative reporting, cultural affairs reporting, science and health reporting, political reporting, and business reporting.
  • JR688 - Capstone (4 Credits)
    The capstone experience provides master’s degree students with the opportunity to demonstrate: (1) reporting, writing, and multimedia producing skills developed throughout the program; and (2) the ability to practice journalism that enables a vibrant discussion of ideas and encourages civic engagement
  • LF101 - Elementary French 1 (4 Credits)
    Stresses mastery of essential vocabulary and primary grammatical structures through a situational approach. Students perceive that language is "living" and they discover by the third week of the semester that they can already communicate in French. Class time is devoted to interactive practice. Conversational skills, pronunciation, and understanding are verified through regular oral exams.
    Instructor: Pierre Hurel
  • LF102 - Elementary French 2 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of LF 101, this course also incorporates reading skills and exposes students to a wider range of cultural materials.
  • LI120 - Introduction to Literary Studies (4 Credits)
    Gives students intensive practice in literary analysis, critical writing, and related research. In discussing primary texts, considerable attention is given to elements of the different genres (e.g., narrative point of view, narrative structure, metrical and free verse), as well as to issues relevant across literary genres (e.g., form and content, voice, contexts, tone). Readings are chosen from the following genres: poetry, drama, narrative modes, and also include selected literary criticism.
    Instructors: MaryEllen Beveridge, Christina Carlson, Brian Cronin, Jackie Hall, Christopher Hennessy, Gazmend Kapllani, Daniela Kukrechtova
  • LI201 - Literary Foundations (4 Credits)
    Surveys foundational works of Western literature in poetry, nonfiction, fiction, and drama in order to familiarize students with literary history as well as the history of our ideas of love, duty, the afterlife, virtue, and vice. Authors studied may include Homer, Sophocles, Plato, Virgil, Ovid, Dante, Boccaccio, the Beowulf poet, and Chaucer.
  • LI202 - American Literature (4 Credits)
    Introduces representative works of American literature in several genres from the colonial period to the modern by writers such as Bradstreet, Franklin, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Douglass, Melville, Dickinson, Whitman, Chopin, Twain, Crane, Hurston, Faulkner, Williams, and Moore.
  • LI203 - British Literature (4 Credits)
    Historical overview of several genres of British literature from the Renaissance to the 20th century, focusing on writers such as More, Spenser, Milton, Defoe, Bronte, Eliot, Joyce, and Beckett.
  • LI204 - Topics in Literature (4 Credits)
    Courses focus on specific themes or topics, such as literature of the city, artists in literature, or coming of age. All topics include literature in at least three genres (selected from poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama).
  • LI208 - US Multicultural Literatures (4 Credits)
    Introduces poetry, fiction, and other genres produced in the multicultural U.S.A. Explores ways writers from disparate communities use various literary forms to articulate resistance, community, and citizenship. Literary texts are situated in their historical contexts and examine the writing strategies of each author. Also includes essays, journalism, and films to learn how diverse cultural texts work to represent America.
    Instructors: Michelle Graham, Christopher Hennessy
  • LI209 - Topics in US Multicultural Lit (4 Credits)
    Courses focus on literature produced by historically oppressed peoples in the United States and on specific themes or topics, such as slavery and freedom, American Indian multi-genre life-stories, or border identities. All topics include the study of literature in at least three genres (selected from poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama). May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • LI210 - American Women Writers (4 Credits)
    Examines fiction, poetry, and other genres by 19th- and 20th-century American women such as Jacobs, Dickinson, Chopin, Kingston, Welty, Rich, and Morrison.
    Instructors: MaryEllen Beveridge, Indira Ganesan, Daniela Kukrechtova, Anna Ross
  • LI211 - Topics in Global Literature (4 Credits)
    Courses focus on literature produced outside the United States in locations affected by imperial expansion. Specific themes or topics might include Literatures of the Asian Diaspora, Latin American Literature and Cinema, or Literature of Europe's Borders. All topics include literature in at least three genres (selected from poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama). May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • LI212 - Black Revolutionary Thought (4 Credits)
    Traces the protest tradition and radical thinking in African American literature. Using landmark essays by W.E.B Du Bois and Alain Locke to frame the debate and then moving from David Walker to Malcolm X and beyond, this course engages questions about the development of the Jeremiadic tradition in African American literature, the role of the black artist in promoting social change, gendered differences in protest literature, and whether politics informs and elevates art or strangles it.
  • LI214 - Latino Literature (4 Credits)
    Explores the idea of borderlands or living on the hyphen by American writers who identify themselves as straddling two cultures. Students read poetry, essays, fiction and theater by authors in the following traditions: Chicano, Puerto Rican (Borinquen), Cuban and Dominican American.
    Instructor: Flora Gonzalez
  • LI215 - Slavery and Freedom (4 Credits)
    Looks at a wide-ranging survey of 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century poems, plays, novels, and nonfiction narratives concerning the issue of American slavery and its aftermath. Explores slave narrative conventions across historical periods as well as themes such as identity, masking, the liberating power of literacy, and masculine and feminine definitions of freedom.
    Instructor: Kimberly McLarin
  • LI216 - Literature of the Gothic (4 Credits)
    Focuses on literary and aesthetic tradition known as the Gothic, following its various manifestations from 18th century England up to present-day America. Students read novels, poetry, short stories and plays. Students interested in postmodern expressions of the Gothic, from graphic novels to film, will be invited to bring these to the table. Is Dracula really about the anxiety of empire? What is Frankenstein saying about social theory and the dangers of Romanticism? And finally, why does Gothic material retain its fascination in the 21st century, when so many aesthetic movements lie moldering in their graves?
    Instructor: William Orem
  • LI217 - Lit, Culture & the Environment (4 Credits)
    Examines the literature, art, and culture of Native and non-Native America and consider how these two very different traditions have affected the environment. Initially, students focus on Native Creation stories and on Genesis in order to better understand the definition of "wilderness." They then study the work of 17th-, 18th-, and 19th-century authors and artists who influenced and/or responded to how the environment should be managed. As students progress to the 20th and 21st centuries, they consider the work of artists, writers, and filmmakers who acknowledge and attempt to come to terms with a drastically changed and oftentimes degraded landscape in their work.
    Instructor: Christine Casson
  • LI303 - The Art of Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Examines a broad range of literary nonfiction works, present and past, paying particular attention to the craft within the nonfiction work but identifying relationships and similarities that literary nonfiction has with the novel and short story. Includes readings from such diverse forms as historical narrative, adventure travel and survival, memoir and the creative nonfiction essay, and other forms of factual writing artfully constructed.
    Instructor: Richard Hoffman
  • LI304 - Topics in Literature (4 Credits)
    Courses focus on specific themes or topics, such as literature of the city, artists in literature, or coming of age. All topics include literature in at least three genres (selected from poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama). May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: William Donoghue
  • LI305 - Modern Poetry and After (4 Credits)
    Explores modern and postmodern traditions of poetry in the works of such 20th-century poets as Eliot, Stevens, Auden, Moore, Lowell, Bishop, Plath, Larkin, Rich, Ashbery, and, in translation, Neruda, Rilke, Herbert, Kazuk, and Tsvetaeva.
  • LI306 - Literatures of Continental Europe (4 Credits)
    Explores seminal works in the European literary tradition, with a particular focus on close reading, textual and rhetorical analysis, and aesthetic criticism. The course may include works by Montaigne, Rousseau, Flaubert, Holderlin, Novalis, Heine, Flaubert, Dostoyevsky, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Proust, Rilke, Kafka, Borges, Bachmann, and Bernhard. Students write short responses to each work and discuss their ideas in class.
  • LI307 - The Art of Poetry (4 Credits)
    Through reading and discussion of poems from different historical periods, students learn the technical aspects of poetry (such as meter, rhyme, and structure) and how poets use these techniques to create meanings and effects, giving students a critical vocabulary for reading and practicing poetry. For students who want to enhance their ability to discuss and write about poetry by learning the essentials of the poet's art.
  • LI308 - The Art of Fiction (4 Credits)
    Explores a broad range of short stories and novels by American and international authors. Teaches students to look at fiction from the perspective of the writer's craft, and emphasizes such elements as structure, narrative, characterization, dialogue, and the differences between shorter and longer forms. Students gain an appreciation of the fiction writer's craft and an enhanced sense of the drama inherent in effective storytelling.
  • LI309 - Topics in Multicultural Literature (4 Credits)
    Courses focus on literature produced by historically oppressed peoples in the United States and on specific themes or topics, such as slavery and freedom, American Indian multi-genre life-stories, or border identities. All topics include the study of literature in at least three genres (selected from poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama). May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Erika Williams
  • LI313 - Novel into Film (4 Credits)
    Studies the adaptation of novels into films, and the narrative conventions that govern each medium. Texts include the works of such writers as Kesey, Burgess, Kundera, Walker, Nabokov, and Puig; films include the work of directors such as Kubrick, Forman, Spielberg, and Babenco.
    Instructor: Kevin Miller
  • LI323 - The American Short Story (4 Credits)
    Acquaints students with the changing thematic and stylistic concerns of the American short story and develops students' critical writing and reading skills. May include authors such as Chopin, Poe, Parker, Hemingway, Faulkner, Stafford, Bambara, Paley, Ford, Oates, and Updike.
  • LI339 - British Novel 1 (4 Credits)
    Engages in social and cultural analysis of the "rise" of the novel in England with representative works from the Restoration (1660) through the end of the 19th century. May include authors such as Behn, Defoe, Sterne, Richardson, Austen, Bronte, Shelley, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy.
    Instructor: William Donoghue
  • LI340 - British Novel 2 (4 Credits)
    Studies representative works of 20th-century British fiction. May cover Modernist authors from the first half of the century such as Forster, Joyce, Ford, Lawrence, Woolf, Waugh, O'Brien, Durrell, Greene, Beckett, Lessing, Murdoch, Golding, and Fowles as well as more contemporary writers from England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland such as McEwan, Barnes, Amis, Crace, Kelman, and Carter.
  • LI361 - Native American Literature (4 Credits)
    Studies works in several genres, including consideration of how traditional myth, story, and ritual contribute to contemporary fiction and poetry, and how the literature reflects and responds to historical and contemporary conditions. May include such authors as Silko, Momaday, Ortiz, Harjo, and Erdrich.
  • LI371 - Shakespearean Tragedy (4 Credits)
    Carefully examines selected tragedies from Romeo and Juliet to Antony and Cleopatra, emphasizing the development of the tragic form.
  • LI372 - Shakespearean Comedy (4 Credits)
    Detailed study of selected comedies from A Midsummer Night's Dream to The Winter's Tale, emphasizing Shakespeare's development of the comic form.
  • LI382 - African-American Literature (4 Credits)
    Surveys African American literature (prose, poetry, and drama) from Olaudah Equiano through Toni Morrison and examines African American literature as part of the field of Diaspora studies. Also explores connections between African American and Caribbean American literatures conceived as literatures of the African Diaspora.
    Instructor: Wendy W. Walters
  • LI393 - American Novel 1 (4 Credits)
    Studies representative American novels written before the 20th century, including works by such authors as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Twain, Chopin, Wharton, and James
    Instructor: Raymond Liddell
  • LI396 - International Women Writers (4 Credits)
    Explores works by contemporary international women writers within their social and political contexts. Readings include work by such writers as Nadine Gordimer, Jamaica Kincaid, Michelle Cliff, Mawal El Saadawi, Bessie Head, Luisa Valenzuela, and others.
  • LI410 - British Romanticism (4 Credits)
    Introduces one of the most significant and revolutionary periods in British literature. Writers such as William Wordsworth, Mary Shelley, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Blake dominated the literary landscape, and their poetry and prose captured this remarkable period of history. This course considers such writers as these in their historical and aesthetic context, and pays particular attention to the ways in which the legacies of the Romantics survive and inform even contemporary modes of literature.
  • LI413 - The Forms of Poetry: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)
    Students study forms of poetry as used by historical and contemporary poets, and then write original poems in those forms (such as the sonnet, villanelle, haiku, sestina, syllabic, and renga), and genre forms (such as Surrealist, Expressionist, Anti-poem, Open Field, and Language poetry).
  • LI414 - After the Disaster: Post-War European Literature (4 Credits)
    Explores post-war European literary works that are marked by a profound sense of loss, disorientation, and pessimism, with a particular focus on the practices of close reading, textual analysis, and theoretically oriented criticism. Explores how the events of the war- most notably the Holocaust -affected the literature of Europe in their wake. Authors to be read include Primo Levi, Ruth Kluger, Marguerite Duras, Maurice Blanchot, Michel Houellebecq, and W.G. Sebald.
    Instructor: Yu-jin Chang
  • LI421 - Topics in American Literature (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in American Literature that concentrate on the study of particular authors, genres, or themes, or on topics related to the special interests and expertise of the faculty. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Robin Fast
  • LI423 - Topics in Global Literature (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in Global Literature that include such topics as Latin American Short Fiction, Postcolonial Literature, and the Hispanic Caribbean, or on topics related to the special interests and expertise of the faculty.
  • LI481 - Topics in African-Amer Lit (4 Credits)
    Studies traditions of African American literature, such as the Harlem Renaissance, Depression Poets and Novelists, or Neo-slave Narratives. Courses may focus on Political Plays of the Sixties, The Blues as Poetry, Spirituals and Jazz as Literature, and include such authors as Wright, Petry, Baraka, Himes, Naylor, and Smith. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • LI482 - Topics in Fiction (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in the novel, novella, and other modes of short fiction from various periods. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Kevin Miller
  • LI526 - Topics in American Literature: LA Stories (4 Credits)
    Los Angeles has inspired writers and communicators like few other cities. This course explores a variety of narrative representations of Los Angeles across different media and genres and offers students a chance to create and workshop their own L.A. stories - be it in fiction, the essay, literary journalism, or their video equivalents. By reading or viewing and then discussing the works of Nathaniel West, Joan Didion, Roman Polanski, and many others, students develop not only a deeper knowledge of the city in which they now find themselves, but also learn about the creative processes and the themes and theses through which L.A. has come to be most widely understood. Offered by the Los Angeles Program only.
  • LI612 - Topics in Poetry (4 Credits)
    Intensive study of poetry, which may focus on an individual poet, a small group of poets, or a school of poetry, and/or may be defined by a single form, theme, region, or period. Topics have included Bishop and Lowell, American Narrative Poetry, Dickinson and Whitman, modern and contemporary Eastern European Poets, and Visionary Poetry.
    Instructor: Pablo Medina
  • LI615 - Top Mult Genres and Hybrid Frm (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in topics that range over two or more genres, and/or focus on combining generic forms. Topics have included The Harlem Renaissance, Native American Literature, Writing on War in the 20th Century, Literature and Violence, The Writer in the Archive, and Hybrid Forms in Literature.
  • LI625 - Topics in Fiction (4 Credits)
    Focuses on fictional narrative. Depending on the instructor, the class may examine texts defined by geography, chronology, culture, and genre. Possible topics of discussion include such issues as craft, theory, mechanics, form, aesthetics, literary movements, and themes. Topics have included Latin American Short Fiction, Diaspora Novelists Between History and Memory, Alienation and the Modern European Novel, Salman Rushdie, Toni Morrison, and Novel into Film.
    Instructor: Flora Gonzalez
  • LI650 - Seminar in the Novel (4 Credits)
    Examines particular narrative strategies in storytelling. Students examine such practices as multiple points of view, chronology, indirect discourse, focalization, etc., as well as historical and cultural contexts. Reading might include works by Nabokov, Proust, Woolf, Faulkner, Sterne, Bernhard, Bowles, among others.
    Instructor: Frederick Reiken
  • LI651 - Seminar in Poetry (4 Credits)
    Analytical and critical study of a variety of poets and/or schools of poetry, modern and contemporary, that explores their approaches to craft, form, and theme, as well as their aesthetic, cultural, and historical assumptions for and about the art.
    Instructor: Jonathan Aaron
  • LI652 - Seminar in Short Fiction (4 Credits)
    Analytical and critical study of a variety of recent American short stories, mostly modern and contemporary, exploring their approaches to form, theme, and technique.
    Instructor: Ladette Randolph
  • LI653 - Seminar in Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the nonfiction narrative, including memoir, personal essay, biography, travel writing, nature writing, and other nonfiction writing from various periods, with particular attention paid to issues of craft and structure, as well as historical and cultural contexts.
    Instructor: Richard Hoffman
  • LI687 - Topics in Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in autobiography, biography, travel writing, nature writing, hybrid forms, and other nonfiction writing from various periods. Recent topics include the Twentieth Century in the First Person, Latin American Women's Autobiography, and the Literary Essay.
  • LS101 - Elementary Spanish 1 (4 Credits)
    Stresses mastery of the essential vocabulary and primary grammatical structures through a situational approach. Students perceive that language is "living" and they discover by the third week of the semester that they can already communicate in Spanish. Class time is devoted to interactive practice. Conversational skills, pronunciation, and understanding are verified through regular oral exams.
  • LS102 - Elementary Spanish 2 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of LS 101, this course also incorporates reading skills and exposes students to a wider range of cultural materials.
  • MB200 - Principles of Business (4 Credits)
    Analyzes information related to business trends, strategies, opportunities, and operations and critically assess alternatives. Through lecture, discussion, case videos, and in-class assignments, students consider external and internal factors driving contemporary business decisions. Topics include: pricing, supply and demand, the management of people, processes, resources, and organization; the globalization of business; the use of information systems to support business efforts; and basic concepts of marketing, sales, business ethics, law, accounting, and finance.
    Instructor: Catherine Flanagan
  • MB300 - Managing Business Operations (4 Credits)
    Explores the operational structure of business, theory, the practices of effective resource management and activities that produce or deliver the goods and services of a business: the management of personnel, materials, equipment, and informational resources that a business needs to produce and deliver its good and services. The course examines how businesses are organized, and how the various departments within a business such as Marketing, Sales, Production, Finance, and Human Resources work together.
