Course Descriptions


Filter the courses by subject area

  • BC110 - Introduction to the Creative Economy (4 Credits)
    An immersive examination of the history of the creative economy, the sharing economy, contemporary creative enterprise models, and their impact within the global economy today. This course explores core themes such as authorship, production and labor, ethics, globalization, community, culture, politics, business practices, and innovation in the arts and communication. The course also examines cultural diversity and the extent to which different cultures are currently represented in various aspects of the creative economy. Student work includes a series of short media presentations and papers on creative economy businesses, organizations, and individuals that produce and distribute goods and services in the realms of marketing, design, film and media, video game and software, music and performing arts, and publishing.
    Instructor: Brenna McCormick
  • BC111 - Creative Collaboration Seminar (4 Credits)
    Students explore the theory and practice of creativity with respect to specific types of group collaboration and roles within the creative enterprise. This includes the businesses, organizations, and individuals that produce and distribute goods and services in the realms of marketing, design, film and media, video game and software, music and performing arts, and publishing. Through selected readings, meetings with guest artists, and hands-on exercises that foster both personal creativity and the creative output of teams, this practical course offers students skills and techniques to increase personal creativity and promote group creativity. The course also examines cultural diversity and the extent to which different cultures are currently represented in various aspects of the creative economy. Students investigate and practice various models of creative collaboration and work collaboratively throughout the semester to create a series of events/works/projects to be presented in class and included in individual portfolios.
    Instructor: Brenna McCormick
  • CC100 - Fundamentals of Speech Communication (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic concepts, theories, and principles of oral communication applied to speaking situations. Develops competence in oral communication through performance and critical analysis of student skills in a variety of speaking formats. Audience analysis, content discovery, communication strategies, arrangement of ideas, use of evidence and reasoning to support claims, language and style, voice and other delivery skills and ethical considerations are covered.
  • CC150 - Radio Programming and Operations (4 Credits)
    An in-depth exploration into the art and science of programming terrestrial, internet, and satellite radio entities, in both the commercial and public sectors. This course focuses on the evolution of broadcasting an audio product for entertainment and informational purposes. It examines the effects of cultural, governmental, technological, and market forces on the radio industry as a whole as well as on individual radio stations throughout North America.
    Instructor: John Casey
  • CC160 - Interpersonal Communication Skills (4 Credits)
    Introduces the practices and principles of interpersonal communication. Focuses on perception, creative/critical listening, nonverbal communication, emotions, power, and self-disclosure. Issues of ethics, technology, and culture are woven throughout class content and discussions. Stages of relationships are explored as well as the influence of communication within and between those stages. Numerous applications to a variety of situations, including those in the family, workplace, and romantic context are undertaken as students draw from their own experiences.
    Instructor: Rich West
  • CC203 - Intercultural Communication (4 Credits)
    Analyzes readings in intercultural communication focusing on verbal and nonverbal customs of various cultures as information from both cultural and language perspectives. Each semester focuses on specific topics or cultures. Background in other cultures is helpful but not essential.
  • CC210 - Culture, Diversity, and Health Communication (4 Credits)
    Provides an understanding of how diverse people and groups communicate about and negotiate issues of health and illness. It uses a socio-ecological approach to study various aspects of culture, health behaviors, and health dynamics. Course investigates processes for developing culturally competent health initiatives for diverse populations. Cross-listed with HC 210.
  • CC220 - Public Discourse in the United States (4 Credits)
    Examines how Americans in the United States talk about important public issues including race, class, work, and foreigners. Applies theories of discourse to case studies of political communication.
    Instructor: Michael Weiler
  • CC221 - Global Political Communication (4 Credits)
    The broad objective of this course is to provide students with a detailed examination of the impact of communication technologies and other contextual variables on political information flows and social interactions in the United States and internationally. This course puts an emphasis on political communication from a permanent campaigning perspective in and out of elections, party politics, and governing processes.
    Instructor: Vincent Raynauld
  • CC235 - Sports Communication (4 Credits)
    Sports is a major industry in the United States today, and this course introduces students to the wide-ranging field of sports communication. The course is a comprehensive survey and analysis of the best practices and techniques for effective public relations in the sports industry. Topics include how to define, develop, and deliver an effective campaign; the use of mass and social media platforms for brands, personalities, and teams; and the management and mitigation of crisis. Course pedagogies include case studies, simulations, presentations by professionals associated with the field, writing assignments, and role-playing exercises.
    Instructor: Charles Steinberg
  • CC236 - Sports Public Relations (4 Credits)
    Provides students with a practical, strategic, and technical understanding of sports communication and the roles that publicists, agents, and sports marketers play in the industry. Discussion topics include various aspects of sports-focused public relations and mass media such as: media relations, social media, branding, media management, crisis communication, and sponsorships. Students explore the public?s relationship with athletes, teams, and sports, as well as broadcast, Internet, and print news mediums as they relate to sports communication. Students can expect to explore topics through a mix of class lectures, assigned readings, written assignments, expert speakers, role-playing exercises, and a final project.
  • CC263 - Argument and Advocacy (4 Credits)
    Studies the art of advocacy. Students develop logical, organizational, and research skills that debate and other forms of oral and written advocacy require. They participate in debates about current political and legal controversies and learn how critical thinking skills are used as tools both for advocates and audiences.
    Instructors: Heather May, Gregory Payne, Michael Weiler, Robert Kubacki
  • CC264 - Oral Presentation of Literature (4 Credits)
    Oral performance of literature (poetry, prose, and drama) is used as the art of understanding and communicating a text's meaning to an audience. Explores the aesthetic dimensions of literature and its performance. Students develop critical skills interpreting texts and evaluating performed literature.
  • CC265 - Professional Voice and Speech (4 Credits)
    Trains voice to develop wide range of controls in pitch, volume, and quality to meet voice and speech needs of journalism, public speaking, and interpretation. International students are encouraged to enroll if interested in accent reduction.
  • CC266 - Conflict and Negotiation (4 Credits)
    Studies conflict theory and principles and practices of dispute resolution. Includes everyday conflict, negotiation, mediation, arbitration, and alternative dispute resolution systems. Emphasizes interpersonal skills development.
  • CC303 - Politics, Advocacy, and Public Opinion (4 Credits)
    Studies the research process from problem definition to survey design, sampling, data analysis, and interpretation of results. Students develop skills in reading and interpreting social scientific research and conducting forms of research pertinent to public and political communication needs.
    Instructor: Spencer Kimball
  • CC304 - Communication Informatics (4 Credits)
    Studies social-shaping communication technologies. Explores central role of communication in creating and sustaining social communities online and examines web-based technology and use by people in building social networks and organizational structures. Analyzes optimal use of information technology to create social presence and cohesion in multiple contexts. Individual and/or team projects explore human communication and intersection of information technologies.
    Instructor: Linda Gallant
  • CC305 - Communication Research Methods (4 Credits)
    Teaches the use of social scientific methods of empirical research to investigate communication phenomena. Students learn how to become critical consumers of research and how to conduct empirical communication research. This course fuses basic research principles with theory and practice.
    Instructor: Rich West
  • CC310 - Campaign Management (4 Credits)
    Focuses primarily on electoral campaigns with attention to persuasive campaigns in general. Includes political advertising.
    Instructor: Charles Coplin
  • CC315 - Introduction to Nonprofit Communication Management (4 Credits)
    Nonprofits rely on a solid strategic plan for success in following their missions; board structure, branding, funding, effective communication, and a commitment to serve their constituencies must be deployed strategically. This course provides a foundation in nonprofit communication management and social media communication strategies.
  • CC316 - Nonprofit Fundraising Campaign (4 Credits)
    Nonprofits depend on donations for a steady stream of income to help serve their missions. This course provides students with an overall understanding of various options nonprofits have to raise funds. An emphasis is placed on developing fundraising strategies and the utilization of sound practices for maximum success to help build sustainability and service-learning partnering with local nonprofits.
  • CC326 - Academic Writing for International Students (1 Credit)
    Covers the structure, organization, and goals of academic English writing assignments. Through two main writing projects students concentrate on creating outlines; drafting; use and citation of sources; peer review, and revision.
    Instructor: Jeremy Heflin
  • CC327 - Ell Seminar in Leadership and Business English (1 Credit)
    Students learn and practice advanced business and academic language skills most commonly used in the United States Emphasis is on improving presentation and discussion facilitation skills
  • CC328 - ELL Dialogues on Global Issues (1 Credit)
    Develops confidence in public speaking through leading class dialogs on current events, conducting a speech, and working in groups to create broadcast news stories. The class will offer practical and theoretical approaches to evaluate and improve English language use.
    Instructor: Jeremy Heflin
  • CC329 - ELL Seminar in Pronunciation, Basic Public Speaking and American Culture (1 Credit)
    Students develop, learn and practice correct American English pronunciation skills while learning basic presentation techniques and American culture.
  • CC330 - Management and Communication (4 Credits)
    Introduces fundamental principles of management in profit, nonprofit, and government settings. Special emphasis is placed on humanistic and systems approaches, communication skills and theory, and national and global trends. Sample topics include planning, organizing, staffing, decision making, and leading. Case method is applied.
    Instructor: Ted Hollingworth
  • CC336 - Sports Management (4 Credits)
    Provides an extensive overview of the management of professional, amateur, and recreational sports and the analytical skills necessary for sports managers to succeed in sports organizations. Aims to provide practical, hands-on experience in the sports industry by surveying the business models of the sports leagues, organizations, and business sectors (such as media, licensing, facilities, etc.). Emphasis is placed on how the application of analytics has altered the decision-making processes of sports organizations. Students examine marketing techniques and activities used to advertise and promote sports events and undertake a comprehensive survey and analysis of the state of digital media and marketing in sports today.
  • CC337 - Topics in Sports Communication: Sports Media (4 Credits)
    Sport is an integral component of today's media, this course examines the history of sports writing and sports broadcasting and the state of these fields today. In addition, this course provides a practical guide to sports broadcasting and production. Students of sports media are taken through techniques of analysis for film, TV, newspapers, magazines, advertisements, and the internet. The course encourages students to engage critically with their own experience of media sport and to develop an independent approach to analysis.
    Instructor: Gene Lavanchy
  • CC344 - Rhetoric of Social Movements (4 Credits)
    Critically examines prominent rhetorical texts and events that shaped political processes and relationships. Applies insights to contemporary contexts and issues.
    Instructor: Michael Weiler
  • CC350 - Media Broadcast Vocal Presentation (4 Credits)
    Course is designed to complement CC 265, Professional Voice and Speech by focusing on voice training for broadcast media specifically, including microphone technique and practice and understanding of audio and video technology.
    Instructor: John Casey
  • CC356 - Crisis Communication (4 Credits)
    Details the importance of managing communication in crisis situations. Topics include definitions, types, classifications, phases, planning, publics, contingency events, time estimating, crisis teams, control centers, working with media, training, and follow-through. Crisis scenarios cover profit, nonprofit, and government organizations at the local, regional, national, and/or global level. Case examples are employed.
    Instructor: Vincent Raynauld
  • CC360 - Social Media and Politics (4 Credits)
    Offers an in-depth look at the role of social media in different aspects of the political process from a permanent campaigning perspective, including in the context of electoral contests, legislative and governing patterns, and party politics. On one hand, it explores how formal political players?candidates for elected office, elected officials, political parties, and governmental agencies?are adapting some of their information dispersion, mobilization, and organizing strategies to the distinct structural and functional properties of social media. On the other hand, it examines the evolution of the way in which and to what extent many players on the edges of the formal political arena are active politically as social media are becoming an increasingly central component of their political engagement toolkit. In sum, this course provides students with a broader understanding of how these two dynamics are fuelling the rise of a political engagement disconnect between political elites and the population at large, especially members of the millennial generation, internationally.
    Instructor: Vincent Raynauld
  • CC372 - Topics in Communication Studies: Animal Advocacy and Outreach (4 Credits)
    Cats, dogs, and other companion animals are like members of the family in American culture. But what rights do they have? How are laws related to animal welfare created? In this course, we will explore the history of the animal rights movement in the U.S. and abroad and examine significant events and cases. We will also explore issues of controversy in the movement, cultural implications, and the intersection of rights and welfare. Guest speakers from various local animal welfare organizations will visit class to discuss their advocacy and outreach projects. Students will also participate in lobbying and outreach campaigns with local animal organizations.
  • CC372 - Topics in Communication Studies: Mental Health, the Media and Public Policy (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the role of communication and rhetoric in shaping distinctions and relations between "Mental Health" and "Public Policy,? looking at mental health issues and challenges for audiences, and the media advocate for or against particular mental health policies and practices. We will examine how the public comes to view mental health issues through representations in a variety of media both ?formal? and ?informal?; problems of efficacy and ethics in the public discourse, forums, and voices playing a part in mental health controversies and debates; and our own practices of advocacy around messaging and policy.
    Instructor: Heather May
  • CC372 - Topics in Communication Studies: Guerilla Public Relations (4 Credits)
    This course is designed to give you a strong understanding of guerilla PR, the essential communication strategic method to plan and execute public relations campaigns with no or little budget. You will learn to think entrepreneurially about communication strategy and tactics; How to map out strategies that redefine communication battlefields in ways that place competing brands on equal footing or even outflank them. We will explore the latest trends, tools, technologies, strategies, tactics and various media types critical to implementing and managing guerilla PR campaigns. We will often discuss and analyze guerilla campaigns, especially from the perspectives of brand communication, sports communication, political communication and global communication.
  • CC372 - Topics in Communication Studies: International Public Relations and Global Communication Management (4 Credits)
    This course will introduce students to the global perspective of public relations with an emphasis on international agency and in-house public relations. Students will gain a practical, strategic, and technical understanding of international public relations and will apply their acquired course knowledge through participation in an international acedemic PR competition called "The GlobeCom Project," which involves virtual teamwork with PR students from diverse countries around the world. Course discussion topics include various aspects of international public relations and global communications management including: media relations, social media, branding, foreign news environments and reporting agencies, media management and crisis communication. Students will explore topics through a mix of class lectures, assigned readings, written assignments, expert speakers, role-playing exercises and the GlobeCom Project.
  • CC415 - Mediation, Facilitation, and Dialogue (4 Credits)
    Considers theory and practice of various forms of third-party-guided dispute resolution. Students learn to mediate conflicts, facilitate discussions, and promote dialogue among parties in conflict. Emphasis is on developing skills in leading groups.
  • CC471 - Topics in Leadership, Politics, and Social Advocacy: Speechwriting and Thought Leadership (4 Credits)
    Speeches are a powerful storytelling tool that fuel advocacy, business, marketing, and political campaigns. Students will learn about how speeches can be used strategically with other forms of online content such as public service announcements, blog posts, and brand journalism to target messages to specific audiences.
  • CC471 - Topics in Leadership, Politics, and Social Advocacy: Digital Storytelling (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to single-camera photo/video production using a mobile device. Students learn how to operate equipment, mainly smart phones and other devices such as iPads and tablets as the principles underlying shooting, editing, and online distribution. Emphasis is placed on the fast paced digital storytelling using non-traditional stages of preproduction, production and postproduction. Topics will include equipment to improve your photos/videos, basic camera settings, applications for basic filming and editing, best video apps for iPhone and iPad, getting smooth motion shots, filming interviews, practical video editing steps, YouTube sharing and analytics, and making a multimedia video story.
    Instructor: Sean Tracey
  • CC471 - Topics in Leadership, Politics, and Social Advocacy: Presidential Politics: General Election (4 Credits)
    This course examines the process involved in electing a President in the United States. We?ll explore how modern campaigns inform, influence, and mobilize voters. Topics include the role of political parties and candidates, campaign strategies and issues, political advertising and media coverage, campaign finance and campaigning and governing. Students upon completion of the course will have a practical and theoretical understanding of the 2016 presidential elections including the electoral college.
  • CC471 - Topics in Leadership, Politics, and Social Advocacy: Student Activism of the '60s (4 Credits)
    This course will explore student activism in the 60's with an emphasis on how the Vietnam War radicalized youth, the strategies and tactics used by student activists and the reaction of the Establishment to such movements. The course will focus on speeches, writings, books, music, movies and other rhetorical artifacts as they defined and branded such movements, and how the student movement was influenced by other activist groups, speakers and events including King, Malcolm X, Nixon, Robert Kennedy, Eugene McCarthy, culminating in the shootings at Kent State.
    Instructor: Gregory Payne
  • CC472 - Topics in Communication Studies: Communication and Online Relationships (4 Credits)
    The manner in which we initiate, maintain, and terminate our relationships has undergone great change over the past decade. Today, more than ever, relationship development takes place electronically and relationships can prosper and/or decay because of technology. This course will explore how communication functions in online relationships. In particular, social networking sites (SNS) have become groundbreaking in relational life. Whether through Facebook posts, Skype conversations, Instagram photos, Snapchat videos, or 140-character Tweets, it?s important to understand how ?relational technology? functions in our lives and the consequences of this technology. Unpacking the complexities of SNS and other electronic communication is important as we communicate with our family, friends, colleagues, and romantic partners.
    Instructor: Rich West
  • CC472 - Topics in Communication: The New Normal: Gender and Race Disparities in Hollywood (4 Credits)
    One cannot engage with mainstream media without observing the abnormal dichotomy and misogynist location of women. This course will function as an applied laboratory by integrating theory, feminist text and personal narratives from industry specialist to understand this paradox. We will use the work of different feminist theories like bell hooks, Audre Lorde, and Patricia Hill Collins as well as current works from Roxanne Gay along with communication theories like Genderlect, Muted Group and Feminist Standpoint Theory to frame our understanding of media. The lived experiences of LA community industry specialist and guest speakers will serve to increase our knowledge. The course will conclude with a collaborative, student-driven construct for enacting equity and addressing gender bias in Hollywood and LA communities. This course is crosslisted with a course being offered in Los Angeles.
  • CC472 - Topics in Communication Studies: The New Abnormal: Gender and Racial Disparities in Hollywood (4 Credits)
    One cannot engage with mainstream media without observing the abnormal dichotomy and misogynist location of women. This course will function as an applied laboratory by integrating theory, feminist text and personal narratives from industry specialist to understand this paradox. We will use the work of different feminist theories like bell hooks, Audre Lorde, and Patricia Hill Collins as well as current works from Roxanne Gay along with communication theories like Genderlect, Muted Group and Feminist Standpoint Theory to frame our understanding of media. The lived experiences of LA community industry specialist and guest speakers will serve to increase our knowledge. The course will conclude with a collaborative, student-driven construct for enacting equity and addressing gender bias in Hollywood and LA communities. This course is crosslisted with a course being offered in Los Angeles.
    Instructor: Miranda Banks
  • CC472 - Topics in Communication: Entertainment PR (4 Credits)
    The entertainment industry contributes more than $500 billion to our nation?s economy. Moreover, this sector has significant economic impacts worldwide. This course will focus on analyzing best practices for successful public relations campaigns in this industry. Coursework will include a case study approach combined with developing and executing a campaign for an entertainment-based organization.
    Instructor: Owen Eagan
  • CC475 - Capstone in Leadership, Politics, and Social Advocacy (4 Credits)
    Advanced theory, research, and practice in political communication. Students develop and enhance portfolios of political communication materials, including development of two communication campaigns.
    Instructor: Owen Eagan
  • CC476 - Capstone in Communication Studies (4 Credits)
    Advanced theory, research, and practice in communication studies. As a key feature of the course, students complete a senior thesis or project.
    Instructors: Owen Eagan, Rich West
  • CC608 - Public Affairs (4 Credits)
    Students gain the knowledge and skills necessary to identify, analyze, and communicate with internal and external stakeholder groups for the purpose of persuasion. Rhetorical strategies are developed for ethical, effective issue advocacy campaigns and campaigns to build identity, and enhance and protect reputation of individuals and organizations. New media developments, diverse and global stakeholder groups, and the 24/7 media environment will be addressed. Students design and produce at least one original communication campaign for a client in the private or public sector.
    Instructor: Mohamed Khalil
  • CC609 - Political Communication (4 Credits)
    Political Communication explores fundamental theories, such as agenda setting, framing, and branding. The balancing of ethical implications confronting many political communication situations is discussed through case studies. Practical communication strategy is evaluated, looking at how the media works in general, including the news (hard and soft), entertainment programs, and advertising, in order to shape political perceptions, change attitudes, and effect behavior. Students are introduced to the latest in grassroots activism and mobilization efforts, including mobile and online communication techniques, to better shape civic life, elections, and policy decisions.
    Instructor: Vincent Raynauld
  • CC621 - Speech Writing & Online Content (4 Credits)
    Persuasive online content, whether in written, visual, and oral communication formats, can motivate audiences and communities to take action. As active audiences and community members, people engage in social advocacy, form opinions, consume products, and motivate others to participate in collective action. Understanding the role of creating effective speeches and web-based content for persuasive and strategic communication requires knowledge and proficiency in speech writing, presentation skills, audience analysis, as well as matching audiences, writing styles, and digital storytelling to the most suitable social media platforms.
    Instructor: Gregory Payne
  • CC645 - Public Opinion Research and Practice (4 Credits)
    Students engage in applied research in communication management. Students develop skills in assessing and formulating problems; designing research; gathering, synthesizing, analyzing, and interpreting data; and applying the results to comprehensive communication strategies. Students learn to apply the most appropriate quantitative and qualitative research methods to particular research problems in an effort to effectively address stakeholder audiences, oversee information management systems, and cultivate and manage intellectual capital. Students gain experience in surveys, polling, focus groups, interviews, communication audits, and learn how to optimize research conducted through the Internet-based research.
    Instructor: Spencer Kimball
  • CC647 - Organizational Communication (4 Credits)
    Instructor: Ted Hollingworth
  • CC648 - Public Relations (4 Credits)
    Addresses in-depth the development of stakeholder relations and communication in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Topics covered include corporate relations, reputation management grassroots organizing, public policy and the media, political communication, social advocacy campaigns, and public diplomacy. Case studies of communication campaigns at the local, state, regional, national, and international levels are used. Students produce and present at least one communication campaign to affect behavior in diverse stakeholder groups.
    Instructor: Ted Hollingworth
  • CC652 - Emerging Communication Technologies (4 Credits)
    Surveys the political and social trends of the effects and uses of web-based communication, especially social media, and the shaping and reshaping of institutions. Students develop knowledge and skills in assessing and developing communication strategies for how to best reach multiple stakeholders and audiences with an emphasis on online communication. Through readings, exercises, and projects such as social media audits, students engage in strategic communication planning to best develop every aspect of an institution's communication management - from the narrowest internal communcation to the broadest public communication campaigns.
    Instructor: Linda Gallant
  • CC655 - Project Management and Communication (4 Credits)
    Develops skills in understanding, applying, and assessing the process known as project management in a variety of environments. This is accomplished by introducing and applying the following: systems theory and its philosophical underpinnings; project management theories, methods, vocabularies, and skills; organizational communication theories; team building theory, application, and trends; and global workplace implications and trends.
    Instructor: Charles Coplin
  • CC692 - Capstone Course in Communication Management (4 Credits)
    Students synthesize prior coursework and new learnings to address an important need in public or organizational life. Calling upon competencies in strategic communication planning and design, students produce and present a final professional-level project as the culmination of their course of study. Readings, case studies, and in-class activities support continued inquiry into the most current theoretical dimensions of the discipline.
    Instructor: Owen Eagan
  • CC695 - Seminar Topics in Communication Management: Digital Storytelling in Public Relations Campaigns (4 Credits)
    In this course, we?ll deconstruct and explore the elements of video storytelling (length, visual style, audio, framing, lighting, art direction and color, cast, dialogue, etc). You?ll understand how your choice of collaborators and your technology (equipment) will enhance or hinder your creative ideas and your potential to produce a good story. You?ll be challenged to think about and utilize a number of compelling concepts to consider when creating your own PR digital stories, including "the power of vague," "the element of surprise," and how to "entertain vs. inform." You?ll work in teams to create stories, to learn how to collaborate, direct, operate a digital camera, and steer your team toward the creation of a successful Public Relations campaign story.
    Instructor: Sean Tracey
  • CD153 - Images of the Disabled (4 Credits)
    Studies how the disabled are portrayed in film, theatre, and literature in contrast with the realities of society. Examines the issue of disability as a culture.
    Instructor: Nancy J. Allen
  • CD162 - American Sign Language 1 (4 Credits)
    Introduces American Sign Language and American deaf culture. Students learn commonly used signs and basic rules of grammar. The course also explores information related to the deaf community, interaction between deaf and hearing people, and deaf education.
  • CD193 - Introduction to Communication Disorders (4 Credits)
    Provides an overview of the variety of communication disorders affecting children and adults from clinical, education, social, and political perspectives. Students learn to use professional terminology to describe clinical sessions during in-class guided observations. Guest speakers include speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and professionals from related fileds.
    Instructor: Lisa Wisman Weil
  • CD201 - Language Acquisition (4 Credits)
    Explores the theoretical and practical aspects of the language learning process and its relation to other aspects of cognitive and social development. Includes discussion of the development of speech and language skills throughout the life span, from birth to adulthood.
    Instructor: Lisa Wisman Weil
  • CD208 - American Sign Language 2 (4 Credits)
    Continues to expand on receptive and expressive skills in ASL with emphasis on developing use of classifiers and the role of spatial relationships.
  • CD233 - Phonetics (4 Credits)
    Studies the various aspects of speech sounds and their production with a focus on articulatory, acoustic, and linguistic bases. Students learn to discriminate, analyze, and transcribe speech sounds using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). The relevance of course content to clinical and other applications is discussed as students learn to use the IPA to transcribe the speech of individuals with communicative impairments and different social dialects and accents. This course may be of special interest to students interested in acting, radio, and/or television broadcasting.
    Instructor: Lisa Lavoie
  • CD234 - Speech and Hearing Anatomy and Physiology (4 Credits)
    Studies the structure of the biological systems that underlie speech, language, and hearing with an emphasis on the processes and neural control of respiration, phonation, resonance, and articulation. Clinical disorders are used to elucidate dysfunction of these normal processes as substrates for human communication.
    Instructor: Alisa Ruggiero
  • CD309 - American Sign Language 3 (4 Credits)
    A continuation of American Sign Language II. Students continue to expand different grammatical features of time signs and some different forms of inflecting verbs. In addition, students continue to develop conversational strategies in asking for clarification, agreeing, disagreeing, and hedging.
  • CD312 - Survey of Speech Disorders (4 Credits)
    Provides students with a basic understanding of speech disorders including articulation and phonology, voice, fluency, neurogenic disorders, and dysphagia. Issues related to assessment and intervention are addressed. Integration of information from the literature into class discussion and written assignments is expected. Students observe diagnostic and therapy sessions toward completion of the 25 hours required by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. They become familiar with clinical terminology and its use in written assignments.
    Instructor: Crystle Alonzo
  • CD313 - Survey of Language Disorders (4 Credits)
    Provides students with a basic understanding of disorders of human communication associated with developmental and acquired language disorders in children and adults. Assessment and intervention are addressed. Students observe diagnostic and therapy sessions toward completion of the 25 hours required by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. This is a writing-intensive course in which students write a major term paper with revisions and learn to use the APA writing conventions.
    Instructor: Crystle Alonzo
  • CD315 - Autism (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to autism spectrum disorder, exploring the strengths and weaknesses of individuals with this diagnosis, from first person accounts, society?s perspective, and expert opinion. Students cover the ongoing debate over possible causes for this complex developmental disorder and discuss both historical treatment ideas, such as the Refrigerator Mother theory, and contemporary advances in diagnostic and treatment approaches. Students use case studies, videos, and research literature to better understand this social communication disorder.
    Instructor: Ruth Grossman
  • CD321 - Talk About Communication (0 Credit)
    Students will participate in at least three journal club meetings to discuss research literature on communication sciences and disorders and related fields within a supportive co-curricular structure and supervised by a CSD faculty member. Students will also attend at least two special CSD events (i.e. guest lecture, clinical case rounds, film screenings) that include faculty-student discussions on the topic at hand. Through these activities, students will gain exposure to research, clinical practice, and community implications of communication disorders that will complement CSD coursework. To enhance their thoughtful participation, students will produce a portfolio of articles reviewed during journal club, one reflection paper for each special event, and an attendance log, signed by the course instructor. May be repeated. Only 4 non-tuition credits may be used toward graduation.
  • CD400 - Clinical Foundations (4 Credits)
    Introduces the clinical process and methodology that underlie observation, assessment, and treatment of communication disorders in children and adults. Students learn to plan and execute a therapy session with a selected client. Clinical writing skills are developed through a variety of written assignments such as treatment plans, data collection and analysis, and progress notes.
  • CD403 - Speech Science (4 Credits)
    Explores physiological, acoustic, and cognitive processes involved in speech production and perception. Instrumentation is also covered so that students can infer acoustic properties of the voicing and resonance features of speech sounds displayed on sound spectrograms.
    Instructor: Amit Bajaj
  • CD409 - American Sign Language 4 (4 Credits)
    A continuation of American Sign Language III. Students continue to expand knowledge and use of advanced grammatical features and further develop conversational abilities.
  • CD467 - Introductory Audiology (4 Credits)
    Includes detailed anatomy of the ear with an overview of the physics of sound and current medical and audiologic management of hearing loss. Covers pure tone and speech audiometry, site-of-lesion testing, and audiogram interpretation.
    Instructor: Nicole Laffan
  • CD468 - Aural Rehabilitation (4 Credits)
    Examines theories underlying habilitation and rehabilitation procedures for deaf and hard-of-hearing children and adults. Covers the effects of hearing loss on an individual and family, education of children with hearing loss, use of sensory aids, and design of aural rehabilitation programs for various populations.
    Instructor: Cathy Bakkensen
  • CD600 - Intro to Clinical Methods (1 Credit)
    Required for graduate students from undergraduate fields other than communication disorders and provides an introduction to clinical practice. Through class discussion, required observation of clinical work, and community screenings, students begin to understand the dynamic interactions between clients and clinicians.
    Instructor: Betsy Micucci
  • CD601 - Clinical Methods I (1 Credit)
    Following the completion of observation hours, students learn beginning assessment procedures, treatment strategies, and clinical writing skills. The course covers policies and procedures pertinent to general clinical performance with a focus on infant, toddler and preschool assessment and treatment experiences. This course must be passed prior to enrolling in CD 602.
    Instructor: Betsy Micucci
  • CD602 - Clinical Methods II (1 Credit)
    Students learn assessment, intervention and documentation for communication disorders often seen in the school-aged population (grades Kindergarten through High School) Pertinent public policies related to work within a school setting are integrated into course material . This course must be passed prior to enrolling in CD 603.
    Instructor: Sandy Cohn Thau
  • CD603 - Clinical Methods III (1 Credit)
    In this course, students learn about assessment, intervention, and documentation with various communication disorders associated with adults and aging. Additional topics include health care reimbursement, public policy, health literacy, and the role of other team members in adult settings.
    Instructor: Laura Glufling-Tham
  • CD604 - Clinical Methods IV (1 Credit)
    This course focuses on the transition from graduate school to professional practice. Topics include prevention of communication disorders across the lifespan, resume writing, interviewing skills, supervision, career settings and professional issues.
    Instructor: Sandy Cohn Thau
  • CD605 - Clinical Practicum (1 Credit)
    As students progress through the program, they are assigned to a variety of clinical opportunities both on and off campus. Students enroll in CD 605 for a minimum of five semesters.
    Instructor: Sandy Cohn Thau
  • CD609 - Research Methods and Measurements (3 Credits)
    Teaches students how to use various pieces of research (potentially complex or even contradictory) to guide evidence?based clinical practice. Students learn how to formulate relevant clinical research questions, what prior research is appropriate to answer those questions, and how to find and interpret the relevant literature. Finally, students become proficient in identifying applications and limitations of that literature for clinical decision-making. An emphasis is placed on critical thinking, synthesis of information, and clear written and oral expression.
    Instructor: Rhiannon J. Luyster
  • CD623 - Fluency Disorders (3 Credits)
    Explores the nature of stuttering from theoretical and empirical perspectives. Cluttering and neurogenic and psychogenic stuttering are also examined. Procedures for evaluating and treating/managing stuttering among children and adults are emphasized.
    Instructor: Amit Bajaj
  • CD635 - Speech Sound Disorders (3 Credits)
    Presents normative and theoretical perspectives on speech sound development as well as assessment and treatment of the disorders of articulation and phonology. General treatment strategies and specific treatment programs are emphasized. Research in evidence-based practice is highlighted.
    Instructor: Amit Bajaj
  • CD641 - Dysphagia (3 Credits)
    Presents a survey of swallowing and swallowing disorders that occur from infancy through adulthood and old age. Feeding and swallowing mechanisms and processes are addressed as well as an overview of assessment procedures and management options.
    Instructor: Gary D. Gramigna
  • CD642 - Autism: Social Communication Development and Disorder (3 Credits)
    Introduces students to the development of social communication skills in children, as well as the presentation, diagnosis and treatment of autism spectrum disorder. Class covers theories of social communication development, and the timing of related milestones in childhood and adolescence. The impact of social communication deficits on language, cognition and peer relationships across the lifespan are discussed. Finally, the course reviews empirically-supported treatments for autism and related disorders.
    Instructor: Lisa Wisman Weil
  • CD645 - Language and Literacy Disabilities (3 Credits)
    Focuses on the relationship between spoken and written language and its role in language-based learning disabilities in school-age students. It addresses the characteristics of language, reading, and spelling impairments; the subtypes of these disorders; and the different intervention approaches used with them. Various models of language and reading development and their disorders are reviewed.
    Instructor: Kelly Farquharson
  • CD650 - Motor Speech Disorders (3 Credits)
    Students learn the etiology, assessment, differential diagnosis, and principles of rehabilitation of speech production disorders in individuals with acquired neuropathologies. Information is presented in the context of speech production theory and (where appropriate) of the neurological disease of which the speech disorder is a symptom.
    Instructor: Alisa Ruggiero
  • CD666 - Continuing Student Status (1 Credit)
    Students who have completed all clinical and academic requirements for the degree except for the comprehensive examination must register for 1 credit of CD 666 Continuing Student Status in order to be graduated.
  • CD677 - Voice Disorders (3 Credits)
    This course is held in the Meltzer Auditorium at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 243 Charles Street, 3rd Floor.
    Instructor: Glenn Bunting
  • CD680 - Neurologic Bases of Communication (3 Credits)
    Outlines the anatomy and functional neurophysiology of human communication and provides an overview of neurodevelopment and its processes and disorders. Although the organization of the human nervous system is presented, emphasis is placed on the relationship of this organization to the components of the various communicative, cognitive, linguistic, sensory, and motor processes that are central to human communication and to the treatment of its disorders.
    Instructor: Ruth Grossman
  • CD684 - Augmentative and Alternative Communication (3 Credits)
    Provides an overview of augmentative and alternative communication systems (AAC) and the process of selecting and implementing these systems for children and adults. The first section of the course concerns the basic processes of AAC: messages, symbols, alternative access, assessment and intervention planning. The second section describes issues related to people with developmental disabilities who require AAC services. The third section focuses on AAC for people with acquired communication disabilities.
    Instructor: Joanne Lasker
  • CD686 - Preschool Language Disorders (3 Credits)
    Examines current perspectives in defining, assessing, and intervening with children with language disturbances from infancy through the preschool years. In addition, issues surrounding older individuals with language functioning in the preschool developmental age range are described. Particular attention is given to assessment and intervention techniques for children and individuals at pre-linguistic, emerging language, and conversational language levels. Additional considerations include multicultural issues, working with caregivers and peers, non-speech communication alternatives, and the diverse roles played by speech-language pathologists.
    Instructor: Kelly Farquharson
  • CD687 - Comprehensive Exams (0 Credit)
    Comprehensive Exams
    Instructor: Joanne Lasker
  • CD689 - Audiology in Speech-Language Pathology (3 Credits)
    Provides students with audiological information relevant to the scope of practice for speech-language pathologists. Basic testing and screening techniques, interpretation of audiometric results, and habilitative and rehabilitative methods are discussed with reference to the current literature.
  • CD690 - Aphasia (3 Credits)
    Pathophysiology, epidemiology, and prevention of aphasia, its nature, assessment, and diagnostic procedures, and approaches to intervention are presented. Issues surrounding recovery and prognosis, and treatment efficacy and outcome are also included. All areas are presented with reference to the current literature in the field and to its clinical application.
    Instructor: Alisa Ruggiero
  • CD692 - Cognitive Communicative Disorders (3 Credits)
    Communication disorders consequent to dementing processes, closed head injury, and damage to the right cerebral hemisphere are covered. Pathology, assessment, differential diagnosis, and treatment are addressed with reference to the current literature.
    Instructor: Amy Litwack
  • DA203 - Perspectives in World Dance (4 Credits)
    Focuses on learning to "see" and "hear" the form and music of the art of dance across world cultures. Students focus on specific dance ethnographies to understand cultural difference through a study of dance and human movement and to explore contemporary anthropological concerns about representation, globalization, history, and identity. Throughout their study, students focus on various theoretical models in anthropology for studying dance/performance. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective and the General Education Global Diversity requirements.
    Instructor: Jennifer Farrell
  • DA231 - Dance Composition I: Improvisation (4 Credits)
    Guides students in the discovery, development, and exploration of their own movement and imagery. The stimuli for dances include personal experiences, abstract ideas, relationships, emotions, and a variety of real or imagined materials. Prerequisite: permission of the dance area head.
    Instructor: Marlena Yannetti
  • DA233 - Ballet I (2 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
    Instructor: Shawn Mahoney
  • DA234 - Modern Dance I (2 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
    Instructor: Jenny Oliver
  • DA237 - Jazz Dance I (2 Credits)
    Permission of the Dance Coordinator required.
  • DA333 - Ballet II (2 Credits)
    Permission of the Dance Coordinator required.
    Instructor: Marlena Yannetti
  • DA335 - Tap Dance II (2 Credits)
    Students at the intermediate level concentrate on exploring more sophisticated levels of technique, style, and rhythmic structure of tap dancing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of the dance area head.
  • DA337 - Jazz Dance II (2 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
    Instructor: Marlena Yannetti
  • DA498 - Directed Study (4 Credits)
    Contract Required (see Department for Information)
  • EC203 - Principles of Economics (4 Credits)
    Introduces and focuses on the essential concepts and principles of microeconomics. Studies the allocation of resources under scarcity through decisions made by individual consumers, firms, and business. Students will examine, understand, and prioritize decisions and behaviors that affect many resources, whether financial, environmental, or human.
    Instructor: Nejem Raheem
  • EC204 - Cultural Economics (4 Credits)
    Introduces the basic concepts and tools of microeconomics and their application in the context of arts, culture, and business. Through lectures, case studies, in-class work, and field study, students learn the economic influences that help determine how and what cultural goods and services get produced and consumed. Students also explore the economic rationale for government intervention in markets and, by extension, the application of microeconomics to the analysis of the effects of public policy on arts markets and the welfare of society in general.
    Instructor: Tylor Orme
  • EC210 - Topics in Economics: History of Economics through Film (4 Credits)
    This course introduces key economic models and schools of thought and analyzes how these concepts have changed over time. Through lectures, case studies, in-class work, and film analysis, students learn how economics has shaped and been shaped by history. Particular focus will be given to applying economic concepts to time periods and examples when economic theory has influenced income inequality and the well-being of minority groups. Students will explore key debates throughout the history of economic thought, as well as how to use economic thinking in analyzing non-economic conflicts.
    Instructor: Tylor Orme
  • GM601 - Marketing Management in a Global Environment (4 Credits)
    Introduces the economically integrated global marketplace that addresses the global economic environment, social and cultural environments, legal and regulatory considerations, foreign exchange and financial decision-making, marketing research, strategic alternatives for global market entry and expansion, and cooperative global strategies and strategic partnerships. Emphasizes differences between domestic and global strategies when applied to product development, pricing, and distribution, and focuses on the unique role of promotion within a global marketing framework.
    Instructor: Barry Horwitz
  • GM603 - Behavioral Economics in a Global Environment (4 Credits)
    Grounded in theories of behavioral economics, this course examines human and consumer behavior within cultures, how members of diverse cultures differ, and the criteria upon which cultural members can and cannot be compared. Cultural value systems are highlighted as they provide insight into the impact of cultural differences on individual and group processes such as decision-making, verbal and nonverbal communication styles, and organizational structure. Models of decision-making and information processing are also explored.
    Instructor: Nejem Raheem
  • GM604 - Research Methods for Global Marketing Communication and Advertising (4 Credits)
    Provides students with an in-depth understanding of the research process, including formulation of research questions and determination of research design including data collection methods, sampling, data analysis, and interpretation. Introduces students to the world of networked information as well as the application of information technology to decision-making in a global business context.
    Instructor: Seounmi Han Youn
  • GM605 - Financial and Strategic Context of Global Market Planning (4 Credits)
    Examines the financial environment surrounding marketing decisions in global enterprises. Financial and strategic tools essential in planning and evaluating marketing activities are examined in an overview of financial aspects of marketing decision-making such as forecasting, budgeting, optimizing, valuing, evaluating, and auditing results. Students apply these tools to marketing and communication decisions in strategic planning that addresses challenges of designing and implementing plans across a global enterprise.
    Instructor: Alan Gonsenhauser
  • GM606 - Global Marketing Communication Planning (4 Credits)
    Introduces disciplines within marketing communication and the concept and practice of integrated marketing communication planning. Describes fundamental theory and practice within advertising, public relations, sales promotion, direct marketing, e-commerce, event planning, and sponsorships. Reviews global issues and institutions in the practice of these disciplines in multinational organizations.
    Instructor: Walter Mills
  • GM636 - Creative Thinking and Problem Solving in a Global Environment (4 Credits)
    The abundance of choices available to consumers for products and services, coupled with messages about them, necessitates that companies differentiate themselves creatively in global markets. Creativity and innovation are becoming cornerstones of business--qualities managers seek in employees and skills graduates must have to excel. This course explores the nature of creativity, creative thinking, and problem solving in a global environment. Interactive exercises, case analyses, discussions, and projects foster and enhance creativity.
    Instructor: Thomas Vogel
  • HC200 - Introduction to Health Communication (4 Credits)
    Introduces the study and application of principles and practices of health communication. This is a foundation for students in exploring what we know about our health due to the different components of communicating about health. Specifically, topics cover doctor-patient communication, the role of culture, social support, family health history, varied communication channels, technology, health campaigns, risk communication, and government policies. Case studies of health practices are used to illustrate these different topics.
    Instructor: Christine Skubisz
  • HC210 - Culture, Diversity, and Health Communication (4 Credits)
    Provides an understanding of how diverse people and groups communicate about and negotiate issues of health and illness. It uses a socio-ecological approach to study various aspects of culture, health behaviors, and health dynamics. Investigates processes for developing culturally competent health initiatives for diverse populations. Cross-listed with CC 210.
  • HC213 - The War on Drugs (4 Credits)
    While the official ?War on Drugs? in the United States was declared in 1971 by Richard Nixon, battles about alcohol and drug use were waged as early as the Colonial Era. This course covers the health effects, social impacts, and legal debates of various drugs including: alcohol, cocaine, opiates, amphetamines, club drugs, marijuana, and tobacco. Using documentaries, media reports, social science research, and original source material, students learn about the prohibition of alcohol in the 1920s, the so-called ?crack epidemic? of the 1980s, and modern-day debates over marijuana decriminalization and legalization. Students are asked to evaluate and propose changes to current U.S. drug policy. There is also a service learning component to the course, where students partner with a local organization to work on needed communication initiatives related in some way to addiction, overdose, harm reduction, or substance use and abuse.
    Instructor: Nancy J. Allen
  • HC400 - Health Communication Campaigns (4 Credits)
    "Just Say No." "This is your brain on drugs." "Live Strong." "Race for the Cure." Health campaigns have influenced our perception of issues related to health and health behaviors for decades. Students learn the process of health campaigns to obtain the skills to develop, implement, and evaluate their own health campaign for a community effort. The course also discusses the role of public health, perceptions of health, and the variety of communication channels available when creating these campaigns. Cross-listed with CC 420.
    Instructor: Nancy J. Allen
  • HC602 - Media Strategies for the Health Professional (4 Credits)
    Students develop an understanding of the strategic use of the media by health communicators in message development and communication strategy execution. Students also explore the ethical concerns of healthcare professionals who utilize the media. Students learn how to develop effective health communication campaigns that bring about behavioral change among target audiences and influence health policy issues at the local, state, national, and international level. In addition, students learn how to develop evaluation techniques for health communication strategies.
    Instructor: Nancy J. Allen
  • HC603 - Research Methods (4 Credits)
    This course is organized around the research process in which students learn how to formulate a research question and define a research problem, decide upon a research design, assess data collection methods, define a sampling frame, determine types of data analyses, interpret data appropriately, and prepare a research report. Topics in both qualitative and quantitative research methods are included. Further, students gain an understanding of the importance of research in the development of health communication strategies.
    Instructor: Christine Skubisz
  • HC605 - Topics in Health Communication: Risk Communication (4 Credits)
    Instructor: Nancy J. Allen
  • HC610 - Applied Learning Experience (4 Credits)
    A capstone experience for students completing the Health Communication program. Students conduct research and develop and implement a communication plan to address the needs of a health-related organization in the Boston area. Projects may include the creation of training modules for health professionals, patient education, health information dissemination, policy advocacy, and the like. Students produce a final report.
  • HI200 - Contemporary World History (4 Credits)
    Integrates the political, social, intellectual, literary, and artistic aspects of the 20th-century landscape in examining such major themes as nationalism and the disintegration of empires; war and revolution; anti-colonial movements in Asia, Africa, and Latin America; and the efforts to construct a new world order.
    Instructor: Kaysha Corinealdi
  • HI201 - Non-Western World History (4 Credits)
    Examines history in a variety of non-Western contexts. The content will vary based upon the non-Western context selected for the semester. Students will focus upon historical events and the impact of these events for civilization in Asian, African, or Middle Eastern contexts.
    Instructor: Owen Miller
  • HI203 - Social Movements in the U.S. (4 Credits)
    Examines political movements of industrial and agricultural workers, the unemployed, and the poor to gain power and economic rights since the Great Depression. Chronicles movements that shaped the policies of the New Deal and the Great Society, and analyzes the ways in which these movements fostered a conservative response late in the century. Explores history in the context of the ideals of democratic liberalism, the emerging power of corporate capitalism, and the modern conservative political coalition. Students study historical texts and a variety of cultural sources (literature, films, photographs, songs, and museum exhibitions).
  • HI204 - Islam in the World (4 Credits)
    Pursues an interdisciplinary study of the origins of Islam and the role of Mohammed, the global expansion of the faith, the theology and thought of the Koran and Moslem traditions, and forms of art and architecture generated by the teachings of the prophet. Explores the impact of the renewal of Islam and its increasing role in the modern world.
    Instructor: Andrea Chiovenda
  • HI211 - African American History (4 Credits)
    Survey sub-Saharan history of the pre-colonial era, and the history of African Americans from the slave trade through the Civil War to the present.
  • HI235 - History of the United States (4 Credits)
    Studies the history of the United States from its colonial beginnings to the present, focusing on the Civil War and its consequences.
  • HI340 - Advanced Topics in World History: Demystifying Revolutionaries: Perspectives from Latin America (4 Credits)
    When asked to name a famous Latin American revolutionary, most college students would say Ernesto ?Che? Guevara. Indeed, Guevara?s image and writings alone have circulated in websites and popular films for the last couple of decades. In this course we will examine the misconceptions, assumptions, and myths surrounding men like Guevara, by tracing how their ideas are indebted to a long history of conquistadores, insurgents, writers, and radical thinkers in colonial and modern Latin America. Through this examination we will also review the attempts to erase women and others viewed as non-conforming from popularized histories of change and revolution.
    Instructor: Kaysha Corinealdi
  • HS101 - First-Year Honors Seminar 1 (4 Credits)
    Introduces the interdisciplinary study of literature and cultural theory, addressing issues of power and ideology in various multicultural contexts.
  • HS102 - First-Year Honors Seminar 2 (4 Credits)
    Introduces the interdisciplinary study of literature and cultural theory, addressing issues of power and ideology in various multicultural contexts.
  • HS103 - Honors Writing Symposium (4 Credits)
    Taken in conjunction with HS 102, develops skills in research, critical thinking, and writing. Stresses revision, relies on frequent workshops of student writing, and aims to sharpen ability to research, evaluate, and use evidence in a reasonable and convincing way. Write an extended research paper on a topic related to HS 102.
  • HS201 - Sophomore Honors Seminar 3 (4 Credits)
    Engages critical thinking and research about philosophical, cultural, and scientific methods of generating knowledge and their ethical implications. Different areas of inquiry are examined each year. Recent topics include environmental ethics, evolution, astronomy, and epistemology.
    Instructor: Diana Sherry
  • HS202 - Sophomore Honors Seminar 4 (4 Credits)
    Engages critical thinking and research about philosophical, cultural, and scientific methods of generating knowledge and their ethical implications. Different areas of inquiry are examined each year. Recent topics include environmental ethics, evolution, astronomy, and epistemology.
    Instructor: Elizabeth Baeten
  • HS301 - Junior Honors Colloquium 1 (0 Credit)
    A one-credit series of workshops and special events that provide mentorship while students develop proposals for Honors theses.
  • HS302 - Junior Honors Colloquium 2 (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
  • HS490 - Honors Thesis (4 Credits)
    At the end of junior year or after completing the Junior Honors Seminar, students file an Honors Thesis Proposal with the Honors Program director. The proposal includes a description of the overall topic in terms of the general issue or project, the specific question or questions formulated, and the general ways in which the student will address the question(s) and accomplish the project. After a successful defense of their proposal, Honor students produce an Honors thesis in their senior year. Students work independently, but consult regularly with the thesis faculty advisor to evaluate and revise the work in progress. The final thesis represents the student's abilities and a commitment to serious intellectual work. At the time the student writes the thesis, he/she will be enrolled in and have previously taken the Honors Program Colloquia.
  • IN108 - Love and Eroticism in Western Culture (4 Credits)
    Love and eroticism were once the epicenter of philosophy. Yet, since the 19th century, love and eroticism have been secondary to "desire," which suggests more of a structure than an individuated experience. Many theorists repeatedly state that one cannot know desire. Course explores the relationship between this alienating structure and the ego-validating interpersonal encounters we call love so as to rethink the roles that love, desire, and eroticism play in our lived experiences.
    Instructor: Amy Aroopala
  • IN110 - Culture, the Arts and Social Change (4 Credits)
    Popular culture and the arts are often regarded as sources of entertainment and escapism. Historically, however, they have also served as important vehicles for raising awareness and promoting social, political and cultural change. This interdisciplinary course explores how literature, cinema, music, and visual arts have been used in a variety of historical and national contexts to facilitate reflection and social transformation.
  • IN112 - Communication Revolutions (4 Credits)
    Provides students a broad understanding of critical current issues in media policy. Engaging in political science, economic, and cultural studies literatures, students explore the intensely political, historical foundations of American broadcast media and the Internet. Students probe the current logics of its operation, applying what we have learned to current pressing debates that should concern anyone seeking to be a media maker. Why do some issues get discussed extensively in our media and not others? What are the implications of current debates on the future of our media system and for democracy itself?
    Instructor: Russell Newman
  • IN117 - Women Artists in Cultural Contexts (4 Credits)
    How has the cultural construction of gender difference placed women at the margins of artistic practice? To what extent have philosophies of art and aesthetics sustained the paradox by which women are simultaneously doubted as artists and represented as muses? Occupying a position inside and outside the domain of artistic practice, the woman artist compels us to challenge both the meaning of gender and the nature of creativity. By engaging text drawn from feminist theory, literature, philosophy, cultural studies, memoir, and visual media, we will explore how women artists register, protest, and subvert the tension arising from pairing ?women? and ?artist.?
    Instructor: Erika R. Williams
  • IN123 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: American Popular Culture (4 Credits)
    Instructor: Jacqueline Romeo
  • IN123 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Creating National Identity in Latin America (4 Credits)
    This interdisciplinary course will study the works of Latin American artists, novelists, essayists, dramaturges and screenwriters engaged in the region?s evolving conversations about collective identity and relation to the wider ?Western? world. Central to our goals is an understanding of the role of gender and gendered participation in the production of national narratives and counter-narratives. Including Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Frida Kahlo and Camila Vallejo, alongside Bartolome de las Casas, Diego Rivera, and Che Guevara, this course provides a historically contextualized study of Latin American cultural conversations about national identity from colonial times to the present.
    Instructor: Dalia Wassner
  • IN123 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Eco-Warriors (4 Credits)
    Environmental activists give voice to a defenseless entity, our earth. This course examines environmentalism and its relationship to communication, specifically the rhetorical methods that ?eco-warriors,? as well as their opponents, employ to maneuver issues of science, morality and ethics to influence the human impact on our world.
    Instructor: Laurel Greenberg
  • IN123 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Beyond Borders (4 Credits)
    Between images of Syrian refugees in the news and US presidential candidate debates, discussions about immigration surround us and easy answers are few and far between. Who deserves asylum? What gives someone the right to be a citizen? How have our ideas about these issues changed over the course of U.S. history? This course will touch on the history of immigration in the United States and abroad, common misconceptions about immigrants and immigration law, and media representations of asylum and refugee seekers.
    Instructor: Sarah Schendel
  • IN123 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Living (with) Borders and Borderlines (4 Credits)
    This course is about political and cultural borders and borderlines in contemporary Europe. Beginning with the proliferation of national borders at the onset of 20th Century and finishing with the vision of a borderless European Union at the end of the Century, we will trace the political and cultural history of borders, identities, ideas, and transformations in Europe during the last century. We will pay particular attention to personal stories, through which we will see how national borders in Europe have shaped, from generation to generation, the personal narratives and identity discourses of the people close to them. Interdisciplinary in nature, this course will draw its reading from such disciplines as border studies, history, literature, ethnology, philosophy, sociology, geography, and visual and media arts.
    Instructor: Gazmend Kapllani
  • IN123 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: The Science and Psychology of Survival (4 Credits)
    The Science and Psychology of Survival What does it take to survive a life-threatening situation? This course explores the theme of survival as a gateway to understanding the complex nature of the human body and mind. Whether stranded in the high Andes, cast adrift at sea, or imprisoned in a Nazi concentration camp, human beings possess an extraordinary capacity for self-preservation. This course combines powerful narratives of survival with biology, anthropology, and psychology to discover why some people overcome dire circumstances and others perish. Do ancient instincts rooted in evolutionary biology help -- or perhaps hinder -- survival in the modern world?
    Instructor: Diana Sherry
  • IN123 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Seeing Suffering (4 Credits)
    Whether online, between the headlines of a newspaper, or on the pages of a graphic novel, images of suffering and violence are a regular occurrence in everyday life. What images should be shown, and when should we look? How should we respond as witnesses, voters, and members of an international community? Pulling from the fields of human rights, journalism, law, and critical theory, this course will examine some of the ways war, forced migration, and humanitarian crises are portrayed in diverse forms of print media.
    Instructor: Sarah Schendel
  • IN123 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: The Science and Psychology of Survival (4 Credits)
    The Science and Psychology of Survival What does it take to survive a life-threatening situation? This course explores the theme of survival as a gateway to understanding the complex nature of the human body and mind. Whether stranded in the high Andes, cast adrift at sea, or imprisoned in a Nazi concentration camp, human beings possess an extraordinary capacity for self-preservation. This course combines powerful narratives of survival with biology, anthropology, and psychology to discover why some people overcome dire circumstances and others perish. Do ancient instincts rooted in evolutionary biology help -- or perhaps hinder -- survival in the modern world?
    Instructor: Diana Sherry
  • IN123 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Living (with) Borders and Borderlines (4 Credits)
    This course is about political and cultural borders and borderlines in contemporary Europe. Beginning with the proliferation of national borders at the onset of 20th Century and finishing with the vision of a borderless European Union at the end of the Century, we will trace the political and cultural history of borders, identities, ideas, and transformations in Europe during the last century. We will pay particular attention to personal stories, through which we will see how national borders in Europe have shaped, from generation to generation, the personal narratives and identity discourses of the people close to them. Interdisciplinary in nature, this course will draw its reading from such disciplines as border studies, history, literature, ethnology, philosophy, sociology, geography, and visual and media arts.
    Instructor: Gazmend Kapllani
  • IN123 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Ethics and Communication (4 Credits)
    Contemporary ethical issues in professional communication including but not limited to privacy, deception, plagiarism, the First Amendment, human subjects protection, source reliability, gender and race representation, accountability, copyright, pornography, conflict of interest, accuracy, poetic license, and obscenity, are examined in the context of major classical and modern theories of ethics and moral philosophy (such as by Aristotle, Kant, Mill, Rawls, Noddings, Nietzsche, and Potter) from Western philosophy. Intended to introduce students to primary ethical issues in their Emerson College majors and intended careers, as well as to interdisciplinary thinking.
    Instructor: Thomas Cooper
  • IN123 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: American Popular Culture (4 Credits)
    Popular culture is all around us, influencing how we think, how we feel, how we vote, and how we live our lives. This course will address critical issues and approaches to the study of recent American popular culture, including media, visual and material culture, sports, politics, and social life, from McDonald?s to Hip Hop. We will be using our own expertise as consumers of popular culture as a starting point for exploring the various roles that it plays in our lives.
    Instructor: Jacqueline Romeo
  • IN125 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Gender and Globalization (4 Credits)
    This class draws on cross-culture experiences, histories, and perspectives as well as transnational, comparative, feminist, and postcolonial theoretical perspectives to explore the construction, production, and representation of gender. The analytical perspective will always be intersectional in nature. Incorporating readings from political science, anthropology, sociology, history, and law, the class will interrogate the ways in which global flows of culture, capital, and discourse determine or limit the ways gender is produced, reinforced, and challenged at the state and local levels. In turn, we look at the way constructions of masculinity and femininity have shaped and influenced these same global flows.
    Instructor: Andrea Chiovenda
  • IN125 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Engendering Cultures (4 Credits)
    How do women writers, dramaturges, photographers, and filmmakers participate in writing and rewriting history? What role do gender and culture together play in healing society, especially after periods of violence? In this course we will look at the way that women through culture, contest the logic behind genocide, apartheid, racism, religious fanaticism, and classist societies. We will look at culture across borders and throughout history, including modern Latin America, Nazi Germany, South African apartheid, the Iranian Revolution, and America?s ongoing internal struggles of race and immigration.
    Instructor: Dalia Wassner
  • IN126 - Literature of Extreme Situations (4 Credits)
    How are human identities shaped, transformed, distorted, and annihilated, or transformed by extreme personal and social experiences? How and why do people make meaning of such experiences through the creation of art, film, and literature? Reading/viewings include tales of obsession, addiction, and adventure, as told through memoir and fiction. Historic and journalistic accounts of genocide, natural disasters, cults, and other mass experiences are also explored. Primary thematic emphasis is on the integrity of the individual and the continuity of the community. Perspectives from the disciplines of psychology, sociology, and philosophy provide the conceptual framework for discussion.
  • IN130 - Exoticism in Literature and Art (4 Credits)
    Explores the history of exoticism, the "charm of the unfamiliar" in literature and art, the specific relationship between the artist or author, the subject, and the intended audience that creates the essence of the "Other" and the fascination with the foreign. Explores colonial fascination with the exotic -- foreign landscapes, customs, cultures -- in 18th- and 19th-century fiction, nonfiction, painting; contemporary representations of exoticism, including photography and auto exoticism. Students discuss film, television, pornography, and performance art through interdisciplinary written and visual media (literature, painting, photography, advertising).
    Instructor: Alden Jones
  • IN135 - Ways of Seeing (4 Credits)
    Investigates how we see and how to look. The aim of the course is to provide an interdisciplinary platform for exploring and examining visual language and visual culture. Explores the techniques used by the artist/producer to communicate meaning through visual means and the way images are received by the spectator in various cultural contexts. Focuses on how we apprehend and process visual information from our interior and exterior experience, from images as they appear in our dreams and through the lens of memory, to the kinds of images we are confronted with every day, from graffiti to photography, fine art to advertising. Students are encouraged to think critically about what makes up their visual world through mindful looking, reading, writing, and creative projects.
  • IN138 - Staging American Women: The Culture of Burlesque (4 Credits)
    Investigates and traces roles and images of women in vaudeville and burlesque of the late 19th and early 20th centuries and their offshoots. Cultural contexts, performance contents, ideas about gender performed in burlesque genre and powerful role they played in shaping dominant ideologies. Parodies, gender roles and relationships, and the highly controlled social and cultural power of the female form and demeanor forecasted a range of interwoven performative and visual arts designed to elaborate, explore, and exploit American ideologies of sex and gender. Ziegfeld girls, pin-up art of Alberto Vargas, early sexploitation films of Sonney and Freidman.
    Instructor: Cynthia Miller
  • IN146 - Making Monsters (4 Credits)
    From origins of Western literature to contemporary blockbuster films, the monster has been a cross-genre mainstay of storytelling. Monsters represent culturally specific fears in forms from prehistoric beasts running rampant in the modern world to the terrifying results of scientific experiments gone wrong. Through a broad sampling of fiction, poetry, academic writing in anthropology, history, cultural studies, and narrative and ethnographic films, students develop the understanding that monsters do not emerge from thin air, but are manifestations of racial, sexual, and scientific anxieties. Discusses cultural and historical roots of monsters from Beowulf to Frankenstein.
  • IN150 - Creativity in Context (4 Credits)
    Why do people create? Literature, film, art, and psychology provide the conceptual framework for solving the mystery of the creative impulse. What are the hallmarks of the creative personality? Is there a causal relationship between mental illness and artistry? How does the larger community of artists -- muses, collaborators, and competitors -- inspire an individual creator? Must artists be motivated by a sense of duty to society? Orwell's Why I Write, Hemingway's A Movable Feast, Plath's journals, and interviews with artists from the Beatles to Joan Didion to Francis Ford Coppola further illuminate the inspirations, motives, and processes of great artists.
    Instructor: Meta Wagner
  • IN154 - Power and Privilege (4 Credits)
    What forms does privilege take, and what is its relation to power and oppression? How can we identify the ways that we may benefit from privilege? What responsibility do people in positions of privilege bear with regard to the benefits they enjoy? Why might people in positions of privilege want to work against it, and what can they do? This course provides students with the tools and resources to identify and address questions of privilege and power as they arise in relation to social categories such as race, class, gender, sexuality, and physical ability.
    Instructor: Claudia Castaneda
  • IN155 - Post-racial America (4 Credits)
    With so much talk about post-racial society in the United States, re-thinking conceptions of race and ethnicity has never been more important. This course examines the sociocultural construction of ?race? and the historical legacy of institutional racism in the United States. It introduces students to contemporary debates about racial identities in popular culture and the media. Students discuss the complex meanings of ?whiteness? and explore the critical concepts of ?white privilege? and ?colorblind racism.? Finally, the course provides an in-depth analysis of the prison industrial complex and its impact on African Americans as well as investigates the politics of immigration on Latinos.
    Instructor: Yasser Munif
  • IN200 - Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies (4 Credits)
    Introduces the interdisciplinary field of women's and gender studies. Topics include "common differences" uniting and dividing women and men; how womanhood has been represented in myth, literature, and media; how gender inequalities have been both explained and critiqued; how gender acquires meaning when connected to race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality; and how to address feminism's historical role in promoting gender studies. Explores central paradox of contemporary thinking: the necessity to make gender both matter and not matter.
  • IN203 - Post-Colonial Cultures (4 Credits)
    Investigates the historical, socioeconomic, and ideological contexts within which 20th-century post-colonial cultures have been produced and are negotiated. Providing geographical coverage and theoretical frameworks, it examines cultural production from formerly colonized nations. Analyzes primary material and critical contexts within which these materials can be read and understood.
    Instructor: Nigel Gibson
  • IN206 - Introduction to Digital Media and Culture (4 Credits)
    Digital Media and Culture is designed to help students develop an informed and critical understanding of how interactive media shape and influence society and communication. Students develop a critical understanding of ideas around participatory technologies, collaborative media, social networks, mobile platforms, and digital culture. The course looks at the evolution of communication and media industries in the interactive age and explores how the future of digital culture will influence daily civic life, national agendas, and global ideas.
    Instructor: Gabriel Mugar
  • IN208 - Rainbow Nation? Race, Class & Culture in South Africa (4 Credits)
    With the end of apartheid and the inauguration of Nelson Mandela as president, South Africa became known as a ?rainbow nation.? While this ?new? South Africa became a symbol of hope for the possibilities of racial reconciliation around the world, more than fifteen years after the first multiracial election inequality remains a stark reality. This course examines the intersection of economic, political, social, and cultural forces shaping contemporary South African society. Through engagement of a variety of texts (including literature, memoir, and film), students explore topics such as apartheid and Afrikaner cultural identity; black intellectual, cultural, and political resistance movements; the Truth and Reconciliation Commission; and hope and disillusionment in postapartheid South Africa.
    Instructor: Cara Moyer-Duncan
  • IN210 - Topics in Global Studies: Terrorism, Counter-terrorism, and Islamophobia (4 Credits)
    The course starts with an exploration of the historical origins of the discourse on terrorism. It examines the anatomy of anti-Arab and anti-Muslim racisms and investigates their impacts on the postcolonial present. The second part examines the history of al-Qaeda in the context of the cold war and the rise of the Islamic State in a post-9-11 world. It highlights their Manichean ideologies, strategies, and goals. Finally, the last section explores the politics of islamophobia in the West. It suggests that Islamophobia should be understood in historical and global contexts.
    Instructor: Yasser Munif
  • IN210 - Topics in Global Studies: Troubled Visions (4 Credits)
    The story of African Americans, Latinos and Asians in contemporary visual art has closely paralleled their social, political, and economic aspirations over the last hundred years. In this course we will examine how artists of color represent themselves in their art and in the context of their history and culture both nationally and globally. We will look at the work of leading figures across a wide range of media (including painting, photography, sculpture, performance, installation, video, public art, and the internet) alongside many others who deserve to be better known, including both the African diaspora in South America and the Caribbean.
    Instructor: Mirta Tocci
  • IN211 - Africana Thought and Practice (4 Credits)
    Although often omitted from mainstream histories, black writers, thinkers, artists, and activists in Africa and the Americas have made significant contributions towards combating racism, colonialism, and other forms of oppression. This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the intellectual, political, and cultural contributions of such figures such as W.E.B. Du Bois, Angela Davis, Frantz Fanon, and Steven Biko. Through engagement of a variety of texts (including literature, memoir, and film), we will explore topics such as Pan-Africanism, black feminism, anti-colonial movements, and the politics of representation.
    Instructor: Cara Moyer-Duncan
  • IN212 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Trauma, Narrative, and Memory (4 Credits)
    In this course, students will create personal, analytical, and artistic written and visual work in response to fictional, visual, and theoretical texts that explore how trauma shapes personal and historical narrative and memory.
    Instructor: Thomas McNeely
  • IN212 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Human Rights and the Arts (4 Credits)
    This course will examine cultural and artistic texts produced in response to human rights violations, for pedagogical purposes in human rights education, and as the proactive engagement of communities to demand their human rights. The course focuses on theatre, music, visual arts, dance, cinema, photography, written journals, and literature. The artistic and cultural texts will be read against the backdrop of human rights theory and several of the historic and contemporary conventions and treaties outlined by the United Nations.
    Instructor: Gazmend Kapllani
  • IN213 - Introduction to Global Studies (4 Credits)
    Many of today?s most pressing problems are embedded in globalization?s web and demand interdisciplinary tools to solve them. Political, historical, economic, and cultural context for issues such as globalization, development, and human rights allow for understanding not just the problems themselves, but their origins and the reasons why such problems have become entrenched. Through case studies that connect theory to past and current events at local, national, and regional levels, this course empowers students to take on global issues in their own lives.
    Instructor: Mneesha Gellman
  • IN216 - Topics in Digital & Media Culture:Souls for Sale: The Sales Effort, from Snake Oil - Dividual Selves (4 Credits)
    Advertising represents but one component of the overall `sales effort??a diminishing one. This class will challenge students? perceptions of the sales effort and advertising itself as a cultural, economic and material practice?as well as a social choice in ?subsidizing? media, even as the advertising ?subsidy? is borne by consumers of the very products advertised. We will explore its historical roots and classic debates, key moments of controversy and activism, present industry structure, emergent modes of tracking, and current policy developments.
    Instructor: Russell Newman
  • IN303 - Poetry and Song (4 Credits)
    Integrates two of the most often combined areas of expression: words and music. Brings together perspectives of poetry and musical composition to introduce ways in which these two disciplines combine in theory, history, and practice of classroom exercises. Ends with a concert or "musical evening" presentation of songs written by students. Open to anyone who writes, or aspires to write, songs and/or poetry.
    Instructor: Scott Wheeler
  • IN307 - Gender, Sexuality, and the Middle East (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to some of the important theoretical and political debates about gender and sexuality in the Middle East by discussing important questions such as: Is the veil a sign of women oppression in the Arab world? Have women disappeared from public sphere? Do Muslim women need saving? Is the social construction of masculinity in the Arab world atypical? Are there active and vibrant grassroots feminist movements in the region? Why does the oppression of Arab women occupy such a unique position in the Western imaginary? Do queer politics and movements in the Middle East share any commonalities with their Western counterparts? This course explores the politics of gender in the Middle East by examining the stories of everyday lives of women and men. While the focus of the course is on the Middle East, discussions will also focus on Western views and representations of Muslim and Arab women.
    Instructor: Yasser Munif
  • IN313 - Highbrow Meets Lowbrow: James and Faulkner on Stage and Screen (4 Credits)
    The fiction of Henry James and William Faulkner, viewed through the lens of interdisciplinary theories of narrative and cultural capital, reveals how popular performance media are reflected in and shape the work of these literary giants. James and Faulkner are "highbrow" canonical authors in the high art tradition, who also worked in "lowbrow" popular performance genres: James as a playwright and Faulkner as a screenwriter. The fiction of both writers has often been adapted for stage, film, and television.
  • IN319 - Feminist Cultural Theory (4 Credits)
    Considers feminist theoretical engagements with culture. Addresses issues that have become central to feminist theorizing, including "the body," "identity and difference," "technoscience," and "the gaze." Through close readings of key texts paired with uses in further theoretical work of these texts, students become familiar with feminist cultural theoretical work, learning how to read and understand it, as well as how to make use of its interdisciplinary and diverse offerings. The reading, discussion, and writing practices incorporated into the course provide students with a feminist theoretical "toolkit" for engaging with different aspects of culture -- from popular culture to technoscience to everyday life.
    Instructor: Claudia Castaneda
  • IN324 - Documenting Visual Culture (4 Credits)
    Examines art, performance, films, and television produced by minority and under-represented peoples from local and international contexts through the lens of anthropological and social theory to see how these acts of visual communication are also sites of cultural and social reproduction. Students are also encouraged to take ethnographic methodology, specifically participant observation and field writing, and incorporate it into their research practices and artistic production in their major.
    Instructor: Kathryn Ramey
  • IN326 - The Dammed Shawsheen: Blending Ecology and Economics in the Real World (4 Credits)
    Examines how to integrate ecological and economic perspectives to inform public decision-making related to natural resource management. Focuses on a proposed dam removal project on the Shawsheen River in northeastern Massachusetts. Students study the project background in the context of the history of New England, visit the current dams, and hear from different stakeholders. The course concludes with student mastery of a cost-benefit analysis that assesses the project from ecological, social-welfare, economic, and historical perspectives.