    Instructor: Ricci Rizzo
  • MB310 - Finance and Accounting (4 Credits)
    Students become familiar with the language of accounting and learn to create, interpret, analyze, and evaluate financial statements (e.g., balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement). Armed with this knowledge, students then use case studies and in-class exercises to analyze how managers use data presented on financial statements to make decisions about budgeting, cost allocation, and overall company performance.
    Instructor: Stanley Miller
  • MB320 - The Business of Broadcasting (4 Credits)
    Examines radio from a business perspective and covers: the history of radio, networks, radio station operations, media buying, ratings, revenue streams, important legislation, and issues facing radio as an industry. Ownership regulations and the process of buying and selling radio stations are all examined.
    Instructor: Richard Ramirez
  • MB371 - Topics in Business Studies (4 Credits)
    Various topics offering opportunities to examine contemporary and historic business issues, trends and events across the spectrum of business and entrepreneurial studies.
    Instructor: Ja-Nae Duane
  • MB400 - Business Policy and Strategy (4 Credits)
    Serves as the Business minor's capstone course by introducing new levels of complexity to broad concepts learned in previous classes. Uses case studies, trade articles, and time-honored academic frameworks, as well as in-class lectures, group exercises, and discussions to challenge students to apply how legal frameworks, business and government regulations, organizational structures, diverse workforces, and customer and stakeholder expectations influence the way contemporary companies conduct business.
  • MB472 - Entrepreneurship I (8 Credits)
    Introduces and immerses students in the process of creating and launching a new venture. Students learn the history and process of entrepreneurship as they explore creative problem solving, innovative thinking, and ethics. Relevant marketing and public relations strategies are presented in addition to basic financial, business, and human resource issues. Experts in the business world provide additional mentoring and practical knowledge.
    Instructor: Lu Ann Reeb
  • MB473 - Entrepreneurship II (8 Credits)
    Provides an advanced immersion in the process of creating and launching a new venture. Students learn about business planning, marketing research, sales and marketing, legal issues, negotiation practices, and business conduct and further develop public speaking and interpersonal communication skills relevant to starting and managing a business. Students prepare for the business competition at the annual E3 Exposition. Students have the opportunity to learn from experts in the business world.
  • MK120 - Communication, Media, and Society (4 Credits)
    Introduces communication theory and the fundamental relationships that exist between communication systems and society. Emphasis is placed on the social, political, and economic context in which marketing communication emerged and evolved, and the role it plays in maintaining, expanding, and articulating our way of life. Majors are required to complete this in the first year.
    Instructor: Paul Mihailidis
  • MK121 - Marketing and Marketing Communication (4 Credits)
    Explores the key types and core functions of contemporary organizations and the multiple roles marketing plays among them. Marketing's 4Ps and the "marketing mix" are examined in depth so as to understand the context in which marketing communication is practiced. Cases are introduced to acquaint students with the notion and essential elements of "strategy."
  • MK220 - Understanding Consumers (4 Credits)
    Examines people in the context of their role as contemporary consumers. Surveys theories of consumer decisionmaking and behavior and the dominant approaches used to understand consumers today. Emphasis is placed on the role and application of understanding consumers in marketing communications campaign strategy, planning and management.
  • MK221 - Messages, Media & Channels (4 Credits)
    Provides a comprehensive overview of modern media and how they are utilized for messaging in marketing communications. Media are treated at the channel (newspaper, radio, TV, magazine, web, FacebookW-O-M, www, etc.) and practice area (non-paid PR, mass paid advertising, direct marketing, and digitalmarketing) levels. Attention is also devoted to how the various media aggregate audiences and finance themselves, as well as recent changes in the ways they are purchased for use by marketing communicators.
  • MK222 - Brands, Organizations and Strategies (4 Credits)
    Establishes the notion of the brand and brand platform as the central organizing principle of contemporary marketing communications. Examines how the brand platform operates at the corporate and product, agency and campaign, and customer journey levels. Introduces the different types and dimensions of strategies used by the various players in marketing communications to link targets, media and messages in service to the brand.
  • MK230 - Marketing, Sales, and Promotion for Radio (4 Credits)
    Explores the concepts, strategies, and goals of marketing, sales, and promotion for radio, including the planning, coordination, and implementation of successful promotional campaigns. Students also become familiar with audience ratings and market research, identification of target markets, and the integration of promotional elements to promote radio stations and other audio media.
  • MK332 - Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods (4 Credits)
    Introduces the scientific method and the processes of primary quantitative and qualitative research in marketing communications. Marketing problems are identified, research objectives formulated, research design determined, questionnaires developed, sampling methods designed, data analyzed and interpreted. The various uses of research in targeting, positioning, product decision-making, messaging, and media utilization are demonstrated.
    Instructor: Seounmi Han Youn
  • MK333 - Ethnographic Methods & Cult An (4 Credits)
    Explores the tools and techniques of ethnography and their uses in defining and solving marketing research problems. Drawing from the traditions of participant observation in the fields of anthropology, sociology, psychology, and market research, the course applies ethnographic methods to the analysis of subcultures and behavioral minorities as well as transnational marketing communication. The focus throughout is on how to fathom the cultural differences that inform and impact consumer decision-making and marketing communication campaigns.
    Instructor: Paul Hackett
  • MK334 - Online Behavior & Web Analytics (4 Credits)
    Introduces the proliferating services and tools available to capture, measure and assess online behavior, information-gathering, decision-making, shopping patterns, and social groupings. Among these, emphasis will be placed on developing the skillful use of Google Analytics as it can be applied to optimize digital marketing communications efforts and initiatives.
  • MK342 - Breakthrough Thinking and Marketing Communications (4 Credits)
    Explores the nature of creative and critical thinking, as well as the increasing importance of creative problem solving in the context of organizations, product development, and marketing communications. Students practice critical thinking skills with written and visual communication materials. Creative thinking skills, methods, and processes are then used to think differently about original and innovative solutions to various organizational, product, and communication challenges.
    Instructor: Michael Tucker
  • MK343 - Global Brand Strategies and Portfolio Management (4 Credits)
    Examines how the notion of the brand can be taken to scale. Explores the uses of different types of brand architectures by different types of organizations as they grow and expand internationally. Considers the values of the brand to the conglomerate organization as it manages its portfolios of companies, products, and customer segments. Use is made of case analysis.
    Instructor: Anthony Lowrie
  • MK344 - Marketing and Sales, Distribution and Service Relationships (4 Credits)
    Analyzes and addresses how to advance the critical customer-facing relationships within an organization between marketing and the sales force, distribution networks, and customer service. Discusses the different types of arrangements that prevail among these functions in b-b and b-c organizations, and in large and small organizations. Special attention is devoted to customer service policies and to the provision of teleservices.
    Instructor: Roxana Maiorescu
  • MK345 - Organizations & Brands Online (4 Credits)
    Examines the enduring elements of online presence required of companies and brands today: website(s), search profile, e-commerce capabilities, and e-crm. How are these driven by bricks-and-mortar identities established previously; what opportunities and requirements do they generate; how do they function to establish frameworks for digital marketing communications campaign activities?
    Instructor: James Moore
  • MK346 - The Corporate Communications Function and Social Responsibility (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the scope and tasks of the communications function in large organizations. These include the intersection with sales, establishing and maintaining the corporate identity, customer intelligence and advocacy, executive coaching, and constituency relations -- carrying, or supporting, all the outward-facing activities of the organization. Often, the chief communications officer also works to align the organization with broader social trends. The leading contemporary example of this is the Social Responsibility movement, which will be analyzed in detail.
    Instructor: Brenda Wrigley
  • MK352 - Creative Concepts and Storytelling (4 Credits)
    Focuses on "the message" in marketing communications, as both the distinctive idea conveyed in a campaign and the many forms in which it is expressed. Advertising copywriting for broadcast and print is practiced, as is writing for blogs and long-form digital formats. Developing and growing stories, and provoking user-generated content to engage consumers across media platforms, is considered as well.
  • MK353 - Visual Literacy (4 Credits)
    Explores the importance and meaning of visuals in business and marketing communications, from the choice of typeface and layout to the use of images, color, symbols, style, and art direction. The application of these and related elements in logos, print, broadcast, and digital media campaigns are considered. Also discusses the mechanisms companies use to maintain consistent visual identities in their persuasive messaging, and the resources available when they consider changing their visual portrayals.
  • MK354 - Writing for PR (4 Credits)
    A survey and workshop that takes up the many forms of writing practiced in public relations. These include news releases and media kits, editorials and newsletters, brochures, white papers, stockholder and employee communications. The notions of voice and personality as well as consistency and style are emphasized.
    Instructor: Suzy Im
  • MK355 - Sales Promotion and Events Management (4 Credits)
    Addresses the uses, value, and mechanics of special offers and non-recurring events in commercial and nonprofit marketing communication. Trade promotions like price and volume discounting, feature and coop advertising, and in-store displays are covered, as are consumer tactics like coupons, memberships, giveaways, and value-added offers. So too are trade shows and placed-based gatherings. Considers both business-to-business and business-to-consumer applications.
    Instructor: John Newton
  • MK356 - Media Relations (4 Credits)
    Exposes students to a broad range of media management concepts and practices including basic marketing and management communication documents, sources, interviews, spin, crisis communication, ethics, international media relations, interactive media strategies, and analyses of current media-related issues.
  • MK357 - Media Planning and the Customer Journey (4 Credits)
    Focuses on how channels are used in marketing communications to connect audiences with messages. The tools of media research and audience analysis are explained to inform construction of media plans, as are the skills of buying and negotiation that guide implementation of plans. The concept of "customer journeys" is introduced; it is coming to be used by the large media firms created by marketing services holding companies to guide the integrated media plans they provide.
    Instructor: Geoffrey Klapisch
  • MK358 - Social Media: Connectivity, Interactivity, Buzz (4 Credits)
    Social media have captured the imagination of the millennial generation, marketers, Hollywood, and now Wall Street since they emerged several years ago. This course focuses on the strategic uses of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and the Next New Thing. It also considers how the connectivity and interactivity social media represent alter traditional concepts like "companies," "customers," "shopping, buying, and selling," what effect this has had on the strategic marcomm landscape, and why revolutions in communication often turn out to be evolutionary instead.
    Instructor: Douglas Quintal
  • MK443 - Sector Application: Entertainment Marketing (4 Credits)
    Contemporary entertainment industries present special circumstances and opportunities for marketers because they are organized around "properties" that provide differential returns-on-investment for various "media expressions" across orchestrated channels over extended periods of time. This course covers recent developments in major arenas like movies, cable, games, theater, and sports, taking up issues that cut across all of them, like intellectual property, licensing, personal branding, and the life cycle of blockbusters.
  • MK471 - Topics in Marketing Comm (4 Credits)
    Offers opportunities to examine cutting edge issues in marketing communications. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • MK480 - Capstone: The Integrated Marketing Communications Campaign (4 Credits)
    Provides a culminating, integrative experience for majors. Students are organized into teams and challenged to develop and execute a complete integrated marketing communications strategy and campaign plan for an existing client, organization, and/or brand. The work is presented both live and in writing, as it would be in a commercial context. The spring semester course is designed around the annual competition of the American Advertising Federation, in which a team of Emerson majors has traditionally played a significant role.
  • MK604 - Introduction to Research Methods (4 Credits)
    This course is organized around the research process in which students learn how to formulate a research question, define a research problem, generate a research design, establish data collection methods, define a sampling frame, determine data analyses, interpret data appropriately, and prepare a research report. Topics in both qualitative and quantitative research methods are included. Students gain an understanding of the importance of research in the development of communication strategies.
  • MK610 - Marketing Management (4 Credits)
    Introduces the marketing management process of making decisions about products, brands, price, distribution channels, and communications plans to deliver value to consumers. Marketing concepts include research methods, consumer behavior, business marketing, customer analysis, competitive strategy, market segmentation and targeting, and product development. Students use analyses to justify managerial recommendations. Integration is emphasized - developing marketing strategies that are consistent from conception through execution. Case studies from a variety of industries are used in class.
    Instructor: John Teopaco
  • MK617 - Consumer Behavior (4 Credits)
    Students investigate comprehensive multidisciplinary, theoretical views of consumer behavior, and apply them to marketing communication contexts. Integrated marketing communication plans require sophisticated consumer behavior analyses that facilitate segmentation, targeting, and positioning efforts. Students learn about the determinants of consumer behavior through the application of theories from disciplines such as communication, marketing, cultural anthropology, economics, sociology, and psychology. Case studies, exercises, and research help students to understand the complexity of consumer behavior given intrapersonal, interpersonal, and situational influences.
    Instructor: Seung-A Jin
  • MK618 - Marketing Communication Integration Strategys (4 Credits)
    Integrated marketing communication (IMC) is a cross-functional process for creating profitable relationships with customers and publics by strategically controlling all messages sent to groups and encouraging dialogue. Students learn to integrate marketing communication elements (e.g., advertising, public relations, publicity, sales promotion, event marketing, direct marketing, e-communication, and selling) to advance an organization's success and brand equity. Case studies and exercises help students learn how to develop effective IMC plans.
    Instructor: Nicole Ames
  • MK620 - Public Relations Management (4 Credits)
    Students explore the role of public relations in IMC, and learn how to construct a public relations plan by analyzing and interpreting public opinion, develop communication programs to achieve public understanding (e.g., financial, media, or government relations), detail a budget, and describe evaluation techniques for measuring impact. Students develop all aspects of the plan, including constructing press releases and developing public service announcements using case studies or field applications.
    Instructor: Brenda Wrigley
  • MK621 - Writing for Marketing Communication (4 Credits)
    Exposes students to a comprehensive survey of writing techniques for integrated marketing communications. Students learn how to develop and refine their writing of communication such as news releases, brochures, speeches, organizational publications (e.g., annual reports), copywriting, and public service announcements. Intensive writing exercises are employed to help students achieve their goals.
    Instructor: Roxana Maiorescu
  • MK627 - Integrated Communication Strategy in Digital Culture (4 Credits)
    Students learn how organizations use the Internet to communicate with consumers and the public, and to examine the differences between traditional media and digital media within the context vehicles and the Internet within the context of strategic marketing communication. Explores the dynamic ways that digital communication influences human behavior and the impact of new mobile and digital media platforms on consumption, participation, marketing strategy, and audience engagement.
    Instructor: Paul Mihailidis
  • MK630 - Advertising, Sales Promotion, and Publicity Management (4 Credits)
    Explores the roles of advertising, sales promotion, and publicity in IMC. Students learn to develop, manage, and evaluate advertising campaigns. In addition, they investigate how to use sales promotion to bring about behavioral change in the contexts of consumer and trade promotion. Further, they learn how to generate and manage publicity. Students evaluate the legal and ethical issues surrounding these marketing communication efforts.
    Instructor: William Anderson
  • MK636 - Creative Thinking and Problem Solving (4 Credits)
    Consumers have an abundance of product and service options, so companies must use creativity to develop differentiated and relevant communications plans. Creativity and innovation are cornerstones of business and qualities that managers expect from their employees. This course explores the nature of creativity, creative thinking, and problem solving. Interactive exercises, case analyses, discussions, and projects foster and enhance creativity.
    Instructor: Brenna McCormick
  • MK639 - Strategic Brand Management (4 Credits)
    Stresses the importance of the role of the brand in IMC strategies. Students learn why brands are important, what they represent to consumers, and what should be done by organizations to manage them properly. Students learn how brand equity can be created, how to measure brand equity, and how to use brand equity to expand global business opportunities. Brand simulations, readings, and discussions facilitate learning.
    Instructor: Kristin J. Lieb
  • MK648 - Media Management Strategies (4 Credits)
    Offers an introduction to strategic decision making in advertising media planning. Provides an understanding of the challenges involved in making media decisions and executing media plans. Students are introduced to media planning tools and study the impact of changing media trends.
  • MK649 - Measuring and Communicating Investments in Marketing (4 Credits)
    An important function of the IMC manager is to optimize investments across different aspects of the marketing and communication mix. This course reviews fundamental tools of analysis used by managers, such as budgeting, forecasting demand, market and segmentation analysis, return-on-investment valuations, media expenditure planning, and evaluation of marketing communication efforts. Exercises, cases, and readings are used to provide students with exposure to the concepts and practice in applying them.
  • MK653 - Web Page Development and Management (4 Credits)
    Presents the website as an important venue for communicating with various publics and organizations, and as an integrated part of a strategic communication plan. Topics such as principles of web design, evaluation of website effectiveness, tracking user perceptions, and consolidating web page information into overall database management are covered. Topics are organized around website development, maintenance, and assessment.
    Instructor: Peter Kery
  • MK695 - Special Studies in Marketing (4 Credits)
    Occasionally, courses are offered that capitalize on trends in the communication industries or address topics not covered in other courses in the program. May be repeated when topics vary.
  • MT102 - College Mathematics (4 Credits)
    Applies mathematical methods to topics including set theory, mathematical logic, plausible and heuristic reasoning patterns, probability theory, and investment theory including simple interest, compound interest, basic annuities, and amortization.
  • MT106 - Business Mathematics (4 Credits)
    Applies mathematical methods to a wide variety of business decisions including reconciliation, taxation, property and casualty insurance, cash and trade discounts, simple interest, simple discount, compound interest, basic annuities, and amortization.
    Instructor: Eiki Satake
  • MT207 - Statistics (4 Credits)
    Prepares students to use, understand, and evaluate basic statistical techniques. Introduces the most common topics and procedures in descriptive and inferential data analysis, such as measures of central tendency and variability, shapes of distributions, correlation and simple linear regression, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, effect size, statistical power, t-tests, and chi-square.