    Instructor: Nejem Raheem
  • IN336 - It?s Not Paranoia If They?re Really After You (4 Credits)
    Aided by disclosures from Edward Snowden, intense debates about online security, privacy, journalistic practices, and governmental and commercial intrusion into our lives continue to rage. This course explores the issue of present-day surveillance practices, connecting them to political economies surrounding the technical infrastructure of the Internet. Topics include encryption and security, new activist formations, emerging concerns for media makers, neoliberalism, and implications for both governance and governmentality. Intersections with economic, cultural, and policy structures are explored.
    Instructor: Russell Newman
  • IN346 - ACT (Action for Community Transformation) Leadership Seminar (0 Credit)
    A non-tuition credit opportunity that enhances experiences by providing direct service in the community with workshops on leadership, organizing, and advocacy. In addition, workshops and direct service ACT Leaders organize ?campus impact? initiatives and advocacy efforts related to direct service.
  • IN370 - Adv. Topics in Global Studies: Postcolonial Cinema (4 Credits)
    The course highlights classic and contemporary post-colonial films and filmmakers from Africa and the Africana Diaspora (Caribbean, Latin America, Europe and the United States) who challenge Hollywood and Western notions of identity, narrative, history and aesthetics.
  • IN370 - Adv. Topics in Global Studies: Worldwide Underground: Hip Hop as Resistance Around the Globe (4 Credits)
    Since emerging in the 1970s, hip hop has been celebrated as an innovative art form and a source of empowerment for marginalized communities. It has developed into a vibrant subculture with a loyal following for the various ways it engages social, political and cultural conditions. This course will explore the global origins of hip hop; hip hop?s elements and aesthetics; hip hop as resistance to racial, gender, and economic oppression in the US; and the adoption of hip hop by marginalized groups around the world as a form of resistance. Case studies include: South Africa, France, Great Britain, Cuba, and Japan.
    Instructor: Cara Moyer-Duncan
  • IN370 - Advanced Topics in Gloabl Studies: Post Colonial Cinema (4 Credits)
    The course highlights classic and contemporary post-colonial films and filmmakers from Africa and the Africana Diaspora (Caribbean, Latin America, Europe and the United States) who challenge Hollywood and Western notions of identity, narrative, history and aesthetics.
  • IN374 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Making Space (4 Credits)
    Students will engage in an inquiry of space as a site of power, using concepts and practices of mapping, inhabiting, and creating spaces as scaffolding. Possible topics include: the space of the body, the home, the prison, the school, the city, migration, the nation, and the universe; and issues of inequality and resistance as they take shape through space.
    Instructor: Claudia Castaneda
  • IN374 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Laughing at/Laughing with - How does Comedy Unite and Divide (4 Credits)
    How does comedy unite and divide? This course responds to a perennial query about the purposes and effects of comedy, particularly pressing in the current period when comedic forms regularly give voice to struggles over difference and diversity as well as ignite them. Are marginalization and omission the price for a sense of comedic community, and if so, who gets marginalized, what gets omitted, and what are the values as well as deficits of these functions? The course will explore comedy across history, in multiple mediums and national contexts: in literature (novels, comic strips), theater, painting, sculpture, film, television, and new media.
    Instructor: Ken Feil
  • IN374 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Code: Culture and Practice (4 Credits)
    This course is designed to teach basic programming skills in the context of critical and cultural media studies. The course requires no prior programming experience, simply a willingness to explore code at a more technical level with the aim of using computation as an expressive, analytical, critical and visualizing medium. Students will be introduced to the culture of collaboration and sharing cultivated through the open source movement and how the technical infrastructure of the web has serious implications for contemporary culture and politics.
    Instructor: Angela Chang
  • IN374 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Reel Race: In & Out of Hollywood (4 Credits)
    Hollywood has played a significant role in the creation and perpetuation of racist ideology and negative stereotypes of Africa and Africans. In this course, we examine the historical evolution of these depictions and the cinema produced by African-American filmmakers that has challenged them. The course begins with the creation of the myth of the ?Dark Continent? during 19th century colonial expansion and then traces the evolution of Hollywood representations and distortions of Africa, Africans and the Africana Diaspora though to the present day. Works by independent black filmmakers that challenge Hollywood representations are studied as illuminating contrasts.
  • IN374 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Dreaming (4 Credits)
    This course will explore a full range of perspectives on dreaming. After an emphasis on the evolution of psychoanalytic points of view on the special character of the dream experience, we will consider ways in which appreciation of dream states has informed our understanding of human development. Dreaming will be considered, further, in relation to literature and the arts, both in terms of parallels among the imaginative mental processes involved and in terms of overt representation of dream states in literature, visual arts, film and performing arts.
    Instructor: Howard Katz
  • IN374 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Holocaust: History, Testimony, Trauma (4 Credits)
    The study of the Holocaust raises fundamental questions about the relation of literature to history, the uses and limits of literary representation and the forms and functions of memory in response to traumatic experience. This is a course in literature and other media that represent the Holocaust. We will read numerous texts depicting Holocaust experience and will study their historical contexts. We will view videos depicting the events of the Holocaust, and testimonies of survivors. Students will be asked to explore their responses to the literature in short essays and in a longer essay due at the end of the semester.
    Instructor: Murray Schwartz
  • IN374 - Topics in Interdiscipl Studies: Laughing at/Laughing with: How does Comedy Unite and Divide (4 Credits)
    How does comedy unite and divide? This course responds to a perennial query about the purposes and effects of comedy, particularly pressing in the current period when comedic forms regularly give voice to struggles over difference and diversity as well as ignite them. Are marginalization and omission the price for a sense of comedic community, and if so, who gets marginalized, what gets omitted, and what are the values as well as deficits of these functions? The course will explore comedy across history, in multiple mediums and national contexts: in literature (novels, comic strips), theater, painting, sculpture, film, television, and new media.
    Instructor: Ken Feil
  • IN374 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: New York, Capital of the Twentieth Century (4 Credits)
    We will examine key documents culled from the seemingly infinite archive dedicated to twentieth-century New York, drawn from diverse fields, such as urbanism and journalism, art and photography, sociology and film, literature and history, dance and philosophy, graffiti and architecture, politics and economics. We will try to formulate a theory of this city, even if this theory must remain a fragmentary one. Since the meaning of our modern life is inseparable from the meaning of urban life, coming to terms with the latter will help us to learn a valuable lesson about the former. The specific city that we will investigate is therefore a paradigm of something much larger than itself.
    Instructor: David Kishik
  • IN374 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Reel Race: In & Out of Hollywood (4 Credits)
    Hollywood has played a significant role in the creation and perpetuation of racist ideology and negative stereotypes of Africa and Africans. In this course, we examine the historical evolution of these depictions and the cinema produced by African-American filmmakers that has challenged them. The course begins with the creation of the myth of the ?Dark Continent? during 19th century colonial expansion and then traces the evolution of Hollywood representations and distortions of Africa, Africans and the Africana Diaspora though to the present day. Works by independent black filmmakers that challenge Hollywood representations are studied as illuminating contrasts.
  • IN402 - Living Art in Real Space: Multidisciplinary Art and the Collaborative Process (4 Credits)
    Examines the development and language of multidisciplinary art from the early 20th century to the present day, with reference to specific artists, trends, and movements. Lectures, slide and video presentations, museum visits, student research, reading, writing, and in-depth experiential processes address how different artistic disciplines inform one another and come together in visual art performance and installations. Culminates in final presentations of multidisciplinary work by student groups documenting and mapping the sources, methods, and process of their collaborations.
    Instructor: Mirta Tocci
  • IN403 - The Shock of the Old: Representations and Renaissance Culture (4 Credits)
    Themes of identity and difference, meaning and paradox, and accommodation and strife are traced through Renaissance drama, poetry, painting, music, other visual media, and the speculative essay. Explores "period" attempts within these media to formulate vocabularies of representation and affect. Relates one's own interpretive practices and assumptions to the thematics of Renaissance representation through written and oral exercises and examination of modern critical and artistic representations and (re)interpretations of Renaissance texts.
    Instructor: Robert Dulgarian
  • IN410 - Digital Media and Culture Lab (4 Credits)
    How have emergent media technologies affected politics, citizenship, the economy, and governance?and vice versa? Students examine evolving relationships between digital media and culture holistically from theoretical, practical, and evaluative standpoints. Students work with faculty to craft research and applied projects in contexts ranging from the local to the global, applying interdisciplinary perspectives from visual arts, journalism, communication studies, political economy, and cultural studies. Areas of exploration include neoliberalism, access, identity, serious gaming, social change, political engagement, and social justice.
    Instructor: Russell Newman
  • IN420 - Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Key Contemporary Thinkers - Freud (4 Credits)
    This course seeks to introduce students to the works of Sigmund Freud and to put those works into a greater context. Freud?s oeuvre is extensive, with 24 volumes of work, and varies from case histories to densely theoretical works to cultural criticism based on his psychoanalytic understanding of the human mind and the human condition. This course will use the works of Freud to engage the students in critical thinking. Because Freud?s works are so diverse, they touch on philosophical, literary, ethical, and historical themes and issues. Reading and discussing Freud?s works will challenge students to engage deeply in questions about how to understand themselves and others. They will be faced with fundamental questions about what people most deeply want, and about what interferes with their getting what they want (both environmental and internal resistances).
  • IN422 - Key Contemporary Thinkers: Marx (4 Credits)
    This course is about Marx?s theory through the writings by Karl Marx. Since the goal of this class is to introduce students to Marx?s thought, not Marxism or Marxists, the class will be driven by close readings and discussions of Marx?s texts. Engaging key concepts of Marx?s thought, such as alienation, ideology, class struggle, and capital, the readings will be philosophical, political, sociological and economic reading Marx?s key texts from the Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts to Capital and the Critique of the Gotha Program, our concern will be conceptual rather than historical. The core of the class will be Marx?s critique of capitalism and the goal of the class will be to introduce students to Marx?s concepts.
    Instructor: Nigel Gibson
  • IN423 - Key Contemporary Thinkers: DuBois (4 Credits)
    Explores the intellectual, cultural, and political contributions of W.E.B. Du Bois, as examined through a broad selection of his writings, drawn both from his greater-known works of political thought, sociology, and critical race theory and also from his lesser-known works of literature, which encompassed the genres of fiction, nonfiction (essay and memoir), and drama. Beginning with his early life and work, students trace his development as a thinker and writer through the Niagara and New Negro Movements, the Harlem Renaissance, and the post-WWII contexts of American and Black Atlantic political and intellectual histories. Special attention is paid to the role played by literary production and criticism in the larger interdisciplinary projects of promoting equality for African Americans (and indeed, for all people of African descent) and critiquing American democracy. How might art?especially literature?best serve the demands of social and ethical praxis? Why did Du Bois turn, again and again, to imaginative discourse, even as he continued to work as a civic leader and political thinker?
    Instructor: Erika R. Williams
  • JR101 - Discovering Journalism (4 Credits)
    Explains how journalism has changed America and the world. Considers the role of journalism as a public service in a democratic society. Students read, view, and listen to the finest and most influential stories. They chart the news in U.S. history, from the American Revolution to today's digital revolution. Students analyze how print, broadcast, and online news have evolved and examine media from other parts of the world. They also explore ethical issues confronting the contemporary journalist and develop knowledge of the First Amendment principles.
  • JR102 - Foundations of Journalism (4 Credits)
    Students appraise and apply the fundamentals of reporting, writing, and producing news. They cover stories in the Greater Boston community and learn how to develop story ideas, define the focus, and identify and evaluate sources. Students also examine and implement reporting strategies for print, broadcast, and online news stories. They incorporate journalistic standards and practices in all newsgathering and news story presentation. Students write and organize basic news stories with skill, accuracy, and clarity and develop a disciplined use of form and style in news writing.
  • JR103 - The Digital Journalist (4 Credits)
    Covers the use of audio and visual media to tell news stories. Examines modern media, analyzes still and moving images, sound, and best web practices. Students learn how to use photography, videography, and audio to tell compelling stories. They develop and report multimedia stories in and around Boston. Image and sound manipulation and other ethical challenges in the digital age are discussed.
  • JR202 - Beat Reporting Across Media (4 Credits)
    Students learn to cover a geographic or community beat, developing and producing stories in text, audio, and video about a community in Boston. Lectures emphasize the role and function of major institutions in public life, from courts to city hall to Congress; basic public records and research; interviewing; and story origination. Students are assigned to a beat and must develop stories in specific areas of civic life, from public safety to demographics change and its impact on community.
  • JR216 - Advanced Audio-Video Journalism (4 Credits)
    Provides intense writing for visual and audio news. Students continue to develop news judgment as it relates to video and audio. They produce and write radio newscasts and reporter packages, as well as organize a video news brief and reporter packages. Students shoot, write, and edit video and audio voiceovers and soundbites for storytelling.
    Instructor: Stephen Iandoli
  • JR220 - Interactive News (4 Credits)
    Introduces the history and theory of the news media on the Internet and web and to the reporting, writing, and designing of online news. In the first half of the semester, students analyze best practices of online news publications and write their own blogs. In the second half, they report, write, and design a multimedia website.
    Instructor: Mark Leccese
  • JR221 - Photojournalism (4 Credits)
    Explores photography as a journalistic storytelling medium by teaching how to communicate news visually in a variety of situations. Develops skills such as shooting pictures on deadline, writing concise and compelling captions, and editing for impact. Through historical and contemporary examples, students learn about the power of photojournalism to document, inform, entertain, persuade, and provoke emotion. Examines the ethical and legal challenges of photojournalism.
    Instructor: Joanne Ciccarello
  • JR240 - Sports Reporting (4 Credits)
    Provides real-world basis for sports coverage in print, broadcast, and online media. Students produce a range of stories in each media, learn the basics of sports beat reporting, learn the necessity of research and reporting for sports stories, deepen knowledge of sports as it appeals to media consumers, and learn how to compete for positions in the job market.
    Instructor: Shalise Manza Young
  • JR241 - Radio Journalism (4 Credits)
    Students learn how to write, report, and produce radio news including international, national, and local news. They learn the process of developing story ideas and gathering and organizing information in a way acceptable for broadcast. Students learn how different types of news stories are reported on radio in short form, breaking news, long form, and podcasting. They identify newsmakers and develop further understanding of the broadcast news field. Professionalism, integrity, and accuracy are practiced at all times.
    Instructor: Judith Yuill
  • JR261 - Feature Writing (4 Credits)
    Students learn to research, organize, and write feature articles for newspapers, magazines, and online media. They develop techniques for finding and focusing stories, interviewing in-depth, improving observation, structure writing, and storytelling. Students understand the variety of feature writing approaches.
    Instructor: Melinda Robins
  • JR270 - Civic Art & Design Studio (4 Credits)
    Civic Art & Design are practices that leverage storytelling and culture to generate social change, to serve the public good and/or to imagine alternate collective futures. In this class we address the shifting sociopolitical role of the artist, designer and storyteller in a world beset by crises, inequities and global concerns. This course covers theories of Civic Art and Design as well as methods for including diverse communities and audiences at various stages in the creation of a project. We review numerous cases of civic art and conduct experiments in storytelling, data visualization, community art, performance, interactive documentary and networked art in order to interrogate where, when, how and why a Civic Storyteller takes action in the world. Throughout the class, we model a design research process that engages with a public data set and culminates in the completion of a public art & media installation. This is an introductory class to get acquainted with storytelling about important civic issues through data analysis and visualization.
    Instructor: Catherine D'Ignazio
  • JR292 - Public Affairs Reporting (4 Credits)
    Introduces the structure and functions of state, local, and federal government from a journalist's perspective. Students report and write in-depth stories on proposed legislation, campaign finance, and current issues in government. Students also become familiar with and make use of public records and open meeting laws, learn advanced reporting skills through readings and class lectures, and review and critique each other's stories.
    Instructor: Mark Leccese
  • JR318 - TV News Producing (4 Credits)
    Students experience deadline-driven television newsroom operations by producing newscasts and rotating through newsroom jobs such as tape editor, writer, producer, anchor, reporter, and videographer. They write news scripts, edit video to tell a news story, organize and produce a newscast, coordinate video elements for a newscast, and work together as a broadcast news team.
  • JR320 - Environmental Journalism (4 Credits)
    Hands-on course in which students prepare multiple stories on environmental issues, learning the topic and the skills. It is both a discussion course and a working course, embracing science and doing reporting. The course has a special focus on the story of the century: the climate change that will affect every aspect of our society. But it examines a wide range of environmental topics, from local to national to global. Discussion touches on the history of environmental reporting from Rachel Carson to the current fireworks between those who dispute global warming and journalists who report on it. Students learn how to recognize and find good stories, how to approach environmental issues; how to deal with scientists; and how to research, report, write and produce from the field. Multimedia reporting is expected.
  • JR353 - Reporting and Writing Complex Stories (4 Credits)
    Students move beyond straight news, inverted pyramid, and short features to understand longer features, narratives, analysis, profiles, investigative, and other forms of in-depth writing. They learn to look for ideas, how to organize reporting, and how to pursue the serious reporting needed for these stories, as well as how to structure a longer, complex story to produce exemplary, stand-out journalism.
    Instructor: Ted Gup
  • JR354 - News Editing and Design (4 Credits)
    Students develop and practice the craft of editing: refining news copy and choosing how and where it will run in a newspaper or on a website. They learn to edit stories for content, structure, word usage, and story flow. Students write headlines and learn appropriate software needed to design pages. Explores issues of style, bias, stereotyping, fairness, and taste.
    Instructor: David Richwine
  • JR364 - Topics in Specialized Reporting: Secrecy (4 Credits)
    Develops background knowledge, understanding, and expertise in a specialized area of journalism. Topics may include politics, blogs and the media, the media and the presidency, war reporting, the alternative press and impact of Pulitzer stories. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Ted Gup
  • JR364 - Specialized Reporting: History of the Alternative Press (4 Credits)
    A survey course on the role of non-mainstream newspapers in modern U.S. society. The course will explore major events and trends between the 1890s and the 1980s through the coverage in special interest newspapers. The publications used to examine topics in social history will include the race and ethnic press, religious press, trade union press, and press of the political left, among others. Students will study both scholarly and primary source writings, consider the use of the alternative press in the historical method, and write research papers that draw on newspapers as sources of history.
    Instructor: Roger House
  • JR365 - Topics in Cultural Affairs: Covering the Entertainment Industry (4 Credits)
    Entertainment is a big business of multi-faceted contracts and billion-dollar deals involving emerging digital technologies and new audience demands. This course will explore the compelling dollars and cents, powerbrokers and companies that shape what entertains us and enterprising ways to cover them.
  • JR365 - Topics in Cultural Affairs: Cultural Criticism (4 Credits)
    A journalism course devoted to the coverage, reporting and analysis of entertainment fields: Movies, Books, Television, Music, and the industry itself as a business subject. What are the biggest entertainment business stories of the past year, and why? What kind of coverage did these stories receive? What specifically marks the difference between in-depth cultural reportage and ?celebrity journalism?? Best practices will be read, discussed, and outlined. Students report and write in-depth critiques on specific films, books and events, as well as report on larger business trends and practices. All assignments embrace multi-media storytelling modes: audio, visual, slideshows, print and broadcast. Students pitch story ideas, spin out alternate angles on single stories, compose sturdy nut graphs, assess the current state of entertainment pages in a variety of outlets, and pitch their profiles as reporters with special knowledge in the entertainment fields.
    Instructor: Tim Riley
  • JR365 - Topics in Cultural Affairs: Film News and Reviews (4 Credits)
    From Hollywood to independent and world cinema, Film News, Review, and Feature Writing examines how film journalism is practiced across an array of media with an emphasis on print and online outlets. Students will acquire a working knowledge of how film-related news, reviews, and feature stories are pitched, assigned, researched, reported, edited, and published. Discussion will include the history of film journalism as well as career paths in film journalism today. Class exercises foster critical and creative thinking as well as the integration of multimedia elements, including audio, video, still photography, and social networking.
  • JR365 - Topics in Cultural Affairs: Literary Journalism (4 Credits)
    Develops background knowledge, understanding, and expertise in a specialized area of culture, arts, entertainment, or sports. Topics may include music journalism, food/fashion reporting, or performing arts reporting. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Doug Struck
  • JR365 - Topics in Cultural Affairs: Music Journalism (4 Credits)
    An intensive writing course covering the classic 1960s rock explosion and its aftershocks. Drawing on the music of the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan, class explores the four main themes of rock style: race, class, demography and gender. Two major papers required: one on the Beatles, and one open subject. Each paper goes through outlines and revisions typical of the publishing process. Additional assignments include story pitching a major music publication and interviewing a band for a color story to hone skills in description, point-of-view, historical context, and political attitudes. The central text, Greil Marcus's Mystery Train, anchors incidental essays by major rock critics of the era, with special attention to style, voice, tone, and best practice examples of New Journalism and rock criticism.
    Instructor: Tim Riley
  • JR366 - Topics in Science, Technology, and Health: Health and Medical Reporting (4 Credits)
    Journalists don't need to be a medical professional to be good health reporters, but they do need to know how doctors, researchers and bureaucrats do their work, and to translate jargon into simple and useful language for audiences. In this class, you will learn how to find news value in official health documents, and how to research and write/produce interesting and accessible stories for popular media.
    Instructor: Melinda Robins
  • JR419 - ENG/TV News Reporting (4 Credits)
    Students work in the field to research, shoot, write, and edit video news stories. They develop reporting and interviewing skills, visual acuity, writing for the eye and ear, and general TV performance abilities. Students also learn and utilize the technical aspects of video shooting and editing.
  • JR485 - Journalism Topics: Blogging (4 Credits)
    Blogging, in less than a decade, has moved from fringes of journalism to the center of modern online media. Students in this course will conceive, design, write and maintain a blog or blogs that treat a subject in depth. Topics covered include the different types of bloggers, interactivity with an audience, writing headlines and summaries, using social media to expand a blog?s audience, and working with images, video, audio, and data visualization. The course will also cover legal and ethical issues involved in blogging.
    Instructor: Mark Leccese
  • JR485 - Journalism Topics: Global Journalism On-line (4 Credits)
    This online course studies the news media around the world and the history and implications of media globalization. What are the press systems like in other countries? How have the web and social media affected local as well as international news flow? How does shrinking international coverage influence American public opinion and policy? Students look at the development of today's international communication systems from the telegraph to social media. They examine issues of ownership and control, local culture and content, and media development. This class is open to seniors and graduate students only.
    Instructor: Melinda Robins
  • JR485 - Journalism Topics: Digital Thinking (4 Credits)
    This course will explore the fundamental question facing journalists today: how will the profession survive? Students will learn how news organizations make money, how the digital revolution has disrupted the business model that supported those organizations for decades, and what the future might hold. They will examine the successful digital efforts by the New York Times, Washington Post, and other legacy organizations, learn about emerging media titans and their ventures, such as BuzzFeed, Huffington Post, and Facebook, and unpack why some efforts fail and others succeed.
    Instructor: David Dahl
  • JR485 - Journalism Topics: Food Reporting (4 Credits)
    Food is an essential part of living and life and food reporting explores the coverage, reporting and production of journalism on this essential subject. Students in this course will examine and dissect the various types of reporting on food in everything from social media to television and glossy magazine. They will develop knowledge about professional expectations and standards in food journalism, from testing and checking ingredients of a recipe to determining trends and traits of food culture. They will apply this new-found expertise to produce stories on food that would appeal to a well-versed food audience.
  • JR490 - Online Publishing Capstone (4 Credits)
    Students create a series of multimedia stories for a personal portfolio of online journalistic work. They use advanced tools for creating interactive stories to produce immersive journalistic stories. Text, video, audio, and photos are used to produce journalistic stories that are difficult to tell in print or broadcast alone.
    Instructor: Paul Niwa
  • JR491 - Broadcast Jour Capstone (4 Credits)
    Refines and further develops ENG or producing skills at an advanced level with the goal of putting together a professional portfolio by semester's end. In addition to completing a body of work, students are expected to engage in in-depth research and critical analysis.
  • JR492 - Deep Reporting Capstone (4 Credits)
    In this project-based course, students pitch, research, report, write, and revise a single long-form story or a series. Work might range from long-form narrative magazine articles or mini-documentaries to multiple-part series on a topic of public importance.
    Instructor: Cindy E. Rodriguez
  • JR493 - Backpack Journalist Capstone (4 Credits)
    Students carry out a project from start to finish, learning skills of self-employment, multimedia, marketing, self-editing, and pitching stories. They learn the basics of budgets, taxes, benefit, and legal implications of freelance and sole-proprietor journalism. Students learn about the risks and benefits of practicing journalism without the shelter, and restrictions, of a newsroom. They discover how to juggle technology, reporting, and entrepreneurial skills.
    Instructor: Doug Struck
  • JR609 - Visual Storytelling and Reporting (4 Credits)
    Students develop an ability to tell stories in a visual language by studying and producing multimedia stories. They start by identifying a story focus and capturing it in a photograph. They then progress to slideshows, audio, video, and interactive works. This course discusses the rights and responsibilities of visual journalists and the emerging philosophies transforming digital media. Students build their social media audience and create an e-portfolio that is developed throughout the master's program.
    Instructor: Mark Micheli
  • JR612 - Advanced Multimedia Reporting (4 Credits)
    Students cover communities bound by geography or common interest. Emphasis is on gaining a deeper understanding of groups largely neglected by traditional media. Students report and produce stories about issues, concerns, and events important to the communities. They build relationships and gather or analyze data about their communities. A panel of community members will give feedback on the students' journalism.
    Instructor: Mark Micheli
  • JR623 - Data Visualization (4 Credits)
    Students organize information from existing databases and their own data collection to create graphics that help citizens explore their community, nation, and world with new depth. Using graphics software and basic programming code, students create both static and animated graphics that show proportions, visualize relationships, or display trends over time.
    Instructor: Catherine D'Ignazio
  • JR626 - Global Journalism Online (4 Credits)
    Studies the news media around the world and the history and implications of media globalization. What are the press systems like in other countries? How have the web and social media affected local as well as international news flow? How does shrinking international coverage influence American public opinion and policy? Students look at the development of today's international communication systems from the telegraph to social media. They examine issues of ownership and control, local culture and content, and media development: the continuing agenda to build media systems so that the disenfranchised can gain information and have a voice.
    Instructor: Melinda Robins
  • JR628 - Law and Public Policy for Journalists (4 Credits)
    Enables students to find, investigate, and navigate through government and research documents, court decisions and documents, and laws and regulations. Students examine the historic reasoning and debate relating to today's laws and regulations. They develop an understanding of the impact of law and public policy in society and within specific communities to inform their journalism.
    Instructor: Joseph Pereira
  • JR632 - Long-Form Multimedia Storytelling (4 Credits)
    Students learn how to plan, report, draft and revise long-form journalism that allows text or visuals/video to serve as the dominant or primary medium in a web-based/multimedia presentation. It emphasizes establishing focus, planning, researching, reporting and sourcing, collecting project assets, and organizing and presenting those story elements to craft a professional-level piece or series of pieces. This course is the foundation for the capstone experience and for other depth reporting classes. (Fall)
    Instructors: Doug Struck, Janet Kolodzy
  • JR637 - Editing and Web Producing (4 Credits)
    Students learn to use language with precision and economy in journalism. A variety of stories are edited for accuracy, grammar, style, organization, fairness, and legal issues. Students work as web producers, editing copy, writing headlines and summaries, and editing photos and writing captions
  • JR688 - Capstone (4 Credits)
    The capstone experience provides master?s degree students with the opportunity to demonstrate: (1) reporting, writing, and multimedia producing skills developed throughout the program; and (2) the ability to practice journalism that enables a vibrant discussion of ideas and encourages civic engagement
    Instructor: Janet Kolodzy
  • LF101 - Elementary French 1 (4 Credits)
    Stresses mastery of essential vocabulary and primary grammatical structures through a situational approach. Students perceive that language is "living" and they discover by the third week of the semester that they can already communicate in French. Class time is devoted to interactive practice. Conversational skills, pronunciation, and understanding are verified through regular oral exams.
    Instructor: Pierre Hurel
  • LF102 - Elementary French 2 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of LF 101, this course also incorporates reading skills and exposes students to a wider range of cultural materials.
    Instructor: Pierre Hurel
  • LI120 - Introduction to Literary Studies (4 Credits)
    Gives students intensive practice in literary analysis, critical writing, and related research. In discussing primary texts, considerable attention is given to elements of the different genres (e.g., narrative point of view, narrative structure, metrical and free verse), as well as to issues relevant across literary genres (e.g., form and content, voice, contexts, tone). Readings are chosen from the following genres: poetry, drama, narrative modes, and also include selected literary criticism.
  • LI201 - Literary Foundations (4 Credits)
    Surveys foundational works of Western literature in poetry, nonfiction, fiction, and drama in order to familiarize students with literary history as well as the history of our ideas of love, duty, the afterlife, virtue, and vice. Authors studied may include Homer, Sophocles, Plato, Virgil, Ovid, Dante, Boccaccio, the Beowulf poet, and Chaucer.
  • LI202 - American Literature (4 Credits)
    Introduces representative works of American literature in several genres from the colonial period to the modern by writers such as Bradstreet, Franklin, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Douglass, Melville, Dickinson, Whitman, Chopin, Twain, Crane, Hurston, Faulkner, Williams, and Moore.
  • LI203 - British Literature (4 Credits)
    Historical overview of several genres of British literature from the Renaissance to the 20th century, focusing on writers such as More, Spenser, Milton, Defoe, Bronte, Eliot, Joyce, and Beckett.
  • LI204 - Topics In Literature: Monsters and Victims in Women's Literature (4 Credits)
    This course examines the images of women as either victims or monsters from ancient Greek drama to contemporary women's writing from various parts of the world. It addresses issues such as the role of sex, gender, female sexuality, ritual and domestic violence, all linked with the image-making of such Greek tragedy figures as Medusa, the Harpies, Iphigeneia, Hecuba, Clytaemnestra, Phaedra and Medea, and explores how these issues, as well as the images of women as monsters or victims that they produce, are unsettled in contemporary women?s writing. Among the writers read in the course are Adrienne Rich, Ellen McLaughlin, She Hawke, Carole Braverman, Olga Taxidou, Theodora E. Sutherland and Paula Vogel.
    Instructor: Vassiliki Rapti
  • LI204 - Topics in Literature: Slipstream Literature (4 Credits)
    Slipstream is not just a category of literature, but suggests an approach, an attitude toward living. It's not surrealism or magical realism or science fiction: it's a state-of-the-art concept that embraces a curiosity with the visionary, unreliable, odd or metaphysical. Cyberpunk auteur Bruce Sterling coined the phrase to describe writing ?? which unnerves; the way that living in the 21st century makes you feel, if you are a person of a certain sensibility. Slipstream is the Interzone that William Burroughs wrote about.? This semester we will explore work that crosses and jumps and leaps over genre, over borders, and over language to ride the next wave.
    Instructor: Peter Shippy
  • LI204 - Topics in Literature: Fashion, Manners and Morals from Jane Austen to Downtown Abbey (4 Credits)
    This course surveys the world of costume, dancing, and etiquette in literature and television/ film, from the Regency period through to the end of the 1920s. The class analyzes novels by Austen (Pride and Prejudice, Northanger Abbey, and Persuasion), alongside diaries and journals from the period, including those of Austen's cousin, Eliza de Feuillide. And it compares these works with texts from both the British and the American traditions, including novels by D.H. Lawrence (Women in Love), Edith Wharton (The Buccaneers, The Custom of the Country), and F. Scott Fitzgerald (The Great Gatsby and The Beautiful and the Damned). We conclude with a unit on the television series "Downton Abbey," interpreted in the context of the culture and mores of the Edwardian and 1920s periods in England.
    Instructor: Christina Carlson
  • LI204 - Topics in Literature: Monsters and Victims in Women's Writing (4 Credits)
    This course examines the images of women as either victims or monsters from ancient Greek drama to contemporary women's writing from various parts of the world. It addresses issues such as the role of sex, gender, female sexuality, ritual and domestic violence, all linked with the image-making of such Greek tragedy figures as Medusa, the Harpies, Iphigeneia, Hecuba, Clytaemnestra, Phaedra and Medea, and explores how these issues, as well as the images of women as monsters or victims that they produce, are unsettled in contemporary women?s writing. Among the writers read in the course are Adrienne Rich, Ellen McLaughlin, She Hawke, Carole Braverman, Olga Taxidou, Theodora E. Sutherland and Paula Vogel.
    Instructor: Vassiliki Rapti
  • LI204 - Topics in Literature: Pen, Paper, Murder (4 Credits)
    What defines crime-based literature? The relationship between crime and literary works, whether fictional or not, can be traced all the way back to literature?s earliest accounts, when oral traditions reveled in tales of brutes, pirates, and highwaymen to entertain and enlighten a crowd. With the advent of the penny-press in the early 1830s, America?s ravenous appetite for such tales grew, especially with the serialized accounts of the murders of Helen Jewett and Mary Rogers in New York, brought to light by James Gordon Bennett in the New York Herald. Why do people become obsessed with certain crimes only to ignore hundreds of others just like them? What roles do they play on our psyche as individuals and artists? What roles do they play as a medium of interpretation?
    Instructor: Scott Sanders
  • LI204 - Topics In Literature: No Futures: Extinction and the Nation in American Literature (4 Credits)
    American literature often imagines the achievement of national identity as an organic process that will be realized in an indeterminate future. Yet many authors return again and again to themes in which these futures appear disrupted, fragmented, reversed, or altogether erased. As we will see over the course of this semester, broken blood lineages, atavistic regression, lost and disinherited property, and various forms of familial, sexual, racial, and species extinction haunt American literary history. This course examines the aesthetic and ideological tensions generated by these paradoxes, asking why the disruption of futurity provokes such persistent artistic engagement, as well as how these engagements shed light on the socio-political contexts out of which they emerge. Over the semester, we will investigate a wide range of discursive forms and literary genres: political letters and speeches, poetry, novels, films, and short stories, encompassing realist, naturalist, modernist, and postmodernist generic conventions.
    Instructor: David Hollingshead
  • LI204 - Topics In Literature: Urban Experience in Modern Literature (4 Credits)
    The course comprises a selective investigation of texts that foreground issues of representation and the production of representations, including their own. We will be exploring and analysing ways in which modes of representation and modes of argument shape each other, in which these modes contribute to produce recognizably `literary? and recognizably `philosophical? discourse, and also in which these discourses privilege or exclude other particular modes of speech and representation.The course will juxtapose readings from classical, early modern, and modern philosophy with mostly modern literature in order to explore issues of representation, the construction of subjectivity, and the placement of the subject in the world. Literary texts will include Beckett?s Murphy, Borges? `The Aleph?, Kincaid?s At the Bottom of the River, Shelley?s Frankenstein, poetry Wallace Stevens, Lispector?s The Hour of the Star, and Woolf?s To the Lighthouse.
    Instructor: Daniela Kukrechtova
  • LI204 - Topics in Literature: Collapsing the Empire (4 Credits)
    This course will focus on literary engagements with empire and representations of gender, race, and post/colonialism in a variety of genres, including novels, poems, and plays. We will primarily focus on the literature of the British Empire ? both English and Anglophone writers ? from the 19th and 20th centuries, though we may also address narratives of imperialism in texts in translation from across the globe. The course will address modernist anxieties over empire in the early 20th century as well as renegotiations of national identity after the independence of former colonies such as Ireland, India, and Jamaica to name a few. We will ask: What does it mean to explore issues or empire within our contemporary moment as well as within the context of history? Authors may include E.M. Forster, Jean Rhys, George Lamming, and Andrea Levy. Students will also engage with postcolonial discourse by theorists such as Edward Said, Bill Ashcroft, and Jenny Sharpe through weekly supplementary readings.
    Instructor: Shannon Derby
  • LI204 - Topics in Literature: Post Modern Fairy Tales (4 Credits)
    Through the study of the origins and transformations of fairy tales, we will explore how storytelling shapes our sense of identity. We examine the recurring motifs within these enduring tales and why and how contemporary authors have subverted these themes and lessons. Above all, we will utilize this traditional literature and its variations to explore various theoretical approaches, which define, interpret, and reflect culture.
    Instructor: Peter Shippy
  • LI208 - US Multicultural Literatures (4 Credits)
    Introduces poetry, fiction, and other genres produced in the multicultural U.S.A. Explores ways writers from disparate communities use various literary forms to articulate resistance, community, and citizenship. Literary texts are situated in their historical contexts and examine the writing strategies of each author. Also includes essays, journalism, and films to learn how diverse cultural texts work to represent America.
  • LI209 - Topics in US Multicultural Lit: Coming of Age: Race, Gender, Class & Ethnicity in Identity Formation (4 Credits)
    How does one ?come of age?? What defines a childhood? How does one?s cultural, ethnic, socio-economic, and/or gender identity shape the way one experiences the transformation from child to adult? How might we, as readers, subvert traditional understandings of childhood in order to shift away from ?universal? frameworks of identity formation? These are just some of the questions we will engage with in this course. We will close read literary works from writers who position their narrators on the edge of both the recognizable and the unrecognizable terrain of childhood. Texts may include: Zitkala-Sa?s American Indian Stories; Maxine Kingston?s The Woman Warrior; Sandra Cisneros? The House on Mango Street; Dorothy Allison?s Bastard Out of Carolina; Edwidge Danticat?s Breath, Eyes, Memory; James McBride?s The Color of Water; Helena Maria Viramontes?s Under the Feet of Jesus; Pete Hamill?s Snow in August
    Instructor: Fiona Maurissette
  • LI210 - American Women Writers (4 Credits)
    Examines fiction, poetry, and other genres by 19th- and 20th-century American women such as Jacobs, Dickinson, Chopin, Kingston, Welty, Rich, and Morrison.
  • LI213 - Latin American Literature and Cinema (4 Credits)
    Considers how Latin American authors use poetry, drama, essay, and fiction to provide alternative versions of national foundations, revolutionary movements and political repression. Students view literary writing in relationship to the languages of scientific inquiry, myth, history, anthropology, psychology and journalism.
  • LI214 - Latino Literature (4 Credits)
    Explores the idea of borderlands or living on the hyphen by American writers who identify themselves as straddling two cultures. Students read poetry, essays, fiction and drama by authors in the following traditions: Chicano, Puerto Rican (Borinquen), Cuban and Dominican American.
  • LI215 - Slavery and Freedom (4 Credits)
    Looks at a wide-ranging survey of 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century poems, plays, novels, and nonfiction narratives concerning the issue of American slavery and its aftermath. Explores slave narrative conventions across historical periods as well as themes such as identity, masking, the liberating power of literacy, and masculine and feminine definitions of freedom.
    Instructor: Kimberly McLarin
  • LI216 - Literature of the Gothic (4 Credits)
    Focuses on literary and aesthetic tradition known as the Gothic, following its various manifestations from 18th century England up to present-day America. Students read novels, poetry, short stories and plays. Students interested in postmodern expressions of the Gothic, from graphic novels to film, will be invited to bring these to the table. Is Dracula really about the anxiety of empire? What is Frankenstein saying about social theory and the dangers of Romanticism? And finally, why does Gothic material retain its fascination in the 21st century, when so many aesthetic movements lie moldering in their graves?
    Instructor: William Orem
  • LI217 - Literature, Culture and the Environment (4 Credits)
    Examines the literature, art, and culture of Native and non-Native America and consider how these two very different traditions have affected the environment. Initially, students focus on Native Creation stories and on Genesis in order to better understand the definition of "wilderness." They then study the work of 17th-, 18th-, and 19th-century authors and artists who influenced and/or responded to how the environment should be managed. As students progress to the 20th and 21st centuries, they consider the work of artists, writers, and filmmakers who acknowledge and attempt to come to terms with a drastically changed and oftentimes degraded landscape in their work.
    Instructor: Christine Casson
  • LI303 - The Art of Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Examines a broad range of literary nonfiction works, present and past, paying particular attention to the craft within the nonfiction work but identifying relationships and similarities that literary nonfiction has with the novel and short story. Includes readings from such diverse forms as historical narrative, adventure travel and survival, memoir and the creative nonfiction essay, and other forms of factual writing artfully constructed.
  • LI304 - Topics in Literature: Literature of Gothic, Part 2 (4 Credits)
    This course will focus on the literary and aesthetic tradition known as the Gothic, moving into more detail than the 200-level course (which is not a specific prerequisite). Our attention this semester will be on gothic narratives ranging from the late Victorian though the postmodern period. What does The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mister Hyde tell us about shifting perceptions of selfhood at the turn of the century? What does The War of the Worlds have to do with vegetarianism, religious crisis, and reverse colonization? Are there any ghosts at Bly? And finally, why does Gothic material retain its fascination in the 21st century, when so many aesthetic movements lie moldering in their graves?
    Instructor: William Orem
  • LI304 - Topics in Literature: Place, Displacement, Memory in Exile Literature (4 Credits)
    Literature has traditionally been a welcoming space for people who, by choice or history, do not fit easily into the mainstream of society. This course will focus on the literature of writers who write from and about the position of an exiled ?outsider,? examining how literary art endeavors to contain, craft, and create that which is remembered. We will consider how narratives of recollection and forgetting produce the particular transport and recovery accessible through literary experience. Among the many questions to be raised, we will consider the ways in which literature can represent and reproduce the human, social, cultural, historical and political experiences of exile, whether an exiled individual experiences a forceful expatriation, a voluntary emigration, or even an internal exile. We will also consider the role that literature might play in creating a sense of community for immigrants, refugees, and other people living in various forms of exile.
    Instructor: Daniela Kukrechtova
  • LI305 - Modern Poetry and After (4 Credits)
    Explores modern and postmodern traditions of poetry in the works of such 20th-century poets as Eliot, Stevens, Auden, Moore, Lowell, Bishop, Plath, Larkin, Rich, Ashbery, and, in translation, Neruda, Rilke, Herbert, Kazuk, and Tsvetaeva.
    Instructor: Christine Casson
  • LI306 - Literatures of Continental Europe (4 Credits)
    Explores seminal works in the European literary tradition, with a particular focus on close reading, textual and rhetorical analysis, and aesthetic criticism. The course may include works by Montaigne, Rousseau, Flaubert, Holderlin, Novalis, Heine, Flaubert, Dostoyevsky, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Proust, Rilke, Kafka, Borges, Bachmann, and Bernhard.
    Instructor: Yu-jin Chang
  • LI307 - The Art of Poetry (4 Credits)
    Through reading and discussion of poems from different historical periods, students learn the technical aspects of poetry (such as meter, rhyme, and structure) and how poets use these techniques to create meanings and effects, giving students a critical vocabulary for reading and practicing poetry. For students who want to enhance their ability to discuss and write about poetry by learning the essentials of the poet's art.
    Instructor: Robin Riley Fast
  • LI308 - The Art of Fiction (4 Credits)
    Explores a broad range of short stories and novels by American and international authors. Teaches students to look at fiction from the perspective of the writer's craft, and emphasizes such elements as structure, narrative, characterization, dialogue, and the differences between shorter and longer forms. Students gain an appreciation of the fiction writer's craft and an enhanced sense of the drama inherent in effective storytelling.
  • LI309 - Topics in Multicultural Literature: Harlem Renaissance (4 Credits)
    Course examines some of the major poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction (autobiography and essay) of one of the most celebrated African American and American arts movements: the Harlem Renaissance. An extension of post-slavery identity for African Americans, the Harlem Renaissance emerged from the intersection of rural and urban; traditional and modern; nationalistic and cosmopolitan; and black and white. We will pay particular attention to migration, inter- and intra-racial relations, the interplay of race, gender, class, and sexuality, and the phenomenon of passing. In addition, although our primary focus will be on written texts, we will also explore the influence of music (jazz and blues) and visual art on the literature and culture of the period.
    Instructor: Erika R. Williams
  • LI311 - Topics in Global Literature: Latin American Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    This seminar explores the ways Latin American writers since the seventeenth century have constructed their identity by redefining literary journalism, memoir and autobiography. These writers and political activists inevitably project their sense of self within and against the religious, social and political realities that characterize their homeland at a specific historical moment. Voice, time and place are inextricably tied. Class discussion centers on text analysis in conjunction with essays that facilitate comprehension of the writer?s reality.
    Instructor: Flora Gonzalez
  • LI313 - Novel into Film (4 Credits)
    Studies the adaptation of novels into films, and the narrative conventions that govern each medium. Texts include the works of such writers as Kesey, Burgess, Kundera, Walker, Nabokov, and Puig; films include the work of directors such as Kubrick, Forman, Spielberg, and Babenco.
    Instructor: William Donoghue
  • LI339 - British Novel 1 (4 Credits)
    Engages in social and cultural analysis of the "rise" of the novel in England with representative works from the Restoration (1660) through the end of the 19th century. May include authors such as Behn, Defoe, Sterne, Richardson, Austen, Bronte, Shelley, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy.
    Instructor: William Donoghue
  • LI361 - Native American Literature (4 Credits)
    Studies works in several genres, including consideration of how traditional myth, story, and ritual contribute to contemporary fiction and poetry, and how the literature reflects and responds to historical and contemporary conditions. May include such authors as Silko, Momaday, Ortiz, Harjo, and Erdrich.
    Instructor: Robin Riley Fast
  • LI371 - Shakespearean Tragedy (4 Credits)
    Carefully examines selected tragedies from Romeo and Juliet to Antony and Cleopatra, emphasizing the development of the tragic form.
    Instructor: Adele Lee
  • LI372 - Shakespearean Comedy (4 Credits)
    Detailed study of selected comedies from A Midsummer Night's Dream to The Winter's Tale, emphasizing Shakespeare's development of the comic form.
    Instructor: Adele Lee
  • LI382 - African-American Literature (4 Credits)
    Surveys African American literature (prose, poetry, and drama) from Olaudah Equiano through Toni Morrison and examines African American literature as part of the field of Diaspora studies. Also explores connections between African American and Caribbean American literatures conceived as literatures of the African Diaspora.
    Instructor: Wendy W. Walters
  • LI393 - American Novel 1 (4 Credits)
    Studies representative American novels written before the 20th century, including works by such authors as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Twain, Chopin, Wharton, and James
    Instructor: Lynne Feeley
  • LI394 - American Novel 2 (4 Credits)
    Studies representative works of 20th-century American fiction. May cover authors from the first half of the century such as Anderson, Cather, Faulkner, James, Hemingway, Dreiser, Wright, Ellison, and Bellow as well as more contemporary writers such as Roth, Coover, Nabokov, Morrison, DeLillo, Burroughs, Momaday, and Silko.
    Instructor: Lynne Feeley
  • LI396 - International Women Writers (4 Credits)
    Explores works by contemporary international women writers within their social and political contexts. Readings include work by such writers as Nadine Gordimer, Jamaica Kincaid, Michelle Cliff, Mawal El Saadawi, Bessie Head, Luisa Valenzuela, and others.
    Instructor: Shannon Derby
  • LI405 - Reading & Writ the Environment (4 Credits)
    Students read contemporary texts that address environmental issues and learn to respond to those texts with effective writing. Texts include late 20th-early 21st Century works on environmental science, environmental justice, environmental sociology, landscape architecture, environmental policy, energy and the environment, ecological psychology, ecological literacy, and ecology in the humanities. Within these texts, major issues concerning landscape sustainability, such as overpopulation, land use, farming practices, climate change, environmental degradation, environmental health, energy sustainability, pollution, waste and recycling, resource depletion, conservation, and environmental law are addressed.
    Instructor: Christine Casson
  • LI411 - Topics in European Literature: God, the Devil, and Hell (4 Credits)
    This course explores literary representations of God, the Devil, and Hell in a variety of texts, ranging from the canonical and non-canonical scriptures, apologia and early theological treatises to Dante?s Inferno and Milton?s Paradise Lost, to more contemporary and secular works. The literary and political implications and uses of these representations will be analyzed through readings of such writers as Carl Schmitt, Walter Benjamin, Giorgio Agamben, Mircea Eliade, and E.M. Cioran.
    Instructor: Yu-jin Chang
  • LI413 - The Forms of Poetry: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)
    Students study forms of poetry as used by historical and contemporary poets, and then write original poems in those forms (such as the sonnet, villanelle, haiku, sestina, syllabic, and renga), and genre forms (such as Surrealist, Expressionist, Anti-poem, Open Field, and Language poetry).
    Instructor: Daniel Tobin
  • LI414 - After the Disaster: Post-War European Literature (4 Credits)
    Explores post-war European literary works that are marked by a profound sense of loss, disorientation, and pessimism, with a particular focus on the practices of close reading, textual analysis, and theoretically oriented criticism. Explores how the events of the war- most notably the Holocaust -affected the literature of Europe in their wake. Authors to be read include Primo Levi, Ruth Kluger, Marguerite Duras, Maurice Blanchot, Michel Houellebecq, and W.G. Sebald.
    Instructor: Yu-jin Chang
  • LI423 - Topics in Global Literature: Cultural Translations (4 Credits)
    Explores this history of translation and offers the means through which students can learn the transnational literacy that is necessary for translating cultures today. Through reading a series of texts on and in translation, the class illustrates the jagged relationship between condition and effect of knowing, that is, the difference between the way a text conveys its truth to its particular cultural context and the knowledge conveyed to the reader at large. The aim of this class is to offer students tools through which they can act in an ethical way, a political way, when it comes to cultural translations in a global cultural context.
    Instructor: Maria Koundoura
  • LI423 - Topics in Global Literature: Latin American Short Fiction (4 Credits)
    Latin American Short Fiction considers short fiction written since the 1940s. It concentrates on major figures of the twentieth century beginning with Jorge Luis Borges who set the parameters of postmodern fiction in Latin American letters. The course centers on authors who ?problematize both the nature of the referent and its relation to the real, historical world by its paradoxical combination of metafictional self-reflexivity with historical subject matter? (Linda Hutcheon, A Poetics of Postmodernism). The course will also consider how writers reach out to a global audience by engaging popular literary forms such as detective fiction, the fantastic, melodrama, new journalism and magical realism.
  • LI423 - Topics in Global Literature: Imagining the Caribbean (4 Credits)
    When you think of the Caribbean, you may imagine: beaches, dancing and leisure; pirates, curses, and hidden treasure; anti-slavery revolts and marooned communities; labor movements and revolutions. It all depends on whose Caribbean you imagine. Making the Caribbean visible from local?as opposed to foreign?perspectives has been a pervasive concern of writers and artists from the anglophone, francophone, and hispanophone Caribbean in the last century. In this course, we will examine the literary strategies used by writers to imagine the Caribbean and the literary, cultural, and political products of these strategies.
  • LI423 - Topics in Global Literature: Transnational Englishes (4 Credits)
    This course explores the spread and diversification of English, its interactions with other languages, and its production and use in literature, politics, and everyday life. The course considers debates about "linguistic imperialism" and the ?inevitability? of English as a global lingua franca, the complicated relations of power between metropolitan and other varieties of English, and the cross-fertilizations of English and other languages as literary, political, and cultural resources
    Instructor: John Trimbur
  • LI423 - Topics in Fiction: Utopian, Dystopian, and Apocalyptic Fictions (4 Credits)
    ?That?s great, it starts with an earthquake? -R.E.M. This course takes early modern, romantic, and victorian visions of utopian worlds, 20th century dystopian visions, and some contemporary apocalyptic fictions. After dispensing some of the obvious allegorical questions about the function of these visions of ?Brave New Worlds,? we consider some of the more complex contours of utopian projects in opposition to dystopian and apocalyptic refutations and whether they are refutations at all. In particular we consider the idea of progress and futurity in the context of Marxist, postmodern, and poststructural theory. Possible texts may include More?s `Utopia?, Cavendish?s `The Blazing World?, Shelley?s `The Last Man', Orwell?s `1984?, Lawrence?s `Apocalypse?, Atwood?s `The Handmaid?s Tale?, Ishiguro?s `Never Let Me Go?, MacCarthy?s `The Road?, selections of Kirkman?s `The Walking Dead?, Mitchell?s `Cloud Atlas?.
    Instructor: Roy Kamada
  • LI481 - Topics in African-Amer Lit: Afrofuturism: Black Speculative Fiction (4 Credits)
    This course examines several genres of black speculative fiction, studying their historical trajectories and future projections, moving from W.E.B. Du Bois to digital diasporas. We will analyze how speculative fiction enables a writer and a reader to imagine new possibilities about race and society. Studying the principles of Afrofuturism, we will read novels, short fiction, and critical theory. At the end of this course you will be able to articulate and defend a working definition of Afrofuturism, drawing on a range of readings from critical analyses to short stories, to cultural theory, to canonical novels.
    Instructor: Wendy W. Walters
  • LI612 - Topics in Poetry: American Narrative Poetry (4 Credits)
    Examines the development of contemporary narrative poetry out of Romantic, Modern, and Postmodern conceptions of consciousness as initially defined by Virginia Woolf in her essay ?The Novel of Consciousness? where she objects to ?the tyranny of plot? in shaping narrative. We will begin by exploring the use of ?submerged plots? in Eliot, Pound, Crane, as well as the threat to consciousness implied by the seemingly straightforward narratives of Frost and the roots of that threat in Wordsworth?s ?The Prelude.? From here, we will question post-modern applications of narrative in new narrative poets such as Rita Dove, Dana Gioia, Andrew Hudgins, B. H. Fairchild and others, in addition to contemporary non-formalist poets like Ellen Bryant Voigt, C.K. Williams, and Eleanor Wilner whose experiments with narrative offer adaptations of the genre not normally accounted for in contemporary postmodern critiques by Marjorie Perloff, Charles Bernstein, and other critics for whom narrative appears little more than a nostalgic reiteration of an outmoded idea of human subjectivity. Above all, the class aims to offer an opportunity for you to read, consider, and discuss a wide range of modern and contemporary narrative poetry.
    Instructor: Daniel Tobin
  • LI615 - Topics in Multiple Genres and Hybrid Forms: Global Renaissance: Literature, Culture and Politics (4 Credits)
    The early modern period produced the globalized world we live in today and texts written in this era can help us explore and understand current, global relations. Designed to expand the traditional parameters within which Renaissance literature is often conceived and encourage students to see the connections that exist between the early modern era and today?s global culture, this course covers a range of texts that describe and dramatize interactions between individuals of various social, political, national, ethnic and religious backgrounds. More specifically, through the works of Philip Massinger, Leo Africanus and Aphra Behn, among others, ?The Global Renaissance? prompts a more complex understanding of human relations as well as the fluidity of identities and (temporal and spatial) border spaces in this period.
    Instructor: Adele Lee
  • LI615 - Topics in Multiple Genres and Hybrid Forms: The Writer, The Daemon, and the Crafstman (4 Credits)
    ?Wild thing, you make my heart sing.? (Chip Taylor, The Troggs) Why has to much workshop writing gone the way of primness and propriety? Why the over-emphasis on form and technique? This course seeks to restore the balance between wildness and craft by exploring the intersection between Dionysus and Apollo in the works of modern and contemporary masters. Readings will include works by Italo Calvino, Marguerite Duras, Federico Garcia Lorca, Vicente Huidobro, Clarice Lispector, Claudia Rankine, and others, as well as a weekly critical essay. Course requirements will include weekly annotations on the readings, an oral presentation by each student, and one ten-page literary essay due at semester?s end.
    Instructor: Pablo Medina
  • LI615 - Topics in Multiple Genres and Hybrid Forms: Sources of Inspiration: Archival Research for Writers (4 Credits)
    Open to writers in all genres, this course will introduce students to a number of Boston area archives, including the Massachusetts Historical Society, the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Boston University's Howard Gotlieb Center, and show them how to search there for subjects they may use in their work. Online historical research will be treated as well. There will be readings in historical fiction, historical narrative nonfiction, and historical narrative poetry.
    Instructor: Megan Marshall
  • LI615 - Topics in Multiple Genres and Hybrid Forms: Native American Literature (4 Credits)
    We will read selected poetry and prose narratives published by American Indian writers since the late 1960s?writers who come from diverse tribal backgrounds, and whose work reflects mixed cultural influences. Though I haven?t yet decided on the texts, they will be chosen from works by some of the following: Simon J. Ortiz, Gerald Vizenor, Leslie Marmon Silko, N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, Sherman Alexie, Thomas King, Joy Harjo, Ernestine Hayes, Carter Revard, Cheryl Savageau, Linda LeGarde Grover, Luci Tapahonso, Deborah Miranda, and Linda Hogan. These writers share, in broad terms, an ethics and aesthetics that focuses on relationship, continuance, struggle, and survival. Their work, consequently, often blends the lyrical and the political, as it simultaneously tells individual and communal stories, and contests the individualism that, from a ?mainstream? perspective, is central to the ?American Dream.? In fact, more often than not they contest that dream. We will explore how our writers? texts reflect such commonalities as they also create distinctive meanings and effects: how they use style, structure, language, voice, imagery, character, setting, and so on. As this literature also insists upon the importance of context, we will attend as well to the contexts from which the writing develops.
    Instructor: Robin Riley Fast
  • LI615 - Topics in Multiple Genres and Hybrid Forms: Translation Seminar (4 Credits)
    This seminar will explore a number of issues inherent in translation, among them the translator's responsibility to the source text; the translatability of culture, music, and dialect; the ethics of translation, and others. The course will also function as a workshop where student translations will be discussed and critiqued. Students will be asked to write short 2-page weekly annotations on readings assigned. In addition, students will be asked to complete a translation project in poetry (10 pages, no more than one poem per page) or fiction (15 pages), with an introduction explaining the approach they used. A working knowledge of a second language is helpful but not essential.
    Instructor: Pablo Medina
  • LI615 - Topics in Multiple Genres & Hybrid Forms: Politics of Writing & Pub in So. Africa & the Caribbean (4 Credits)
    This course examines apartheid and post-liberation South African literature and colonial and postcolonial Caribbean literature with special attention to the role of periodicals in the formation and circulation of these literatures. The following questions will orient the course: What is the relationship between literary creation and the literary marketplace? How did colonialism and apartheid organize publishing infrastructure, and how have writers and publishers struggled in these contexts to create independent publishing projects? How have writers fashioned plurilingual forms in South Africa and the Caribbean? What is the role writers and publishers have played in anti-colonial and anti-apartheid politics?
  • LI615 - Topics in Multiple Genres and Hybrid Forms: Travel Literature (4 Credits)
    Home and away, placement and displacement, location and dislocation are all themes that abound not only in contemporary literature in all its forms (fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama) but also in contemporary literary and cultural criticism. This class explores the theme of travel in literature across its historical terrain in order to understand not only the evolution of its forms but also its role in the construction of identities, familiar and foreign.
    Instructor: Maria Koundoura
  • LS101 - Elementary Spanish I (4 Credits)
    Stresses mastery of the essential vocabulary and primary grammatical structures through a situational approach. Students perceive that language is "living" and they discover by the third week of the semester that they can already communicate in Spanish. Class time is devoted to interactive practice. Conversational skills, pronunciation, and understanding are verified through regular oral exams.
  • LS102 - Elementary Spanish 2 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of LS 101, this course also incorporates reading skills and exposes students to a wider range of cultural materials.
  • MB200 - Principles of Business (4 Credits)
    Analyzes information related to business trends, strategies, opportunities, and operations and critically assess alternatives. Through lecture, discussion, case videos, and in-class assignments, students consider external and internal factors driving contemporary business decisions. Topics include: pricing, supply and demand, the management of people, processes, resources, and organization; the globalization of business; the use of information systems to support business efforts; and basic concepts of marketing, sales, business ethics, law, accounting, and finance.
    Instructor: Catherine Flanagan
  • MB300 - Managing Business Operations (4 Credits)
    Explores the operational structure of business, theory, the practices of effective resource management and activities that produce or deliver the goods and services of a business: the management of personnel, materials, equipment, and informational resources that a business needs to produce and deliver its good and services. The course examines how businesses are organized, and how the various departments within a business such as Marketing, Sales, Production, Finance, and Human Resources work together.
    Instructor: Ricci Rizzo
  • MB310 - Finance and Accounting (4 Credits)
    Students become familiar with the language of accounting and learn to create, interpret, analyze, and evaluate financial statements (e.g., balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement). Armed with this knowledge, students then use case studies and in-class exercises to analyze how managers use data presented on financial statements to make decisions about budgeting, cost allocation, and overall company performance.
    Instructor: Stanley Miller
  • MB320 - The Business of Broadcasting (4 Credits)
    Examines radio from a business perspective and covers: the history of radio, networks, radio station operations, media buying, ratings, revenue streams, important legislation, and issues facing radio as an industry. Ownership regulations and the process of buying and selling radio stations are all examined.
    Instructor: Richard Ramirez
  • MB371 - Topics in Business Studies: Building an Arts-Based Business (4 Credits)
    Teaches a strategic approach to decision making and problem solving when growing and scaling an arts-based business. Each student will be part of small, multidisciplinary teams that work hands-on through challenges that will vary from product innovation to larger issues facing humanity. Each student will walk away with knowledge in creative leadership, agile management and the ability to execute this methodology within any organization or group.
    Instructor: Ja-Nae Duane
  • MB400 - Business Policy and Strategy (4 Credits)
    Serves as the Business minor's capstone course by introducing new levels of complexity to broad concepts learned in previous classes. Uses case studies, trade articles, and time-honored academic frameworks, as well as in-class lectures, group exercises, and discussions to challenge students to apply how legal frameworks, business and government regulations, organizational structures, diverse workforces, and customer and stakeholder expectations influence the way contemporary companies conduct business.
  • MB472 - Entrepreneurship I (8 Credits)
    Introduces and immerses students in the process of creating and launching a new venture. Students learn the history and process of entrepreneurship as they explore creative problem solving, innovative thinking, and ethics. Relevant marketing and public relations strategies are presented in addition to basic financial, business, and human resource issues. Experts in the business world provide additional mentoring and practical knowledge.
    Instructor: Lu Ann Reeb
  • MB473 - Entrepreneurship II (8 Credits)
    Provides an advanced immersion in the process of creating and launching a new venture. Students learn about business planning, marketing research, sales and marketing, legal issues, negotiation practices, and business conduct and further develop public speaking and interpersonal communication skills relevant to starting and managing a business. Students prepare for the business competition at the annual E3 Exposition. Students have the opportunity to learn from experts in the business world.
    Instructor: Lu Ann Reeb
  • MK100 - Writing Competency for Marketing Communication (0 Credit)
    Instructor: Brenda Wrigley
  • MK120 - Communication, Media, and Society (4 Credits)
    Introduces communication theory and the fundamental relationships that exist between communication systems and society. Emphasis is placed on the social, political, and economic context in which marketing communication emerged and evolved, and the role it plays in maintaining, expanding, and articulating our way of life. Majors are required to complete this in the first year.
    Instructor: Paul Mihailidis
  • MK121 - Marketing and Marketing Communication (4 Credits)
    Explores the key types and core functions of contemporary organizations and the multiple roles marketing plays among them. Marketing's 4Ps and the "marketing mix" are examined in depth so as to understand the context in which marketing communication is practiced. Cases are introduced to acquaint students with the notion and essential elements of "strategy."
  • MK220 - Understanding Consumers (4 Credits)
    Examines people in the context of their role as contemporary consumers. Surveys theories of consumer decisionmaking and behavior and the dominant approaches used to understand consumers today. Emphasis is placed on the role and application of understanding consumers in marketing communications campaign strategy, planning and management.
  • MK221 - Messages, Media & Channels (4 Credits)
    Provides a comprehensive overview of modern media and how they are utilized for messaging in marketing communications. Media are treated at the channel (newspaper, radio, TV, magazine, web, FacebookW-O-M, www, etc.) and practice area (non-paid PR, mass paid advertising, direct marketing, and digitalmarketing) levels. Attention is also devoted to how the various media aggregate audiences and finance themselves, as well as recent changes in the ways they are purchased for use by marketing communicators.
  • MK222 - Brands, Organizations and Strategies (4 Credits)
    Establishes the notion of the brand and brand platform as the central organizing principle of contemporary marketing communications. Examines how the brand platform operates at the corporate and product, agency and campaign, and customer journey levels. Introduces the different types and dimensions of strategies used by the various players in marketing communications to link targets, media and messages in service to the brand.
  • MK230 - Marketing, Sales, and Promotion for Radio (4 Credits)
    Explores the concepts, strategies, and goals of marketing, sales, and promotion for radio, including the planning, coordination, and implementation of successful promotional campaigns. Students also become familiar with audience ratings and market research, identification of target markets, and the integration of promotional elements to promote radio stations and other audio media.
  • MK332 - Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods (4 Credits)
    Introduces the scientific method and the processes of primary quantitative and qualitative research in marketing communications. Marketing problems are identified, research objectives formulated, research design determined, questionnaires developed, sampling methods designed, data analyzed and interpreted. The various uses of research in targeting, positioning, product decision-making, messaging, and media utilization are demonstrated.
    Instructor: Paul M.W. Hackett
  • MK333 - Ethnographic Methods and Cultural Analysis (4 Credits)
    Explores the tools and techniques of ethnography and their uses in defining and solving marketing research problems. Drawing from the traditions of participant observation in the fields of anthropology, sociology, psychology, and market research, the course applies ethnographic methods to the analysis of subcultures and behavioral minorities as well as transnational marketing communication. The focus throughout is on how to fathom the cultural differences that inform and impact consumer decision-making and marketing communication campaigns.
    Instructor: Paul M.W. Hackett
  • MK334 - Online Behavior and Web Analytics (4 Credits)
    Introduces the proliferating services and tools available to capture, measure and assess online behavior, information-gathering, decision-making, shopping patterns, and social groupings. Among these, emphasis will be placed on developing the skillful use of Google Analytics as it can be applied to optimize digital marketing communications efforts and initiatives.
    Instructor: Agaptus Anaele
  • MK342 - Breakthrough Thinking and Marketing Communications (4 Credits)
    Explores the nature of creative and critical thinking, as well as the increasing importance of creative problem solving in the context of organizations, product development, and marketing communications. Students practice critical thinking skills with written and visual communication materials. Creative thinking skills, methods, and processes are then used to think differently about original and innovative solutions to various organizational, product, and communication challenges.
    Instructor: Michael Tucker
  • MK343 - Global Brand Strategies and Portfolio Management (4 Credits)
    Examines how the notion of the brand can be taken to scale. Explores the uses of different types of brand architectures by different types of organizations as they grow and expand internationally. Considers the values of the brand to the conglomerate organization as it manages its portfolios of companies, products, and customer segments. Use is made of case analysis.
    Instructor: Anthony Lowrie
  • MK344 - Marketing and Sales, Distribution and Service Relationships (4 Credits)
    Analyzes and addresses how to advance the critical customer-facing relationships within an organization between marketing and the sales force, distribution networks, and customer service. Discusses the different types of arrangements that prevail among these functions in b-b and b-c organizations, and in large and small organizations. Special attention is devoted to customer service policies and to the provision of teleservices.
    Instructor: Roxana D. Maiorescu
  • MK346 - The Corporate Communications Function and Social Responsibility (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the scope and tasks of the communications function in large organizations. These include the intersection with sales, establishing and maintaining the corporate identity, customer intelligence and advocacy, executive coaching, and constituency relations -- carrying, or supporting, all the outward-facing activities of the organization. Often, the chief communications officer also works to align the organization with broader social trends. The leading contemporary example of this is the Social Responsibility movement, which will be analyzed in detail.
    Instructor: Brenda Wrigley
  • MK352 - Creative Concepts and Storytelling (4 Credits)
    Focuses on "the message" in marketing communications, as both the distinctive idea conveyed in a campaign and the many forms in which it is expressed. Advertising copywriting for broadcast and print is practiced, as is writing for blogs and long-form digital formats. Developing and growing stories, and provoking user-generated content to engage consumers across media platforms, is considered as well.
  • MK353 - Visual Literacy (4 Credits)
    Explores the importance and meaning of visuals in business and marketing communications, from the choice of typeface and layout to the use of images, color, symbols, style, and art direction. The application of these and related elements in logos, print, broadcast, and digital media campaigns are considered. Also discusses the mechanisms companies use to maintain consistent visual identities in their persuasive messaging, and the resources available when they consider changing their visual portrayals.
  • MK354 - Writing for PR (4 Credits)
    A survey and workshop that takes up the many forms of writing practiced in public relations. These include news releases and media kits, editorials and newsletters, brochures, white papers, stockholder and employee communications. The notions of voice and personality as well as consistency and style are emphasized.
    Instructor: Suzy Im
  • MK355 - Sales Promotion and Events Management (4 Credits)
    Addresses the uses, value, and mechanics of special offers and non-recurring events in commercial and nonprofit marketing communication. Trade promotions like price and volume discounting, feature and coop advertising, and in-store displays are covered, as are consumer tactics like coupons, memberships, giveaways, and value-added offers. So too are trade shows and placed-based gatherings. Considers both business-to-business and business-to-consumer applications.
    Instructor: Gloria Noronha
  • MK356 - Media Relations (4 Credits)
    Exposes students to a broad range of media management concepts and practices including basic marketing and management communication documents, sources, interviews, crisis communication, ethics, international media relations, interactive media strategies, and analyses of current media-related issues.
    Instructor: Ricci Rizzo
  • MK357 - Media Planning and the Customer Journey (4 Credits)
    Focuses on how channels are used in marketing communications to connect audiences with messages. The tools of media research and audience analysis are explained to inform construction of media plans, as are the skills of buying and negotiation that guide implementation of plans. The concept of "customer journeys" is introduced; it is coming to be used by the large media firms created by marketing services holding companies to guide the integrated media plans they provide.
    Instructor: Geoffrey Klapisch
  • MK358 - Social Media: Connectivity, Interactivity, Buzz (4 Credits)
    This new course was previously offered as a topic class under MK471. Students who took Social Media and Marketing under MK471 are not allowed to also take this class.
  • MK371 - Topics in Marketing Communication: Design and Layout (4 Credits)
    Explores the basics of design, from its history, influence and important designers; to the use of typography, color, ?white space?, shape and layout principles; to the funda?mentals of Adobe PhotoShop and InDesign. Concept sketching will be required as part of the process of developing ideas and learning the principles of good design, working toward the goal of crafting and recognizing design products that are appealing, strategic and meaningful.
    Instructor: Craig Grant
  • MK371 - Topics in Marketing Communication: Exploring Entrepreneurship (4 Credits)
    Learn what it means to be an entrepreneur and explore the many pathways to entrepreneurship that include developing an idea for a venture, testing the idea for sustainability, building a business plan and creating an elevator pitch. The course will include experiential projects, case studies, lectures, guest speakers and exposure to the startup ecosystem. Open to seniors and graduate students in all majors.
  • MK371 - Topics in Marketing Communication: Customer Analytics and Insight-Driven Marketing (4 Credits)
    Today, more than ever before, companies rely on analytics and insights to support the delivery of personalized, customer-centric marketing communications. This course introduces students to the most common types of customer analytic techniques utilized by medium and large enterprises. Particular emphasis will be placed on the development and application of descriptive analytics and customer segmentation approaches. We will utilize the latest analytical software to perform a variety of data analyses and uncover actionable customer insights. We will also use the analytic results to create insight-driven marketing strategies that are tailored to the needs of unique customer segments.
    Instructor: Mike McGuirk
  • MK371 - Topics in Marketing Communication: Inbound in the Integrated Marketing Framework (4 Credits)
    Marketing Automation and Inbound are two of the most transformative elements in the field of marketing today. In partnership with HubSpot, this course will offers students access to Inbound leader HubSpot?s tools and training, which will be placed in the Integrated Marketing context. A team project will offer the opportunity to solve a real world business problem and demonstrate Inbound and HubSpot competency. Once the course is completed, it is expected that students will be prepared to take the HubSpot administered test to earn the highly prized, professional HubSpot Certification.