    Instructors: Michael Duggan, Eiki Satake
  • MU137 - Listening to Music (4 Credits)
    Intended for students with little or no experience in music who want to develop their listening skills and musical understanding. Emphasis is on a non-theoretical study of the elements and compositional principles of music, and careful listening to selected works of master composers in the context of a brief survey of classical music in its historical and social context. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
    Instructor: Fredericka King
  • MU139 - History of Jazz (4 Credits)
    A study of the evolution of jazz, a continuously evolving form synthesizing many different music styles. Attention is given to its African American origins, historical identifications, antisocial tendencies, political aspects, and subjective effects that have effected cultural change. Emphasis is placed on listening to the works of Armstrong, Ellington, Davis, Gillespie, Parker, Monk, Coltrane, and Mingus. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective and the General Education U.S. Diversity requirements.
  • MU201 - History of Music: European (4 Credits)
    A survey of European music from Greek beginnings through the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Classical, Baroque, and Romantic periods up to and including contemporary musical forms. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
  • MU202 - History of Music: American (4 Credits)
    A survey of American music from the first American settlers to the present including the development of such forms as folk, regional, religious, ethnic, jazz, musical theater, and various popular styles. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
    Instructor: Fredericka King
  • MU203 - Perspectives in World Music (4 Credits)
    Investigates music-making within a variety of cultures, including societies from Africa, the Caribbean, India, the Far East, and Native Americans. Musical experience is examined from both the sonic and social perspectives, including musical form, instruments, and style, as well as music's role as a vehicle for defining and representing social values. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective and the General Education Global Diversity requirements.
  • MU204 - Music Analysis I (2 Credits)
    An introduction to the analysis of music, especially as it appears in musical theatre. Topics include song structure, dance forms, and identification of the features in various genres and historical styles. Required for BFA Musical Theatre majors.
    Instructor: Jonathan Mastro
  • MU205 - Music Analysis II (2 Credits)
    A continuation of Music Analysis I, this course focuses on the music and lyrics of songs and shows in the musical theatre repertoire. The focus moves from basic terminology to a more detailed connection between analysis and performance. Other topics include the structure of entire shows, detailed analysis of duets and other ensemble pieces, and an increased focus on recent musical theatre repertoire. Required for BFA Musical Theatre majors.
  • MU256 - Deconstructing Twentieth-Century Art Music (4 Credits)
    Introduces Western art music of the 20th century to non-music majors. Students chronologically explore diverse styles and genres of music as composed by a panorama of vibrant musical personalities in the 20th century. Students' goal will be to demystify some of the construction techniques and resulting sounds that have currently expanded our definition of "e-music." Included in their discovery will be discussions on the interplay of music, literature, and the visual arts as reactive and motivating forces on current 21st-century aesthetics. Students close the course by investigating current trends in art music. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
  • MU353 - Applied Music: Voice (2 Credits)
    Advanced work in vocal technique and development of a repertoire, consisting of ten weekly 60-minute lessons with a private instructor. Required for BFA Musical Theatre majors. No more than 8 credits of Applied Music: Voice may be counted toward credits required for graduation.
  • MU354 - Applied Music: Piano (2 Credits)
    For students for whom the study of piano is relevant to their professional goals. Students have a weekly 60-minute individual lesson. No more than 8 credits of Applied Music: Piano may be counted toward credits required for graduation.
    Instructor: Scott Nicholas
  • PA101 - Languages of the Stage (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to the various means of expression available to the art of the stage. In addition to an exploration of the techniques of the written script, students are introduced to the visual forms of artistic communication, their history, and the conventions of all theatrical forms. (Performing Arts students only)
  • PA472 - Production Projects (2 Credits)
    Students with senior standing may define project work in acting, directing, design technology, stage and production management, arts and business management, musical theatre, theatre education, dance or dramaturgy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.
  • PB207 - Introduction to Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces writing for commercial markets. Students develop, research, and write nonfiction articles and learn where to market them. May be repeated once for credit and may be substituted for one 200-level WR (writing) workshop.
  • PB302 - Copyediting (4 Credits)
    Practical course about the process of editing and preparing manuscripts for publication. Together with hands-on assignments, the course considers the relation of editor to author, the nature of copyediting in various publishing environments, and other topics.
    Instructor: Carol Parikh
  • PB307 - Intermediate Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Requires students to research and write an article or magazine feature. Students learn terms, concepts, and techniques to improve both writing and critical thinking. May be repeated once for credit and may be substituted for one 300-level WR (writing) workshop.
    Instructor: Delia Cabe
  • PB380 - Magazine Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Provides an understanding of the magazine field from the perspective of writers and editors. Looks at the similarities and differences between general interest magazines and more focused magazines, and how magazines compete with each other and with other media for audiences and revenues. Topics include how magazines carve out niches, the relationship between the business and editorial departments, and the editorial operations of magazines. The course also looks at the history of the magazine industry.
  • PB383 - Book Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Examines the acquisition and editing of a manuscript, its progress into design and production, and the final strategies of promotion and distribution of a finished book.
  • PB395 - Applications for Print Publishing (4 Credits)
    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the publishing industry. Students also learn related computer-based skills, such as type and image sourcing, image acquisition, including scanning, and copyright issues. Although some design issues are addressed, the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes students have basic Macintosh skills.
  • PB401 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Column Writing (4 Credits)
    This magazine publishing course covers the process of researching, writing, and revising magazine columns with an understanding of the importance of audience. Draws on both the published writing of seasoned columnists from a variety of genres as well as weekly columns written by students. May be substituted for one 400-level WR (writing) workshop.
  • PB402 - Book Editing (4 Credits)
    Book editing, or substantive editing, is a highly subjective, visceral skill informed by flexibility, judgment, life experience, grammatical grace, signposts, caution lights, road maps, respect for the author, and subtle diplomacy in the author/editor relationship, all directed toward helping the writer to the intended creative goal. In other words, book editing is an art, not a science. However, an exploration of the foundations of constructive shaping, development, organization, and line-editing may release the inner shepherd/wrangler in you.
    Instructor: Daniel Weaver
  • PB403 - Electronic Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Explores various methods of digital publishing including e-books and web site creation. The course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the planning, development and management of digital content.
    Instructor: John Rodzvilla
  • PB481 - Book Design and Production (4 Credits)
    Covers book and book jacket design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. This is not a software instruction course.
  • PB482 - Magazine Design and Production (4 Credits)
    Course covers magazine design fundamentals: typography, image research and assignment, prepress and manufacturing, and traditional and computer-based tools and equipment. Each student produces a sample magazine through a workshop process of presentations and revisions. This is not a software instruction course.
  • PB483 - Magazine Editing (4 Credits)
    Provides students with an understanding of the magazine editing process. Topics range from idea generation and story selection to the mechanics of editing, the editorial process, and the somewhat elusive topic of the role of the editor. Students address such issues as story focus, direction, topicality, structure, sense of audience, and voice, often through popular magazines with long and interesting histories.
  • PB491 - Topics in Publishing (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in book, magazine, and electronic publishing. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • PB675 - Principles of Management for Publishing (4 Credits)
    This course will provide students with a basic overview and knowledge of how different publishing enterprises are organized and managed. Helps students develop a firm understanding of the organizational and financial skills required for a career in publishing.
    Instructor: Jeanne Emanuel
  • PB676 - Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Gives students experience in developing magazine feature stories. Students brainstorm, report, and write their own magazine-style stories, with emphasis on the shaping and editing stage. They also read and discuss published work by professionals. Class is conducted as a writing workshop in a style that mimics a magazine atmosphere. This course may count for 1 workshop credit for nonfiction students.
    Instructor: William Beuttler
  • PB678 - Magazine Editing (4 Credits)
    Course about the magazine editing process. Covers topics ranging from focus, direction, topicality, structure, sense of audience, and voice, and explores the practical application of editing skills as well as historic examples of editors and their magazines.
  • PB679 - The Editor/Writer Relationship (4 Credits)
    Examines the magazine writing and editing process, and covers topics ranging from idea generation and story selection to the mechanics of editing and how the editorial process works.
    Instructor: William Beuttler
  • PB680 - Magazine Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Examines the magazine field from the perspective of writers and editors, and covers the editorial and business operations of magazines, the editorial mix, and magazine geography.
  • PB682 - Magazine Design and Prod. (4 Credits)
    Covers magazine design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. Students produce sample magazines through a workshop process of presentations and revisions. Course assumes students have necessary computer skills.
    Instructor: Lisa Diercks
  • PB683 - Book Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Introduction to the book publishing industry, including a detailed examination of the editorial, marketing, and design and production stages of the book publishing process. Course also looks at important developments and issues within the field, such as online publishing, and at various jobs in book publishing.
  • PB685 - Book Editing (4 Credits)
    Considers book editing skills, tasks, and responsibilities from initial review and acquisition of a book manuscript through project development. Emphasizes trade book editing, but also considers editorial work at scholarly and professional presses.
  • PB686 - Book Design and Prod. (4 Credits)
    Covers book and book jacket design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. Students design a book through a workshop process of presentations and revisions. Course assumes students have necessary computer skills.
  • PB687 - Column Writing (4 Credits)
    Magazine publishing course explores the process of researching, writing, and revising magazine columns, and examines the importance of audience. This course may count for one workshop requirement for nonfiction students.
    Instructor: Delia Cabe
  • PB688 - Copyediting (4 Credits)
    Covers the process of editing and preparing manuscripts for publication. Together with hands-on assignments, the course considers the relation of editor to author, the nature of copyediting in various publishing environments, and other topics.
  • PB689 - Book Publicity (4 Credits)
    Familiarizes students with trade book promotion to the media. Begins with an overview of book publicity and then covers the publicity process, the type of freelance help available, crafting press material, the author/publicist dynamic, how to secure and promote bookstore events, the art of the interview, and the art of the pitch. All assignments and classroom activities are based on real-world publishing tasks so that students leave the class thoroughly prepared to promote their book or someone else's.
  • PB691 - Applications for Print Publish (4 Credits)
    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the print publishing industry. Some design issues are addressed, but the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes the student has basic Macintosh skills.
  • PB692 - Electronic Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Introduces electronic and new media publishing formats, including but not limited to the web, online publishing, CD-ROM, and DVD. Course assumes the student has basic computer skills.
  • PB693 - Book Marketing & Sales (4 Credits)
    Course is designed as an extension of the Book Publishing Overview course for students who want to further explore the sales and marketing sides of business - where marketing and sales fit into the life of a book, the differences between the two areas, and the distinct effect that each, done well or badly, has on a book's success. It then tracks the marketing and sales process through a book's publication with specific assignments at each stage based on real-world publications tasks from sales forecasting to planning (and budgeting for) marketing campaigns to sales calls and the retailers' buying processes.
    Instructor: Beth Ineson
  • PB694 - Top in Writing and Publishing (4 Credits)
    Topics may include offerings in genre nonfiction writing, review and criticism, literary editing, alternative publishing, online editing and writing, business and legal issues, among others. Some topics may require a prerequisite or permission of instructor.
  • PB695 - Creating Electronic Publications for the Web and E-Readers (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the creation and design of complete texts in a variety of e-formats. Students will produce complete texts using the extensible Markup Language (XML) and .epub formats. The course covers the current trends and tools of the industry and explores how e-texts are created for e-readers and tablets.
    Instructor: Colleen Cunningham
  • PB696 - Web Development for Electronic Publishing (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the design and format of text and images for the computer and mobile phone screen. Students create sites using HTML and CSS. Topics covered include: content evaluation, usability standards, design aesthetics, user experience, JavaScript, and hosting solutions.
    Instructor: John Rodzvilla
  • PH105 - Introduction to Ethics (4 Credits)
    Introduces important theories on nature of the good in human conduct. Theories belong to Western philosophical tradition and include works of Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Mill, and others.
  • PH110 - Ethics and Justice (4 Credits)
    Considers ethical theories and theories of justice, especially those related to questions of economic, criminal, political, and social justice.
    Instructor: Robb Eason
  • PH112 - Religion in Eastern Cultures (4 Credits)
    Studies the origin and development of Hinduism in India; Buddhism in India, China, and Japan; Taoism and Confucianism in China; and Shintoism in Japan. Students read original texts; development of doctrine in each religious tradition; and literary, artistic, and cultural impact of each religion on Eastern civilizations.
    Instructor: Eric Michael Dale
  • PH115 - Islamic Ways of Life (4 Credits)
    Religious faith has been, and continues to be, a powerful force in human life. The Middle East gave birth to three monotheistic belief systems—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—which have had profound effect on fundamental ideas that eventually spread throughout the world. Course examines the historical contexts that gave birth to the Islam, playing particular attention to the philosophical underpinnings of Islam. Students are introduced to the ways in which each faith shapes moral, political, and aesthetic values.
    Instructor: M. Chloe Mulderig
  • PH116 - Christian Ways of Life (4 Credits)
    Religious faith has been, and continues to be, a powerful force in human life. The Middle East gave birth to three monotheistic belief systems—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—which have had profound effect on fundamental ideas that eventually spread throughout the world. Course examines the historical contexts that gave birth to the Christianity, playing particular attention to the philosophical underpinnings of Christianity. Students are introduced to the ways in which each faith shapes moral, political, and aesthetic values.
  • PH117 - Jewish Ways of Life (4 Credits)
    Religious faith has been, and continues to be, a powerful force in human life. The Middle East gave birth to three monotheistic belief systems—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—which have had profound effect on fundamental ideas that eventually spread throughout the world. Course examines the historical contexts that gave birth to the Judaism, playing particular attention to the philosophical underpinnings of Judaism. Students are introduced to the ways in which each faith shapes moral, political, and aesthetic values.
    Instructor: Albert Axelrad
  • PH200 - Contemporary Ethics (4 Credits)
    Examines contemporary ethical issues of abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, and affirmative action in light of major theories of ethics and morals from the history of Western philosophy.
    Instructor: Ian Blaustein
  • PH203 - Special Topics in Ethics (4 Credits)
    Topics announced prior to each term may include: Art and Politics, Media Ethics, Feminist Ethics, Political Philosophy, or Judaism. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: David Kishik
  • PH204 - Environmental Ethics (4 Credits)
    Considers philosophical ethics in relation to environmental issues. Topics include: religious beliefs as a foundation for environmental commitments, duties, and obligations toward other species; "deep ecology"; ecofeminism; economic imperatives versus environmental concerns; and disproportionate burden of environmental problems borne by certain groups.
    Instructor: Charles Oliver
  • PH205 - Virtues, Vices & Temptations (4 Credits)
    A key assumption in traditional moral philosophy is that the acquisition of a virtuous character is necessary for a good life. Experimental results in social psychology, however, indicate that situational pressures may be more reliable predictors of human behavior than presence of stable character traits. This course surveys key concepts in the history of moral philosophy and examines criticism of those concepts arising from the situationist literature and our possible responses to them.
    Instructor: Pablo Muchnik
  • PH210 - Narrative Ethics (4 Credits)
    Provides overview of classical and modern approaches to ethical theory using examples from fiction and film to show how ethical theories can be applied. Connects abstract theory with "real life" through storytelling and story analysis to understand and evaluate moral issues.
  • PH300 - Special Topics in Philosophy (4 Credits)
    Topics in political theoryphilosophy vary by semester and may include: Aesthetics of Everyday Life; Art and Politics; Community, Communication, and Public Policy; Liberalism and Communitarianism; Logic; Censorship, Privacy, and the Public Good. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • PH303 - Citizenship as Civic Engagement (4 Credits)
    What does it mean to be or become a citizen? Readings and discussions will include what it means to be a citizen in a local community, a national community, and, perhaps, a world community. What are the responsibilities involved in being an engaged citizen? This is a philosophy course, and we will be examining these issues on a theoretical and on a practical level. All students will be placed n a local non-profit for approximately 2-3 hours a week.
    Instructor: Elizabeth Baeten
  • PH304 - Political Philosophy (4 Credits)
    Examines basic themes in the tradition of political philosophy and their implication for our contemporary understanding of freedom, rights, citizenship, justice, legitimacy, the public sphere, and the public good.
  • PL220 - International Politics (4 Credits)
    Explores the nature, techniques, and problems of interaction among states. Students understand the development of the modern state system;, the evolution of alliances and collective security; and the role of law, morality, and international organizations. They also analyze in depth the history of America's involvement in 20th century the international relations.
  • PL225 - U.S. Government and Politics (4 Credits)
    Develops knowledge and understanding about the American political system including national, state, and local government. Examines constitutional foundations, citizenship, civil liberties, public opinion, political parties, the electoral system, and the legislative process as well as the judicial history of these issues.
  • PL240 - Communication, Politics, & Law (4 Credits)
    Develops an interdisciplinary understanding of the political-legal communication field with emphasis on the U.S. Constitution and the legal system as well as constructing and communicating political-legal arguments.
    Instructor: Michael Brown
  • PL328 - Political Thought (4 Credits)
    Analyzes the evolution of political theory from early Greece to the present. Studies the formation of the Western political tradition and the relationship of political theory to the development of absolutism, constitutional monarchy, liberal democracy, and socialism. Looks at the issues of idealism and realism in political thought, individual rights versus the needs of the collective, and the relation of these considerations to the emergence of totalitarian political ideologies.
    Instructor: William Mott IV
  • PL332 - Civil Rights (4 Credits)
    Reviews and develops an understanding of the U.S. Constitution, congressional legislation, and Supreme Court cases affecting and controlling minority rights from 1776 to the present.
    Instructor: Michael Brown
  • PL333 - The First Amendment (4 Credits)
    Engages in in-depth study of the U.S. Constitution and federal laws as they relate to communication. Develops an understanding of the First Amendment, the Federal Communication Commission, and political speech.