    Instructor: Randy Harrison
  • MK443 - Sector Application: Entertainment Marketing (4 Credits)
    Contemporary entertainment industries present special circumstances and opportunities for marketers because they are organized around "properties" that provide differential returns-on-investment for various "media expressions" across orchestrated channels over extended periods of time. This course covers recent developments in major arenas like movies, cable, games, theater, and sports, taking up issues that cut across all of them, like intellectual property, licensing, personal branding, and the life cycle of blockbusters.
    Instructor: Kristin J. Lieb
  • MK471 - Advanced Topics in Marketing Communication: Global Strategic Communication (4 Credits)
    In this course you will learn about the transformative and effective use of communication in work conducted for celebrities, corporations, governments, political and health campaigns, activist groups, and not for profit organizations. The knowledge gained will enable you to apply global strategic communication principles to a variety of settings ranging from the promotion of a movie, book, organization to the promotion of a cause. Open to seniors and graduate students in all majors.
    Instructor: Roxana D. Maiorescu
  • MK480 - Capstone: The Integrated Marketing Communications Campaign-AAF (4 Credits)
    Provides a culminating, integrative experience for majors. Students are organized into teams and challenged to develop and execute a complete integrated marketing communications strategy and campaign plan for an existing client, organization, and/or brand. The work is presented both live and in writing, as it would be in a commercial context. The spring semester course is designed around the annual competition of the American Advertising Federation, in which a team of Emerson majors has traditionally played a significant role.
    Instructor: Michael Tucker
  • MK480 - Capstone: The Integrated Marketing Communications Campaign (4 Credits)
    Provides a culminating, integrative experience for majors. Students are organized into teams and challenged to develop and execute a complete integrated marketing communications strategy and campaign plan for an existing client, organization, and/or brand. The work is presented both live and in writing, as it would be in a commercial context. The spring semester course is designed around the annual competition of the American Advertising Federation, in which a team of Emerson majors has traditionally played a significant role.
  • MK604 - Introduction to Research Methods (4 Credits)
    This course is organized around the research process in which students learn how to formulate a research question, define a research problem, generate a research design, establish data collection methods, define a sampling frame, determine data analyses, interpret data appropriately, and prepare a research report. Topics in both qualitative and quantitative research methods are included. Students gain an understanding of the importance of research in the development of communication strategies.
    Instructor: Seounmi Han Youn
  • MK610 - Marketing Management (4 Credits)
    Introduces the marketing management process of making decisions about products, brands, price, distribution channels, and communications plans to deliver value to consumers. Marketing concepts include research methods, consumer behavior, business marketing, customer analysis, competitive strategy, market segmentation and targeting, and product development. Students use analyses to justify managerial recommendations. Integration is emphasized - developing marketing strategies that are consistent from conception through execution. Case studies from a variety of industries are used in class.
    Instructor: John Teopaco
  • MK617 - Canceled (4 Credits)
    Students investigate comprehensive multidisciplinary, theoretical views of consumer behavior, and apply them to marketing communication contexts. Integrated marketing communication plans require sophisticated consumer behavior analyses that facilitate segmentation, targeting, and positioning efforts. Students learn about the determinants of consumer behavior through the application of theories from disciplines such as communication, marketing, cultural anthropology, economics, sociology, and psychology. Case studies, exercises, and research help students to understand the complexity of consumer behavior given intrapersonal, interpersonal, and situational influences.
  • MK618 - Marketing Communication Integration Strategies (4 Credits)
    Integrated marketing communication (IMC) is a cross-functional process for creating profitable relationships with customers and publics by strategically controlling all messages sent to groups and encouraging dialogue. Students learn to integrate marketing communication elements (e.g., advertising, public relations, publicity, sales promotion, event marketing, direct marketing, e-communication, and selling) to advance an organization's success and brand equity. Case studies and exercises help students learn how to develop effective IMC plans.
    Instructor: Jeffrey Myers
  • MK618 - Marketing Communication Integration Strategys (4 Credits)
    Integrated marketing communication (IMC) is a cross-functional process for creating profitable relationships with customers and publics by strategically controlling all messages sent to groups and encouraging dialogue. Students learn to integrate marketing communication elements (e.g., advertising, public relations, publicity, sales promotion, event marketing, direct marketing, e-communication, and selling) to advance an organization's success and brand equity. Case studies and exercises help students learn how to develop effective IMC plans.
    Instructor: Jeffrey Myers
  • MK618 - Marketing Communication Integration Strategies (4 Credits)
    Integrated marketing communication (IMC) is a cross-functional process for creating profitable relationships with customers and publics by strategically controlling all messages sent to groups and encouraging dialogue. Students learn to integrate marketing communication elements (e.g., advertising, public relations, publicity, sales promotion, event marketing, direct marketing, e-communication, and selling) to advance an organization's success and brand equity. Case studies and exercises help students learn how to develop effective IMC plans.
    Instructor: John Teopaco
  • MK621 - Writing for Marketing Communication (4 Credits)
    1 seat is available for Non-IMC students on a first come/first serve basis. Please email the department assistant in the Marketing department for information on how to register.
    Instructor: Samantha Mayowa
  • MK630 - Advertising, Sales Promotion, and Publicity Management (4 Credits)
    Explores the roles of advertising, sales promotion, and publicity in IMC. Students learn to develop, manage, and evaluate advertising campaigns. In addition, they investigate how to use sales promotion to bring about behavioral change in the contexts of consumer and trade promotion. Further, they learn how to generate and manage publicity. Students evaluate the legal and ethical issues surrounding these marketing communication efforts.
    Instructor: Jeffrey Myers
  • MK636 - Creative Thinking and Problem Solving (4 Credits)
    One seat is available for Non-IMC students on a first come/first serve basis. Please email the department assistant Marketing department for information on how to register.
    Instructor: Brenna McCormick
  • MK639 - Strategic Brand Management (4 Credits)
    One seat is available for Non-IMC students on a first come/first serve basis. Please email the department assistant Marketing department for information on how to register.
  • MK648 - Media Management Strategies (4 Credits)
    Offers an introduction to strategic decision making in advertising media planning. Provides an understanding of the challenges involved in making media decisions and executing media plans. Students are introduced to media planning tools and study the impact of changing media trends.
    Instructor: Geoffrey Klapisch
  • MK649 - Measuring and Communicating Investments in Marketing (4 Credits)
    An important function of the IMC manager is to optimize investments across different aspects of the marketing and communication mix. This course reviews fundamental tools of analysis used by managers, such as budgeting, forecasting demand, market and segmentation analysis, return-on-investment valuations, media expenditure planning, and evaluation of marketing communication efforts. Exercises, cases, and readings are used to provide students with exposure to the concepts and practice in applying them.
    Instructor: William Anderson
  • MK668 - Capstone in Integrated Marketing Communication (4 Credits)
    Students develop an IMC plan for an organization as the culminating experience in the IMC program. Students demonstrate their knowledge and work in teams to solve an organization?s marketing communication problem or help the organization pursue an opportunity through the implementation of an IMC strategy. Students must demonstrate competencies in market research, market analysis, strategy development, communications and media planning, and IMC program development and evaluation. Students must have completed 28 credits before taking Capstone, no exceptions.
  • MK695 - Topics in Marketing Communication: Global Strategic Communication (4 Credits)
    In this course you will learn about the transformative and effective use of communication in work conducted for celebrities, corporations, governments, political and health campaigns, activist groups, and not for profit organizations. The knowledge gained will enable you to apply global strategic communication principles to a variety of settings ranging from the promotion of a movie, book, organization to the promotion of a cause.
    Instructor: Roxana D. Maiorescu
  • MK695 - Special Studies in Marketing Communication: Descriptive and Predictive Customer Analytics (4 Credits)
    Successfully communicating and interacting with customers in today?s omni-channel environment requires insights that highlight the current and future needs of customers. This course explores the use of descriptive and predictive analytic solutions that enable the development of timely and highly relevant marketing communications across the customer lifecycle. Students will utilize SAS analytical software to conduct a variety of descriptive and predictive analyses on a broad set of customer data sources. We will develop customer segmentation schemas and predictive behavior models and learn how to apply these analytical tools to improve marketing performance as well as the customer experience.
    Instructor: Mike McGuirk
  • MK695 - Topics in Marketing Communication: Global Advertising and Public Relations (4 Credits)
    Examine & Practice the foundational theories of Global PR and Advertising. The course will then establish how today?s phenomenon of Content Marketing blurs the boundaries of the traditional theories and reaches forward into tomorrow?s marketing in corporate & non-profit environments. Be prepared for a global sense of Content with PR and Advertising perspectives.
    Instructor: Roberta Hummel
  • MK695 - Topics in Marketing Communication: Research on Consumer Behavior in the Digital Age (4 Credits)
    Traditional research in consumer behavior focuses primarily on the buyer in the context of in-store purchases. However, today's revolutions in technology continue to expand the arena in which consumers can engage in new consumption behaviors. Social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram, and Pinterest all provide ways in which companies can pay influencers, such as celebrities, to post about their product. Platforms such as Reddit allow consumers to form their own niche brand communities. Companies such as Amazon continue to build ways in which it is easier and more convenient for consumers to shop online. All of these changes in the technological landscape continue to shape new consumer behaviors. This research-intensive course is designed to have students develop research on the forefront of consumer behavior in the context of digital. Students will spend the first part of the course reviewing new research on digital consumer behavior and new research methods of digital data collection (e.g., using API?s). Students will then spend the rest of the semester planning and executing a research project on digital consumer behavior.
  • MK695 - Topics in Marketing Communication: Descriptive and Predictive Customer Analytics (4 Credits)
    Successfully communicating and interacting with customers in today?s omni-channel environment requires insights that highlight the current and future needs of customers. This course explores the use of descriptive and predictive analytic solutions that enable the development of timely and highly relevant marketing communications across the customer lifecycle. Students will utilize SAS analytical software to conduct a variety of descriptive and predictive analyses on a broad set of customer data sources. We will develop customer segmentation schemas and predictive behavior models and learn how to apply these analytical tools to improve marketing performance as well as the customer experience.
    Instructor: Mike McGuirk
  • MT102 - Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning (4 Credits)
    Covers various topics that encourage students to develop interpreation, analysis, and evaluation skills from a quantitative perspective. A stronger emphasis is placed on reasoning than computation. Primary topics include set theory (studying collections of objects) and logic (simple and compound statements, conditionals, symbolic language, truth tables). Additional topics may be chosed from the areas of elementary discrete mathematics, number theory, and graph theory.
    Instructor: William Gilligan
  • MT106 - Business Mathematics (4 Credits)
    Applies mathematics to daily business experience and develops an intuitive and quantitative sense of business through a variety of topics. The theory of simple and compund interest, present/future values, and elementary annuities is emphasized.
    Instructor: Eiki Satake
  • MT207 - Statistics (4 Credits)
    Prepares students to use, understand, and evaluate basic statistical techniques. Introduces the most common topics and procedures in descriptive and inferential data analysis, such as measures of central tendency and variability, shapes of distributions, correlation and simple linear regression, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, effect size, statistical power, t-tests, and chi-square.
    Instructors: Eiki Satake, Michael Duggan
  • MU137 - Listening to Music (4 Credits)
    Intended for students with little or no experience in music who want to develop their listening skills and musical understanding. Emphasis is on a non-theoretical study of the elements and compositional principles of music, and careful listening to selected works of master composers in the context of a brief survey of classical music in its historical and social context. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
    Instructor: Fredericka King
  • MU202 - History of Music: American (4 Credits)
    A survey of American music from the first American settlers to the present including the development of such forms as folk, regional, religious, ethnic, jazz, musical theater, and various popular styles. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
    Instructor: Fredericka King
  • MU203 - Perspectives in World Music (4 Credits)
    Investigates music-making within a variety of cultures, including societies from Africa, the Caribbean, India, the Far East, and Native Americans. Musical experience is examined from both the sonic and social perspectives, including musical form, instruments, and style, as well as music's role as a vehicle for defining and representing social values. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective and the General Education Global Diversity requirements.
    Instructor: Mehmet Ali Sanlikol
  • MU204 - Music Analysis I (2 Credits)
    An introduction to the analysis of music, especially as it appears in musical theatre. Topics include song structure, dance forms, and identification of the features in various genres and historical styles. Required for BFA Musical Theatre majors.
    Instructor: Scott Wheeler
  • MU205 - Music Analysis II (2 Credits)
    A continuation of Music Analysis I, this course focuses on the music and lyrics of songs and shows in the musical theatre repertoire. The focus moves from basic terminology to a more detailed connection between analysis and performance. Other topics include the structure of entire shows, detailed analysis of duets and other ensemble pieces, and an increased focus on recent musical theatre repertoire. Required for BFA Musical Theatre majors.
  • MU220 - History of American Popular Music (4 Credits)
    This survey of American popular music from 1950 to the present traces the development of rock & roll, soul, disco, punk, metal, rap, hip-hop and other popular genres from their multicultural roots to the digital world of the 21st century. Students examine the cultural, social, political, and economic dimensions of these genres along with their impact on the global population and marketplace. Students also connect developments in technology (recording, production, etc.) with the enormous growth of the music industry and its effect on the consumer via means of production, distribution, and promotion. Students also address the work of female musicians, songwriters, producers, etc., and the obstacles they face in the commercial music industry.
    Instructor: Fredericka King
  • MU239 - History of Jazz (4 Credits)
    A study of the evolution of jazz, a continuously evolving form synthesizing many different music styles. Attention is given to its African American origins, historical identifications, antisocial tendencies, political aspects, and subjective effects that have effected cultural change. Emphasis is placed on listening to the works of Armstrong, Ellington, Davis, Gillespie, Parker, Monk, Coltrane, and Mingus. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective and the General Education U.S. Diversity requirements.
  • MU254 - Applied Music: Piano (0 Credit)
    Studio course consists of ten 60-minute lessons with a private instructor. Students may pursue this course on a non-credit basis by payment of a course fee.
    Instructor: Scott Nicholas
  • MU301 - Chorus (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
    Instructor: David McGrory
  • MU353 - Applied Music: Voice (2 Credits)
    Advanced work in vocal technique and development of a repertoire, consisting of ten weekly 60-minute lessons with a private instructor. Required for BFA Musical Theatre majors. No more than 8 credits of Applied Music: Voice may be counted toward credits required for graduation.
  • MU354 - Applied Music: Piano (2 Credits)
    For students for whom the study of piano is relevant to their professional goals. Students have a weekly 60-minute individual lesson. No more than 8 credits of Applied Music: Piano may be counted toward credits required for graduation.
    Instructor: Scott Nicholas
  • PA101 - Languages of the Stage (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to the various means of expression available to the art of the stage. In addition to an exploration of the techniques of the written script, students are introduced to the visual forms of artistic communication, their history, and the conventions of all theatrical forms. (Performing Arts students only)
  • PA102 - Theatre as a Collaborative Art (4 Credits)
    Emphasizes the building of a collaborative process among theatre artists. Students research historical collaborative relationships, create and conceptualize approaches to various texts, and familiarize themselves with the approaches of artists currently working in the theatre.
    Instructor: Courtney O'Connor
  • PA125 - Performing Improv Comedy (4 Credits)
    Explores the fundamentals of improvisation for comedic performance through the use of games and exercises in a fast-paced, challenging learning environment. Guides students through the fundamentals of short form improvisation, focusing on building trust and spontaneity, and exploring aspects and techniques of storytelling, ensemble playing, movement, developing characters (status and emotion) and using space. Students will explore other forms of improvisation, including solo performance improvisation, structured audience interactive improvisation, and longer forms of improvisation.
  • PA372 - Prod Proj: Design/Technology (2 Credits)
    Students with junior standing may define project work in acting, directing, design technology, stage and production management, arts and business management, musical theatre, theatre education, dance or dramaturgy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.
    Instructor: Debra Acquavella
  • PA440 - Creative Producing I (4 Credits)
    Focuses on all the elements necessary for being a successful producer in the context of current opportunities and challenges for making art in our contemporary moment. Students work in the context of the artistic programming at Emerson College in the Office of the Arts, particularly as it pertains to ArtsEmerson: The World On Stage, and HowlRound: A Center for the Theater Commons.
    Instructor: P. Carl
  • PA472 - Prod Proj: Directing (4 Credits)
    Students with senior standing may define project work in acting, directing, design technology, stage and production management, arts and business management, musical theatre, theatre education, dance or dramaturgy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.
  • PA640 - Creative Producing I (4 Credits)
    Focuses on all the elements necessary for being a successful producer in the context of current opportunities and challenges for making art in our contemporary moment. Students work in the context of the artistic programming at Emerson College in the Office of the Arts, particularly as it pertains to ArtsEmerson: The World On Stage, and HowlRound: A Center for the Theater Commons.
    Instructor: P. Carl
  • PB203 - Introduction to Electronic Publishing (4 Credits)
    Explores various methods of digital publishing including e-books, digital magazines and web site creation.The course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the planning, development and management of digital content.
    Instructor: John Rodzvilla
  • PB207 - Introduction to Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces writing for commercial markets. Students develop, research, and write nonfiction articles and learn where to market them. May be repeated once for credit and may be substituted for one 200-level WR (writing) workshop.
  • PB302 - Copyediting (4 Credits)
    Practical course about the process of editing and preparing manuscripts for publication. Together with hands-on assignments, the course considers the relation of editor to author, the nature of copyediting in various publishing environments, and other topics.
    Instructors: Daniel Fitts, Teresa Elsey
  • PB307 - Intermediate Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Requires students to research and write an article or magazine feature. Students learn terms, concepts, and techniques to improve both writing and critical thinking. May be repeated once for credit and may be substituted for one 300-level WR (writing) workshop.
    Instructor: Delia Cabe
  • PB380 - Magazine Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Provides an understanding of the magazine field from the perspective of writers and editors. Looks at the similarities and differences between general interest magazines and more focused magazines, and how magazines compete with each other and with other media for audiences and revenues. Topics include how magazines carve out niches, the relationship between the business and editorial departments, and the editorial operations of magazines. The course also looks at the history of the magazine industry.
    Instructor: Gian Lombardo
  • PB383 - Book Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Examines the acquisition and editing of a manuscript, its progress into design and production, and the final strategies of promotion and distribution of a finished book.
  • PB395 - Applications for Print Publishing (4 Credits)
    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the publishing industry. Students also learn related computer-based skills, such as type and image sourcing, image acquisition, including scanning, and copyright issues. Although some design issues are addressed, the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes students have basic Macintosh skills.
  • PB402 - Book Editing (4 Credits)
    Book editing, or substantive editing, is a highly subjective, visceral skill informed by flexibility, judgment, life experience, grammatical grace, signposts, caution lights, road maps, respect for the author, and subtle diplomacy in the author/editor relationship, all directed toward helping the writer to the intended creative goal. In other words, book editing is an art, not a science. However, an exploration of the foundations of constructive shaping, development, organization, and line-editing may release the inner shepherd/wrangler in you.
    Instructor: Daniel Weaver
  • PB491 - Topics in Publishing: Writing and Editing for The Cultureist.com (4 Credits)
    Students gain practical experience creating content for The Culture-ist, an online travel and culture magazine that focuses on social good and millennials. Students will pitch and critique story ideas; make assignments; report, write, and edit articles; and manage the editorial workflow. They?ll examine best practices for web publishing and analyze which stories get the most traction online. Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the instructor. Students must email susanne_althoff@emerson.edu a short writing sample and one story idea for The Culture-ist. Students from every department, who are interested in writing, are invited to apply.
    Instructor: Susanne Althoff
  • PB491 - Topics in Publishing: Advanced Publication Design (4 Credits)
    This workshop course examines the process of publication design and production, from the time the content leaves editorial to delivery of printed book or magazine. You will increase your understanding of the field, and the skills you acquire will make you better prepared to work on future projects, for print or other design media. Through presentation and revision, you will design a book or magazine on a subject of your choosing.
    Instructor: Lisa Diercks
  • PB491 - Topics in Publishing: Writing for The Boston Globe Magazine (4 Credits)
    Offers students practical experience writing articles and creating other content (such as photos, videos, and online features) for The Boston Globe?s Sunday magazine. Work that meets the Globe?s standards will be published in print and/or online. In the classroom students will examine the state of magazine publishing, including audience trends, business models, and new forms of storytelling. Students will also interact with Globe editors. Course will count as an elective for Journalism majors. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and, for undergraduates, senior standing. Students must email susanne_althoff@emerson.edu a writing sample and statement of interest in the course. Students from every department are invited to apply.
    Instructor: Susanne Althoff
  • PB491 - Topics in Publishing: Publishing Management and Innovation (4 Credits)
    Examines the skills needed to be a successful publishing manager in a changing industry. Covers new business models, new revenue streams, strategic planning, leadership, organization, finance, personnel, and more. Addresses book, magazine, and electronic publishing.
    Instructor: Susanne Althoff
  • PB491 - Topics in Publishing: Designing the NE Book Show Catalogue (4 Credits)
    As a semester-long project we will design and produce the event catalog for the sixtieth anniversary of the New England Book Show (www.newenglandbookshow.org). The Book Show is an annual event, organized by Bookbuilders of Boston, a nonprofit dedicated to supporting the New England book publishing industry. The Show features the best book and cover designs of publishers and designers throughout the New England region. And for several years now, the Show also honors the best design work from New England?area design and publishing students. Students will gain experience working with a real-life client on a real-life project while examining the process of book design and production, from delivery of written and visual content to the final bound books. The skills students acquire will make them better prepared to work on future print projects.
    Instructor: Lisa Diercks
  • PB675 - Publishing Management and Innovation (4 Credits)
    Examines the skills needed to be a successful publishing manager in a changing industry. Covers new business models, new revenue streams, strategic planning, leadership, organization, finance, personnel, and more. Addresses book, magazine, and electronic publishing.
    Instructor: Susanne Althoff
  • PB676 - Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Gives students experience in developing magazine feature stories. Students brainstorm, report, and write their own magazine-style stories, with emphasis on the shaping and editing stage. They also read and discuss published work by professionals. Class is conducted as a writing workshop in a style that mimics a magazine atmosphere. This course may count for 1 workshop credit for nonfiction students.
    Instructor: Bill Beuttler
  • PB678 - Magazine Editing (4 Credits)
    Course about the magazine editing process. Covers topics ranging from focus, direction, topicality, structure, sense of audience, and voice, and explores the practical application of editing skills as well as historic examples of editors and their magazines.
    Instructor: Bill Beuttler
  • PB680 - Magazine Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    MA Students only.
  • PB682 - Magazine Design and Production (4 Credits)
    Covers magazine design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. Students produce sample magazines through a workshop process of presentations and revisions. Course assumes students have necessary computer skills.
    Instructor: Lisa Diercks
  • PB683 - Book Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Introduction to the book publishing industry, including a detailed examination of the editorial, marketing, and design and production stages of the book publishing process. Course also looks at important developments and issues within the field, such as online publishing, and at various jobs in book publishing.
  • PB685 - Book Editing (4 Credits)
    Considers book editing skills, tasks, and responsibilities from initial review and acquisition of a book manuscript through project development. Emphasizes trade book editing, but also considers editorial work at scholarly and professional presses.
    Instructor: David Emblidge
  • PB686 - Book Design and Prod. (4 Credits)
    Covers book and book jacket design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. Students design a book through a workshop process of presentations and revisions. Course assumes students have necessary computer skills.
    Instructor: Lisa Diercks
  • PB687 - Column Writing (4 Credits)
    Magazine publishing course explores the process of researching, writing, and revising magazine columns, and examines the importance of audience. This course may count for one workshop requirement for nonfiction students.
    Instructor: Delia Cabe
  • PB688 - Copyediting (4 Credits)
    Covers the process of editing and preparing manuscripts for publication. Together with hands-on assignments, the course considers the relation of editor to author, the nature of copyediting in various publishing environments, and other topics.
  • PB689 - Book Publicity (4 Credits)
    Familiarizes students with trade book promotion to the media. Begins with an overview of book publicity and then covers the publicity process, the type of freelance help available, crafting press material, the author/publicist dynamic, how to secure and promote bookstore events, the art of the interview, and the art of the pitch. All assignments and classroom activities are based on real-world publishing tasks so that students leave the class thoroughly prepared to promote their book or someone else's.
    Instructor: Lissa Warren
  • PB691 - Applications for Print Publishing (4 Credits)
    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the print publishing industry. Some design issues are addressed, but the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes the student has basic Macintosh skills.
    Instructor: Joseph Durand
  • PB691 - Applications for Print Publish (4 Credits)
    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the print publishing industry. Some design issues are addressed, but the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes the student has basic Macintosh skills.
    Instructor: Joseph Durand
  • PB692 - Electronic Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Introduces electronic and new media publishing formats, including but not limited to the web, online publishing, CD-ROM, and DVD. Course assumes the student has basic computer skills.
    Instructors: Brendan Gannon, John Rodzvilla, Kenneth Gagne
  • PB693 - Book Marketing & Sales (4 Credits)
    Course is designed as an extension of the Book Publishing Overview course for students who want to further explore the sales and marketing sides of business - where marketing and sales fit into the life of a book, the differences between the two areas, and the distinct effect that each, done well or badly, has on a book's success. It then tracks the marketing and sales process through a book's publication with specific assignments at each stage based on real-world publications tasks from sales forecasting to planning (and budgeting for) marketing campaigns to sales calls and the retailers' buying processes.
    Instructor: Beth Ineson
  • PB694 - Topics in Writing and Publishing: Writing for The Boston Globe Magazine (4 Credits)
    Offers students practical experience writing articles and creating other content (such as photos, videos, and online features) for The Boston Globe?s Sunday magazine. Work that meets the Globe?s standards will be published in print and/or online. In the classroom students will examine the state of magazine publishing, including audience trends, business models, and new forms of storytelling. Students will also interact with Globe editors. Course will count as an elective for Journalism majors. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and, for undergraduates, senior standing. Students must email susanne_althoff@emerson.edu a writing sample and statement of interest in the course. Students from every department are invited to apply.
    Instructor: Susanne Althoff
  • PB694 - Topics in Writing and Publishing: Writing and Editing for TheCultureist.com (4 Credits)
    Students gain practical experience creating content for The Culture-ist, an online travel and culture magazine that focuses on social good and millennials. Students will pitch and critique story ideas; report, write, and edit articles; and manage the editorial workflow. They'll finish the semester with several published clips. They'll also examine best practices for digital publishing and analyze which stories get the most traction online. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Students must email susanne_althoff@emerson.edu a short writing sample and one story idea for The Culture-ist. Students from every department are invited to apply.
    Instructor: Susanne Althoff
  • PB694 - Topics in Writing and Publishing: Fundamentals of Content Strategy (4 Credits)
    Content strategy is about developing content as a business asset, using it to achieve specific business goals. This course is designed to help you plan and execute an effective content strategy to build an audience. It will be conducted as a dynamic live project, where you will work alone and in groups to get experience in all the facets of content strategy. You?ll devise a strategy, set goals, create a project plan, and conduct basic research to test your assumptions. You will create, publish, and propagate regular content to meet the needs of the audience you define. You will learn how to organize and optimizing your content for maximum impact, and how to set metrics, measure your results, and iterate.
    Instructor: Michael Boezi
  • PB694 - Topics in Writing and Publishing: Works, Texts & Documents: Textual Editing and Criticism (4 Credits)
    An introduction to literary editing, we will explore the different ways that literary works, and their physical manifestations, have been produced, transmitted and revised over time. We will focus on how the editor's cultural and aesthetic framework affect the editor's approach to a literary work -- about how different theories of the text and differences in the means of textual reproduction yield both a wide range of interpretive practices and differing "stabilized" texts. The process of determining the physical representation of a work is not only an interpretive activity but it is also one that has empirical, or scientific, underpinnings. The goals of this course are twofold: to give students greater awareness of the intrinsic value of editing as it relates to the work itself and not to any considerations of sale-ability; and to provide an environment in which students have the opportunity to become informed, critical and skeptical readers of literary texts and documents.
    Instructor: Gian Lombardo
  • PB694 - Topics in Writing and Publishing: The Art of Literary Publishing (4 Credits)
    The course will focus on contemporary, small press, literary book publishers. In this class, students will have the opportunity to think about the aesthetics of publishing using Roberto Calasso's book The Art of Publishing and the new anthology Literary Publishing in the Twenty-First Century as a means to concentrate our conversations and help students think about publishing values. As a part of our conversation, we will be discussing the various ways publishers develop and deliver "content," create series and lists, design covers, market, distribute, and manage backlists.
    Instructor: Ladette Randolph
  • PB694 - Topics in Writing and Publishing: Publishing Success & Failure: Navigating the Changing Marketplace (4 Credits)
    The last ten years have seen a sea change in publishing. The advent of the ebook, apps for mobile devices, an explosion in the numbers of small independent publishers, the rise of self-publishing and greater consolidation of the major trade publishers have had far-reaching effects on how publishers do business. While many organizations are resisting change, many companies have sprung up in the last decade that have embraced change. We will examine these companies and their business models to determine which models might turn out to be the most successful in the marketplace, what practices might be replicable and where openings for further innovation exist. In addition, we will explore how to create such an entrepreneurial organization and discuss the particular concerns of start-ups and how best to find and mine market opportunities.
    Instructor: Gian Lombardo
  • PB695 - Creating Electronic Publications for the Web and E-Readers (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the creation and design of complete texts in a variety of e-formats. Students will produce complete texts using the extensible Markup Language (XML) and .epub formats. The course covers the current trends and tools of the industry and explores how e-texts are created for e-readers and tablets.
    Instructor: Iris Febres
  • PB696 - Web Development for Electronic Publishing (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the design and format of text and images for the computer and mobile phone screen. Students create sites using HTML and CSS. Topics covered include: content evaluation, usability standards, design aesthetics, user experience, JavaScript, and hosting solutions.
    Instructor: Christopher Lackey
  • PF610 - Writing Workshop in Popular Fiction (4 Credits)
    Uses student manuscripts as its main texts, supplemented by published stories and novels, to illustrate the fundamental aspects of popular fiction. Explores the conventions and complexities of narration, characterization, scene, dialogue, style, tone, plot, etc. Emphasis is on the generation and revision of original work.
  • PF616 - Topics in Hist of Popular Form: Utopian, Dystopian, Apocalyptic Literature (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in topics that cover the historic development of genres within popular fiction. Topics could include American gothic, monster literature, dystopian future, steampunk, supernatural horror, and other speculative fictions.
    Instructor: Roy Kamada
  • PF616 - Topics in the History of Popular Forms: Utopian, Dystopian & Apocalyptic Literature (4 Credits)
    This course will take as its starting point early modern Romantic, and Victorian visions of Utopian worlds, 20th century dystopian visions, and some contemporary apocalyptic fictions. After dispensing with some of the obvious allegorical questions about the function of these visions of "Brave New Worlds," we will consider some of the more complex contours of utopian projects in opposition to dystopian and apocalyptic refutations (and whether they are refutations at all). In particular we will consider the idea of progress and futurity in the context of Marxist, postmodern, and poststructural theory as well as in the context of some religious eschatological traditions.
    Instructor: Roy Kamada
  • PF630 - Introduction to the Publishing Process for Writers (4 Credits)
    An overview of core publishing processes: editorial, marketing, and design and production. The course covers how traditional and independent publishers turn a manuscript into a finished book. It also looks at the role of the literary agent and how to manage a book project.
    Instructor: John Rodzvilla
  • PH105 - Introduction to Ethics (4 Credits)
    Introduces important theories on nature of the good in human conduct. Theories belong to Western philosophical tradition and include works of Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Mill, and others.
  • PH110 - Ethics and Justice (4 Credits)
    Considers ethical theories and theories of justice, especially those related to questions of economic, criminal, political, and social justice.
  • PH203 - Special Topics in Ethics and Value Theory: Chinese Philosophy (4 Credits)
    Arising during the tumultuous Warring States period (5th-3rd centuries BC), the seminal thinkers and texts of Confucianism, Daoism, and many other of the Hundred Schools set the foundation for discourses in ethics, religion, and political philosophy in Chinese civilization over the next two millennia. Course introduces a broad range of classical, Neo-Confucian, and modern Chinese thought, exploring its philosophical, religious, and social dimensions using both primary and secondary sources in translation. Attention is paid not only to classical thinkers but also contemporary theorists, including the New Confucianism of Mou Zongsan and Tu Wieming and the development of Boston Confucianism.
    Instructor: Eric Michael Dale
  • PH203 - Special Topics in Ethics and Value Theory: On Friendship (4 Credits)
    In any culture, there are certain key concepts, which when pulled apart reveal that culture?s underlying structure. Friendship is one of these. This course will trace the history of this idea in the West in order to understand how its meaning has shifted and developed over time. We will start our investigation with the Ancients, for whom it was an essential component of the good life; move to the Middle Ages, when Greek and Roman conceptions mixed with ideas about Christian brotherhood to create the monastic ideal; consider modern views, which were deeply affected by the rise of the nation state, market structures, and the Enlightenment; and close with a look at current conceptions, which reflect our non-religious, multi-cultural, and post-modern age. Our emphasis throughout will be on the idea of friendship itself and the relationship between its particular form and the larger culture in which it is embedded.
    Instructor: Charles Oliver
  • PH203 - Topics in Ethics and Value Theory: On Friendship (4 Credits)
    In any culture, there are certain key concepts, which when pulled apart reveal that culture?s underlying structure. Friendship is one of these. This course will trace the history of this idea in the West in order to understand how its meaning has shifted and developed over time. We will start our investigation with the Ancients, for whom it was an essential component of the good life; move to the Middle Ages, when Greek and Roman conceptions mixed with ideas about Christian brotherhood to create the monastic ideal; consider modern views, which were deeply affected by the rise of the nation state, market structures, and the Enlightenment; and close with a look at current conceptions, which reflect our non-religious, multi-cultural, and post-modern age. Our emphasis throughout will be on the idea of friendship itself and the relationship between its particular form and the larger culture in which it is embedded.
    Instructor: Charles Oliver
  • PH203 - Topics in Ethics and Value Theory: Morality and Nature (4 Credits)
    Topics announced prior to each term may include: Art and Politics, Media Ethics, Feminist Ethics, Political Philosophy, or Judaism. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Robb Eason
  • PH203 - Special Topics in Ethics and Value Theory: Ethics of Lying (to oneself and others) (4 Credits)
    Topics announced prior to each term may include: Art and Politics, Media Ethics, Feminist Ethics, Political Philosophy, or Judaism. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Ian Blaustein
  • PH203 - Special Topics in Ethics and Value Theory: Free Will, Responsibility (4 Credits)
    This course examines a variety of theories of free will and moral and legal responsibility. Students will examine our society's evolving views on free will against the backdrop of current scientific findings across numerous fields, findings that put into question our traditional ideas concerning moral and legal responsibility. We will also examine the role of moral luck in our assessments of agent-based views of autonomy and moral and legal agency.
    Instructor: Robb Eason
  • PH203 - Special Topics in Ethics: Problems of Exculsion in a Pluralistic Democracy (4 Credits)
    This course examines the difficulties of solving fundamental conflicts of value in pluralistic societies like ours. Taking as test cases the challenge that religious discourse poses to a predominantly secular political culture, as well as the problems of gender and racial oppression, we will reconstruct the efforts that ethical theorists have made to cope with the effects of radical individualism and the presence of competing conceptions of what is good and just.
    Instructor: Pablo Muchnik
  • PH203 - Special Topics in Ethics and Value Theory: Free Will, Responsibility (4 Credits)
    This course examines a variety of theories of free will and moral and legal responsibility. Students will examine our society's evolving views on free will against the backdrop of current scientific findings across numerous fields, findings that put into question our traditional ideas concerning moral and legal responsibility. We will also examine the role of moral luck in our assessments of agent-based views of autonomy and moral and legal agency.