  • PS101 - Introductory Psychology (4 Credits)
    Presents topics across the range of sub-disciplines that make up the field, including the history of psychology, research methods, attention and consciousness, learning, memory, language, motivation, emotion, social perception and interaction, child and adult development, and mental illness. Students engage in discussions, presentations, and demonstrations centered on key ideas in the field.
  • PS200 - Social Psychology (4 Credits)
    Introduces the discipline of social psychology. Examines how the behavior of individuals is influenced by their social environment. Topics include impression formation, persuasion, conformity, interpersonal attraction, helping behavior, aggression, and prejudice.
  • PS201 - Abnormal Psychology (4 Credits)
    Provides an introduction to the nature, etiology, and classification of abnormal behaviors and therapeutic methods used to treat them. An explanation of the relation between mental disorder and the social and cultural setting is also provided.
  • PS202 - Developmental Psychology (4 Credits)
    Explores the stage/age-related physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development of individuals. Topics include physical maturation and sensory-motor development; thinking, reasoning, and language processes; personality growth; social cognition; and interpersonal interaction. Attention is also given to the discussion of contemporary issues in developmental psychology.
    Instructor: Eileen McBride
  • PS203 - Cognitive Psychology (4 Credits)
    Studies the mental mechanisms and processes involved with perception, learning, memory, and thinking. Topics may include perception, attention, memory, language, problem solving, decision-making, mental representation and knowledge, reasoning, creativity, and intelligence. Highlights the close relationship between modern cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience that ties cognitive processes to brain systems.
    Instructor: Amy DiBattista
  • PS301 - Personal Growth and Adjustment (4 Credits)
    Reviews the recent shift in psychology from the classic disease or medical-model perspective to a "strengths-based" model emphasizing well-being and adjustment. Examines this theoretical development, but also explores the proposed conditions that enhance well-being, support resilience, and allow individuals and communities to thrive. Topics include intention and mindfulness, self-efficacy, self-regulation, creativity and flow, and attachment and love.
    Instructor: Elizabeth Donovan
  • PS306 - Psychology of Prejudice (4 Credits)
    Explores the psychological causes and consequences of stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination through an analysis of psychological theory and empirical research. By focusing on the experiences of a wide range of groups, the course examines themes such as group identity and intergroup conflict; the nature of categorization; why stereotypes persist; the personal and societal impact of prejudice; and how prejudice might be overcome.
    Instructor: Aaron B. Daniels
  • PS380 - Advanced Topics in Psychology (4 Credits)
    Upper-level special offerings in psychology focus on important questions in contemporary psychology. Each course uses theory and methods within major psychological perspectives such as cognitive, biological, evolutionary, developmental, social, and clinical psychology to demonstrate how psychology addresses and responds to concerns of individuals and groups in real-world contexts. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Lindsey Beck
  • SC210 - Human Health and Disease (4 Credits)
    How is our human body designed and maintained and how is the intricate balance of this system disrupted in illness? This course explores the structure, function, and interrelationship between several body systems through the study of human disease. Several major non-infectious diseases are selected (for example, diabetes, Alzheimer's, heart disease, and lung cancer) as a platform for discussing the chemistry and anatomy of the body. Study of these diseases informs discussion on mechanisms of drug action, the nature of disease risk factors, ethics and politics of healthcare, and the role of mind-body relationships in health and disease.
    Instructor: Jamie Lichtenstein
  • SC211 - Food and Nutrition (4 Credits)
    Introduces food systems, diet, and nutrition. Helps students become informed consumers of food by discussing what we eat, why we eat, where our food comes from, how it is processed, and how it affects our health. Students learn principles of nutrition, including the function of nutrients, food composition and diet analysis, the workings of the digestive system, and the nutritional roots of disease. The environmental, sociological, and psychological implications of food are discussed, and emphasis is placed on dispelling common myths about food and on questioning information presented in the media.
    Instructor: Kimberly Dong
  • SC212 - Evolution of Human Nature (4 Credits)
    Introduces the field of evolutionary biology and its application to all species, including humans. Major topics include natural selection, adaptation, and sexual selection, as well as genetics. Focuses particularly on the ancestral legacies of primate and human evolution that continue to influence modern-day society, including topics such as cooperation, jealousy, aggression, and health.
  • SC213 - The Brain and Behavior (4 Credits)
    Discusses the general structure of the human brain and perceptual, cognitive, and neurologic functions and disorders tied to various brain systems. Covers neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, basic sensory functions, brain development, mechanisms of drugs and hormones, sleep, consciousness, and investigative methods used to study the brain. Higher neurocognitive functions, including language and memory and a range of neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders are also explored.
    Instructor: Vinoth Jagaroo
  • SC214 - Plagues and Pandemics (4 Credits)
    Infectious diseases are a leading worldwide cause of human death. This course describes and discusses the role, origins, spread, and impact of infectious diseases. By examining how the human immune system guards against infectious disease, students gain an understanding of the complex interaction between host and pathogen. This foundation is a launching point for discussion of topics such as the rise of drug-resistant microbes, advances in diagnostic and vaccine development, the socioeconomic and political factors involved in disease progression, food preservation and safety, and the use of microbes and microbial products in bioterrorism.
  • SC215 - Personal Genetics & Identity (4 Credits)
    As it becomes increasingly possible to obtain personalized versions of our individual human genomes, it behooves us to consider how much weight this information carries in generating our physical uniqueness and individual identity. This course introduces the biological basis of inheritance and human variation while considering the personal and public implications of accessibility to one's genetic information. In particular, students explore what our DNA can and can't tell us about appearance, disease, ancestry, and behavior. Students consider the marketing of genetic tests, the use of DNA databases in forensic science, regulation of the personal genomics industry, and genetic privacy.
  • SC216 - DNA and Society (4 Credits)
    Explores the structure and function of DNA and the role of the genetic code in shaping the basic cellular units of life. Covers the molecular biology necessary to understand science developments that have garnered the attention of the media and the scientific community, including those relating to biotechnology, stem cells, and genetic engineering. Students discuss this science at its intersection with art, policy, marketing, medicine, and human experience. They gain an appreciation of how molecular biology impacts our society and obtain the tools necessary to make informed decisions about the science we encounter.
  • SC220 - Energy and Sustainability (4 Credits)
    Energy has emerged as one of the most important issues facing our society, as it is increasingly clear that our current patterns of energy use are not sustainable. The course examines the ways in which we use energy, as individuals and as a society, and discusses available and future energy technologies in terms of their environmental impact and technical, economic, and political viability. Students explore various energy sources, beginning with traditional fossil fuel-based technologies, then focusing on emerging technologies, such as hydropower, wind, biomass, solar, geothermal, oceanic, fuel cell, and nuclear.
  • SC221 - Meteorology (4 Credits)
    Introduces the basic concepts involved in the analysis of weather phenomena and climate patterns at global and local scales. Major topics of discussion include: atmospheric composition and dynamics; solar radiation; temperature, moisture, and condensation; optical phenomena in the atmosphere; weather patterns; severe weather; and weather forecasting techniques.
    Instructor: Benjamin Papandrea
  • SC223 - Climate Change (4 Credits)
    Climate change is a complex topic of enormous scientific interest, societal importance, and political debate. This course introduces the science of climate change and global warming, focusing in particular on: past environmental change, including abrupt changes and past intervals of warmth; the response of physical and biological systems to recent and ongoing changes in climate; future climate scenarios, forecasting uncertainties, and public-policy options; and critical evaluation of media coverage of climate-change issues.
    Instructor: Caitlin McDonough
  • SC225 - Science and Politics of Water (4 Credits)
    Explores the confluence of fundamental ecological, hydrological, and other environmental processes with policy and law at the watershed scale. Emphasis is placed on how natural pathways of the flow of water support vital freshwater ecosystem services such as clean drinking water and healthy fish populations. Students also seek insight toward improved management by weighing the trade-offs required for other valued uses such as recreation, agriculture, hydropower, and industrial uses.
    Instructor: Jon Honea
  • SC290 - Topics in Science (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in science focused on theoretical perspectives, methodological approaches, and contemporary questions in science. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Jennifer Gordon
  • SC310 - Science in Translation: Health and Genetics (4 Credits)
    Refines and broadens students' ability to interpret scientific language and communicate critical scientific content to others. This course examines popular representations of molecular biology in various outlets such as film, fiction, and journalism. Conversation about any scientific inaccuracies provides motivation for delving deeper into the science, and discussion of creative intent provides a mechanism for discussing ethical, social, and political impact of related research. Students then apply such interpretative understandings to their own craft as they put scientific translation and communication into practice in select scenarios.
  • SC312 - Visual & Spatial Preception (4 Credits)
    Examines visual and spatial processes and the sensory, cognitive, and neurophysiologic aspects of vision and spatial perception. Reviews the anatomy and physiology of the eye and the visual system, including the brain systems responsible for processing and making sense of visual input. Focus is then given to perception of size, form, color, motion, and three-dimensional space, followed by perceptual and neurological disorders in the visuospatial realm. The course is relevant to students interested in the workings of the visual system, as well as to students in visual media or marketing interested in applied principles of visual perception.
    Instructor: Vinoth Jagaroo
  • SC320 - Science in Translation: Environmental Science (4 Credits)
    Refines and broadens students' ability to interpret scientific language and communicate critical scientific content to others. This course examines popular representations of environmental issues in various outlets such as film, fiction, and journalism. Conversation about any scientific inaccuracies provides motivation for delving deeper into the science, and discussion of creative intent provides a mechanism for discussing ethical, social, and political impact of related research. Students then apply such interpretative understandings to their own craft as they put scientific translation and communication into practice in select scenarios.
    Instructor: Jon Honea
  • SC392 - Advanced Topics in Envir Scien (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in science focused on theoretical perspectives, methodological approaches, and contemporary questions in environmental science. Material is presented and discussed at an advanced level, assuming students have some knowledge and understanding of the scientific method. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • SO150 - Principles of Sociology (4 Credits)
    Introduces key sociological concepts, methodologies that provide pivotal tools for critical analysis of structures, agents of power focusing on roles shaping relationships, and institutions in local and global communities. Explores historical biographies that shape worldviews. Brings history to bear on present to identify and shape sociological imagination. Hands-on approaches extend learning beyond classroom, ensuring theory linked to practice. Students learn and live sociology as an integral aspect of individual and community identities.
    Instructor: Courtney Feldscher
  • SO200 - Communities and Race Relations (4 Credits)
    Studies the history and sociology of racial and ethnic groups in United States, including consideration of group tensions and aggressions. Gives overview of social experiences of major ethnic groups that entered the United States and selected Native American societies. Modern issues of inter-group relations are examined.
  • SO206 - Gender in a Global Perspective (4 Credits)
    Examines gender in a comparative and global context framed by interdisciplinary perspectives from sociology, anthropology, psychology, and cultural studies. Studies social construction of gender across cultures and globalization as a web of complex forces shaping gender-construction activities and institutions. Students compare experiences with other cultures and analyze work, play, and intimacy and institutional structures, including religion, politics, military, media, and the economy.
    Instructor: Chun Yi Sum
  • SO208 - Visual Society (4 Credits)
    Social theories of economic cultural change describe increasing significance of visual images and decline of texts, oral communication, and face-to-face interactions. The visualization of culture is considered in connection to economic globalization and the shift from production to consumption economies examined in television, websites, billboards, clothing, and window displays. Visual-ethnographic studies explore effects of visual culture (electronic and digital images, video, film, photography, magazine images) on identity, race, sexuality, politics, opportunity, community, and tradition.
    Instructor: Sam Binkley
  • SO222 - Humor and Society (4 Credits)
    Explores humor as a window into key sociological questions. What do jokes, gags, clowns, comedians, pranks and cartoons have to do with social order, conflict, inequality, identity and interactions? How does the comedy, as a sociological perspective, illuminate the humor of social organizations and of our subjective states? Students study key sociological arguments and relate them to the humor they observe in their own lives and in the social world around them.
  • SO310 - Advanced Topics in Sociology (4 Credits)
    Topics announced prior to each term may include: Alienation and Fragmentation in the Individual; Theories of Love, Sex, and Intimacy; or Postmodern Religion and the Secularization of Society. May be repeated for credit it topics differ.
    Instructor: Tulasi Srinivas
  • SO360 - Deviance and Social Control (4 Credits)
    Examines various forms of social control, the use of power constructing normative boundaries that differentiate normal and deviant perspectives. Media roles within popular culture, and overviews of differing academic perspectives include specific grand theories evidenced through sociological imagination; varieties of violent forms; sexual configurations; mental disorders; substance usages; white-collar dysfunctions; governmental-economic forms. Ethical dimensions of choice change through personal self-critique or examination of career roles in chosen media specialties.
  • TH121 - Introduction to Acting 1 (4 Credits)
    Introduces the acting process to the non-performance major. Group and individual exercise work develops a relaxed instrument able to respond freely, in the body and the voice, to emotional and external stimuli. The course moves from fundamental explorations through improvisation to work on scripted material.
    Instructor: Richard Gilman
  • TH122 - Introduction to Acting 2 (4 Credits)
    Building on the work of TH 121, this course proceeds to careful study of acting craft through the vocabulary of intentions, actions, obstacles, subtext, and objectives.
    Instructor: Joseph Antoun
  • TH123 - Acting 1: Movement (4 Credits)
    An intensive exploration of movement and improvisation. A variety of improvisatory approaches are employed to tap into individual creativity and to discover the power of group creation. Physical demands increase as the body is emphasized as the instrument of communication. The work includes exploration of space, energy, dynamics, rhythm, and sensory response. Actors learn to channel their physical and emotional energy into dramatic action. Prerequisite: by audition only.
  • TH124 - Acting 2: Voice and Text (4 Credits)
    Bases the actor's work in the experience of voice and language. The goal is a free voice in a free body and the ability to express thought and emotion with openness and truth. The course guides students through awareness of and release from habitual tensions and into body alignment, breathing, resonators, sound and movement, group interaction, and the exploration of individual and group creativity. Students use both scripted and improvised material as they discover the two to three octaves of the speaking voice and its connection with thoughts and words. Prerequisite: by audition only.
  • TH130 - Improvisation I (2 Credits)
    Introduces performance majors to improvisation, developing listening skills, spontaneous playing, and the art of presence. Required for all students enrolled in the Actor Training Program. Prerequisite: by audition only.
  • TH131 - Acting Fundamentals (2 Credits)
    Introductory course intended to provide the acting foundation necessary for more advanced scene study. Students apply fundamental concepts explored in first-year voice, movement, and improvisation into written scenes. The emphases are on experiential exercises: improvisations, open scenes, and basic contemporary scene work.
  • TH140 - Rendering (2 Credits)
    Structured to develop fundamental skills in observation, drawing, painting, and modeling, with an emphasis on the application of these skills to the theatrical design process. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. This is the first course required of students in the Design/Technology concentration.
    Instructor: Timothy Jozwick
  • TH142 - Stagecraft: Electrics (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
    Instructor: Nicole Cerra
  • TH143 - Stagecraft: Properties Construction (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
    Instructor: Ronald De Marco
  • TH144 - Stagecraft: Costume Contruction (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
  • TH145 - Stagecraft:Scenic Construction (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
    Instructor: Sarah Spollett
  • TH146 - Stagecraft: Scene Painting (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
    Instructor: Joe Keener
  • TH147 - Stagecraft: Crafts (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
    Instructor: Mary Ellen Adams
  • TH148 - Stagecraft: Masks (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
    Instructor: Brynna Bloomfield
  • TH150 - History of Fashion & Décor: Design Research (4 Credits)
    Explores the development of styles of Western architecture, furniture, and clothing as a demonstration of the human need to express the social, cultural, and psychological ideals of the period in which it occurs. From the Greeks to the 17th century, the period is presented within its historical-sociological context. The period visual elements are examined according to shape, style, construction, function, and evolution of appearance.
    Instructor: Mary Harkins
  • TH203 - Perspectives in World Theatre (4 Credits)
    Looks at theatre and performance as an essential component and expression of culture. Surveys material in select time periods and global settings to demonstrate how the various elements of theatre work to reflect and shape culture on issues such as nationality, ethnicity, race, religion, gender, sexuality, class, and age. In order to do so, this course examines the roles and practices of directors, designers, dramaturges, and playwrights throughout the world from the classical to the postmodern period, and of varying theatrical styles. Readings include plays and historical material, as well as dramatic theory and criticism. Students attend lectures, participate in group work, view theatrical performances and videos, and talk to professionals in the field. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
    Instructors: Nancy Finn, June Guertin
  • TH204 - Theatre into Film (4 Credits)
    Explores the artistic languages of theatre and film. Dramatic material written for the stage is read and analyzed and the process of adaptation of that material is explored. Texts include the works of such playwrights as Shakespeare, Strindberg, Williams, and Albee. Film texts include the work of directors such as Lumet, Cukor, Solberg, and Nichols. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
    Instructor: Sunil Swaroop
  • TH205 - Dress Codes: American Clothes in the Twentieth Century (4 Credits)
    Examines American clothes and fashion in the 20th century, with a primary focus on the visual elements of everyday dress. Six distinct periods are studied according to the silhouette and decorative details of each. Further, each fashion period is studied within the context of its indirect influences (social, cultural, historical, technological, economical). Particular focus is given to concepts of masculinity and feminity, and gender ambiguity; challenges to gendered clothes (such as trousers on women, long hair on men); and anti-fashion (zoot suits, beatniks, hippies, punk, goth). Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
    Instructor: Mary Harkins
  • TH215 - World Drama in Its Context 1 (4 Credits)
    Surveys theatre and drama from the Greeks through the Restoration, with a focus on the major periods of Western theatre and dramatic literature: the Greeks, Roman theatre and drama, Medieval theatre, Elizabethan drama, Italian Commedia Dell'arte, Spanish Golden Age, French Neo-Classicism, and Restoration. In addition, students survey Eastern classical theatre and drama with a particular emphasis on the Sanskrit theatre, the Chinese drama and the Peking Opera, and the classical theatre of Japan, including Kabuki, No, and the puppet theatre. There are selected readings of plays in their historical context with particular attention paid to theatrical styles of plays and production.