    Instructor: Robb Eason
  • PH203 - Special Topics in Ethics: Problems of Exculsion in a Pluralistic Democracy (4 Credits)
    This course examines the difficulties of solving fundamental conflicts of value in pluralistic societies like ours. Taking as test cases the challenge that religious discourse poses to a predominantly secular political culture, as well as the problems of gender and racial oppression, we will reconstruct the efforts that ethical theorists have made to cope with the effects of radical individualism and the presence of competing conceptions of what is good and just.
    Instructor: Pablo Muchnik
  • PH203 - Topics in Ethics and Value Theory: Morality and Nature (4 Credits)
    Topics announced prior to each term may include: Art and Politics, Media Ethics, Feminist Ethics, Political Philosophy, or Judaism. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Robb Eason
  • PH203 - Topics in Ethics and Value Theory: Chinese Philosophy (4 Credits)
    Arising during the tumultuous Warring States period (5th-3rd centuries BC), the seminal thinkers and texts of Confucianism, Daoism, and many other of the Hundred Schools set the foundation for discourses in ethics, religion, and political philosophy in Chinese civilization over the next two millennia. Course introduces a broad range of classical, Neo-Confucian, and modern Chinese thought, exploring its philosophical, religious, and social dimensions using both primary and secondary sources in translation. Attention is paid not only to classical thinkers but also contemporary theorists, including the New Confucianism of Mou Zongsan and Tu Wieming and the development of Boston Confucianism.
    Instructor: Eric Michael Dale
  • PH210 - Narrative Ethics (4 Credits)
    Provides overview of classical and modern approaches to ethical theory using examples from fiction and film to show how ethical theories can be applied. Connects abstract theory with "real life" through storytelling and story analysis to understand and evaluate moral issues.
  • PH300 - Special Topics in Philosophy: Brains and Bodies, Minds and Machines (4 Credits)
    How does the mind relate to the body? Are minds and brains the same thing? Can computers or robots have minds? How do popular culture?s portrayals of the relationship between minds, bodies, brains, and machines match findings in the natural sciences and in philosophy? How do factors like race and gender affect our conceptions of mind? Finally how do exogenous factors like technology and art affect our ideas of the mind and brain and their relationship to bodies and machines? This course will examine these questions by engaging with Philosophy, Science, Literature, and Film.
    Instructor: Robb Eason
  • PH303 - Citizenship as Civic Engagement (4 Credits)
    What does it mean to be or become a citizen? Readings and discussions will include what it means to be a citizen in a local community, a national community, and, perhaps, a world community. What are the responsibilities involved in being an engaged citizen? This is a philosophy course, and we will be examining these issues on a theoretical and on a practical level. All students will be placed n a local non-profit for approximately 2-3 hours a week.
    Instructor: Elizabeth Baeten
  • PH304 - Political Philosophy (4 Credits)
    Examines basic themes in the tradition of political philosophy and their implication for our contemporary understanding of freedom, rights, citizenship, justice, legitimacy, the public sphere, and the public good.
    Instructor: Ian Blaustein
  • PH307 - Genesis (4 Credits)
    The most influential text every written has had such a profound impact on our culture for the past two millennia that we rarely even bother to read the actual words underneath the layers of assumptions about their meaning. In this course, students not only examine the Genesis narrative rather closely but also encounter some of the pivotal works where its cosmic, apocalyptic, moral, sexual, and violent themes resonate most beautifully: from religion to philosophy, from poetry to literature, from science to art, from theater to film.
    Instructor: David Kishik
  • PL222 - Human Rights (4 Credits)
    Presents human rights issues in an international context, exploring major tensions such as how universal or culturally relative rights should be. From the philosophy of ?the right to have rights? to contemporary policy dilemmas on immigration and ethnic minority rights, this class unpacks rights assumptions and assesses ?real world? solutions. What are human rights? Who deserves them? How are they protected? What obligation do states and citizens have to ensure rights are not violated? Students review Latin American, US, and African case studies to explore the pressing human rights issues of our time.
    Instructor: Mneesha Gellman
  • PL225 - U.S. Government and Politics (4 Credits)
    Develops knowledge and understanding about the American political system including national, state, and local government. Examines constitutional foundations, citizenship, civil liberties, public opinion, political parties, the electoral system, and the legislative process as well as the judicial history of these issues.
  • PL230 - The US and Latin America (4 Credits)
    Instructor: Mneesha Gellman
  • PL240 - Communication, Politics, and Law (4 Credits)
    Develops an interdisciplinary understanding of the political-legal communication field with emphasis on the U.S. Constitution and the legal system as well as constructing and communicating political-legal arguments.
    Instructor: Michael Brown
  • PL322 - Truth, Justice and Reconciliation (4 Credits)
    Investigates themes of post-conflict memory, truth commissions, transitional justice, human rights, political ?amnesia,? and the role of post conflict education. Theoretical discussions are illustrated with case studies from El Salvador, Sierra Leone, Cambodia, Chile, Rwanda, and South Africa, among others. The class engages questions such as: what happens after violent conflict, and who is held accountable? Who remembers and who forgets the violence, and how do individuals, communities, and states go about rebuilding the social, political, and legal fabric in post-conflict contexts?
    Instructor: Mneesha Gellman
  • PL332 - Civil Rights (4 Credits)
    Reviews and develops an understanding of the U.S. Constitution, congressional legislation, and Supreme Court cases affecting and controlling minority rights from 1776 to the present.
    Instructor: Michael Brown
  • PL333 - The First Amendment (4 Credits)
    Engages in in-depth study of the U.S. Constitution and federal laws as they relate to communication. Develops an understanding of the First Amendment, the Federal Communication Commission, and political speech.
    Instructor: Michael Brown
  • PS101 - Introductory Psychology (4 Credits)
    Presents topics across the range of sub-disciplines that make up the field, including the history of psychology, research methods, attention and consciousness, learning, memory, language, motivation, emotion, social perception and interaction, child and adult development, and mental illness. Students engage in discussions, presentations, and demonstrations centered on key ideas in the field.
  • PS200 - Social Psychology (4 Credits)
    Introduces the discipline of social psychology. Examines how the behavior of individuals is influenced by their social environment. Topics include impression formation, persuasion, conformity, interpersonal attraction, helping behavior, aggression, and prejudice.
  • PS201 - Abnormal Psychology (4 Credits)
    Provides an introduction to the nature, etiology, and classification of abnormal behaviors and therapeutic methods used to treat them. An explanation of the relation between mental disorder and the social and cultural setting is also provided.
  • PS202 - Developmental Psychology (4 Credits)
    Explores the stage/age-related physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development of individuals. Topics include physical maturation and sensory-motor development; thinking, reasoning, and language processes; personality growth; social cognition; and interpersonal interaction. Attention is also given to the discussion of contemporary issues in developmental psychology.
    Instructor: Jack Demick
  • PS203 - Cognitive Psychology (4 Credits)
    Studies the mental mechanisms and processes involved with perception, learning, memory, and thinking. Topics may include perception, attention, memory, language, problem solving, decision-making, mental representation and knowledge, reasoning, creativity, and intelligence. Highlights the close relationship between modern cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience that ties cognitive processes to brain systems.
    Instructor: Vinoth Jagaroo
  • PS306 - Psychology of Prejudice (4 Credits)
    Explores the psychological causes and consequences of stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination through an analysis of psychological theory and empirical research. By focusing on the experiences of a wide range of groups, the course examines themes such as group identity and intergroup conflict; the nature of categorization; why stereotypes persist; the personal and societal impact of prejudice; and how prejudice might be overcome.
    Instructor: Sukanya Ray
  • PS307 - Psychology of Relationships (4 Credits)
    The psychology of relationships is the scientific study of how we initiate, develop, and maintain close relationships, including friendships and romantic relationships. Relationship researchers take an empirical approach to studying personal and social relationships, which involves carefully observing social phenomena, collecting and analyzing data, and drawing conclusions based on the nature of those data. Students study a variety of topics in which relationship processes are at work, including what attracts us to a potential friend or romantic partner, why we fall in love, why we feel jealous, and how we respond to relationship conflicts.
    Instructor: Lindsey A. Beck
  • PS380 - Advanced Topics in Psychology: Narratives of Disorder (4 Credits)
    An exploration of the nature and development of psychological disorder, viewed through the lens of personal narrative. Beginning with the biological and psychosocial origins of disorder, we trace the emergence of psychological difficulties from early risk factors to first diagnosis, and from diagnosis to the process of psychosocial adjustment ? aligning ideas of the self, and identity, to a new reality of psychological challenge. The class uses a socio-cultural and developmental framework to examine the personal impact of diagnosis over the lifespan and introduces qualitative methodologies to collect, analyse and explore personal accounts of mental illness and psychological dysfunction.
    Instructor: Eileen McBride
  • PS498 - Directed Study (2 Credits)
    Contract Required (see Department for Information)
    Instructor: Eileen McBride
  • RL115 - Islamic Ways of Life (4 Credits)
    Religious faith has been, and continues to be, a powerful force in human life. The Middle East gave birth to three monotheistic belief systems?Judaism, Christianity, and Islam?which have had profound effect on fundamental ideas that eventually spread throughout the world. Course examines the historical contexts that gave birth to the Islam, playing particular attention to the philosophical underpinnings of Islam. Students are introduced to the ways in which each faith shapes moral, political, and aesthetic values.
    Instructor: Carol Ferrara
  • RL116 - Christian Ways of Life (4 Credits)
    Religious faith has been, and continues to be, a powerful force in human life. The Middle East gave birth to three monotheistic belief systems?Judaism, Christianity, and Islam?which have had profound effect on fundamental ideas that eventually spread throughout the world. Course examines the historical contexts that gave birth to the Christianity, playing particular attention to the philosophical underpinnings of Christianity. Students are introduced to the ways in which each faith shapes moral, political, and aesthetic values.
    Instructor: Eric Michael Dale
  • SC210 - Human Health and Disease (4 Credits)
    How is our human body designed and maintained and how is the intricate balance of this system disrupted in illness? This course explores the structure, function, and interrelationship between several body systems through the study of human disease. Several major non-infectious diseases are selected (for example, diabetes, Alzheimer's, heart disease, and lung cancer) as a platform for discussing the chemistry and anatomy of the body. Study of these diseases informs discussion on mechanisms of drug action, the nature of disease risk factors, ethics and politics of healthcare, and the role of mind-body relationships in health and disease.
    Instructor: Jamie Lichtenstein
  • SC211 - Food and Nutrition (4 Credits)
    Introduces food systems, diet, and nutrition. Helps students become informed consumers of food by discussing what we eat, why we eat, where our food comes from, how it is processed, and how it affects our health. Students learn principles of nutrition, including the function of nutrients, food composition and diet analysis, the workings of the digestive system, and the nutritional roots of disease. The environmental, sociological, and psychological implications of food are discussed, and emphasis is placed on dispelling common myths about food and on questioning information presented in the media.
    Instructor: Kimberly Dong
  • SC212 - Evolution of Human Nature (4 Credits)
    Introduces the field of evolutionary biology and its application to all species, including humans. Major topics include natural selection, adaptation, and sexual selection, as well as genetics. Focuses particularly on the ancestral legacies of primate and human evolution that continue to influence modern-day society, including topics such as cooperation, jealousy, aggression, and health.
    Instructor: Diana Sherry
  • SC213 - The Brain and Behavior (4 Credits)
    Discusses the general structure of the human brain and perceptual, cognitive, and neurologic functions and disorders tied to various brain systems. Covers neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, basic sensory functions, brain development, mechanisms of drugs and hormones, sleep, consciousness, and investigative methods used to study the brain. Higher neurocognitive functions, including language and memory and a range of neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders are also explored.
    Instructor: Vinoth Jagaroo
  • SC215 - Personal Genetics & Identity (4 Credits)
    As it becomes increasingly possible to obtain personalized versions of our individual human genomes, it behooves us to consider how much weight this information carries in generating our physical uniqueness and individual identity. This course introduces the biological basis of inheritance and human variation while considering the personal and public implications of accessibility to one's genetic information. In particular, students explore what our DNA can and can't tell us about appearance, disease, ancestry, and behavior. Students consider the marketing of genetic tests, the use of DNA databases in forensic science, regulation of the personal genomics industry, and genetic privacy.
  • SC216 - DNA and Society (4 Credits)
    Explores the structure and function of DNA and the role of the genetic code in shaping the basic cellular units of life. Covers the molecular biology necessary to understand science developments that have garnered the attention of the media and the scientific community, including those relating to biotechnology, stem cells, and genetic engineering. Students discuss this science at its intersection with art, policy, marketing, medicine, and human experience. They gain an appreciation of how molecular biology impacts our society and obtain the tools necessary to make informed decisions about the science we encounter.
  • SC220 - Energy and Sustainability (4 Credits)
    Energy has emerged as one of the most important issues facing our society, as it is increasingly clear that our current patterns of energy use are not sustainable. The course examines the ways in which we use energy, as individuals and as a society, and discusses available and future energy technologies in terms of their environmental impact and technical, economic, and political viability. Students explore various energy sources, beginning with traditional fossil fuel-based technologies, then focusing on emerging technologies, such as hydropower, wind, biomass, solar, geothermal, oceanic, fuel cell, and nuclear.
    Instructor: Jon Honea
  • SC221 - Meteorology (4 Credits)
    Introduces the basic concepts involved in the analysis of weather phenomena and climate patterns at global and local scales. Major topics of discussion include: atmospheric composition and dynamics; solar radiation; temperature, moisture, and condensation; optical phenomena in the atmosphere; weather patterns; severe weather; and weather forecasting techniques.
    Instructor: Benjamin Papandrea
  • SC222 - Earth Science: Natural Disasters (4 Credits)
    Focuses on natural disasters to introduce students to a range of earth-science fields, including geology, meteorology, ecology, and hydrology. Explores a variety of natural processes, such as earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, hurricanes, floods, landslides, wildfires, tornadoes, and climate change. Particular attention is paid to the impacts of natural disasters on human populations, the built environment, and natural resources.
    Instructor: Wyatt Oswald
  • SC223 - Climate Change (4 Credits)
    Climate change is a complex topic of enormous scientific interest, societal importance, and political debate. This course introduces the science of climate change and global warming, focusing in particular on: past environmental change, including abrupt changes and past intervals of warmth; the response of physical and biological systems to recent and ongoing changes in climate; future climate scenarios, forecasting uncertainties, and public-policy options; and critical evaluation of media coverage of climate-change issues.
  • SC225 - Science and Politics of Water (4 Credits)
    Explores the confluence of fundamental ecological, hydrological, and other environmental processes with policy and law at the watershed scale. Emphasis is placed on how natural pathways of the flow of water support vital freshwater ecosystem services such as clean drinking water and healthy fish populations. Students also seek insight toward improved management by weighing the trade-offs required for other valued uses such as recreation, agriculture, hydropower, and industrial uses.
    Instructor: Jon Honea
  • SC226 - Plants and People (4 Credits)
    Introduces plant biology, botany, and ecology, with a particular focus on the importance of plants to humans. Explores the basics of plant structure, growth processes, and reproduction; plant diversity and evolution; the use of plants for food, medicine, and other products; the interactions between plants and the environments they live in; and the role of plants in global environmental change.
    Instructor: Wyatt Oswald
  • SC232 - Physics of Everyday Life (4 Credits)
    Examines the concepts of classical mechanics, oscillating systems, and electricity and magnetism, focusing on ways students encounter physical phenomena in daily life.
  • SC292 - Topics in Environmental Science: New England Forests (4 Credits)
    Explores the ecology, history, and biodiversity of the forested landscape in New England across multiple temporal and spatial scales. From the boreal forests of northern New England to mixed hardwood stands famous for their fall colors to pine barrens on sandy coasts we will examine the patterns and processes of forested communities from across the region. This course will draw on contemporary research in botany, plant physiology, wildlife biology, conservation biology, and landscape ecology to expose students to current science in New England. We will use a historical perspective to understand forces including glaciation, human influence before and after European settlement, fragmentation, conservation, invasive species, pollution, and climate change and their influences on the forested landscape.
    Instructor: Caitlin McDonough
  • SC310 - Science in Translation: Health and Genetics (4 Credits)
    Refines and broadens students' ability to interpret scientific language and communicate critical scientific content to others. This course examines popular representations of molecular biology in various outlets such as film, fiction, and journalism. Conversation about any scientific inaccuracies provides motivation for delving deeper into the science, and discussion of creative intent provides a mechanism for discussing ethical, social, and political impact of related research. Students then apply such interpretative understandings to their own craft as they put scientific translation and communication into practice in select scenarios.
  • SC312 - Visual & Spatial Preception (4 Credits)
    Examines visual and spatial processes and the sensory, cognitive, and neurophysiologic aspects of vision and spatial perception. Reviews the anatomy and physiology of the eye and the visual system, including the brain systems responsible for processing and making sense of visual input. Focus is then given to perception of size, form, color, motion, and three-dimensional space, followed by perceptual and neurological disorders in the visuospatial realm. The course is relevant to students interested in the workings of the visual system, as well as to students in visual media or marketing interested in applied principles of visual perception.
    Instructor: Vinoth Jagaroo
  • SC320 - Science in Translation: Environmental Science (4 Credits)
    Refines and broadens students' ability to interpret scientific language and communicate critical scientific content to others. This course examines popular representations of environmental issues in various outlets such as film, fiction, and journalism. Conversation about any scientific inaccuracies provides motivation for delving deeper into the science, and discussion of creative intent provides a mechanism for discussing ethical, social, and political impact of related research. Students then apply such interpretative understandings to their own craft as they put scientific translation and communication into practice in select scenarios.
    Instructor: Jon Honea
  • SO150 - Principles of Sociology (4 Credits)
    Introduces key sociological concepts, methodologies that provide pivotal tools for critical analysis of structures, agents of power focusing on roles shaping relationships, and institutions in local and global communities. Explores historical biographies that shape worldviews. Brings history to bear on present to identify and shape sociological imagination. Hands-on approaches extend learning beyond classroom, ensuring theory linked to practice. Students learn and live sociology as an integral aspect of individual and community identities.
    Instructor: Deborah Baskin
  • SO200 - Race and Ethnicity; The Key Concepts (4 Credits)
    Race and ethnicity continue to affect the social world and the people who inhabit it in multiple ways. The course situates the study of race and ethnicity within its own historical and intellectual context and exposes students to the broad diversity of sociological scholarship in the field. Its purpose is to provide students with an understanding of the conceptual evolution of key concepts and the ways in which they are deployed or remain pertinent in current debates. Key concepts surveyed include, but are not limited to, race, ethnicity, racism, anti-racism, gendered racism, discrimination colorblindness, and whiteness.
    Instructor: Paul Anskat
  • SO206 - Gender in a Global Perspective (4 Credits)
    Examines gender in a comparative and global context framed by interdisciplinary perspectives from sociology, anthropology, psychology, and cultural studies. Studies social construction of gender across cultures and globalization as a web of complex forces shaping gender-construction activities and institutions. Students compare experiences with other cultures and analyze work, play, and intimacy and institutional structures, including religion, politics, military, media, and the economy.
  • SO222 - Humor and Society (4 Credits)
    Explores humor as a window onto key sociological questions. What do jokes, gags, clowns, comedians, pranks and cartoons have to do with social order, conflict, inequality, identity and interactions? How does the comedy, as a sociological perspective, illuminate the humor of social organizations and of our subjective states? Students will study key sociological arguments and relate them to the humor they observe in their own lives and in the social world around them.
    Instructor: Sam Binkley
  • SO310 - Advanced Topics in Sociology: Sociology of Insiders and Outsiders (4 Credits)
    Human societies have always been divided into those groups that have power, authority, access to resources and privilege, and those that are systematically denied these things. This course examines the structures and processes that create these groups. Attention is paid to outsider groups defined by race, class, gender, sexual orientation and ability, as well as specific insider groups defined by whiteness, straightness and masculinity. Students also examine the exclusionary attitudes and behaviors that reproduce group identities, such as racism, sexism, homophobia and classism.
    Instructor: Sam Binkley
  • SO310 - Advanced Topics in Sociology: Insiders and Outsiders (4 Credits)
    Topics announced prior to each term may include: Alienation and Fragmentation in the Individual; Theories of Love, Sex, and Intimacy; or Postmodern Religion and the Secularization of Society. May be repeated for credit it topics differ.
    Instructor: Sam Binkley
  • SO310 - Advanced Topics in Sociology: Sociology of Insiders and Outsiders (4 Credits)
    Human societies have always been divided into those groups that have power, authority, access to resources and privilege, and those that are systematically denied these things. This course examines the structures and processes that create these groups. Attention is paid to outsider groups defined by race, class, gender, sexual orientation and ability, as well as specific insider groups defined by whiteness, straightness and masculinity. Students also examine the exclusionary attitudes and behaviors that reproduce group identities, such as racism, sexism, homophobia and classism.
    Instructor: Sam Binkley
  • SO310 - Advanced Topics in Sociology: Insiders and Outsiders (4 Credits)
    Human societies have always been divided into those groups that have power, authority, access to resources and privilege, and those that are systematically denied these things. This course examines the structures and processes that create these groups. Attention is paid to outsider groups defined by race, class, gender, sexual orientation and ability, as well as specific insider groups defined by whiteness, straightness and masculinity. Students also examine the exclusionary attitudes and behaviors that reproduce group identities, such as racism, sexism, homophobia and classism.
    Instructor: Sam Binkley
  • SO498 - Directed Study (2 Credits)
    Contract Required (see Department for Information)
  • SW611 - Residency I - Storytelling and Writing Short Scripts (2 Credits)
    The initial residency is comprised of an orientation and welcome, master classes, seminars, intensive workshops, one-on-one advisory meetings, screenings and lectures on various craft, history and theory topics related to creating story and writing short scripts and webisodes. During the residency, students meet daily with their assigned peer groups and their advisors to form the work plan for the semester following the residency.
    Instructor: Jean Stawarz
  • SW621 - Film and Television Genres (4 Credits)
    Instructor: Jim Lane
  • SW622 - Writing Series Television (4 Credits)
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  • SW631 - Writiing for Short-Form Media (4 Credits)
    Instructor: Jean Stawarz
  • TH121 - Introduction to Acting 1 (4 Credits)
    Introduces the acting process to the non-performance major. Group and individual exercise work develops a relaxed instrument able to respond freely, in the body and the voice, to emotional and external stimuli. The course moves from fundamental explorations through improvisation to work on scripted material.
    Instructor: Richard Gilman
  • TH122 - Introduction to Acting 2 (4 Credits)
    Building on the work of TH 121, this course proceeds to careful study of acting craft through the vocabulary of intentions, actions, obstacles, subtext, and objectives.
    Instructor: Joseph Antoun
  • TH123 - Acting 1: Movement (4 Credits)
    An intensive exploration of movement and improvisation. A variety of improvisatory approaches are employed to tap into individual creativity and to discover the power of group creation. Physical demands increase as the body is emphasized as the instrument of communication. The work includes exploration of space, energy, dynamics, rhythm, and sensory response. Actors learn to channel their physical and emotional energy into dramatic action. Prerequisite: by audition only.
  • TH124 - Acting 2: Voice and Text (4 Credits)
    Bases the actor's work in the experience of voice and language. The goal is a free voice in a free body and the ability to express thought and emotion with openness and truth. The course guides students through awareness of and release from habitual tensions and into body alignment, breathing, resonators, sound and movement, group interaction, and the exploration of individual and group creativity. Students use both scripted and improvised material as they discover the two to three octaves of the speaking voice and its connection with thoughts and words. Prerequisite: by audition only.
  • TH130 - Improvisation I (2 Credits)
    Introduces performance majors to improvisation, developing listening skills, spontaneous playing, and the art of presence. Required for all students enrolled in the Actor Training Program. Prerequisite: by audition only.
  • TH131 - Acting Fundamentals (2 Credits)
    Introductory course intended to provide the acting foundation necessary for more advanced scene study. Students apply fundamental concepts explored in first-year voice, movement, and improvisation into written scenes. The emphases are on experiential exercises: improvisations, open scenes, and basic contemporary scene work.
  • TH140 - Rendering (2 Credits)
    Structured to develop fundamental skills in observation, drawing, painting, and modeling, with an emphasis on the application of these skills to the theatrical design process. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. This is the first course required of students in the Design/Technology concentration.
    Instructor: Timothy Jozwick
  • TH141 - Stagecraft: Special Topics (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
    Instructor: Molly Trainer
  • TH142 - Stagecraft: Electrics (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
    Instructor: Nicole Cerra
  • TH143 - Stagecraft: Properties Construction (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
    Instructor: Ronald De Marco
  • TH146 - Stagecraft: Scene Painting (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
    Instructor: Joe Keener III
  • TH147 - Stagecraft: Crafts (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
    Instructor: Nadine Grant
  • TH150 - History of Fashion & Decor: Design Research (4 Credits)
    Explores the development of styles of Western architecture, furniture, and clothing as a demonstration of the human need to express the social, cultural, and psychological ideals of the period in which it occurs. From the Greeks to the 17th century, the period is presented within its historical-sociological context. The period visual elements are examined according to shape, style, construction, function, and evolution of appearance.
    Instructor: Mary Harkins
  • TH203 - Perspectives in World Theatre (4 Credits)
    Looks at theatre and performance as an essential component and expression of culture. Surveys material in select time periods and global settings to demonstrate how the various elements of theatre work to reflect and shape culture on issues such as nationality, ethnicity, race, religion, gender, sexuality, class, and age. In order to do so, this course examines the roles and practices of directors, designers, dramaturges, and playwrights throughout the world from the classical to the postmodern period, and of varying theatrical styles. Readings include plays and historical material, as well as dramatic theory and criticism. Students attend lectures, participate in group work, view theatrical performances and videos, and talk to professionals in the field. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements. Performing Arts majors are not permitted to ernoll in this course.
    Instructors: June Guertin, Khaleem Ali, Nancy Finn
  • TH204 - Theatre into Film (4 Credits)
    Explores the artistic languages of theatre and film. Dramatic material written for the stage is read and analyzed and the process of adaptation of that material is explored. Texts include the works of such playwrights as Shakespeare, Strindberg, Williams, and Albee. Film texts include the work of directors such as Lumet, Cukor, Solberg, and Nichols. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
  • TH205 - Dress Codes: American Clothes in the Twentieth Century (4 Credits)
    Examines American clothes and fashion in the 20th century, with a primary focus on the visual elements of everyday dress. Six distinct periods are studied according to the silhouette and decorative details of each. Further, each fashion period is studied within the context of its indirect influences (social, cultural, historical, technological, economical). Particular focus is given to concepts of masculinity and feminity, and gender ambiguity; challenges to gendered clothes (such as trousers on women, long hair on men); and anti-fashion (zoot suits, beatniks, hippies, punk, goth). Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
    Instructor: Mary Harkins
  • TH215 - World Drama in Its Context 1 (4 Credits)
    Surveys theatre and drama from the Greeks through the Restoration, with a focus on the major periods of Western theatre and dramatic literature: the Greeks, Roman theatre and drama, Medieval theatre, Elizabethan drama, Italian Commedia Dell'arte, Spanish Golden Age, French Neo-Classicism, and Restoration. In addition, students survey Eastern classical theatre and drama with a particular emphasis on the Sanskrit theatre, the Chinese drama and the Peking Opera, and the classical theatre of Japan, including Kabuki, No, and the puppet theatre. There are selected readings of plays in their historical context with particular attention paid to theatrical styles of plays and production.
    Instructors: Brian Cronin, Joshua Polster, Matthew Dicintio, Michael Lueger
  • TH216 - World Drama in Its Context 2 (4 Credits)
    Surveys theatre and drama from the late 17th century to the present. The major periods of world theatre and drama, Romanticism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism are studied with particular emphasis on 20th-century theatre and drama throughout the world, including Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Attention is given to the work of both women and men. Theatrical conventions, innovations, and techniques developed in the Western and non-Western theatres are explored.
    Instructors: Joshua Polster, Khaleem Ali, Michael Lueger, Nancy Finn
  • TH221 - Scene Study 1 (4 Credits)
    This intensive acting class builds on the first?year acting courses to ensure a personal commitment in the way students approach and experience scene work and acting technique. Through exercises and improvisations, students increase awareness, strengthen the ability to talk and listen, and practice recognizing and experiencing moment-to-moment acting. They then apply these skills to dramatic scripts. Students learn how to read a play from the actor?s perspective and how to break down and explore a scene in terms of given circumstances, relationships, and character needs.
  • TH222 - Scene Study II (4 Credits)
    Strengthens and deepens the work begun in TH 221. Students are now ready to codify their experience into a meaningful acting vocabulary. Terms such as action, objective, super-objective, obstacle, and subtext are layered into scene work from American and British realism. Students begin to use imagery in order to more fully encounter and receive the imaginary world of the play.
  • TH240 - Drafting (2 Credits)
    Through weekly projects, students learn graphic techniques in drafting for theatrical production. The focus is on conventional symbolization, development of ground plans, sections, elevations, orthographics, isometrics, and construction drawings. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
    Instructor: Janie Howland
  • TH242 - Lighting Design I (4 Credits)
    Basic principles of stage lighting design are introduced, including the mechanics and optics of lighting instruments, electrical theory and practices, control systems, basic design concepts, and color theory. Controllable qualities of light are investigated and demonstrated through students' participation on a lighting crew for a department production. Design techniques are developed through a complete lighting design project. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
    Instructor: Scott Pinkney
  • TH243 - Sound Design (4 Credits)
    Introduces the basic principles of theatrical sound design and the practices and skills required to develop a production's sound design and supportive technical documentation. Students are introduced to script analysis, system layout, effects development, source researching, and organization. The combined hands-on presentations and class assignments allow students to develop a working knowledge of the sound designer's responsibilities and skills. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH244 - Costume Construction (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic costume patterning and construction methods. Students not only study draping, drafting, and flat-patterning, but also learn terminology, equipment usage, and the skills necessary to the entire costuming process. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
    Instructor: Laurie Bramhall
  • TH245 - Scene Design 1 (4 Credits)
    Introduces the fundamental principles of design. Students learn how proficiency in a core set of design skills can lead to effective performance in a variety of theatrical and commercial production situations. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
    Instructor: Timothy Jozwick
  • TH248 - Costume Design 1 (4 Credits)
    Students develop an understanding of the basic principles of costume design, character analysis, and costume design presentation. Lectures and class discussions prepare students to confront specific problems in design projects. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
    Instructor: Nadine Grant
  • TH250 - Design Essentials (4 Credits)
    Introduces the theatrical design process and personnel within the regional theatre model. Emphasis is placed on the interconnection between the various design areas and their function in the process of making theatre. Students explore script analysis from the designer's point of view, review various production styles and venues, and experience current production design approaches. This course exposes students to some of the basic skills and processes employed by theatrical designers. Students are expected to supply appropriate materials as needed and attend selected theatrical productions.
    Instructor: Janie Howland
  • TH252 - Master Electrician (4 Credits)
    Studies the tools of lighting, principles of electricity, and the technical electrical skills required to become safe and proficient as a theatrical electrician as well as the process of creating paperwork, budgeting shows, and leading crews as a master electrician.
    Instructor: Daniel Carr
  • TH265 - Foundations of Education (4 Credits)
    Examines the basis of public education and the teaching process from a theoretical and methodological viewpoint. Multiple perspectives are employed to investigate these issues, including, but not limited to, the philosophical, historical, sociological, psychological, economic, and political. Required course for initial licensure as a Teacher of Theatre.
    Instructor: Bethany Nelson
  • TH275 - Arts Management I (4 Credits)
    Explores the theory and practice of arts management, with particular focus on theatre management. Extensive readings in arts management provide a foundation for further work in the field.
  • TH277 - Stage Management I (4 Credits)
    The fundamentals of stage management explored through readings, discussion, written exercises, and appropriate hands-on experience.
    Instructor: Debra Acquavella
  • TH313 - African-American Theatre and Culture (4 Credits)
    African-American drama and theater in Africa and America are studied from their origins in African ritual and in early 19th-century America to the present. Lectures and discussions focus on traditional and modern drama and theater, as well as significant periods of dramatic activity such as the Harlem Renaissance, the Federal Theatre Project, and the Black Arts Movement, and on representative works by major contemporary African and African-American dramatists. Fulfills the General Education U.S. Diversity requirement.
    Instructor: Ali-Reza Mirsajadi
  • TH315 - Topics in Contemporary Theatre: U.S Contemporary Theatre (4 Credits)
    Features the major sociopolitical and artistic forces that helped shape contemporary U.S. theatre, as well as the seminal plays, productions and practitioners. Topics to be discussed will include the Theatre of Chance, Absurdist Theatre, the Theatre of Cruelty, Musical Theatre, Actos and Epic Theatre, Performance Art, Intercultural Theatre, and Documentary Theatre. This course will also focus on current productions and presentations in Boston.
    Instructor: Joshua Polster
  • TH320 - Stage Combat: Close Quarter Combat (4 Credits)
    Unarmed theatrical combat techniques suitable for both stage and screen are taught, including: shared-weight illusions and grappling, contact and non-contact strikes, and falls and rolls. Another unit focuses on incorporating combat props such as knives and found objects. Scene work ranges from classical to modern to self-scripted. This is an acting class using physical lines of dialogue; students bring all of their acting, voice, and movement skills to bear on this work.
    Instructor: Ted Hewlett
  • TH322 - Acting for the Camera (4 Credits)
    Prepares acting students for work on camera. Students explore the actor's relationship both to the camera and to the medium. Coursework includes improvisation, monologue, and scene work. A portion of the course is devoted to "the business of acting" with special attention to film and television auditioning. Technical skill for film and television performance and an introduction to the element of film production (script/story structure, editing, lighting, and cinematography) are components of the course.
    Instructor: Ken Cheeseman
  • TH324 - Dialects (4 Credits)
    Continues the actor?s work of experiencing voice and language in a free body as a means to develop versatile and intelligible speech. Using specific Linklater Sound and Movement exercises as a bridge to text and as a physical connection to phonetics, students explore and expand the actor?s range, stamina, and expressive ability. Students use these tools, along with Paul Meier?s textbook, Accents and Dialects for Stage and Screen, to acquire British Standard (RP), Cockney, Irish, German, Russian, New York, and American Southern dialects as well as other specialty dialects as time allows. The goal of the class is to expand the actor?s choices of speech and vocal expression and to acquaint her/him with the resources necessary to learn dialects.
    Instructor: Amelia Silberman
  • TH325 - BFA Acting Studio 1 (4 Credits)
    Intensive discovery of acting technique that builds on the first two years of voice and movement/improvisation work to ensure a personal commitment in the way a student studies and experiences scene work through the vocabulary of intentions, actions, obstacles, subtext, and objectives. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: BFA Acting majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 326.
  • TH326 - BFA Acting Studio 2 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 325 students in the BFA program in Acting. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: BFA Acting majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 325.
    Instructors: Ted Hewlett, Sarah Hickler
  • TH327 - Advanced Musical Theatre Technique I (4 Credits)
    Intensive technique work in acting and musical theatre repertoire. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class. Semester includes specific instruction in "clean singing." Prerequisite: BFA Musical Theatre majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 329 or TH 429.
    Instructor: Scott LaFeber
  • TH328 - Advanced Mus Th Technique II (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 327 for students in the BFA program in Musical Theatre. Scenes from musical theatre and plays as well as advanced musical solo work are considered. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class. Semester includes specific work in dialects. Prerequisite: TH 327. Co-requisite: TH 329 or TH 429.
    Instructor: Scott LaFeber
  • TH329 - Musical Theatre Dance Repertoire I (2 Credits)
    Students are assigned to class by skill level as determined by musical theatre and dance faculty. Students explore various styles of musical theatre dance and hone their audition and performance skills. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: BFA Musical Theatre majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 327, TH 328, TH 427, or TH 428.
    Instructor: Jennifer Farrell
  • TH340 - AutoCAD (4 Credits)
    Students learn to use the technology of computer assisted drafting (CAD) to communicate common graphical information required in theatre design and technology. This includes the creation of ground plans, elevations, section views, orthographic views, technical details, and light plots. Students produce both electronic files and printed documents that conform to accepted theatre graphics standards. The techniques of 3D modeling and rendering are also introduced.
    Instructor: Keith Cornelius
  • TH342 - Lighting Design II (4 Credits)
    Presents approaches to lighting design and poses specific design problems for students to solve. Attention is also given to color, composition, cueing, and production through presentations and discussions in class. Students participate in department productions as assistant designers and electricians. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
    Instructor: Scott Pinkney
  • TH345 - Scene Design 2 (4 Credits)
    Builds on the experience of fundamental level coursework. Students develop methods for solving the practical and aesthetic problems that a professional designer, working in theatre and allied fields, will encounter. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
    Instructor: Timothy Jozwick
  • TH348 - Costume Design 2 (4 Credits)
    Explores advanced design principles and processes in all areas of costume design. Students experience the complete process of designing costumes for a given project, including (a) creating and presenting the design concept; (b) developing appropriate paperwork for counting, building, and running costumes; and (c) budgeting specs and rendering final sketches. Students produce a portfolio of work and learn to communicate professionally with other members of the theatrical production team. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
    Instructor: Nadine Grant
  • TH372 - Topics in Theater Studies: Introduction to Directing a Musical (4 Credits)
    Students will define and explore the specific challenges and opportunities in directing for Musical Theatre including: Script and score analysis; Guiding performers to move fluidly from text to song and/or movement; Coaching a musical theatre song from both and acting and vocal perspective; and Honing skills needed to work collaboratively across disciplines to build cohesiveness where text, song, and movement work together to create an elevated theatrical experience.
    Instructor: Diane DiCroce
  • TH372 - Topics in Theater Studies: Introduction to Fight Direction (4 Credits)
    Stage Managers, Directors, and Theatre Educators will frequently need to deal with productions that involve staged violence, sometimes without the expertise of a professional Fight Director. This class will introduce students to fundamental techniques and principles so that they can safely stage simple conflicts, as well as know when it is imperative to bring in a Fight Director to maintain safety for actors, crew, and audience members. Course work includes: hand to hand combat; swordplay; weapons maintenance; firearm safety; fight notation; blood illusions; how to be a fight captain and run fight calls; and communicating effectively with Fight Directors and other members of the creative team. Pre-requisite: permission of the instructor.
    Instructor: Ted Hewlett
  • TH372 - Topics in Theater Studies: Documentary Theatre (4 Credits)
    This course will examine the history, theories and styles of Documentary Theatre by studying scholarship and a range of documentary dramas throughout the world from its inception in various types of theatre to its modern form. Theatre topics will include Journalistic Theatre, Agitprop Theatre, Living Newspapers, Lehrstucke (?learning plays?), Epic Theatre, Tribunal Dramas, Poor Theatre, Artaudian Theatre Collectives, Actos, Theatre of the Oppressed, Performance Art, and an in-depth focus on contemporary Documentary Theatre. This course will also study the process of creating a new work of Documentary Theatre, based on archival research and interviews. Students will investigate a local community of their choosing and create a documentary theatre performance as a final project.
    Instructor: Joshua Polster
  • TH375 - Arts Management II (4 Credits)
    A detailed exploration of the theory and practice of arts management using current case studies from within the field. Exploration will include extensive readings, guest speakers, research, group discussions and writing exercises.
    Instructor: David Colfer
  • TH376 - Production Management (4 Credits)
    Explores professional production management in theatre, ranging from commercial and nonprofit regional theatre models to touring and special events management.
    Instructor: Skip Curtiss
  • TH377 - Stage Management II (4 Credits)
    Addresses the students' needs for comprehensive intermediate instruction, primarily focusing on the position of the assistant stage manager and how he or she functions not only within the stage management team but also as a collaborator/facilitator on plays and musicals.
  • TH381 - Directing I: Fundamentals of Directing (4 Credits)
    Major principles of play directing are studied. Through comprehensive script analysis, students become familiar with the structure of a play as a basis on which the various elements of theatre can be organized to achieve dramatic unity. Laboratory application of directing practices introduces students to the techniques employed by a director to communicate with actors and audience, including principles of composition, movement, stage business, and rhythm.
    Instructor: Benny Sato Ambush
  • TH388 - Playwriting I (4 Credits)
    Working from the reading and analysis of contemporary plays, from discussions of contemporary theatrical techniques, and from exercises through which the student writer gains access to personal material, the major focus of the semester is the writing and revision of several drafts of at least 1 one-act play suitable for production on stage. Pieces, scenes, and whole plays are read in class and active participation in the workshop process is a required component of the course.
    Instructor: Andrew Clarke
  • TH402 - Living Art in Real Space: Multidisciplinary Art and the Collaborative Process (4 Credits)
    Examines the development and language of multidisciplinary art from the 20th century to the present day, with reference to specific artists, trends, and movements. Lectures, slide and video presentations, museum visits, student research, reading, writing, and in-depth experiential processes address how different artistic disciplines inform one another and come together in visual art performance and installations. Culminates in final presentations of multidisciplinary work by student groups documenting and mapping sources, methods, and process of their collaborations.
    Instructor: Brian Cronin
  • TH410 - Principles of Dramaturgy (4 Credits)
    Provides theoretical and critical background to the profession of dramaturgy. Explores the history of dramaturgy as well as different professional venues and the variety of tasks that dramaturges perform within a particular venue. Introduces students to the areas of dramatic criticism (theatre critics and scholars, translators, script analysts, and editors), literary office dramaturgy (new script analysis, season planning, literary management of the theatre, etc.), and production dramaturgy (working with the director, audience outreach, new play development, etc.).
    Instructor: Robert Duffley
  • TH411 - Topics in Drama Studies: Reinventing Classic Plays for Contemporary Audiences (4 Credits)
    This course looks at five contemporary plays and the five classic plays that inspired them. Euripides? Medea morphs into Marina Carr?s By the Bog of Cats; Ibsen?s A Doll?s House becomes Rebecca Gilman?s Dollhouse; Lynn Nottage?s Ruined is influenced by Brecht?s Mother Courage; Bruce Norris? Clybourne Park is a spin-off of Lorraine Hansberry?s A Raisin in the Sun; and Yael Farber?s Mies Julie resets Strindberg?s Miss Julie in post-Apartheid South Africa. We will study the plays both on the page and in performance, and you will transform a classic play into a new version of your own creation.
    Instructor: Nancy Finn
  • TH411 - Topics in Drama Studies: The Literary Office (4 Credits)
    Writing for theater entails more than the script. In this practical seminar, students will study forms of writing used every day by a theater's literary and marketing offices. In their examination of these forms, students will encounter their historical precedents and survey contemporary examples. Prospective students should be prepared to workshop writing consistently over the semester. In conversation with a curriculum of contemporary scripts, and with theater productions in the Boston area, students will develop skills in the following forms: New Script Evaluations; Theater Reviews; Online Resources; Field Publications; and Program Content. Through these exercises, students will leave the course with a portfolio of their own work for presentation to potential employers.
    Instructor: Robert Duffley
  • TH412 - Play Analysis (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to the art and skill of play analysis, with an eye toward production and cultural significance. Students learn building blocks of dramatic structure and analyze how structure contributes to the understanding of a play. They study plays, critical essays, and performances spanning 25 centuries of Western theatrical practice. Part of the class time is devoted to mapping the structures of the plays and analyzing how these structures may be used to create textually supported interpretations both on stage and in writing. Students explore the material through lecture, discussion, videos, and group activities.
    Instructor: Joshua Polster
  • TH420 - Stage Combat: Historical Weaponry (4 Credits)
    Introduces three weapons commonly found in plays and films: broadsword (for example, from Richard III or The Lord of the Rings); quarterstaff (such as in Robin Hood or Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon); and rapier and dagger (think Romeo and Juliet or The Three Musketeers). Students explore the fundamentals of creating safe illusions of violence using footwork, distance, targeting, blocks, strikes, and simulated wounds and kills. Scene work focuses on classical material. This is an acting class using physical lines of dialogue; students bring all of their acting, voice, and movement skills to bear on this work.
    Instructor: Ted Hewlett
  • TH421 - Advanced Acting Topics: Michael Checkhov Technique (4 Credits)
    This advanced acting course centers on the acting technique of Michael Checkhov and employs his "psycho-physical" approach to the craft of acting. Working via movement and the body's inherent capacity to experience space, direction, and image, we will explore the actor's impulse to transform. Psycho-physical exercises will be employed to introduce students to the foundational work and, from this platform, discoveries will then be applied to group and solo scripted work as well as scenes.
    Instructor: Craig Mathers
  • TH421 - Advanced Acting Special Topics: Monologues, Auditioning & Professional Preparation (4 Credits)
    You?ve studied acting, voice, music, combat and all of the other tools to make you a complete actor, but you still don?t have a plan for your future? This class is perfect for you!! The focus of this course will be in selecting and working on monologues and audition pieces for theatre, but also practicing overall strategies for success in professional acting including film, television and voice over work. Through class discussions, industry guest speakers, practice, and assignments, you will learn first-hand how to take care of the business side of your career from developing marketing strategies to developing unique perspectives on your career and talent.
    Instructor: Spiro Veloudos
  • TH421 - Advanced Acting Special Topic: Solo Performance (4 Credits)
    In this new class, students will engage in the entire, multi-faceted process of creating an oral history and then turning the raw material into a script and then a solo performance. Students will begin by identifying and researching a topic, finding and interviewing a source, transcribing the material, shaping and editing the transcriptions into a script, and then rehearsing and finally performing their original material as a Public Curriculum Project. Students will produce two pieces in this way; an initial ?practice? effort of two or three minutes, and then the main piece of approximately 15-20 minutes. Students will learn interviewing techniques, editing skills, rehearsal techniques for solo work, and will receive the same kind of detailed critical feedback as in scene study class. A significant portion of the first six to eight weeks will involve extensive work outside of class, and thus demands an unusually solid work ethic and the ability to make decisions in the field.
    Instructor: Benny Sato Ambush
  • TH421 - Advanced Acting Special Topic: Advanced Acting for the Camera (4 Credits)
    Students will be teamed with a graduate directing class to create material which could potentially be used for reels and to spec ideas for pilots and independent features. Using improvisation and working in teams students will both devise work and work some pre- written scenes from existing films and television shows.
    Instructor: Ken Cheeseman
  • TH421 - Advanced Acting Special Topic: Skills for Contemporary Actors (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the skillset required of an actor working in contemporary mediums and with contemporary material. The class focuses on emotional realism, with a significant emphasis on truthfulness in performance. Coursework includes scene and monologue work, on-camera work, audition skills (for the stage and for film and television), cold reading techniques, putting yourself on tape, dramatic improv, and working with ?bad? or poorly written material. The course will focus on material written in the last twenty years, and will include a unit on creating your own work.
    Instructor: Lindsay Beamish
  • TH423 - Action Theater (4 Credits)
    Action Theater? is a training system in physical theater improvisation that integrates vocal, physical, and verbal skills while connecting to the agility of the imagination. Exercises isolate the components of action -time, space, shape, and energy- so they can be examined, experienced, and altered in order to expand the expressive range and palette. The work provides tools to examine one's perceptive and responsive process, and address habits that limit one's ability to remain embodied, engaged, and in the moment. Students apply these skills to structured solo and ensemble improvisational performance.
    Instructor: Cassandra Tunick
  • TH425 - BFA Acting Studio 3 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 325 and TH 326 for students in the BFA program in Acting. Scene study problems move toward issues of style, including a range of aesthetic and acting style issues. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, stage combat (including unarmed and Elizabethan rapier), and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. Co-requisite: TH 426.
    Instructor: Craig Mathers
  • TH426 - BFA Acting Studio 4: (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 425 for students in the BFA program in Acting. Beyond continued scene work, significant attention is paid to audition technique and to a thorough orientation to the profession and the business of acting. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. Co-requisite: TH 425.
  • TH427 - Musical Theatre Styles I (4 Credits)
    An intensive investigation of pop-rock styles, both in pure pop repertoire and contemporary musical theatre repertoire, in solo work and scenes. The semester culminates in individual cabaret performances, created by the students themselves. Co-requisite: TH 329 or TH 429.
    Instructor: David McGrory
  • TH428 - Musical Theatre Styles II (4 Credits)
    Senior-level BFA Musical Theatre majors continue the exploration of musical theatre genres and styles as they spend the semester working strictly on works by emerging composers. The composers are invited to visit and participate in classes, creating opportunities for networking and connecting with the artists who are creating new works of musical theatre. In addition, one class per week is devoted to preparations for the Senior Showcase, which is performed for students, families, and industry professionals during commencement weekend. Co-requisite: TH 329 or TH 429.
    Instructor: Diane DiCroce
  • TH429 - Musical Theatre Dance Repertoire II (2 Credits)
    Students are assigned to class by skill level, as determined by musical theatre and dance faculty. Students explore various styles of musical theatre dance and hone their audition and performance skills. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: BFA Musical Theatre majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 327, TH 328, TH 427, or TH 428.
    Instructor: Rachel Bertone
  • TH431 - Shakespeare Performance (4 Credits)
    Explores Shakespeare?s poetry through the body and voice as a way not only of avoiding intellectual pitfalls but also as a path to nurture and experience this poetry through embodied vibration, sensation and image. Rhetorical structure and devices are explored as well in the manner, via the body rather than the brain.
    Instructor: Jonathan Fried
  • TH440 - Technical Theatre Laboratory: Projection Design (4 Credits)
    Explores the basic theories and principles of projection design for theater. Topics will include discussion of script analysis, how to research and acquire imagery and footage, an overview of basic media server technology and projection technology, creation of content, and collaboration and integration with other departments. Design techniques will also be developed through a complete projection design project. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH441 - Topics in Technical Design (4 Credits)
    Permission of Instructor Required
    Instructor: Keith Cornelius
  • TH460 - Drama as Education I (4 Credits)
    Examines the philosophy behind the teaching of theatre and the use of drama as an educational tool in classroom, workshop, and production settings. Students learn to assess the learning needs of their students, develop appropriate educational goals, and design and implement teaching strategies. There are 40 hours of pre-practicum work, including observations of area theatre and drama classes from grades pre-K through 12. Course is open to any Performing Arts major and others with permission of instructor. It is required for Theatre Education majors seeking initial licensure as a Teacher of Theatre.
    Instructor: Bethany Nelson
  • TH461 - Drama as Education 2 (4 Credits)
    Students delve more deeply into the philosophy and practice of teaching through drama and theatre. Forty hours of pre-practicum work with students from grades pre-K through 12 is required. Course is required for Theatre Education majors seeking initial licensure as a Teacher of Theatre.
    Instructor: Bethany Nelson
  • TH463 - Student Teaching Seminar (2 Credits)
    Students concurrently enrolled in TH 465, Student Teaching Practicum, also attend this weekly seminar to explore issues, resources, questions, problems, and solutions to the teaching/learning challenges they are facing in their practicum experience. Topics pertinent to beginning teachers, including classroom management strategies and curriculum and lesson plan development are explored. Students reflect on their teaching experiences and critically examine their current and future roles as classroom instructors. Students will understand the need for a community of teachers and gain a sense of confidence about their teaching skills. Co-requisite: TH465.
    Instructor: Robert Colby
  • TH468 - Multicultural Education (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to a variety of perspectives and approaches to multicultural education. Includes an exploration of the range of issues involved in this complex topic, such as curricular and teaching issues, social and behavioral issues, bilingual education, testing systems, tacking, and unequal power dynamics. Also focuses on the ways in which drama and theater can facilitate change in these areas.
    Instructor: Bethany Nelson
  • TH469 - Playmaking/Teaching/Playmaking (4 Credits)
    Provides an intensive introduction and exploration of playmaking with young people, ages 8-21. Offers a variety of approaches to developing original material with students, and identifies strategies for integrating curriculum topics and playmaking, as well as social, personal, and societal exploration. The role of playmaking as a culturally relevant curriculum is addressed.
    Instructor: Bethany Nelson
  • TH470 - Design in Practice Topics (4 Credits)
    In this advanced course of study, students develop the required practical skills necessary for the design and execution of a theatrical production design. Students further develop the ability to analyze a script, song, or score and translate the ideas therein into visual images. They learn to move a design from concept to completion under the actual "in theatre" conditions, while still maintaining a safe, constructive learning environment. They put into actual practice the equipment, methods, procedures, and skills necessary to implement a successful design. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
    Instructor: Scott Pinkney
  • TH477 - Stage Management III (4 Credits)
    Provides students with the additional tools, techniques, and information to build the bridge from practicing stage management in an educational environment to the professional theatre or MFA program through in-depth study of the Actor's Equity Rules, creation of complex repertory rehearsal schedules of multiple productions, and hands-on training exercises of calling musical show cues with lighting, automation, and fly to music with cue lights.
    Instructor: Debra Acquavella
  • TH479 - Topics in the Business of Theatre: Business of Design (4 Credits)
    Instructor: Scott Pinkney
  • TH482 - Directing 2: Theory & Practice (4 Credits)
    Extending the experiences of Directing I, this course emphasizes the application and unification of stage directing techniques and theories leading to a concept for production. Through selected scenes and projects for class presentation, students continue the exploration of materials and methods of communicating the dramatic content of a script to an audience.
    Instructor: Damon Krometis
  • TH487 - Stage Management IV (4 Credits)
    Instructor: Debra Acquavella
  • TH488 - Playwriting II (4 Credits)
    Includes, but is not limited to, the study of dramaturgical elements in the work of contemporary and classic playwrights, as well as continued study of story development, structure, and the use of dialogue. Students present a variety of work in class, their own and the work of others, looking at plays from the perspective of the actor, director, designer and, most importantly, the audience. By the end of the semester, students complete the first draft of a newly conceived full-length play or the third draft of the one-act play begun in Playwriting I.
    Instructor: Andrew Clarke
  • TH514 - Theatre Studies Seminar: Burning Down the House (4 Credits)
    This course will examine how theatre can be used as a tool to address human rights issues and violations. Students will analyze how theatre in performance, both as an aesthetic product and as a creative process, has the potential to engage both audiences and production members in critical dialogues regarding human rights. We will critically examine dramatic literature, as text and through scene work, in an effort to develop an interdisciplinary vocabulary across human rights & theatre. Students will also have the opportunity to explore curriculum design and development in which dramatic activities are used to address diverse topics in human rights education. We will read both theoretical texts and plays to inform our study of the intersection between human rights and theatre.
    Instructor: P. Carl
  • TH562 - Theatre for Young Audiences (4 Credits)
    Introduces the scope, purposes, and history of theatre experiences for children and adolescents. Topics include play reading and analysis, the examination of formal and participatory theatre, and theatre-in-education techniques.
    Instructor: Robert Colby
  • TH584 - Directing the Musical (4 Credits)
    Building on the experience of one directing class, students are instructed in the particular challenges of directing a musical theatre production: from coaching singing and acting performance to staging complex scenes that involve music and dance, from learning the skills needed to create a collaborative atmosphere to understanding the communication skills needed to work well with designers, technicians, stage managers, and all other personnel involved in the production of musical theatre.
    Instructor: Spiro Veloudos
  • TH621 - Special Topics in Acting: Solo Performance (4 Credits)
    In this acting course, you will be responsible for generating, developing and structuring personal stories, and for discovering the most theatrical way to tell them. By enacting events and stories from your own life you will discover the specific impulses, images and actions that have shaped your dramatic imaginations. You will enter into a challenging, creative process that is both personally and collectively rewarding.
    Instructor: Kathleen Donohue
  • TH621 - Special Topics in Acting: Voice and Text (4 Credits)
    Voice & Text bases the actor-teacher's work in a fully embodied experience of voice and language. The goal of the course is to cultivate a free voice in a free body, and the ability to express every nuance of thought and feeling with clarity, ease, and truth. The course guides students through an awareness of and release from habitual tensions into a more effective and economical use of the body as an instrument for human communication and expression. Additional focus will be on self-awareness, breathing, resonance, sound and movement, ensemble-building skills, the actor-audience relationship, and the teacher's presence. Classroom discussions will deal with the importance of voice training in theater education, as well as the challenges and pedagogical issues that arise when teaching the material.
    Instructor: Melissa Healey
  • TH621 - Special Topics in Acting: Theatre of the Oppressed (4 Credits)
    This course is primarily a hands-on exploration of the theatrical techniques inspired by the revolutionary work of Augusto Boal (Theater of the Oppressed). We will experience acting as an essential social art, a tool for democratic education, a channel for personal transformation, and a means of artistic liberation. Exploring the connections between the theater practitioner's life and one's role within the larger community as an A.C.T.O.R. --artist, creator, teacher, organizer and researcher, we re-discover what it is to be human. Bring with you a desire to play, learn and grow with others. We must all do theater ?to find out who we are, and to discover who we could become? - Augusto Boal.
    Instructor: Gail Burton
  • TH625 - Performance: Theatre and Community (4 Credits)
    Examines the relationships between theatre and culture, where culture is understood as a process of knowing the other, of looking and listening, of creating and maintaining connection in a community. An examination of theoretical texts in economics, history, sociology, cultural studies, politics, and performance provides a foundation for exploring and experiencing various techniques of making theatre in community.
    Instructor: Gail Burton
  • TH650 - Design in Production (4 Credits)
    This course is a comprehensive survey of scene, lighting, and costume design as they relate to the work of the non-design specialist. Emphasis is placed on the interconnection among the various design areas and their function in the process of making theatre. Students are expected to supply appropriate materials.
    Instructor: Brynna Bloomfield
  • TH660 - Drama as Education I (4 Credits)
    Students examine the philosophical foundations of theatre, speech, and the use of drama as an educational tool. They explore the uses of creative drama/improvisation in both formal and informal learning environments. Students learn to assess needs, develop appropriate educational goals and objectives, and design and implement teaching strategies using drama. This course is required for students seeking the Initial License in Massachusetts as a Teacher of Theatre (pre-K through grade 12). Readings, class participation, and participation in laboratory teaching sessions are required.
  • TH661 - Drama as Education II (4 Credits)
    Students explore the principles of educational drama and the teaching of drama and speech. A survey of various educational resources available to drama and speech teachers is included. The role of drama and speech within the wider context of the arts in education is discussed. This course is required for students seeking the Initial License in Massachusetts as a Teacher of Theatre (pre-K through grade 12).
  • TH662 - Playmaking (4 Credits)
    This course is designed to provide an intensive introduction and exploration of playmaking with young people, ages 8-21. The course offers a variety of approaches to developing original material with students, and identifies strategies for integrating curriculum topics and playmaking, as well as social, personal, and societal exploration.
    Instructor: Bethany Nelson
  • TH663 - Student Teaching Seminar (2 Credits)
    Students concurrently enrolled in TH 665, Student Teaching Practicum, also attend this weekly seminar to explore issues, resources, questions, problems, and solutions to the teaching/learning challenges they are facing in their practicum experience. Topics pertinent to beginning teachers, including classroom management strategies and curriculum and lesson plan development are explored. Students reflect on their teaching experiences and critically examine their current and future roles as classroom instructors. Students will understand the need for a community of teachers and gain a sense of confidence about their teaching skills. Prerequisite: Permission of the Theatre Education Program Director. Co-requisite: TH665.
    Instructor: Robert Colby
  • TH672 - Production Projects (2 Credits)
    Contract Required - See Department for Information
  • TH680 - Directing: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)
    The directorial process is examined, beginning with textual analysis of dramatic action, and covering such areas as ground plans, pictorial composition, movement, and stage action. The relationship of the director and other theater artists is also studied. Student work includes selected scenes and projects prepared for class presentation.
  • TH699 - Master's Thesis (4 Credits)
    Graduate Program Director Permission Required; Contract Required (See Department for information)
    Instructor: Courtney O'Connor
  • VM100 - History of Media Arts I (4 Credits)
    This is the first of a two-semester course that explores the historical development of the media arts, including the film, broadcasting, and sound recording industries until 1965. Investigates the relationships between economics, industrial history, and social and political systems, and the styles and techniques of specific films and broadcast programs. Special attention is given to the diversity of styles of presentation in the media.
  • VM101 - History of Media Arts II (4 Credits)
    This is the second of a two-semester course that explores the historical development of the media arts, focusing on the continuing development of the film, broadcasting, and sound recording industries after 1965, as well as the development of video and digital technologies. Investigates the relationships between economics, industrial history, and social and political systems, and the styles and techniques of specific films and videos, broadcast programs, and digital media products.
  • VM105 - Introduction to Visual Arts (4 Credits)
    Investigates the visual language of communication shared among all of the visual arts, emphasizing visual analysis, understanding of materials, the history of style and techniques, and the functions and meanings of art in its varied manifestations. Provides a foundation for subsequent studies in the visual and media arts.
  • VM120 - Foundations in Visual and Media Arts Production (4 Credits)
    A combination of lectures and hands-on workshops examines the relationships among photography, graphics, audio, film, video, and digital media within the context of cross-media concepts, theories, and applications. Traces the creative process from conception and writing through production and post-production. Students proceed through a series of exercises that lead to completion of a final project, establishing a foundation for advanced production coursework.
  • VM140 - Video Prod for non-majors (4 Credits)
    This course is not open to Visual and Media Arts majors. Introduces students to single-camera video production. Students learn how to operate equipment as the principles underlying shooting, editing, and online distribution. Emphasis is placed on the traditional stages of preproduction, production and postproduction, but students also examine how video is used in other environments (such as desktop and smartphone platforms).
    Instructor: Bob Nesson
  • VM200 - Media Criticism and Theory (4 Credits)
    Explores theoretical and critical approaches to the study of photography, film, television and video, audio, and digital culture. Theories and methods examine issues relating to production and authorship in the media arts, audience reception and effects, political ideology, ethics, aesthetics, cultural diversity, and schools of thought within the liberal arts. Extensive critical writing and reading in media criticism and theory.
  • VM202 - Critical Listening (4 Credits)
    Provides a study of the psycho-acoustic perception and analysis of classical and contemporary use of sound in the media. Students identify and define acoustic variables, comparing past and present recordings in all media.
    Instructor: David Doms
  • VM203 - History of Photography: 19th Century to the 1970's (4 Credits)
    Surveys the aesthetic and technical development of photography from its invention to the 1970's with emphasis on the 20th century. A critical analysis of the medium develops an understanding of the influence and appropriation of photography today.
    Instructor: Brian McNeil
  • VM204 - Topics in Media Arts: Introduction to Producing (4 Credits)
    Through practical approaches students will understand the roles producers take from development through distribution. Through trade articles and class discussions, students will explore the various producers' roles in overseeing content for film, television and digital media projects. The course will include a basic introduction to story, the proper technique for evaluating screenplays through the writing of coverage, and an analysis of the evolution and future of the role of producer/s as technology and distribution methods democratize the industry. Further, the investigation of theoretical frameworks for leadership will serve as a guideline for team building.
  • VM204 - Topics in Media Arts: Practice: Drafting and Rendering for Filmmakers (4 Credits)
    This course will enable filmmakers to visually communicate design ideas with clarity, detail and accuracy. Students learn and practice observation through drawing, color, drafting and 3-dimensional visualization. The third part of the class introduces digital rendering with Vectorworks, Photoshop and Sketchup.
    Instructor: Brynna Bloomfield
  • VM204 - Topics in Media Arts: Introduction to Producing (4 Credits)
    Through practical approaches students will understand the roles producers take from development through distribution. Through trade articles and class discussions, students will explore the various producers' roles in overseeing content for film, television and digital media projects. The course will include a basic introduction to story, the proper technique for evaluating screenplays through the writing of coverage, and an analysis of the evolution and future of the role of producer/s as technology and distribution methods democratize the industry. Further, the investigation of theoretical frameworks for leadership will serve as a guideline for team building.
    Instructor: Amy DePaola
  • VM204 - Topics in Media Arts Practice: Introduction to Producing (4 Credits)
    Through practical approaches students will understand the roles producers take from development through distribution. Through trade articles and class discussions, students will explore the various producers' roles in overseeing content for film, television and digital media projects. The course will include a basic introduction to story, the proper technique for evaluating screenplays through the writing of coverage, and an analysis of the evolution and future of the role of producer/s as technology and distribution methods democratize the industry. Further, the investigation of theoretical frameworks for leadership will serve as a guideline for team building.
    Instructor: Amy DePaola
  • VM205 - History Of Photography: 1970's to the Present (4 Credits)
    From documentary and documents of performances to the highly constructed imagery utilized by contemporary artists, students explore diverse subjects, styles, and methods that cover portrait, object, city, memory, appropriation, landscape, and narrative. The course combines weekly slide talks with theory and criticism reading discussions, field trips to exhibitions, visiting artists, research papers, and a final production project and exhibition.
    Instructor: Sarah Pollman
  • VM214 - History of Non-Western Art I: East Asian Arts (4 Credits)
    Investigates arts of the East Asian region, particularly the areas of present-day China, Korea, and Japan. Artworks are contextualized within indigenous traditions such as Confucianism and Chan/Zen and examined from a diversity of critical perspectives. Considers issues of identity, religion, politics, and modernization, as well as contemporary artworks such as installation and performance.
    Instructor: De-nin Lee
  • VM215 - History of Non-Western Art II: South Asian Arts (4 Credits)
    Introduces art and architecture of the South Asian region, ranging from the areas of present-day Afghanistan and Pakistan to India and Nepal. Examines visual culture of the Indus Valley Civilization and several major world religions: Buddhism, Hinduism, Jain, and Islam. Also considers issues of identity, empire, and post-colonial politics in art made under the Mughal rulers, during the British Raj, and in the present.
    Instructor: De-nin Lee
  • VM216 - History of Non-Western Art III: African and African Diaspora Arts (4 Credits)
    Examines a diverse selection of art and architecture from regional kingdoms, cultures, and religions of Africa and the African Diaspora. Artworks are contextualized within critical, discursive frameworks of ritual, performance, trade, modernism, craft, and narrative. Considers the politics of colonial history and their impact on art collecting practices and museum display.
    Instructor: T. Amanda Lett
  • VM220 - Writing the Short Subject (4 Credits)
    Studies the writing of the short subject within the genres of fiction, nonfiction, and experimental concepts and scripts (including animation). Scripts range from 3 to 15 minutes and are suitable for production within the budget and time constraints of an Emerson College class. Students complete comprehensive revisions of their work.
  • VM221 - Writing the Feature Film (4 Credits)
    Examines the fundamentals of writing for narrative feature-length film. Investigates structure, character, conflict, scene writing, and dialogue, taking students from ideation through to the development of a detailed outline. Students write the first 25-30 pages of a screenplay.
  • VM222 - Writing for Television (4 Credits)
    Examines writing for television in a variety of formats, with a predominant emphasis on situation comedies and drama. The elements of each genre are analyzed, challenging students to find their own unique "voice," and new and innovative ways to write stories within established formats. Also covered are reality television and children's television, story outlining, and script formatting. Each student writes a first-draft script of an existing sitcom or drama.
  • VM230 - Introduction to Film Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces the basics of non-synchronous 16mm filmmaking, including camera operation, principles of cinematography and lighting for black-and-white film, non-sync sound recording and transfers, and picture and sound editing.
    Instructors: Gabrielle Follett, Gautam Chopra, Ingrid Stobbe, Jonathan Dorn, Korbett Matthews, Maria Antonieta Astudillo, Paul Turano, Peter Flynn, Sofia Caetano
  • VM231 - Intermediate Film Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces the technical, conceptual, and procedural skills necessary to successfully complete a short double-system sync-sound 16mm film, including pre-production, production, and post-production procedures and techniques.
  • VM241 - Introduction to Studio TV Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces studio television practice. Students learn the principles of pre-production, production, and post-production for the studio as well as control room procedures. Students prepare their own multi-camera, live-on-tape studio productions.
    Instructors: Bavand Karim, Justin Petty
  • VM241 - Introduction to Studio Television Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces studio television practice. Students learn the principles of pre-production, production, and post-production for the studio as well as control room procedures. Students prepare their own multi-camera, live-on-tape studio productions.
    Instructor: Bavand Karim
  • VM241 - Introduction to Studio TV Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces studio television practice. Students learn the principles of pre-production, production, and post-production for the studio as well as control room procedures. Students prepare their own multi-camera, live-on-tape studio productions.
    Instructors: Bavand Karim, John Donovan
  • VM242 - Introduction to Documentary Production (4 Credits)
    A gateway course on single-camera field production for students who want to learn the art and technology of nonfiction storytelling. Through a series of workshops, screenings, and hands-on production projects, this course emphasizes content development, storytelling strategies, and production skills in the context of relevant ethical, aesthetic, and social issues.
  • VM243 - Introduction to Narrative Drama (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to the personnel and techniques involved in the broad category of narrative fiction production. Emphasis is placed on organization and the translation of the script into a visual narrative. Students have the opportunity to hone their production skills on a variety of creative projects. The course also prepare students for advanced-level course work and BFAs in narrative fiction.
  • VM250 - Introduction to Sound Principles and Audio Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces audio physics, sound principles,and the theory and practice of audio recording and mixing. Emphasis is on concept development for sound production, signal routing and the mixer console, analog and digital audio recording, and editing techniques.
  • VM251 - Location Sound Recording (4 Credits)
    Intensive study in the theory and practice of field/location and studio audio recording for film, video, and television. Covers techniques in the use of field/studio recorders and mixers, microphones, boom poles, and shot blocking. Also covers tape-based and hard-disk digital recorders, and time-code synchronization management.
    Instructor: Mark van Bork
  • VM260 - Introduction to Interactive Media (4 Credits)
    Introduces the theory and practice of interactive media. Stresses the conceptual, aesthetic, and technical concerns of interactivity. Technologies covered are HTML, CSS, and Javascript. Additional topics include semantic web design and development, graphics and imaging, interface design, user experience, project management, and the mobile web. Emphasis is on making creative works.
  • VM261 - Computer Animation (4 Credits)
    The first course of a two-course sequence, introducing students to the fundamentals of three-dimensional modeling and animation, and preparing them for the second course, VM 363 Advanced Computer Animation. Students learn to model, texture objects, compose and light scenes, animate, and add dynamics, as well as render animations into movies and compositing audio, titles, and credits in post-production.
    Instructor: John Craig Freeman
  • VM263 - Drawing For Time-Based Media (4 Credits)
    Imparts key drawing skills required in pre-visualization, concept art creation, set design, storyboarding, two-dimensional media production, and post-production. Develops students' abilities to think spatially, whether constructing a plan for a set or depicting a character in action. Also focuses on anatomy, locomotion, and communication possibilities of the human form.
    Instructor: Anya Belkina
  • VM265 - Introduction to Photography (4 Credits)
    Introduces the fundamentals of black-and-white photography by combining darkroom techniques with the latest digital processes. Essential comparisons between the two methods are explored by learning camera controls, film development to darkroom printing, digital capture to print workflow, and through the hybrid combination of these techniques. Critiques of student work develop an aesthetic and conceptual understanding of the creative process. Students must use cameras with manually adjustable speed and aperture.
  • VM270 - Introduction to Game Design (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to game creating that explores the fundamental elements of games, emphasizing non-digital methodologies and rapid prototyping in a hands-on environment. Students engage with and make games as entertainment and communication tools, developing an understanding of play and how to induce it in others.
    Instructor: Sarah Zaidan
  • VM280 - Global Media (4 Credits)
    Explores key concepts in global media studies, providing exposure to the work of international media makers, media industry practices, national and regional media aesthetics, and a variety of cultures of makers and audiences. Focusing on one particular issue or medium and using it as a case study, the course develops and expands students? understanding of how contemporary global media help shape cultural, aesthetic, technological, and economic exchanges worldwide.