  • TH216 - World Drama in Its Context 2 (4 Credits)
    Surveys theatre and drama from the late 17th century to the present. The major periods of world theatre and drama, Romanticism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism are studied with particular emphasis on 20th-century theatre and drama throughout the world, including Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Attention is given to the work of both women and men. Theatrical conventions, innovations, and techniques developed in the Western and non-Western theatres are explored.
  • TH221 - Scene Study I (4 Credits)
    This intensive acting class builds on the first–year acting courses to ensure a personal commitment in the way students approach and experience scene work and acting technique. Through exercises and improvisations, students increase awareness, strengthen the ability to talk and listen, and practice recognizing and experiencing moment-to-moment acting. They then apply these skills to dramatic scripts. Students learn how to read a play from the actor’s perspective and how to break down and explore a scene in terms of given circumstances, relationships, and character needs.
  • TH222 - Scene Study II (4 Credits)
    Strengthens and deepens the work begun in TH 221. Students are now ready to codify their experience into a meaningful acting vocabulary. Terms such as action, objective, super-objective, obstacle, and subtext are layered into scene work from American and British realism. Students begin to use imagery in order to more fully encounter and receive the imaginary world of the play.
  • TH240 - Drafting (2 Credits)
    Through weekly projects, students learn graphic techniques in drafting for theatrical production. The focus is on conventional symbolization, development of ground plans, sections, elevations, orthographics, isometrics, and construction drawings. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
    Instructor: Janie Howland
  • TH242 - Lighting Design I (4 Credits)
    Basic principles of stage lighting design are introduced, including the mechanics and optics of lighting instruments, electrical theory and practices, control systems, basic design concepts, and color theory. Controllable qualities of light are investigated and demonstrated through students' participation on a lighting crew for a department production. Design techniques are developed through a complete lighting design project. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
    Instructor: Scott Pinkney
  • TH243 - Sound Design (4 Credits)
    Introduces the basic principles of theatrical sound design and the practices and skills required to develop a production's sound design and supportive technical documentation. Students are introduced to script analysis, system layout, effects development, source researching, and organization. The combined hands-on presentations and class assignments allow students to develop a working knowledge of the sound designer's responsibilities and skills. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH244 - Costume Construction (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic costume patterning and construction methods. Students not only study draping, drafting, and flat-patterning, but also learn terminology, equipment usage, and the skills necessary to the entire costuming process. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
    Instructor: Laurie Bramhall
  • TH245 - Scene Design 1 (4 Credits)
    Introduces the fundamental principles of design. Students learn how proficiency in a core set of design skills can lead to effective performance in a variety of theatrical and commercial production situations. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
    Instructor: Timothy Jozwick
  • TH247 - Make-Up: Theatre (2 Credits)
    Presents a comprehensive study of the art of traditional make-up for the stage. Through the use of cosmetics and prosthetics, students learn to execute corrective, character, and age make-up. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Co-requisite: TH 347.
    Instructor: Mary Ellen Adams
  • TH248 - Costume Design 1 (4 Credits)
    Students develop an understanding of the basic principles of costume design, character analysis, and costume design presentation. Lectures and class discussions prepare students to confront specific problems in design projects. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH250 - Design Essentials (4 Credits)
    Introduces the theatrical design process and personnel within the regional theatre model. Emphasis is placed on the interconnection between the various design areas and their function in the process of making theatre. Students explore script analysis from the designer's point of view, review various production styles and venues, and experience current production design approaches. This course exposes students to some of the basic skills and processes employed by theatrical designers. Students are expected to supply appropriate materials as needed and attend selected theatrical productions.
  • TH252 - Master Electrician (4 Credits)
    Studies the tools of lighting, principles of electricity, and the technical electrical skills required to become safe and proficient as a theatrical electrician as well as the process of creating paperwork, budgeting shows, and leading crews as a master electrician.
    Instructor: Daniel Carr
  • TH265 - Foundations of Education (4 Credits)
    Examines the basis of public education and the teaching process from a theoretical and methodological viewpoint. Multiple perspectives are employed to investigate these issues, including, but not limited to, the philosophical, historical, sociological, psychological, economic, and political. Required course for initial licensure as a Teacher of Theatre.
  • TH275 - Arts Management I (4 Credits)
    Explores the theory and practice of arts management, with particular focus on theatre management. Extensive readings in arts management provide a foundation for further work in the field.
    Instructor: Julie Hennrikus
  • TH277 - Stage Management I (4 Credits)
    The fundamentals of stage management explored through readings, discussion, written exercises, and appropriate hands-on experience.
    Instructor: Debra Acquavella
  • TH313 - African-American Theatre and Culture (4 Credits)
    African-American drama and theater in Africa and America are studied from their origins in African ritual and in early 19th-century America to the present. Lectures and discussions focus on traditional and modern drama and theater, as well as significant periods of dramatic activity such as the Harlem Renaissance, the Federal Theatre Project, and the Black Arts Movement, and on representative works by major contemporary African and African-American dramatists. Fulfills the General Education U.S. Diversity requirement.
    Instructor: Amissa Miller
  • TH315 - Topics in Contemporary Theatre (4 Credits)
    Covers various topics in the aesthetics of contemporary theatre with particular focus on the history, theory, and criticism of selected contemporary performers and directors, such as Robert Wilson, Richard Foreman, Anne Bogart, Tadeusz Kantor, Jerzy Grotowski, Peter Brook, Julie Taymor, and Tadashi Suzuki, and groups such as Open Theatre, Living Theatre, and Mabou Mines. May be repeated for credit if topics differ. Prerequisite: junior standing. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
  • TH320 - Stage Com:Close Quarter Combat (4 Credits)
    Unarmed theatrical combat techniques suitable for both stage and screen are taught, including: shared-weight illusions and grappling, contact and non-contact strikes, and falls and rolls. Another unit focuses on incorporating combat props such as knives and found objects. Scene work ranges from classical to modern to self-scripted. This is an acting class using physical lines of dialogue; students bring all of their acting, voice, and movement skills to bear on this work.
    Instructor: Ted Hewlett
  • TH322 - Acting for the Camera (4 Credits)
    Prepares acting students for work on camera. Students explore the actor's relationship both to the camera and to the medium. Coursework includes improvisation, monologue, and scene work. A portion of the course is devoted to "the business of acting" with special attention to film and television auditioning. Technical skill for film and television performance and an introduction to the element of film production (script/story structure, editing, lighting, and cinematography) are components of the course.
    Instructor: Erin Schwall
  • TH325 - BFA Acting Studio 1 (4 Credits)
    Intensive discovery of acting technique that builds on the first two years of voice and movement/improvisation work to ensure a personal commitment in the way a student studies and experiences scene work through the vocabulary of intentions, actions, obstacles, subtext, and objectives. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: BFA Acting majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 326.
    Instructor: Kathleen Donohue
  • TH326 - BFA Acting Studio 2 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 325 students in the BFA program in Acting. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: BFA Acting majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 325.
    Instructor: Sarah Hickler
  • TH327 - Advanced Musical Theatre Technique I (4 Credits)
    Intensive technique work in acting and musical theatre repertoire. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class. Semester includes specific instruction in "clean singing." Prerequisite: BFA Musical Theatre majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 329 or TH 429.
    Instructor: Scott LaFeber
  • TH328 - Advanced Mus Th Technique II (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 327 for students in the BFA program in Musical Theatre. Scenes from musical theatre and plays as well as advanced musical solo work are considered. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class. Semester includes specific work in dialects. Prerequisite: TH 327. Co-requisite: TH 329 or TH 429.
  • TH329 - Musical Theatre Dance Repertoire I (2 Credits)
    Students are assigned to class by skill level as determined by musical theatre and dance faculty. Students explore various styles of musical theatre dance and hone their audition and performance skills. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: BFA Musical Theatre majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 327, TH 328, TH 427, or TH 428.
    Instructor: Jennifer Farrell
  • TH330 - Auditions and Monologues (4 Credits)
    Helps students develop skills in choosing, analyzing, and performing monologues for their portfolio. Addresses acting issues and staging possibilities. Students learn how to comport themselves in audition interviews both before and after their presentations.
    Instructor: Kathleen Donohue
  • TH340 - AutoCAD (4 Credits)
    Students learn to use the technology of computer assisted drafting (CAD) to communicate common graphical information required in theatre design and technology. This includes the creation of ground plans, elevations, section views, orthographic views, technical details, and light plots. Students produce both electronic files and printed documents that conform to accepted theatre graphics standards. The techniques of 3D modeling and rendering are also introduced.
  • TH342 - Lighting Design II (4 Credits)
    Presents approaches to lighting design and poses specific design problems for students to solve. Attention is also given to color, composition, cueing, and production through presentations and discussions in class. Students participate in department productions as assistant designers and electricians. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH346 - Scene Painting (4 Credits)
    Students will practice with a variety of scene shop paint media and surfaces while they learn how to depict both natural and architectural forms. Both large-scale backdrop painting and more detailed faux finish techniques will be studied. Students are expected to supply appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH347 - Make-Up Effects for Film and Television (2 Credits)
    2 credits This basic course in the art of film and television make-up effects includes the use of refined cosmetics and prosthetic techniques to execute character, age, and casting molds to create appliances for extreme stylistic character make-up on a studio partner. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.Corequisite: TH247.
    Instructor: Mary Ellen Adams
  • TH372 - Topics in Theater Studies (4 Credits)
    Special Topics in Theatre Studies.
  • TH375 - Arts Management II (4 Credits)
    A detailed exploration of the theory and practice of arts management using current case studies from within the field. Exploration will include extensive readings, guest speakers, research, group discussions and writing exercises.
  • TH376 - Production Management (4 Credits)
    Explores professional production management in theatre, ranging from commercial and nonprofit regional theatre models to touring and special events management.
    Instructor: Debra Acquavella
  • TH377 - Stage Management II (4 Credits)
    Addresses the students' needs for comprehensive intermediate instruction, primarily focusing on the position of the assistant stage manager and how he or she functions not only within the stage management team but also as a collaborator/facilitator on plays and musicals.
  • TH381 - Directing I: Fundamentals of Directing (4 Credits)
    Major principles of play directing are studied. Through comprehensive script analysis, students become familiar with the structure of a play as a basis on which the various elements of theatre can be organized to achieve dramatic unity. Laboratory application of directing practices introduces students to the techniques employed by a director to communicate with actors and audience, including principles of composition, movement, stage business, and rhythm.
  • TH388 - Playwriting I (4 Credits)
    Working from the reading and analysis of contemporary plays, from discussions of contemporary theatrical techniques, and from exercises through which the student writer gains access to personal material, the major focus of the semester is the writing and revision of several drafts of at least 1 one-act play suitable for production on stage. Pieces, scenes, and whole plays are read in class and active participation in the workshop process is a required component of the course.
    Instructor: Andrew Clarke
  • TH402 - Living Art in Real Space: Multidisciplinary Art and the Collaborative Process (4 Credits)
    Examines the development and language of multidisciplinary art from the 20th century to the present day, with reference to specific artists, trends, and movements. Lectures, slide and video presentations, museum visits, student research, reading, writing, and in-depth experiential processes address how different artistic disciplines inform one another and come together in visual art performance and installations. Culminates in final presentations of multidisciplinary work by student groups documenting and mapping sources, methods, and process of their collaborations.
    Instructor: Sunil Swaroop
  • TH410 - Principles of Dramaturgy (4 Credits)
    Provides theoretical and critical background to the profession of dramaturgy. Explores the history of dramaturgy as well as different professional venues and the variety of tasks that dramaturges perform within a particular venue. Introduces students to the areas of dramatic criticism (theatre critics and scholars, translators, script analysts, and editors), literary office dramaturgy (new script analysis, season planning, literary management of the theatre, etc.), and production dramaturgy (working with the director, audience outreach, new play development, etc.).
    Instructor: Whitney Dibo
  • TH411 - Topics in Drama Studies (4 Credits)
    Various offerings in dramatic literature, theatre history, and/or criticism including, but not limited to, modern American drama, contemporary European and American drama, contemporary women playwrights, gay and lesbian drama, Shakespeare and the Greeks, the history of acting, the history of the physical theatre, and performance studies. All courses are reading, research, and writing intensive. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • TH412 - Play Analysis (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to the art and skill of play analysis, with an eye toward production and cultural significance. Students learn building blocks of dramatic structure and analyze how structure contributes to the understanding of a play. They study plays, critical essays, and performances spanning 25 centuries of Western theatrical practice. Part of the class time is devoted to mapping the structures of the plays and analyzing how these structures may be used to create textually supported interpretations both on stage and in writing. Students explore the material through lecture, discussion, videos, and group activities.
    Instructor: Joshua Polster
  • TH420 - Stage Combat: Historical Weaponry (4 Credits)
    Introduces three weapons commonly found in plays and films: broadsword (for example, from Richard III or The Lord of the Rings); quarterstaff (such as in Robin Hood or Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon); and rapier and dagger (think Romeo and Juliet or The Three Musketeers). Students explore the fundamentals of creating safe illusions of violence using footwork, distance, targeting, blocks, strikes, and simulated wounds and kills. Scene work focuses on classical material. This is an acting class using physical lines of dialogue; students bring all of their acting, voice, and movement skills to bear on this work.
    Instructor: Ted Hewlett
  • TH421 - Advanced Acting: Special Topic (4 Credits)
    Intensive scene study and acting technique exploring specific issues of style, genre, or other defined topics. Topics offered may include, but are not limited to, Shakespeare, the Greeks, Stage Combat, Comedy, Auditions and Monologues, scene work from modern drama, Asian approaches to theatre and performance, Self-Scripting, Solo Performance, Advanced Voice/Dialects, Acting for the Camera, and Musical Theatre Performance. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • TH423 - Action Theater (4 Credits)
    Action Theater™ is a training system in physical theater improvisation that integrates vocal, physical, and verbal skills while connecting to the agility of the imagination. Exercises isolate the components of action -time, space, shape, and energy- so they can be examined, experienced, and altered in order to expand the expressive range and palette. The work provides tools to examine one's perceptive and responsive process, and address habits that limit one's ability to remain embodied, engaged, and in the moment. Students apply these skills to structured solo and ensemble improvisational performance.
  • TH425 - BFA Acting Studio 3 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 325 and TH 326 for students in the BFA program in Acting. Scene study problems move toward issues of style, including a range of aesthetic and acting style issues. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, stage combat (including unarmed and Elizabethan rapier), and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. Co-requisite: TH 426.
    Instructor: Craig Mathers
  • TH426 - BFA Acting Studio 4 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 425 for students in the BFA program in Acting. Beyond continued scene work, significant attention is paid to audition technique and to a thorough orientation to the profession and the business of acting. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. Co-requisite: TH 425.
    Instructor: Benny Sato Ambush
  • TH427 - Musical Theatre Styles I (4 Credits)
    An intensive investigation of pop-rock styles, both in pure pop repertoire and contemporary musical theatre repertoire, in solo work and scenes. The semester culminates in individual cabaret performances, created by the students themselves. Co-requisite: TH 329 or TH 429.
    Instructor: Stephen Terrell
  • TH428 - Musical Theatre Styles II (4 Credits)
    Senior-level BFA Musical Theatre majors continue the exploration of musical theatre genres and styles as they spend the semester working strictly on works by emerging composers. The composers are invited to visit and participate in classes, creating opportunities for networking and connecting with the artists who are creating new works of musical theatre. In addition, one class per week is devoted to preparations for the Senior Showcase, which is performed for students, families, and industry professionals during commencement weekend. Co-requisite: TH 329 or TH 429.
  • TH429 - Musical Theatre Dance Repertoire II (2 Credits)
    Students are assigned to class by skill level, as determined by musical theatre and dance faculty. Students explore various styles of musical theatre dance and hone their audition and performance skills. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: BFA Musical Theatre majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 327, TH 328, TH 427, or TH 428.
    Instructor: Stephanie Heroux
  • TH440 - Technical Theatre Laboratory (4 Credits)
    Various workshops are structured to introduce students to a broad range of technical experience. The subject matter for these workshops may include: 1. Properties design and construction 2. Audio design for performing arts 3. Advanced electrics 4. Design and construction for film and television Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH441 - Topics in Technical Design (4 Credits)
    Introduces the organization of the scene shop, tool maintenance and usage, construction techniques, technical drawing development, computer applications, rigging, and time and material budgeting. Students complete class projects and work on Emerson Stage productions. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. May be repeated for credit.
    Instructor: Keith Cornelius
  • TH460 - Drama as Education I (4 Credits)
    Examines the philosophy behind the teaching of theatre and the use of drama as an educational tool in classroom, workshop, and production settings. Students learn to assess the learning needs of their students, develop appropriate educational goals, and design and implement teaching strategies. There are 40 hours of pre-practicum work, including observations of area theatre and drama classes from grades pre-K through 12. Course is open to any Performing Arts major and others with permission of instructor. It is required for Theatre Education majors seeking initial licensure as a Teacher of Theatre.
    Instructor: Bethany Nelson
  • TH461 - Drama as Education 2 (4 Credits)
    Students delve more deeply into the philosophy and practice of teaching through drama and theatre. Forty hours of pre-practicum work with students from grades pre-K through 12 is required. Course is required for Theatre Education majors seeking initial licensure as a Teacher of Theatre.
  • TH463 - Student Teaching Seminar (2 Credits)
    Students concurrently enrolled in TH 465, Student Teaching Practicum, also attend this weekly seminar to explore issues, resources, questions, problems, and solutions to the teaching/learning challenges they are facing in their practicum experience. Topics pertinent to beginning teachers, including classroom management strategies and curriculum and lesson plan development are explored. Students reflect on their teaching experiences and critically examine their current and future roles as classroom instructors. Students will understand the need for a community of teachers and gain a sense of confidence about their teaching skills. Co-requisite: TH465.
    Instructor: Robert Colby
  • TH465 - Student Teaching Practicum (2 Credits)
    An 8- to 14-week practicum providing supervised student teaching activities at either the elementary, middle, or high school level. Students practice teaching in a school system, which permits them to interact with students and teachers in their area of concentration. Working closely with the on-site supervising practitioner, students develop instructional units and must be engaged in 300 hours of teaching. The practicum is open only to students who have completed their education program sequence. Co-requisite: TH463.
    Instructor: Christina Marin
  • TH468 - Multicultural Education (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to a variety of perspectives and approaches to multicultural education. Includes an exploration of the range of issues involved in this complex topic, such as curricular and teaching issues, social and behavioral issues, bilingual education, testing systems, tacking, and unequal power dynamics. Also focuses on the ways in which drama and theater can facilitate change in these areas.
    Instructor: Bethany Nelson
  • TH469 - Playmaking/Teaching/Playmaking (4 Credits)
    Provides an intensive introduction and exploration of playmaking with young people, ages 8-21. Offers a variety of approaches to developing original material with students, and identifies strategies for integrating curriculum topics and playmaking, as well as social, personal, and societal exploration. The role of playmaking as a culturally relevant curriculum is addressed.
  • TH470 - Design in Practice Topics (4 Credits)
    In this advanced course of study, students develop the required practical skills necessary for the design and execution of a theatrical production design. Students further develop the ability to analyze a script, song, or score and translate the ideas therein into visual images. They learn to move a design from concept to completion under the actual "in theatre" conditions, while still maintaining a safe, constructive learning environment. They put into actual practice the equipment, methods, procedures, and skills necessary to implement a successful design. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
    Instructor: Scott Pinkney
  • TH477 - Stage Management III (4 Credits)
    Provides students with the additional tools, techniques, and information to build the bridge from practicing stage management in an educational environment to the professional theatre or MFA program through in-depth study of the Actor's Equity Rules, creation of complex repertory rehearsal schedules of multiple productions, and hands-on training exercises of calling musical show cues with lighting, automation, and fly to music with cue lights.
  • TH479 - Topics in Business of Theatre (4 Credits)
    Various topics related to the business of theatre for future working professionals are explored. Different sections approach issues relevant to specific career paths, i.e., acting, design, stage management, etc., such as: the finding of appropriate audition material, and audition and casting process in theatre, film, and television; the requirements for admission to professional trade unions, AEA, and exploration of service organizations; issues of titles, licenses, and/or permits; preparing a professional resume and/or portfolio, job strategies using online sources for entry-level work; entrepreneurial opportunities and interaction with allied businesses and fundraising for nonprofit companies; and other topics as appropriate to individual sections.
    Instructor: Scott Pinkney
  • TH482 - Directing II: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)
    Extending the experiences of Directing I, this course emphasizes the application and unification of stage directing techniques and theories leading to a concept for production. Through selected scenes and projects for class presentation, students continue the exploration of materials and methods of communicating the dramatic content of a script to an audience.
    Instructor: Joseph Antoun
  • TH488 - Playwriting II (4 Credits)
    Includes, but is not limited to, the study of dramaturgical elements in the work of contemporary and classic playwrights, as well as continued study of story development, structure, and the use of dialogue. Students present a variety of work in class, their own and the work of others, looking at plays from the perspective of the actor, director, designer and, most importantly, the audience. By the end of the semester, students complete the first draft of a newly conceived full-length play or the third draft of the one-act play begun in Playwriting I.
  • TH521 - Ensemble Workshop Topics (4 Credits)
    Students create a workshop production focused on a collective approach to theatrical collaboration. Research and in-depth study of the chosen source material accompany practical application and approaches to working in an ensemble, leading to a public showing of the group's work.
  • TH540 - Puppetry (4 Credits)
    The art of puppetry and the basic methods of construction, operation, manipulation, and performance of puppets are examined. Emphasis is on the use of puppets as an educational tool. Projects include creating examples of each of the four major types of puppets: shadow, hand, rod, and marionette -- using a range of construction techniques and materials appropriate to an educational setting. The course culminates in the construction of puppets for in-class presentations. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH562 - Theatre for Young Audiences (4 Credits)
    Introduces the scope, purposes, and history of theatre experiences for children and adolescents. Topics include play reading and analysis, the examination of formal and participatory theatre, and theatre-in-education techniques.
    Instructor: Robert Colby
  • TH567 - Playwriting for and with Youth (4 Credits)
    Introduces a variety of schemes and stimuli to use in writing scripts for child or youth audiences or to use in helping young people write their own plays. Attention is given to freeing and stretching the imagination, issues of structure, and methods of play development, culminating in readings of new work. Class work includes writing, improvising, reading aloud, critiquing, and discussing work for and with youth.
    Instructor: Courtney O'Connor
  • TH579 - 10K and Under: Writing the Small Arts Grant (4 Credits)
    Students design grant proposals with a focus on community-based projects, learning grant writing, skill building, and developing relationships with local arts funders and community artists successful at grant writing and community-based collaborations. Skills include research, budget preparation, developing "boilerplate" data, and writing for specific constituencies and potential audiences.
  • TH584 - Directing the Musical (4 Credits)
    Building on the experience of one directing class, students are instructed in the particular challenges of directing a musical theatre production: from coaching singing and acting performance to staging complex scenes that involve music and dance, from learning the skills needed to create a collaborative atmosphere to understanding the communication skills needed to work well with designers, technicians, stage managers, and all other personnel involved in the production of musical theatre.
    Instructor: Stephen Terrell
  • TH614 - Theatre Studies Seminar (4 Credits)
    Examination and exploration of various topics in theater studies, including but not limited to the areas of theater history, criticism, theory, aesthetics, performance studies, and dramatic literature. May be repeated for credit if topic differs.
  • TH621 - Special Topics in Acting (4 Credits)
    Involves intensive explorations of specific topics.
  • TH622 - Principles of Acting (4 Credits)
    This introductory course has the dual objectives of developing students' abilities as actors and as coaches and teachers of acting in either classroom or rehearsal settings. Skills in improvisation and in working with scripted material will be honed, and attention will be given to movement and voice as a part of the acting process. The course also explores how and when to use these techniques, particularly with adolescent actors.
  • TH625 - Performance: Theatre and Community (4 Credits)
    Examines the relationships between theatre and culture, where culture is understood as a process of knowing the other, of looking and listening, of creating and maintaining connection in a community. An examination of theoretical texts in economics, history, sociology, cultural studies, politics, and performance provides a foundation for exploring and experiencing various techniques of making theatre in community.
    Instructor: Amissa Miller
  • TH650 - Design in Production (4 Credits)
    This course is a comprehensive survey of scene, lighting, and costume design as they relate to the work of the non-design specialist. Emphasis is placed on the interconnection among the various design areas and their function in the process of making theatre. Students are expected to supply appropriate materials.
  • TH660 - Drama as Education I (4 Credits)
    Students examine the philosophical foundations of theatre, speech, and the use of drama as an educational tool. They explore the uses of creative drama/improvisation in both formal and informal learning environments. Students learn to assess needs, develop appropriate educational goals and objectives, and design and implement teaching strategies using drama. This course is required for students seeking the Initial License in Massachusetts as a Teacher of Theatre (pre-K through grade 12). Readings, class participation, and participation in laboratory teaching sessions are required.
  • TH661 - Drama as Education II (4 Credits)
    Students explore the principles of educational drama and the teaching of drama and speech. A survey of various educational resources available to drama and speech teachers is included. The role of drama and speech within the wider context of the arts in education is discussed. This course is required for students seeking the Initial License in Massachusetts as a Teacher of Theatre (pre-K through grade 12).
  • TH663 - Student Teaching Seminar (2 Credits)
    Students concurrently enrolled in TH 665, Student Teaching Practicum, also attend this weekly seminar to explore issues, resources, questions, problems, and solutions to the teaching/learning challenges they are facing in their practicum experience. Topics pertinent to beginning teachers, including classroom management strategies and curriculum and lesson plan development are explored. Students reflect on their teaching experiences and critically examine their current and future roles as classroom instructors. Students will understand the need for a community of teachers and gain a sense of confidence about their teaching skills. Prerequisite: Permission of the Theatre Education Program Director. Co-requisite: TH665.
    Instructor: Robert Colby
  • TH665 - Student Teaching Practicum (2 Credits)
    This 8- to 14-week practicum provides supervised teaching activities at either the elementary, middle, or high school level. Students practice teaching in a school system that permits them to interact with students and teachers in their area of concentration. Working closely with the on-site supervising practitioner, students develop instructional units and must be engaged in 300 hours of teaching. The practicum is open only to students who have completed their program sequence. Requirements and prerequisites may be obtained from the Theatre Education program director. Co-requisite: TH 663.
    Instructors: Robert Colby, Christina Marin, Angela Zomer
  • TH667 - Special Topics in Theatre Education (4 Credits)
    Examines such topics as theatre-in-education, puppetry, playwriting with and for youth, theatre education outreach, and the teaching of dance and movement. Subject matter varies each semester. May be repeated for credit.
  • TH669 - Contemporary Issues in Education (4 Credits)
    Students examine the critical, philosophical, historical, and sociological issues facing education in general, and communication and performing arts education in particular. Students will also evaluate current research in communication and performing arts education and apply it to practice.
    Instructor: Christina Marin
  • TH680 - Directing: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)
    The directorial process is examined, beginning with textual analysis of dramatic action, and covering such areas as ground plans, pictorial composition, movement, and stage action. The relationship of the director and other theater artists is also studied. Student work includes selected scenes and projects prepared for class presentation.
    Instructor: Maureen Shea
  • VM100 - History of Media Arts I (4 Credits)
    This is the first of a two-semester course that explores the historical development of the media arts, including the film, broadcasting, and sound recording industries until 1965. Investigates the relationships between economics, industrial history, and social and political systems, and the styles and techniques of specific films and broadcast programs. Special attention is given to the diversity of styles of presentation in the media.
  • VM101 - History of Media Arts II (4 Credits)
    This is the second of a two-semester course that explores the historical development of the media arts, focusing on the continuing development of the film, broadcasting, and sound recording industries after 1965, as well as the development of video and digital technologies. Investigates the relationships between economics, industrial history, and social and political systems, and the styles and techniques of specific films and videos, broadcast programs, and digital media products.
  • VM105 - Introduction to Visual Arts (4 Credits)
    Investigates the visual language of communication shared among all of the visual arts, emphasizing visual analysis, understanding of materials, the history of style and techniques, and the functions and meanings of art in its varied manifestations. Provides a foundation for subsequent studies in the visual and media arts.
  • VM120 - Foundations in Visual and Media Arts Production (4 Credits)
    A combination of lectures and hands-on workshops examines the relationships among photography, graphics, audio, film, video, and digital media within the context of cross-media concepts, theories, and applications. Traces the creative process from conception and writing through production and post-production. Students proceed through a series of exercises that lead to completion of a final project, establishing a foundation for advanced production coursework.
    Instructors: Matthew Hashiguchi, David Humphreys, David Kelleher, Maurice Methot
  • VM200 - Media Criticism and Theory (4 Credits)
    Explores theoretical and critical approaches to the study of photography, film, television and video, audio, and digital culture. Theories and methods examine issues relating to production and authorship in the media arts, audience reception and effects, political ideology, ethics, aesthetics, cultural diversity, and schools of thought within the liberal arts. Extensive critical writing and reading in media criticism and theory.
  • VM202 - Critical Listening (4 Credits)
    Provides a study of the psycho-acoustic perception and analysis of classical and contemporary use of sound in the media. Students identify and define acoustic variables, comparing past and present recordings in all media.
    Instructor: David Doms
  • VM203 - History of Photography: 19th Century to the 1970's (4 Credits)
    Surveys the aesthetic and technical development of photography from its invention to the 1970's with emphasis on the 20th century. A critical analysis of the medium develops an understanding of the influence and appropriation of photography today.
    Instructor: Brian McNeil
  • VM204 - Topics in Media Arts: Practice (4 Credits)
    Explores various aspects of media arts practice. May be repeated for credit it topics differ.
  • VM205 - History Of Photography: 1970's to the Present (4 Credits)
    From documentary and documents of performances to the highly constructed imagery utilized by contemporary artists, students explore diverse subjects, styles, and methods that cover portrait, object, city, memory, appropriation, landscape, and narrative. The course combines weekly slide talks with theory and criticism reading discussions, field trips to exhibitions, visiting artists, research papers, and a final production project and exhibition.
  • VM210 - History of Western Art I: Renaissance and Baroque (4 Credits)
    Explores Renaissance and Baroque art, beginning with Proto-Renaissance works in the 14th century, and concluding with the Late Baroque in the later 17th/early 18th century. Students study major works and artists characterizing these movements, and the critical treatment they received over the centuries.
    Instructor: Judith Hull
  • VM211 - History of Western Art II: 18th and 19th Century Art (4 Credits)
    Investigates the evolution of the arts in the Western tradition through the 18th and 19th centuries. Major works, styles, and artists are examined within the context of contemporaneous sociocultural movements, such as the Enlightenment. Among the movements studied are: Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Art Nouveau, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism.
  • VM212 - History of Western Art III: Modern (4 Credits)
    Examines the major styles, works, and artists of the first half of the 20th century, prior to the advent of Abstract Expressionism. Examines a wide variety of European and American modern art, investigating critical and public reactions. Among the movements studied are: Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Dada, Futurism, Surrealism, the Bauhaus, Constructivism, and De Stijl.
  • VM213 - History of Western Art IV: Post World War II (4 Credits)
    Chronological study of Western contemporary art after World War II, starting with Abstract Expressionism. Considers the major styles, works, and artists, investigating numerous forms of European and American contemporary art, and their attendant criticism, in a broad contextual framework. Among the movements studied are: Pop Art, Minimalism, New Realism, Postmodernism, Conceptualism, Neo-Expressionism, Graffiti, Photorealism, Earth Works, and Performance Art.
  • VM214 - History of Non-Western Art I: East Asian Arts (4 Credits)
    Investigates arts of the East Asian region, particularly the areas of present-day China, Korea, and Japan. Artworks are contextualized within indigenous traditions such as Confucianism and Chan/Zen and examined from a diversity of critical perspectives. Considers issues of identity, religion, politics, and modernization, as well as contemporary artworks such as installation and performance.
    Instructor: De-nin Lee
  • VM220 - Writing the Short Subject (4 Credits)
    Studies the writing of the short subject within the genres of fiction, nonfiction, and experimental concepts and scripts (including animation). Scripts range from 3 to 15 minutes and are suitable for production within the budget and time constraints of an Emerson College class. Students complete comprehensive revisions of their work.
  • VM222 - Writing for Television (4 Credits)
    Examines writing for television in a variety of formats, with a predominant emphasis on situation comedies and drama. The elements of each genre are analyzed, challenging students to find their own unique "voice," and new and innovative ways to write stories within established formats. Also covered are reality television and children's television, story outlining, and script formatting. Each student writes a first-draft script of an existing sitcom or drama.
  • VM230 - Introduction to Film Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces the basics of non-synchronous 16mm filmmaking, including camera operation, principles of cinematography and lighting for black-and-white film, non-sync sound recording and transfers, and picture and sound editing.
  • VM231 - Intermediate Film Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces the technical, conceptual, and procedural skills necessary to successfully complete a short double-system sync-sound 16mm film, including pre-production, production, and post-production procedures and techniques.
    Instructors: Harlan Bosmajian, Gautam Chopra, Jared M. Gordon, William Palumbo
  • VM240 - Introduction to Video Field Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces single-camera video production. Students learn the equipment and techniques used in single-camera field production and post-production, writing, and producing a variety of projects, edited in digital non-linear mode.
  • VM241 - Introduction to Studio TV Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces studio television practice. Students learn the principles of pre-production, production, and post-production for the studio as well as control room procedures. Students prepare their own multi-camera, live-on-tape studio productions.
  • VM250 - Introduction to Sound Principles and Audio Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces audio physics, sound principles,and the theory and practice of audio recording and mixing. Emphasis is on concept development for sound production, signal routing and the mixer console, analog and digital audio recording, and editing techniques.
  • VM251 - Location Sound Recording (4 Credits)
    Intensive study in the theory and practice of field/location and studio audio recording for film, video, and television. Covers techniques in the use of field/studio recorders and mixers, microphones, boom poles, and shot blocking. Also covers tape-based and hard-disk digital recorders, and time-code synchronization management.
  • VM260 - Introduction to Interactive Media (4 Credits)
    Introduces the theory and practice of interactive media. Stresses the conceptual, aesthetic, and technical concerns of interactivity. Technologies covered are HTML, CSS, and Javascript. Additional topics include semantic web design and development, graphics and imaging, interface design, user experience, project management, and the mobile web. Emphasis is on making creative works.
  • VM261 - Computer Animation (4 Credits)
    The first course of a two-course sequence, introducing students to the fundamentals of three-dimensional modeling and animation, and preparing them for the second course, VM 363 Advanced Computer Animation. Students learn to model, texture objects, compose and light scenes, animate, and add dynamics, as well as render animations into movies and compositing audio, titles, and credits in post-production.
    Instructor: John Craig Freeman
  • VM262 - Drawing (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic techniques in drawing, exploring the use of line and image in contemporary art. The language of drawing in contemporary art and architecture will inform the practice of drawing.
    Instructor: William DeWolf
  • VM263 - Drawing For Time-Based Media (4 Credits)
    Imparts key drawing skills required in pre-visualization, concept art creation, set design, storyboarding, two-dimensional media production, and post-production. Develops students' abilities to think spatially, whether constructing a plan for a set or depicting a character in action. Also focuses on anatomy, locomotion, and communication possibilities of the human form.
    Instructor: Anya Belkina
  • VM265 - Introduction to Photography (4 Credits)
    Introduces the fundamentals of black-and-white photography by combining darkroom techniques with the latest digital processes. Essential comparisons between the two methods are explored by learning camera controls, film development to darkroom printing, digital capture to print workflow, and through the hybrid combination of these techniques. Critiques of student work develop an aesthetic and conceptual understanding of the creative process. Students must use cameras with manually adjustable speed and aperture.
  • VM300 - Topics in Vis & Med Arts: Stud (4 Credits)
    Explores various aspects of media arts history, theory, and criticism. May be repeated for credit it topics differ.
    Instructor: Joanna Tam
  • VM303 - Studies in Digital Media and Culture (4 Credits)
    Examines the dramatic shift in meaning and processes of contemporary communication by investigating the social, artistic, economic, and political implications of using digital ways of working. Topics include the Internet and the web, cyberspace and censorship, games, digital film and video, multimedia and interactivity, virtual reality, person-machine interfaces, and globalization considerations.
    Instructor: Sarah Zaidan
  • VM304 - History of Documentary (4 Credits)
    Examines the history and theory of documentary media production, with attention to the economic, technological, ethical, and aesthetic concerns of documentarians.
    Instructor: Michael Selig
  • VM305 - History of Experimental/Avant-garde (4 Credits)
    Examines the history and theory of experimental and avant-garde film, video, and other moving image practices and their connections to broader art and social movements. Through extensive reading and viewing, students investigate avant-garde and experimental cinema form, style, and content as well as historical and contemporary filmmakers' production methods and distribution networks in film communities and the art world.
  • VM308 - Cinema and Social Change (4 Credits)
    Throughout cinema's history, numerous filmmakers have sought to harness the power of the medium and to channel it in the service of political and social change. Have they made a difference and by what measure and what strategy: Surveying fiction and documentary, commercial and independent cinema, features and shorts, this course aims to offer a wide-ranging examination of the ways directors around the world have employed their art and their craft in the pursuit of fostering social justice.
  • VM315 - Topics in Art History (4 Credits)
    Studies a selected topic in art history. Emphasizes critical analyses of artworks with respect to their aesthetic, historical, sociocultural, philosophical and/or political contexts. Image lectures, museum and/or gallery visits, reading, class discussion, and project activities may be utilized to engage students in the material. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Joseph Ketner
  • VM320 - Writing the Feature Film (4 Credits)
    Examines the fundamentals of writing for narrative feature-length film. Investigates structure, character, conflict, scene writing, and dialogue, taking students from ideation through to the development of a detailed outline. Students write the first 25-30 pages of a screenplay.
  • VM322 - Comedy Writing for Television (4 Credits)
    Examines writing television comedy with an emphasis on sitcoms. Areas of study also include sketch writing and writing for late-night TV. Students learn how to writie physical comedy, how to write for existing shows and characters, sitcom structure, format, and joke writing. Each student writes a script for an existing sitcom that will be workshopped.
  • VM323 - Writing Primetime Drama (4 Credits)
    Examines writing for primetime television drama, including study of the history of television drama and the difference between plot-driven dramas and character-driven dramas, writing effective protagonists and antagonists, and writing for existing dramas and characters. Students write a script for an existing primetime television drama that will be workshopped in class.
  • VM324 - Topics in Screenplay Genres (4 Credits)
    Studies a given genre from the perspective of the screenwriter. Working in a specific genre, students write a treatment, an original outline for a feature film, and up to the first half of a script in the specific genre. Honing critical skills, students engage in analytical and aesthetic discourse about their own work, as well as material written by others. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM325 - Writing the Adaptation (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the process of analyzing material from another medium (e.g., novels, plays, comic books) and translating into a screenplay. Students write one original first act of a public domain property, as well as one analytical paper.
    Instructor: Stephen Glantz
  • VM328 - Topics in Film Writing (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in varying areas of film writing. Topics may include dialogue, great screenwriters, scene study and rewriting. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Steven Grossman
  • VM329 - Topics in Television Writing (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in varying areas of television writing. Topics may include webisodes, reality television, and comedy writing for late night. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: James Macak
  • VM331 - Topics in Vis & Med: Practice (4 Credits)
    Explores various aspects of media arts practice. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Charles E. McCarry
  • VM332 - Production Management (4 Credits)
    Introduces the budgeting and logistical organization of film and television productions, reviewing the roles of Associate Producer, Production Unit Manager, First Assistant, Second Assistant Location Manager, and other members of the producer's and director's teams.
    Instructor: Kenneth Golden
  • VM335 - Alternative Production Techniques for Filmmaking (4 Credits)
    Intermediate-level 16mm production workshop in the use of unorthodox, non-computer-driven methods and processes for developing and producing motion pictures. Provides an overview of historic methods of formal exploration of the basic materials of film as a projection medium, including camera-less filmmaking, direct animation, and loop projections, as well as alternative mechanical processes such as xerography, hand process, and alternative camera tools and techniques. Primary emphasis is on creative invention and exploration.
    Instructor: Kathryn Ramey
  • VM350 - Sound Design (4 Credits)
    Introduces the art of inventing sounds and composing soundtracks for visual media such as film, video, computer animation, and websites. Focus is on audio post-production and the roles of the supervising sound editor and the sound designer. Post-production techniques include sound recording, sound editing, and sound mixing in stereo and surround sound.
  • VM351 - Audio for New Media (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the creative possibilities of sound in a variety of digital media environments. Topics include MIDI control, digital sound synthesis, data compression, and real-time control of sound within applications such as Flash, MAX/MSP/Jitters, and CSound.
    Instructor: Maurice Methot
  • VM352 - Studio Recording (4 Credits)
    Explores the principal tools of the professional audio production studio and how they can be used for creative productions. Includes instruction in multi-track recording and sound processing equipment.
    Instructor: Owen Curtin
  • VM360 - Film Animation (4 Credits)
    Introduces film animation in which short animated exercises and individual sequences are located within a survey of animation as an art form and commercial product. Students employ a range of media, exploring and developing ideas and skills in producing 16mm animated sequences, culminating in a final project.
  • VM362 - Motion Graphics (4 Credits)
    Covers the practice and art of motion graphics and visual effects, including the design process, artistic concepts, and technologies. Production techniques range from title sequences for film, to compositing of real and virtual worlds and a myriad of digital time-based art forms. Students make a series of projects using post-production and compositing software.
  • VM363 - Advanced Computer Animation (4 Credits)
    The second course in the two-course computer animation sequence, introducing students to advanced three-dimensional modeling and animation techniques and preparing them for independent computer animation production work. Continues to develop skills acquired in computer animation, including modeling, texturing objects, composing and lighting scenes, animating, dynamics, rendering, and post-production compositing.
    Instructor: Anya Belkina
  • VM364 - 3D Computer Gaming (4 Credits)
    Provides students with the fundamentals of game design and theory. Students learn to create and import assets, develop objectives, script behaviors and action, and build game levels. Students complete the course with an original portfolio-ready single player game.
  • VM365 - Darkroom Photography (4 Credits)
    An intermediate-level course in black-and-white photography designed to explore a variety of "ways of seeing" as well as demonstrate techniques that further enhance the photographic image. Assignments build on one another (tone, time, frame, point of view, scale, and sequence). Critical viewing and seeing as well as guest artists and gallery visits are encouraged as students begin to form their personal photographic vision.
    Instructors: David Akiba, Lauren Shaw
  • VM366 - Digital Photography (4 Credits)
    A hands-on production class created especially for the photography student who is interested in the digital darkroom. It is designed to give students a basic introduction to the elements of digital capture, manipulation, and output. The course addresses the digital tools within the context of the aesthetics of photography. Photoshop is used as another photographic tool.
    Instructor: Camilo Ramirez
  • VM370 - Business Concepts for Modern Media (4 Credits)
    Focuses on strategic thinking, planning, organization, and implementation of media projects from conception (pre-production) through release/distribution/exhibition (theatrical, non-theatrical, digital, web). Includes acquiring fundamental skills and a working knowledge of business math, business plans, intellectual property and copyright basics, grant writing and resources, and current trends in advertising, marketing, and press package materials.
  • VM371 - Alternative Media Production: Out of the Box (4 Credits)
    Fosters an exploratory approach to making media projects by providing unorthodox conceptual frameworks in which students conceive and execute short projects using both conventional and unconventional acquisition devices in a variety of media. Students work individually or collaboratively throughout the course to develop ideas and acquire material for assignments.
    Instructor: Robert Todd
  • VM372 - Directing Image and Sound (4 Credits)
    Examines the story telling tools of the director including an introduction to script analysis, camera composition, lens choices, scene blocking, and staging action for the camera, with particular emphasis on exploring approaches to image and sound. Students acquire skills to develop solution to dramatic and practical problems through exercises. It is recommended that students complete VM 372 prior to enrolling in VM373, Directing Actors for the Screen.
  • VM373 - Directing Actors for the Screen (4 Credits)
    Develops skills in directing actors in dramatic performances for the screen. Students are taken step by step through the directing process with a particular emphasis on research and visualization, as they learn how to plan and direct narrative sequences. Classes will be offered in conjunction with Acting for the Camera classes in Performing Arts.
  • VM375 - Advanced Interactive Media (4 Credits)
    Continues to explore interactive media, including consideration of conceptual, aesthetic, and technical concerns. Technologies covered include interactive web elements, databases, mobile development, and an introduction to programming. Emphasis is on making creative works.
  • VM376 - Editing for Film and Video (4 Credits)
    Furthers understanding of and ability to work with medium- to long-format post-production processes through editing assignments in film and video, along with critical examination of completed motion pictures.
  • VM377 - Documentary Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Develops skills necessary to produce documentary productions in video or film. Covers production processes from story development through all the production phases. Practical considerations of production are balanced with theoretical debates on the legal and ethical responsibilities of those who document others.
    Instructor: Laurel Greenberg
  • VM378 - Basic Cinematography and Videography (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic elements of the aesthetics, technology, and craft of cinematography and videography. Students gain a working knowledge of 16mm and digital video cameras, as well as basic lighting design and equipment, with an emphasis on crew relations and organization. Includes a comprehensive exploration of the work of significant cinematographers.
    Instructors: Shaun Clarke, Brian Dowley, Joseph Kolbe
  • VM380 - Media Copyright and Content (4 Credits)
    Copyright is the legal foundation that gives value and property rights to any creative work. This includes music as well as books, films, television shows, choreographed work, architectural designs, plays, paintings, maps, photographs, video games, and computer software. Students look at the history, development, and purpose of copyright and other intellectual property law. They also explore the purpose and value of fair use and of the public domain, and alternative views of copyright such as the “Creative Commons.”
  • VM400 - Topics in Visual and Med Arts (4 Credits)
    Explores various aspects of visual and media arts history, theory, and criticism. Course may be repeated for credit if topics vary.
    Instructors: Ken Feil, Kelley Misata, Matthew Noferi
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics (4 Credits)
    Examines various topics in media arts in seminar format, with emphasis on students' oral and written presentation of material. Course may be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM409 - Seminar in Western Art (4 Credits)
    Provides a study in a selected area of art and art history with emphasis on the development of analytical and theoretical approaches to the understanding of works of art. Presentation of independent research and participation in the evaluation of the research work of seminar members is expected. Fulfills the Aesthetics perspective of the General Education requirements. Course may be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM410 - Seminar in Non-Western Art (4 Credits)
    Provides a focused study on a particular culture or issue germane to history and/or criticism of non-Western art. Emphasizes a diversity of perspectives, paying careful attention to frame investigations within the artistic, socio-cultural, political, philosophical, and spiritual contexts indigenous to the respective culture(s) being studied. Fulfills the Aesthetics perspective and Global Diversity requirements. Course may be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM412 - American Film Comedy (4 Credits)
    A historical approach to the development of American film comedy explores theories of comedy and their value to the critical interpretation of comic films. Also considers the varying ways spectators are addressed, and the impact of performers and directors on various comedy styles.
  • VM418 - Transnational Asian Cinemas (4 Credits)
    Asian "national" cinemas are examined and problematized in the contexts of media and economic globalization, including: the politics of transnational film practices; issues surrounding filmic representation and diasporic identities; the construction and negotiation of national, gender, and genre differences; local-regional-global dynamics; and questions of the postcolonial in Asian contexts.
    Instructor: Shujen Wang
  • VM420 - Topics in Media Arts: Practice (4 Credits)
    Explores various aspects of media arts practice. Course may be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM423 - Writing Television Pilots (4 Credits)
    Examines how to create a television series, including developing an original premise, and writing convincing, multi-dimensional characters, and intriguing, character-specific dialogue. Students write an entire television pilot script to be workshopped in class, along with a pilot package that includes a logline, series synopsis and a 13-week episode guide with character and story arcs.
    Instructor: Mark Saraceni
  • VM428 - Feature Writing Workshop (4 Credits)
    Working from detailed outlines developed in VM 221 Writing the Feature Film, students complete a first draft of a feature-length screenplay. Students read each other's work, write a critical analysis of each segment, and engage in discussion of aesthetics, craft, and form.
    Instructor: Diane Lake
  • VM429 - Comedy Writer's Room (4 Credits)
    Emulates a Hollywood comedy writing room. Students collectively create and write an original pilot script for a TV comedy. Students write character sketches, a comprehensive story outline, the first draft of the script and all subsequent drafts, and participate in an extensive punch-up. Participants gain a keen understanding of how a Hollywood comedy writers' room works, how to write under deadline, how to pitch jokes, and how to write comedy as a team.
    Instructor: Michael Bent
  • VM440 - Advanced Studio Production: Fiction (4 Credits)
    Provides the opportunity for specialized work in fiction television genres that include a studio component, such as drama series, soap operas, and situation comedies. Students create projects and produce, direct, light, and crew them.
  • VM441 - Advanced Studio Production: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Provides the opportunity for specialized work in nonfiction multi-camera television genres, including talk shows, live performance, and public affairs programming. Emphasis is on designing, producing, directing, lighting, and studio crewing.
    Instructor: Eric Handler
  • VM450 - Advanced Sound Design (4 Credits)
    Advanced studies in audio post-production, with emphasis on expanding students' conceptual framework and refining creative audio post-production skills in surround sound mixing and applications in film, video, and digital media.
    Instructor: Elizabeth Fausak
  • VM456 - Advanced Studio Recording (4 Credits)
    Explores the theoretical and technical applications of multi-effects signal processing, advanced multi-track mixing, and MIDI sequencing. Students apply the semester's evolving topics to the production and development of one major creative project integrating musical and sound art composition elements of differing styles, lengths, and levels of complexity.
  • VM457 - Recording Industry as a Business (4 Credits)
    Explores the ways sound entertainment and information products are developed, produced, and marketed. Examines market analysis principles and legal requirements and structure, including licensing agreements, contracts, and copyright; along with the examination of revenue issues such as royalties, record sales, product endorsements; and cost-centered issues such as promotion, advertising, and touring.
  • VM465 - Documentary Photography (4 Credits)
    Provides the foundation for an intense photographic investigation of an issue-cultural, political, ideological, or personal. Develops greater competence in negative making and black-and-white printing, with emphasis on strongly informative images. Assignments require the student to discover narrative possibilities while creating strong individual images. The course's technical components are supplemented by considerations of the history of documentary photography.
    Instructor: Lauren Shaw
  • VM470 - Advanced New Media Projects (4 Credits)
    Provides an opportunity for senior VMA students working in computer animation, interactive media, motion graphics, digital photography, networked performance, audio, or other forms of new media to create advanced portfolio work. Projects, both collaborative and individual, are developed in the context of peer-based critique and analysis. The focus is on using new technologies for creative self-expression. Students complete the course with an original portfolio-ready project. May be repeated once for credit if projects differ.
    Instructor: John Craig Freeman
  • VM471 - Topics in Documentary:Practice (4 Credits)
    Advanced documentary production workshops in varying areas of professional practice. Topics may include personal documentary, filmmaking and the environment, or social and community action; there may be future offerings proposed under this designation (subject to review of the curriculum committee)- for example, a course in Developing Cross-Platform Documentary. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM475 - Creative Producing for Film (4 Credits)
    Explores the ways in which a creative producer engages with a project from conception through completion with a focus on the development process. It will discuss original ideas, source material (books, stories), pitching, creating log lines, script coverage, the notes process and assembling the creative team. It will cover customary business affairs including chain-of-title, copyright, talent and option agreements. Key issues in finance, marketing and distribution will also be examined.
  • VM476 - Editing for Advanced Film and Video (4 Credits)
    This advanced-level 16mm film and video post-production workshop is designed to assist in the editing and completion of students' advanced-level projects. Technical procedures as well as aesthetic and conceptual issues endemic to post-production of motion picture projects are examined with an eye to their practical application to students' work on their projects.
  • VM478 - Advanced Cinematography and Videography (4 Credits)
    Offers advanced-level exploration of aesthetics, technology, and craft of cinematography and videography. Students gain a working knowledge of the advanced level of cameras in the department and are expected to develop complex lighting and shot designs. Emphasis is on aesthetic use of the technical elements of motion picture acquisition. Includes significant collaboration with other courses in the curriculum including BFA and BA Production Workshop.
  • VM490 - BFA Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Provides the means for students to produce portfolio work. BFA students are required to take two consecutive semesters of the workshop, 4 credits per semester. Work may be produced in teams, partnerships, or individually. Projects must be proposed in the semester preceding the semester in which the work is to be produced (see section on BFA requirements above). Students may also apply to serve as non-BFA participants for a single semester and for 4 credits only, serving as crew members or staff on another student's project. Prerequisites: Completion of one specialization-level production course, and approval by the faculty BFA committee based on application.
  • VM491 - BA Capstone Project (4 Credits)
    Students are admitted by application to produce portfolio work as a Capstone Project. Applications must include a detailed description of the proposal for consideration by a faculty panel. The proposal can be for either a creative project based in any area of the program, including film, TV, animation, sound design, or digital art and games; or a significant research project in media studies. Provides an opportunity to produce a significant piece of creative or scholarly work.
  • VM492 - Photo Practicum (4 Credits)
    Designed to integrate, enrich, and solidify a student's photographic skills building on past productions. Emphasis is placed on developing a portfolio representative of a personal vision.
  • VM600 - Business of Modern Media (4 Credits)
    Focuses on strategic thinking and implementation of media projects from conception (pre-production) through release/distribution/exhibition. Material covered includes business plans; grant resources, writing, and package preparation; acquiring rights associated with production; preparing for feature production (optioning literary property, pitching ideas, offerings, prospectus); legal issues (rights, copyright, and intellectual property); insurance considerations; advertising; and marketing. Students are required to conduct database web research on the industry and festivals in addition to following current trends in global markets, financing, advertising, and marketing.
  • VM602 - Media Production Ethics and Cultural Diversity (4 Credits)
    Ethical and diversity issues, including deception, privacy, pornography, racism, discrimination, defamation of character, sexism, stereotyping, piracy, censorship, obscenity, ethnocentricity, confidentiality, fairness, and hate speech are investigated as they apply to the production process of film, video, new media, audio, and photography.
    Instructor: Thomas Cooper
  • VM604 - Topics in Media Production (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in the area of media studies and production.
  • VM605 - Graduate Writing Short Subject (4 Credits)
    Introduces the three genres of short form--nonfiction, experimental, and fiction. Students learn the differences and components of each genre and acquire an understanding of the art, craft, and discipline of each process from a writer's point of view. Emphasis is on developing the writer-s individual personal vision.
  • VM606 - Writing for Interactive Media (4 Credits)
    Explores the fundamentals of writing for the interactive screen. Examines narrative, non-text, web, and multi-user game contexts as the student works from the ideation phase through completed works made ready for production.
  • VM611 - Principles of Sound Production (4 Credits)
    An introductory course in audio physics, sound principles, and the theory and practice of audio recording and mixing. Emphasis is also placed on concept development within sound production concurrent to the study of signal routing and the mixer console, analog and digital audio recording and editing techniques.
    Instructor: Pierre Archambault
  • VM612 - Graduate Sound Design (4 Credits)
    An introductory course on the art of the sound designer and the processes and theories applied to composing and editing sound tracks for visual media such as film, video, computer animation, and websites. Areas of focus are in audio postproduction techniques and in the roles of the supervising sound editor and the sound designer. Postproduction techniques include dialog correction and automated dialog replacement (ADR), Foley session recording, sound effects acquisition and editing, and the mixing and localization theories and practices for stereo and surround-sound. The theoretical focus of the course is on the voice in film and visual media, as speech, as song, and everything that remains afterward with an ongoing theoretic investigation into the relationship between sound and image.
  • VM613 - Foundations of Image and Sound Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces the aesthetics and practice of image and sound production. Topics include visual composition, preproduction skills, lighting, basic directing, camera operation, lens theory, and editing. Students create projects using digital still photography and video.
  • VM614 - Graduate Studio Production (4 Credits)
    An introduction to the fundamentals of studio video production. Students produce, direct, and work crew for productions. Lectures, production analyses, and critiques of work are included.
    Instructor: Michael Goodman
  • VM621 - Documentary Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Introduces the practice of documentary video production. Emphasizes documentary strategies, research, budgeting, production, and postproduction. Students produce a documentary short.
  • VM624 - Graduate Directing Actors for the Screen (4 Credits)
    This is a workshop-style class that focuses on the director-actor interaction. John Cassavetes said that acting is the essential discipline for moviemakers, and in this intensive course, students learn the language of acting and the techniques of directing actors in dramatic productions.
  • VM625 - Computer Animation 1 (4 Credits)
    This is the first course in the two-course computer animation sequence, introducing students to the fundamentals of three-dimensional modeling and animation and preparing them for the second course, Computer Animation II. Students learn to develop concepts, produce storyboards, model, texture objects, compose and light scenes, animate, and add dynamics. Finally, they learn to render their animations into movies and to composite movies, audio, titles, and credits in postproduction. In addition to these production skills, students develop their conceptual understanding as well as their critical and creative thinking about the practice of computer animation.
  • VM628 - Experimental Media Production (4 Credits)
    This is a project-based course for students who are interested in experimental analog and digital media. Along with project assignments open to a wide range of processes in various media, students examine ways that audiovisual media can be used to question mainstream genres, either through the invention of new forms or by subverting and hybridizing those forms. Students also look at how alternative venues and audiences shift the meaning and orientation of production. Technical topics include innovative uses of film, video, audio, and software, for example, direct animation or contact recording. Other topics include: the medium as metaphor, alternative representations of politicized subject matters, ordering systems other than the narrative, non-camera-based visual production, installation art and media as object, media's use of performance and anti-performance, image appropriation, the macro and the miniature within the frame, the long take, repetition and feedback loops, and other generative strategies for media makers.
  • VM631 - Graduate Cinematography (4 Credits)
    Introduces the art of cinematography on both an aesthetic and technical level. Students learn how to shoot on both film and digital formats. They also learn fundamental lighting skills using an array of professional lighting units. Emphasizes the learning of creative techniques for visualizing narrative scripts and exploring the emotional subtext of the cinematic image.
    Instructor: Harlan Bosmajian
  • VM632 - Advanced Editing (4 Credits)
    Provides a framework for advanced digital editing skills like large-scale media management, off-beat and innovative cutting techniques, emerging individual editing styles, and cutting long-form projects.
    Instructor: Daniel Gaucher
  • VM640 - MFA Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    This is an intensive workshop for second-year MFA students to concentrate on the main body of their artistic output. Students present their own work and critique the work of others, as well as work on their current projects. Centered on the self-directed production schedule and the collaborative nature of critique in an MFA program, this course prepares students to become lifelong artists. Course to be repeated three times during matriculation.
  • VM651 - Studies in Narrative and Media History (4 Credits)
    Offers a historical survey of media art from the perspective of narrative studies. Exposes students to a wide array of narrative structures historically evident in media art, including conventional and unconventional fictional narrative forms, as well as varying types of narrative evident in documentary and experimental media works. In addition, students are introduced to the role of visual images in media narratives, as well as the impact of digital technologies on narrative forms. Students are expected to develop an understanding of the role of narrative structure in effecting emotion and in communicating ideas.
    Instructor: Jane Shattuc
  • VM652 - Theories of Integrated Media (4 Credits)
    Media are no longer discreet forms of expression. Digital technology has created an integrated environment where even analog media are most often produced and/or viewed in a digital context or with digital tools. This course is an intensive introduction to theories of producing and consuming film, video, photography, and sound, both in isolation and couched within digital technologies. Students are given a background in traditional approaches to media criticism and encouraged to question how the new digital context has altered those approaches and changed the conditions under which the creative expression and consumption of media takes place.
  • VM655 - Topics in Media Studies (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in the area of Media Studies.
  • VM664 - Studies in Documentary History and Theory (4 Credits)
    A historical investigation of the theories and practice of documentary representation in film, television, video, and new media.
    Instructor: Michael Selig
  • WDC306 - Phil of Law, Sup Ct & US Const (4 Credits)
    In his opening statement before the hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee on his nomination to become the Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, John Roberts asserted that ‚ “judges are like umpires.” This claim is at once elegantly simple and subtly complex. Yet, to some commentators, it stands at odds with what many consider to be the current conservative shift of the Court. This course will examine the working of the Court through historical, political and philosophical lenses. In the first half of the course, we will examine a number of positions about the nature of “law.” We will consider views that hold law variously to be a set of commands, rules, principles and the like. In this context, we will contrast the views of judicial interpretation set forth by Justices Antonin Scalia and Stephen Breyer. In the second half of the course, we will explore some of the more contested topics currently facing the Court that push the Court toward the ideological fray of partisan politics. Throughout we will read and discuss historical and contemporary landmark cases. We will focus particular attention in this course on questions of legal reasoning and how judges ought to decide cases. We will read, analyze and debate a variety of kinds of texts, including classics from the history of philosophy and legal theory and Supreme Court decisions from particular cases. This course is ideal not only for students interested in law school, but also for anyone interested in the political and philosophical issues surrounding the Supreme Court in contemporary politics.
  • WDC307 - Scandalous Wshngtn: Uncovering (4 Credits)
    The nation’s capital is almost as famous for its scandals as it is for its politics. Using some of Washington’s most notorious public scandals, this course examines over 200 years of the city’s rich and colorful history. We’ll explore sites around the city where major events occurred, including Lafayette Square, Georgetown, and U Street. Insiders and long-time residents will serve as resources for uncovering the truth behind the headlines that shook Washington. By analyzing the origins and contexts of scandals involving murder, slavery, espionage and riots, we’ll reveal the intriguing life and culture unique to Washington. **All meals, tours, and activities are extra costs and the sole responsibility of the students.
  • WDC315 - Rising China and US Relations (4 Credits)
    This course will explore the contemporary political and economic relationship between China and the United States with particular emphasis on how the rise of these two powers in the 20th and 21st centuries has changed the dynamics of their bilateral relations. Although this relationship has been labeled the most important bilateral relationship for the Obama administration and a springboard for its Asian pivot, China’s reaction to the ‘Asian Pivot’ increasingly has been suspicious. The students will explore how the Obama administration’s interactions and goals for its relationship with China operate not in a historical vacuum, but within a complicated spectrum of decades of contacts and impressions that motivate both sides. The course focus will be on the expansion of China and the United States’ global influence in Asia and beyond and especially explore the interdependence and frictions during the last 20 years. Students will gain an understanding of how cultural factors have impacted Sino-American relations and continue to influence the present multi-faceted relationship. The intersection of U.S.-Chinese modern history, politics, ideology, and trade will be topics of analysis. The role of globalization will be examined to better understand the 21st century economic and business agendas that guide and irritate the key bilateral players. As part of the experiential pedagogical approach, students should expect to be interactive in the class, including case study presentations and team role-playing. Guest speakers and an off-site field trip are included in the course. Course readings and a research paper are required. No previous Chinese history or economics course is necessary, but a background and interest in international relations or international economics are useful.
  • WDC320 - Media and the Movies (4 Credits)
    Heroes or villains? Popular movies provide varying images of journalists, from the crusading pair of reporters who brought down President Nixon in "All the President's Men" to the fictional reporter in "Absence of Malice" who was used by a frustrated prosecutor unable to solve a murder case. This course will use the cinema to explore the role of journalists and their rights and responsibilities. We will examine the use of confidential sources, libel, conflicts of interests and other ethical issues, and the way movies help shape the public's image of the media.
  • WDC350 - Nonprofit Ldrshp and Mgmnt (4 Credits)
    The nonprofit sector is the third-largest workforce in the U.S., after retail trade and manufacturing. The rapid proliferation of nonprofits and the approaching retirement of baby boomers are creating abundant career opportunities in nonprofits, from large hospitals and universities to arts organizations, environmental groups and community-based human service agencies. In this course, students gain an overview of the history, size, scope, and functions of the nonprofit sector; explore key issues such as government-nonprofit relations and board governance; and learn to prepare grant proposals and other documents. The course includes case studies, field trips and guest speakers from some of the most successful organizations in Washington.
  • WR101 - Introduction to College Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces college writing, focusing on cultural analysis that appears in academic work and in the public intellectual sphere. Emphasizes how writers work with texts (including images, film, music, and other media) to develop writing projects. Through four main writing projects that concentrate on drafting, peer review, and revision, students learn to be constructive readers of each other's writing and to understand the rhetoric of intellectual inquiry.
    Instructors: Priscilla Andrade, Emily Avery-Miller, Kyle Dacuyan, Ricky Davis, Pamela DeGregorio, Zyanya Dickey, Daniel DiPaolo, Johnette Ellis, Katherine Faigen, Amy Fant, Colleen Fullin, Rachel Hezekiah, Steve Himmer, Whitney James, Meredith Jordan, Raquel Kaplan, Kristina Kopic, Mary Kovaleski Byrnes, Tamera Marko, Eric Marshall, Laura McCune-Poplin, Caitlin Mcgill, Maire McGillicuddy, Peter Medeiros, Elizabeth Milarcik, Todd Natti, Michael Ostrov, Elizabeth Parfitt, Christopher Poole, Ashley Rivers, Wesley Rothman, Jeffrey Schwartz, Eric Sepenoski, Stephen Shane, Kayleigh Shoen, William Tierney, Donald Vincent, Charles Walker, Claudia Ward-de Leon, Ashley Wells
  • WR121 - Research Writing (4 Credits)
    Research-based writing course that explores how rhetorical situations call on writers to do research and how writers draw on various types of writing to present the results of their research. Through four main writing projects, students develop an understanding of the purposes and methods of research and a rhetorical awareness of how research-based writing tasks ask them to consider their relation to the issues they are researching and to their audiences.
    Instructors: Priscilla Andrade, Cheryl Buchanan, Sarah Ehrich, John Fantin, Tamera Marko, Jordan Pailthorpe, Ashley Rivers
  • WR211 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Fiction and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR212 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Poetry and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR216 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Nonfiction and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR311 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction (4 Credits)
    Original Fiction is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR312 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Poetry (4 Credits)
    Original Poetry is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR313 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Drama (4 Credits)
    Original Drama is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR315 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Comedy (4 Credits)
    Original Comedy is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: Michael Bent
  • WR316 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Original Nonfiction is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: Douglas Whynott
  • WR317 - Topics in Creative Writing (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in various genres of writing such as Experimental Fiction, Lyric Poetry, Micro Essays, among others. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Kevin Miller
  • WR320 - Travel Writing (4 Credits)
    The best travel writing takes readers on a journey that is not only geographic, but also narrative. This intermediate course in literary travel writing introduces writers to key ways to transform their experiences in the world- be it a far-flung travel destination or one's hometown- into compelling narratives in the form of short essay or memoir. In addition to short reading and writing assignments, students complete three polished travel essays: two to be workshopped and one to hand into the instructor on the last day of class.
  • WR405 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Poetry (4 Credits)
    Advanced writing workshop in poetry with in-class discussion of original poems by students already seriously engaged in writing poetry. The course pays special attention to getting published and students are encouraged to submit their work to magazines. May be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: Gail Mazur
  • WR407 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Fiction (4 Credits)
    Extensive fiction writing of short stories and/or novels coupled with in-class reading for criticism and the craft of fiction. May be repeated once for credit.
  • WR415 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Advanced writing workshop in various nonfiction forms, such as memoir, travel writing, literary journalism, or other narrative nonfiction writing. Students will already have completed at least one nonfiction workshop, have a project in development, and be capable of discussing such techniques as characterization, point of view, and narrative structure as they appear in literary nonfiction forms.
    Instructor: Douglas Whynott
  • WR416 - Adv Topics in Writing (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in various genres of writing like Comedy Writing, Travel Writing, Experimental Fiction, among others. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • WR440 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Screenwriting (4 Credits)
    Advanced workshop in feature film writing in which students learn how to work with characters, dialogue, and dramatic structure through story development, mini treatments, and scene breakdown. Students beginning new scripts produce at least half of a screenplay and a solid, outlined second half. Students continuing a work-in-progress script revise and polish. Course also includes study and discussion of successfully produced film/TV scripts. May be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: Christopher Keane
  • WR600 - Teaching College Composition (4 Credits)
    Introduction to composition history, theory, and pedagogy that prepares students to teach college writing courses. Examines debates and practices in college composition and their conceptual foundations and introduces rhetoric as a productive art and means of analysis. In preparation to teach writing, students learn how to design writing assignments, to run writing workshops, to respond to and evaluate student writing, and to produce a syllabus for a first-year composition course.
  • WR605 - Poetry Workshop (4 Credits)
    In-class discussions of original poems aim to help students learn strategies for generating and revising work. The workshop asks students to consider their work in light of the essential issues of the poet's craft, and to articulate their individual sensibilities as poets.
  • WR606 - Fiction Workshop (4 Credits)
    Uses student manuscripts as its main texts, supplemented by published stories, to illustrate the fundamental aspects of fiction, mainly in the short story form. Explores the complexities of narration, characterization, scene, dialogue, style, tone, plot, etc. Emphasis is on the generation of fictional works and on their revision.
  • WR608 - Spec Top in Fiction Workshop (4 Credits)
    This course continues to examine the art and craft of short fiction by focusing on special topics such as revision, microfiction and linked stories.
  • WR610 - Forms in Poetry (4 Credits)
    Explores how poems are shaped by attention to metrical lineation and rhythm, stanza structure, and the forms of poetry, such as the sonnet, sestina, villanelle, renga, ballade, ghazal, etc. Students are expected to write original poems in forms as well as develop their practical knowledge of prosody.
  • WR613 - Nonfiction Workshop (4 Credits)
    Stresses the writing of many forms of nonfiction, such as informal essays, autobiography, profiles, travel writing, or literary journalism, coupled with reading assignments of relevant texts.
    Instructor: Richard Hoffman
  • WR652 - Novel Workshop (4 Credits)
    A workshop in structuring and writing the opening chapters of a novel. Explores story premise, stylistic approach, point-of-view, and other structural parameters, as well as revision.
    Instructor: Mako Yoshikawa
  • WR655 - Writing the Nonfiction Book (4 Credits)
    Workshop on the extended narrative, with discussions of organizing the research, developing an outline and devising a structure, carrying out the plan, and writing the book proposal. Students submit their own work and also examine various approaches of nonfiction books.
    Instructor: Douglas Whynott