    Instructor: Vinicius Navarro
  • VM300 - Topics in Visual and Media Arts Studies: History of Video Games (4 Credits)
    Over the past four decades, video games have grown into a field that encompasses a billion dollar entertainment industry, platforms for self-expression, tools for education, innovations in technology, and more. This course explores the historical development of video games from their arcade beginnings to the latest releases. With a focus on hands-on gameplay, students will explore the relationship between hardware, software, and society, enabling them to understand the places both iconic and recent video games occupy within the media landscape.
    Instructor: Sarah Zaidan
  • VM301 - Post Colonial Cinema (4 Credits)
    An examination of the historical, socioeconomic, and ideological contexts of film production, distribution, and exhibition of post-colonial films that explore and challenge Hollywood and Western notions of identity, narrative, history, and oral traditions. Films viewed are from Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, the United Kingdom, and the United States.
  • VM303 - Studies in Digital Media and Culture (4 Credits)
    Examines the dramatic shift in meaning and processes of contemporary communication by investigating the social, artistic, economic, and political implications of using digital ways of working. Topics include the Internet and the web, cyberspace and censorship, games, digital film and video, multimedia and interactivity, virtual reality, person-machine interfaces, and globalization considerations.
    Instructor: Martin Roberts
  • VM304 - History of Documentary (4 Credits)
    Examines the history and theory of documentary media production, with attention to the economic, technological, ethical, and aesthetic concerns of documentarians.
    Instructor: Michael Selig
  • VM305 - History of Experimental/Avant-garde (4 Credits)
    Examines the history and theory of experimental and avant-garde film, video, and other moving image practices and their connections to broader art and social movements. Through extensive reading and viewing, students investigate avant-garde and experimental cinema form, style, and content as well as historical and contemporary filmmakers' production methods and distribution networks in film communities and the art world.
    Instructor: Kathryn Ramey
  • VM311 - Latin American Cinema (4 Credits)
    Looks at films from various Latin American countries, examining both popular and artistic traditions that have developed since the early twentieth century. Best known for the innovative film movements of the 1960s, Latin American cinema has a history that goes back to the silent era and continues today in the hands of a new generation of filmmakers. This course focuses on some key moments in this history, while also exploring concepts such as colonialism and post-colonialism, cultural imperialism, Third World filmmaking, transnational cinema, and globalization.
    Instructor: Vinicius Navarro
  • VM315 - Topics in Art History: Andy Warhol (4 Credits)
    This course examines the art and life of Andy Warhol (1928-1987). An icon of Pop Art Warhol produced silkscreened images of mass culture in America such as Campbell?s Soup and Marilyn Monroe, and was influential in the dramatic transformation that occurs in the visual arts during the 1960s. He worked in a staggering array of media, venturing from the visual arts into film, television, magazine publishing, and promoting rock music. He is among the few visual artists who is a household name. Scholars, critics, historians and other artists consider him to be one of the most important artists in the second half of the twentieth century. How does this artist evolve, in his own words, from creating ?symbols of the harsh, impersonal products and brash materialistic objects on which America is built today,? to being ?an Art Businessman?? Through lectures, readings, writings, presentations and discussion the course will grapple with the complex identity of this artist who has profoundly shaped contemporary culture.
    Instructor: Joseph Ketner
  • VM315 - Topics in Art History: Chinese Landscape Painting (4 Credits)
    This course examines the tradition of Chinese landscape painting in imperial times and its legacy now. We analyze landscape as a vehicle for embodying a range of religious (Buddhist and Daoist), social, and political values historically. That will serve as our basis for considering the present moment as human pressures on the natural environment mount and artists use landscape to address urgent problems of pollution, environmental justice, and global climate change.
    Instructor: De-nin Lee
  • VM322 - Comedy Writing for Television (4 Credits)
    Examines writing television comedy with an emphasis on sitcoms. Areas of study also include sketch writing and writing for late-night TV. Students learn how to writie physical comedy, how to write for existing shows and characters, sitcom structure, format, and joke writing. Each student writes a script for an existing sitcom that will be workshopped.
    Instructor: Manuel Basanese
  • VM324 - Topics in Screenplay Genres: Writing the Comedy Feature (4 Credits)
    Studies a given genre from the perspective of the screenwriter. Working in a specific genre, students write a treatment, an original outline for a feature film, and up to the first half of a script in the specific genre. Honing critical skills, students engage in analytical and aesthetic discourse about their own work, as well as material written by others. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
    Instructor: Marc Weinberg
  • VM324 - Topics in Screenplay Genres: Sci-Fi Screenwriting (4 Credits)
    In this course, students will trek into the infinite storytelling galaxy of sci-fi as a catalyst for exploring the complex moral, social, and ethical questions of our world by imagining a unique alternative story universe. Strengthening their story structure, scene writing and character development skills, students will develop loglines, story breakdowns, beat sheets, and complete scripts for stories where anything can happen ? if the writer makes it plausible. With a focus on building a strong thesis as the basis of their speculative fiction, students will also explore writing special effects, research, and the science of sci-fi
    Instructor: Mark Saraceni
  • VM324 - Topics in Screenplay Genres: Thriller! Mystery! Suspense! (4 Credits)
    The thriller, mystery and suspense genres are among the most popular movies. Students will learn to write high stake, maximum tension scripts that surprise audiences and take viewers to the emotional and psychological edge. This class will move beneath the surface of technique, studying theory, form and content as well as narrative strategies. An original outline for a feature-length movie (theatrical, cable, streaming platforms), antagonist/protagonist bios and a minimum of fifty pages of the screenplay will be written.
    Instructor: Jean Stawarz
  • VM325 - Writing the Adaptation (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the process of analyzing material from another medium (e.g., novels, plays, comic books) and translating into a screenplay. Students write one original first act of a public domain property, as well as one analytical paper.
    Instructor: Stephen Glantz
  • VM328 - Topics in Film Writing: Writing for Animation (4 Credits)
    Students explore techniques and approaches unique to writing animation and will examine a variety of animation formats, methods, and genres in order to understand the demands, opportunities, challenges, and styles of this storytelling form. Students will write an outline, treatment, and either a television pilot or the first half of a screenplay.
    Instructor: Steven Grossman
  • VM329 - Topics in Television Writing: Comedy Writing for Late Night (4 Credits)
    This course examines how to write comedy for late night television, with a heavy emphasis on joke writing, monologue writing, sketch writing, current events and satire. In addition to working on individual assignments, students with also learn how to write effectively as a team. The final project will require students to collectively create and write an innovative show designed for late night television.
    Instructor: Martie Cook
  • VM329 - Topics in Television Writing: Life on Display (4 Credits)
    In this course, students will study reality television series, and in groups create original ?unscripted? series for broadcast, from concept development, to show pitch writing, to preparation for pre-production, production, and post-production. In groups, students will research, develop, and create a number of original series with emphasis on innovative ways to expand and contribute to the reality genre in docu-soap, lifestyle, competition, or investigative formats. Each student group will write an industry standard Pilot Pitch, with Show Descriptions for 4 to 6 episodes. In addition, they will produce a 5- to 7-minute video Trailer for their original reality series.
    Instructor: Hassan Ildari
  • VM329 - Topics in Television Writing: Comedy Writing for Late Night (4 Credits)
    This course examines how to write comedy for late night television, with a heavy emphasis on joke writing, monologue writing, sketch writing, current events and satire. In addition to working on individual assignments, students with also learn how to write effectively as a team. The final project will require students to collectively create and write an innovative show designed for late night television.
    Instructor: Martie Cook
  • VM329 - Top: Writing for Tweens (4 Credits)
    Remember those 'tween shows you grew up on? Ever think about writing for them? Now's your chance. Will discuss and analyze `tween story elements, formats, genres, platforms/networks, and expectations. Examine how to balance the unique challenges facing a writer for ?tweens in exploring differences and worlds and keeping the shows entertaining. Students choose to write a spec script for an existing series or a pilot.
    Instructor: Martie Cook
  • VM331 - Topics in Visual and Media Arts: Virtual Reality Production (4 Credits)
    This course is intended to teach the fundamentals of pre-production, production and post-production for creating live action media in a virtual reality environment. We will explore several genres in the medium including, but not limited to, observational, event, documentary and narrative production. This course focuses on live action, and does not cover animation or gaming.
    Instructor: Daniel Gaucher
  • VM331 - Topics in Visual and Media Arts Practice: Behind the Screen (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to the elements of running a successful cinema series. This course will offer a combination of lectures, opportunity to meet area industry professionals (from theatres, film festivals and booking agencies) and article readings on the current and constantly changing field of cinema exhibition. Students will be spending one night per week observing in the cinema and seeing first hand the challenges and rewards of creating a communal movie viewing environment. Course work includes weekly journals including reading responses, a short research paper and will culminate in a presentation proposed by the student according to their area of interest. Experiential hours will be scheduled on Tuesdays and/or Thursdays from 6:00-10:00 pm. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor required, e-mail anna_feder@emerson.edu.
    Instructor: Anna Feder
  • VM331 - Topics in Visual and Media Arts: WGBH Partnership (4 Credits)
    This course presents students with a hands-on approach to working in a professional production environment. If offers a unique opportunity to serve as a crewmember on a broadcast series during both production and post-production stages. Readings associated with this course will provide insight into production techniques, analytical essays, and segment editing. Prerequisites: VM101, VM110, VM120, and Junior Standing. Special Permission required for registration, e-mail instructor at bavand_karim@emerson.edu
    Instructor: Bavand Karim
  • VM331 - Topics in Visual and Media Arts: Film News and Reviews (4 Credits)
    From Hollywood to independent and world cinema, Film News and Reviews examines how film journalism is practiced across an array of media with an emphasis on print and online outlets. Students will acquire a working knowledge of how film-related news, reviews, and feature stories are pitched, assigned, researched, reported, edited, and published. Discussion will include the history of film journalism as well as career paths in film journalism today. Class exercises foster critical and creative thinking as well as the integration of multimedia elements, including audio, video, still photography, and social networking.
    Instructor: Erin Trahan
  • VM332 - Production Management (4 Credits)
    Provides an in-depth study covering the responsibilities of the Production Manager/Line Producer throughout the pre-production, physical production and wrap process of a project. The course focuses on the Production Manager or Line Producer?s key relationships with crew and staff both on set and in the production office as well as introduces the industry standard scheduling and budgeting programs as the tools to support production. The material covered will help prepare students to properly manage their own projects as well as provide the necessary tools for production experience in a broader/industry context.
    Instructor: Amy DePaola
  • VM335 - Alternative Production Techniques (4 Credits)
    Intermediate-level 16mm production workshop in the use of unorthodox, non-computer driven methods and processes for developing and producing motion pictures. Provides an overview of historical methods of formal exploration of the basic materials of film as a projection medium, including camera-less filmmaking, direct animation, and loop projections, as well as alternative mechanical processes such as xerography, hand-process, and alternative-camera tools and techniques. Primary emphasis is on creative invention and exploration.
    Instructor: Kathryn Ramey
  • VM340 - SPEC (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
    Instructor: Jean Stawarz
  • VM350 - Sound Design (4 Credits)
    Introduces the art of inventing sounds and composing soundtracks for visual media such as film, video, computer animation, and websites. Focus is on audio post-production and the roles of the supervising sound editor and the sound designer. Post-production techniques include sound recording, sound editing, and sound mixing in stereo and surround sound.
    Instructor: Pierre Archambault
  • VM352 - Studio Recording (4 Credits)
    Explores the principal tools of the professional audio production studio and how they can be used for creative productions. Includes instruction in multi-track recording and sound processing equipment.
    Instructor: Mark van Bork
  • VM361 - 2D Character Animation (4 Credits)
    Building upon the system of analytical drawing and the fundamentals of artistic anatomy covered in the prerequisite course, VM263, this class further develops a student aptitude for inventing, constructing, and animating creatures and characters in two-dimensional media. A special emphasis is placed on studying facial muscles and animating a variety of facial expressions. While conceptual coherence and craftsmanship of each project are of primary importance, the course also aims to raise student proficiency in such software packages as Illustrator, Photoshop, After Effects, and Maya. Students are expected to generate 2D imagery combining tactile and digital techniques, sequence media elements, and output screen-ready self-contained shorts.
    Instructor: Anya Belkina
  • VM362 - Motion Graphics (4 Credits)
    Covers the practice and art of motion graphics and visual effects, including the design process, artistic concepts, and technologies. Production techniques range from title sequences for film, to compositing of real and virtual worlds and a myriad of digital time-based art forms. Students make a series of projects using post-production and compositing software.
  • VM363 - Advanced Computer Animation (4 Credits)
    The second course in the two-course computer animation sequence, introducing students to advanced three-dimensional modeling and animation techniques and preparing them for independent computer animation production work. Continues to develop skills acquired in computer animation, including modeling, texturing objects, composing and lighting scenes, animating, dynamics, rendering, and post-production compositing.
    Instructor: Jason Wiser
  • VM364 - 3D Computer Gaming (4 Credits)
    Provides students with the fundamentals of game design and theory. Students learn to create and import assets, develop objectives, script behaviors and action, and build game levels. Students complete the course with an original portfolio-ready single player game.
    Instructor: John Craig Freeman
  • VM365 - Darkroom Photography (4 Credits)
    An intermediate-level course in black-and-white photography designed to explore a variety of "ways of seeing" as well as demonstrate techniques that further enhance the photographic image. Assignments build on one another (tone, time, frame, point of view, scale, and sequence). Critical viewing and seeing as well as guest artists and gallery visits are encouraged as students begin to form their personal photographic vision.
    Instructors: David Akiba, Lauren Shaw
  • VM366 - Digital Photography (4 Credits)
    A hands-on production class created especially for the photography student who is interested in the digital darkroom. It is designed to give students a basic introduction to the elements of digital capture, manipulation, and output. The course addresses the digital tools within the context of the aesthetics of photography. Photoshop is used as another photographic tool.
  • VM370 - The Business of Film (4 Credits)
    Examines legal, administrative, and financial components that are integrated within the process of filmmaking. Key areas that are explored include the basics of business affairs (ownership and copyright, rights agreements); talent and key crew agreements; learning how to raise film financing; examining financial streams from a global perspective, from crowdfunding to foreign presales and equity; studying varying methods of distribution from customary models for theatrical film to online, VOD/hybrid distribution; and exploring current trends in marketing and publicity.
    Instructor: Maria Agui Carter
  • VM371 - Alternative Media Production: Out of the Box (4 Credits)
    Fosters an exploratory approach to making media projects by providing unorthodox conceptual frameworks in which students conceive and execute short projects using both conventional and unconventional acquisition devices in a variety of media. Students work individually or collaboratively throughout the course to develop ideas and acquire material for assignments.
    Instructors: Pamela Larson, Robert Todd
  • VM372 - Directing Image and Sound (4 Credits)
    Examines a director?s preparation in detail, with particular emphasis on forming creative approaches to the script, as well as image and sound design. Production and postproduction strategies are also addressed.
  • VM373 - Directing Actors for the Screen (4 Credits)
    Develops skills in directing actors in dramatic performances for the screen. Students are taken step by step through the directing process with a particular emphasis on research and visualization, as they learn how to plan and direct narrative sequences. Classes will be offered in conjunction with Acting for the Camera classes in Performing Arts.
  • VM375 - Advanced Interactive Media (4 Credits)
    Continues to explore interactive media, including consideration of conceptual, aesthetic, and technical concerns. Technologies covered include interactive web elements, databases, mobile development, and an introduction to programming. Emphasis is on making creative works.
    Instructor: David Kelleher
  • VM376 - Editing for Film and Video (4 Credits)
    Furthers understanding of and ability to work with medium- to long-format post-production processes through editing assignments in film and video, along with critical examination of completed motion pictures.
  • VM377 - Documentary Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Develops skills necessary to produce documentary productions in video or film. Covers production processes from story development through all the production phases. Practical considerations of production are balanced with theoretical debates on the legal and ethical responsibilities of those who document others.
  • VM378 - Basic Cinematography and Videography (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic elements of the aesthetics, technology, and craft of cinematography and videography. Students gain a working knowledge of 16mm and digital video cameras, as well as basic lighting design and equipment, with an emphasis on crew relations and organization. Includes a comprehensive exploration of the work of significant cinematographers.
  • VM380 - Media Copyright and Content (4 Credits)
    Copyright is the legal foundation that gives value and property rights to any creative work. This includes music as well as books, films, television shows, choreographed work, architectural designs, plays, paintings, maps, photographs, video games, and computer software. Students look at the history, development, and purpose of copyright and other intellectual property law. They also explore the purpose and value of fair use and of the public domain, and alternative views of copyright such as the ?Creative Commons.?
    Instructor: Barry Marshall
  • VM381 - Production Design (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to the work of the production designer, the creative individual responsible for the ?look? of production. Topics include: developing and implementing the design concept, strategies for working on location or sound stage, and collaboration with the cinematographer, art director and set decorator. The work of notable production designers will be considered. Class projects and actual production work combine theory with practice.
    Instructor: Charles E. McCarry
  • VM400 - Topics in Communication: The New Normal: Gender and Race Disparities in Hollywood (4 Credits)
    One cannot engage with mainstream media without observing the abnormal dichotomy and misogynist location of women. This course will function as an applied laboratory by integrating theory, feminist text and personal narratives from industry specialist to understand this paradox. We will use the work of different feminist theories like bell hooks, Audre Lorde, and Patricia Hill Collins as well as current works from Roxanne Gay along with communication theories like Genderlect, Muted Group and Feminist Standpoint Theory to frame our understanding of media. The lived experiences of LA community industry specialist and guest speakers will serve to increase our knowledge. The course will conclude with a collaborative, student-driven construct for enacting equity and addressing gender bias in Hollywood and LA communities. This course is crosslisted with a course being offered in Los Angeles.
  • VM400 - Topics in Visual and Media Arts Studies: Cyber-Activism & the Power of Technology for Good & Evil (4 Credits)
    Technology has not only allowed for the unprecedented global dissemination of information within the last several decades; it has become a power tool for social and political activists around the world. Individual activists and well-organized groups now have access to millions of people and social networks that provide an influential contemporary forum for advocating for change. This course explores 'cyber activism' in theory, in practice, and as business structures. We will examine the history of activism and how technology has changed the playing field; and where we might go in the future as technology advances. We will research different the good, bad and ugly approaches used by activists around the world. This is a highly interactive class where research and discussion are essential to success.
    Instructor: Kelley Misata
  • VM400 - Topics in Visual and Media Studies: Disaster Films (4 Credits)
    This course surveys cinematic disaster as a Hollywood genre with specific cycles of production, and as a recurrent motif (what Susan Sontag called ?the imagination of disaster?) in numerous genre movies, independent films and avant-garde works. Focusing on historical, theoretical, social and aesthetic issues, the course continually considers how disaster movies represent hegemonic norms related to national and social identity, gender, race/ethnicity, class, sexuality, and other social categories. Course content includes lectures, reading, discussions, exams and papers.
    Instructor: Ken Feil
  • VM400 - Topics in Visual and Media Arts Studies: Cinephilia and the Auteurs (4 Credits)
    In his review of Bitter Victory (1958), Jean-Luc Godard declared: "the cinema is Nicholas Ray." In his study The American Cinema: Directors and Directions 1929-1968, Andrew Sarris placed Ray beneath the "Pantheon Directors" in a lovely named but secondary grouping he called "The Far Side of Paradise." This course will dive into just such nuances from this fascinating period of film criticism and cinephilia (the 1950s and 1960s). By examining the French response (Bazin and Cahiers) to the American cinema (mainly of the 1940s and 1950s), and by looking at films by directors like Ray and Howard Hawks, we will explore the French influence on American and British critics.
    Instructor: Barry Marshall
  • VM400 - Topics in Visual and Med Arts: The New Abnormal: Gender and Racial Disparities in Hollywood (4 Credits)
    One cannot engage with mainstream media without observing the abnormal dichotomy and misogynist location of women. This course will function as an applied laboratory by integrating theory, feminist text and personal narratives from industry specialist to understand this paradox. We will use the work of different feminist theories like bell hooks, Audre Lorde, and Patricia Hill Collins as well as current works from Roxanne Gay along with communication theories like Genderlect, Muted Group and Feminist Standpoint Theory to frame our understanding of media. The lived experiences of LA community industry specialist and guest speakers will serve to increase our knowledge. The course will conclude with a collaborative, student-driven construct for enacting equity and addressing gender bias in Hollywood and LA communities. This course is crosslisted with a course being offered in Los Angeles.
    Instructor: Miranda Banks
  • VM400 - Topics in Visual and Media Studies: Women Above and Below the Line (4 Credits)
    Histories of Hollywood are often told as the achievements of great men. This class focuses instead on the many contributions made by women in Hollywood both above and below the line, including the work of female directors, writers, producers, studio heads, actresses, and other forms of women's work. Some case studies include: Alice Guy Blache, Frances Marion, Lucille Ball, Mary Tyler Moore, Julie Dash, Oprah Winfrey, Christine Vachon, Kathryn Bigelow, and women in Hollywood today. We will read histories and biographies of these women, and screen samples of their work across film, television, and digital media in order to consider: Why certain moments in Hollywood were more or less open to women? Is there such a thing as "women's work"? How can this study lead to greater diversity and inclusion in Hollywood?
    Instructor: Jennifer Porst
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics: The Other in US Film and Television (4 Credits)
    Images of those considered outside the ?mainstream? have both complicated and reinforced the national American narrative of who we are as a nation and a culture, as well as who the central characters of our stories deserve to be. While foregrounding supposedly normative race, sex, or gender depictions in traditional American media, Hollywood and television representations of those considered outside the imagined ?norm? reflect society's fears, phobias and fascination with the ?other." In this course we explore race, sex, and gender portrayal in American film and television and how they reflect, reinforce, or refract the national narrative. Using a combination of critical viewings, script and scene analysis, discussions, exercises and workshops we will examine how the ?other? both challenges and defines the ?center."
    Instructor: Maria Agui Carter
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics: Film Noir (4 Credits)
    This seminar will survey film noir from its inception and identification in the 1940s through its contemporary status as a recognized generic and industrial category. We will explore the origins of film noir, paying particular attention to social determinants and changes in the postwar film industry. Other influences will be considered including the visual arts, literature, philosophy, as well as the more generalized phenomenon of ?modernism.? Each week we will watch a film and engage in in-depth analysis of the complex narrative, visual, and aural patterns of the film screened. Other topics we will consider will include gender representation; the way the city is constructed in film noir, issues of realism, and representations of the ?American Dream.? Students will leave the course with an enhanced understanding of the ways social and industrial factors shape the form and content of motion pictures, and how categories are constructed, maintained, and change over time. They will also hone their critical skills through writing and oral presentation of material.
    Instructor: Eric Schaefer
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics: "D" is for Desire (4 Credits)
    The objective of this course is to survey the politics and aesthetics of the moving image in order to gain a better understanding of contemporary art strategies and methods. In this course students will have the opportunity to analyze influential art videos, films and theory, in order to learn new ways of seeing and enhancing their visual literacy. Students will also have the opportunity to work on short video projects to define and express their own desired aesthetic.
    Instructor: Maria Zervou
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics: Telivision Culture (4 Credits)
    This course looks at how TV makes a commodity of culture. We examine American TV as an institution as well as a cultural producer. This knowledge involves the mapping of the intricacies of TV practice as well as understanding the role of American culture. Although the television has gone through massive economic changes in its fifty-five years, its production process has not measurably altered. So what is the method of TV? If it is not simply mass production, what is it? Can TV be original? Where does it get its ideas? By combining the study of genres and cultural theories derived from the sociology of culture, the course will introduce students to the complex relationship of economics to culture. In the process we learn to think, argue, and write about American television on a conceptually sophisticated and informed level.
    Instructor: Jane Shattuc
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics: Queer TV Comedy (4 Credits)
    This seminar examines LGBTQ representations in TV comedy since 1997, beginning with Ellen DeGeneres' historic sitcom Ellen. Historical, ideological and formal/aesthetic analyses explore how and why comedy has served a central means to integrate LGBTQ characters into television, in addition to how stereotyping, the closet, camp, carnivalesque sexuality, and gender performativity have served as comedic devices with multiple functions and meanings. Students are expected to conduct intensive research for writing assignments, spoken presentations, and class discussions.
    Instructor: Ken Feil
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics: Animation Histories: Jules Engel (4 Credits)
    Through lecture-discussion, screenings, research and critical writing we study the European roots of experimentation in animation history that led to the production of Walt Disney's Fantasia; the impact of the Disney Strike and World War II on the animation industry; and the influence and demise of an inventive post-war mode of Modernist cartoon in Hollywood. We trace the legacy and creative force of the artist-mentor-educator in America, Jules Engel (1909-2003), progenitor of a singular mode of fine art in cinema, experimental animation. This seminar is research-based critical writing that culminates in a formal research paper (15+ pages) and oral presentation.
    Instructor: Janeann Dill
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics: Animation Histories: Jules Engle and Experimental Animation (4 Credits)
    Through lecture-discussion, screenings, research, and critical writing, we study the European roots of experimentation in animation history that led to the production of Walt Disney's Fantasia; the impact of the Disney Strike and World War II on the animation industry; and the influence and demise of an inventive post-war mode of Modernist cartoon in Hollywood. We trace the legacy and creative force of the artist-mentor-educator in America, Jules Engel (1909-2003), progenitor of a singular mode of fine art in cinema, experimental animation. This seminar is research-based critical writing that culminates in a formal research paper (15+ pages) and oral presentation.
    Instructor: Janeann Dill
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics: D is for Desire (4 Credits)
    The objective of this course is to survey the politics and aesthetics of the moving image in order to gain a better understanding of contemporary art strategies and methods. In this course students will have the opportunity to analyze influential art videos, films and theory, in order to learn new ways of seeing and enhancing their visual literacy. Students will also have the opportunity to work on short video projects to define and express their own desired aesthetic.
    Instructor: Maria Zervou
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics: Ethics and Cultural Diversity (4 Credits)
    Primary issues of media ethics such as privacy, security, pornography, deception, reputation, product placement, and conflict of interest overlap with issues of cultural diversity such as discrimination, ?myth-representation?, profiling, and social justice and fairness pertaining to race, gender, sexual orientation, disability, age, religion, and nationality. Using numerous examples from film, Internet, television, audio and other media, this seminar will feature screenings, discussions, debates, papers, and the building of ?the community of justice and fairness?.
    Instructor: Thomas Cooper
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics: Realism, Modernism, Postmodernism (4 Credits)
    This course covers the central art movements that have affected the history of film, video, and sound of the past 125 years. We will study the art, literature and media of each movement in order to have a thorough understanding of their aesthetic, intellectual, philosophical, and political intricacies. This understanding will encompass some of the following questions (but not limited to): How has Hollywood adopted Renaissance realism? How and why has modernism become the aesthetic of progressive art? Does postmodernism qualify as an art movement and the equal of the other two movements?
    Instructor: Jane Shattuc
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics: History of Exploitation Films (4 Credits)
    From the earliest days of cinema, exploitation movies have existed on the fringes of the industry and many exploitation filmmakers have taken on ?cult? status (Ed Wood, Roger Corman, H.G. Lewis, Doris Wishman). Taking advantage of controversial issues and often hyping sex and violence for box office success, these low-budget films remained viable in the face of economic pressure and social hostility. Within broader historical contexts this seminar will consider how exploitation movies maintained or subverted the aesthetic and political status quo (especially on issues of gender and race), their low-rent production strategies, their outrageous promotional schemes, censorship, issues of taste and cultural standards, and the role that audiences and fandom have played in their popularity.
    Instructor: Eric Schaefer
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics: Sound as Fine Art (4 Credits)
    This seminar surveys the world of auditory art from the oral tradition to contemporary art works of sound and noise/music composition. The course examines the influences of culture, society, and the arts and sciences on the movements and conceptual constructs existing within the culture of sound art. The seminar?s focus is on Post World War I, Twentieth & Twenty-First Century experiments and explorations into sound, noise and radio; the avant-garde in sound & experimental music; aleatory forms of composition & performance; computer generative works; visual elements in sound performance; installation art; and the aesthetics of silence.
    Instructor: Pierre Archambault
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics: Ethics and Cultural Diversity (4 Credits)
    Primary issues of media ethics such as privacy, security, pornography, deception, reputation, product placement, and conflict of interest overlap with issues of cultural diversity such as discrimination, "myth-representation", profiling, and social justice and fairness pertaining to race, gender, sexual orientation, disability, age, religion, and nationality. Using numerous examples from film, Internet, television, audio and other media. This seminar will feature screenings, discussions, debates, papers, and the building of "the community of justice and fairness".
    Instructor: Thomas Cooper
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics: Western Film and TV (4 Credits)
    The Western genre was once a staple of the American motion picture industry and the most popular programming in the first two decades of American television. The Western has all but disappeared as a predominant story type, but the impact of the genre?s representation of American westward expansion, American masculinity, and race and gender continue to be felt in public discourse and in public life. This course will investigate the history of the Western in film and television, its conventional formulation, and various innovative instances of the genre.
    Instructor: Michael Selig
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics: It's Not TV, It's HBO (4 Credits)
    Since its debut, HBO has been a powerhouse in American television and film. They regularly dominate the nominations for Emmy and Golden Globe awards, and their success has profoundly affected the television and film industries and the content they produce. This course will examine the birth and development of HBO in order to see what a closer analysis of the channel and its programming can tell us about television, Hollywood, and American culture over the last four decades. We will also look to the future to see what HBO might become in the increasingly global and digital television landscape.
    Instructor: Jennifer Porst
  • VM402 - Seminar in Media Arts Topics: Sex on Screen (4 Credits)
    From Edison?s ?The Kiss? to mobile media culture and in forms ranging from simple loops, to Hollywood movies, to educational films, to sexploitation and pornography, the history of sexually oriented moving images in the U.S. had been complex and contentious. This seminar will explore how sexuality and gender have been represented on screen, the ways in which sexuality and ?power? have been historically intertwined, how sexual minorities have been portrayed, the influence of censorship and self-regulation on image making, the ways in which content has created controversy and how controversy has shaped content. With a special focus on the ?sexual revolution? of the 1960s and `70s, this seminar will engage with a range of historical, social, political and ethical issues surrounding moving images that have had a direct impact on our daily lives.
    Instructor: Eric Schaefer
  • VM409 - Sem: Urban Public Art (4 Credits)
    This seminar investigates the design, creation, commission, patronage and placement of public art within the urban fabric. Students examine their roles as community members and participate in multiple field trips. Topics include: practical concerns and historical background; public art typologies; public art's relationships with institutions; funding; audience agency; and temporary and alternative art forms. The artworks studied range from traditional sculpture and mural painting, to less conventional and more transgressive works including interventions and ephemeral installations.
    Instructor: Cher Knight
  • VM409 - Seminar in Western Art: What is Contemporary Art? (4 Credits)
    This course is designed to give students experience in curating an art exhibition. First, we survey contemporary art. Second, we visit the studios of graduate students in the visual arts at area colleges. Third, students curate an exhibition of these artists. The objectives are to ask: What is contemporary art? What is the artistic voice of your generation? How do you create a visual art experience that expresses the voice of your generation?
    Instructor: Joseph Ketner
  • VM410 - Seminar in Non-Western Art: Art in the PRC: Mao to Now (4 Credits)
    Examines art promoted by the Communist regime in China from the beginnings of the party through the Mao and post-Mao eras. Considers, too, the impact of policies of repression on art and artists, such as during the Cultural Revolution. Finally, studies art critical of the government and the impact of globalization on Chinese artists.
    Instructor: De-nin Lee
  • VM418 - Transnational Asian Cinemas (4 Credits)
    Asian "national" cinemas are examined and problematized in the contexts of media and economic globalization, including: the politics of transnational film practices; issues surrounding filmic representation and diasporic identities; the construction and negotiation of national, gender, and genre differences; local-regional-global dynamics; and questions of the postcolonial in Asian contexts.
    Instructor: Shujen Wang
  • VM420 - Topics in Media Arts Practice: Narrative Motion Picure Lab-Technical Craft (4 Credits)
    The Narrative Motion Picture Production Lab is a pre-production, production and post-production intensive class co-taught by director Regge Life and director of photography Harlan Bosmajian. Designed for second semester juniors and seniors, the class is a chance for students to hone their specific film production skills in an educational environment that will be as much like a professionally run film-set as the students would encounter outside Emerson College. The goal of the class is the creation of a completed festival-ready short film around 15-20 minutes in length. Students interested in Camera, Grip/Electric, Editing/DIT/Color Correction and sound should e-mail harlan_bosmajian@emerson.edu for information and instructor approval for registration.
    Instructor: Harlan Bosmajian
  • VM420 - Topics in Media Arts Practice: Narrative Motion Picure Lab (4 Credits)
    The Narrative Motion Picture Production Lab is a pre-production, production and post-production intensive class co-taught by director Regge Life and director of photography Harlan Bosmajian. Designed for second semester juniors and seniors, the class is a chance for students to hone their specific film production skills in an educational environment that will be as much like a professionally run film-set as the students would encounter outside Emerson College. The goal of the class is the creation of a completed festival-ready short film around 15-20 minutes in length. Students interested in directing and producing should e-mail theodore_life@emerson.edu for information and instructor approval for registration.
  • VM420 - Topics in Media Arts: Exploring and Exploiting Temporality in Media Art (4 Credits)
    A project-based course that explores the nature of time in media art. Grounded with a focus on experimental and non-fiction film, the course draws on popular culture, philosophy, sociology, history, and literature to interrogate the meanings, treatments, and uses of temporality. Topics and techniques discussed included stasis, duration, repetition, instantaneousness, chronology, and nostalgia. Emphasis placed on analog filmmaking, but all media/modes are welcomed and encouraged.
    Instructor: Billy Palumbo
  • VM420 - Topics in Media Arts: Practice: Projection Design (4 Credits)
    Explores the basic theories and principles of projection design for theater. Topics will include discussion of script analysis, how to research and acquire imagery and footage, an overview of basic media server technology and projection technology, creation of content, and collaboration and integration with other departments. Design techniques will also be developed through a complete projection design project. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • VM420 - Topics in Media Arts: Creating Feminist Media (4 Credits)
    In this cross-media production/theory hybrid course, students will develop their creative authorial voice by critically examining the work of female-identified media artists, discussing key contemporary feminist issues illuminated by the work, and exploring artistic interpretations of the female experience. Class discussion, screenings, and critical readings will provide the necessary background for the creation of socially conscious media projects. Please note: the nature of this course requires the screening and discussion of potentially sensitive material during every class.
    Instructor: Colleen Poplin
  • VM420 - Topics in Media Arts Practice: Advanced Motion Graphics (4 Credits)
    This course is in-depth workshop in the practice and art of motion graphics and visual effects. The course will emphasize design process, both creative and technical. Students will use digital technologies and graphic deign to create artistic short motion pieces (e.g. title sequences, experimental film, narrative sequence, animations, commercials,). Students will first make a series of short projects using advanced visual effects and compositing software and then a half-semester long production. Projects may be done individually, but they most likely will be produced by small groups of students working together. Prerequisite: VM362, VM478 and Permission of the instructor with evidence of previous experience in motion graphics, computer animation, film animation, or advanced cinematography. Email: james_sheldon@emerson.edu
    Instructor: James Sheldon
  • VM420 - Topics in Media Arts: Music Video Production (4 Credits)
    This is an upper level production course offering VMA students the opportunity to advance their creative and technical skills in the short, inventive form of music video. Students will collaborate in producing concept-driven and live performance videos. Students will select subjects from Berklee College student bands, who will apply in an open submission process specifically for this course. In addition to the productions, students will be exposed to the genre?s history and its influential directors. They will also study trends and styles that have been groundbreaking or have had an impact on filmmaking.
    Instructor: Laurel Greenberg
  • VM423 - Writing Television Pilots (4 Credits)
    Examines how to create a television series, including developing an original premise, and writing convincing, multi-dimensional characters, and intriguing, character-specific dialogue. Students write an entire television pilot script to be workshopped in class, along with a pilot package that includes a logline, series synopsis and a 13-week episode guide with character and story arcs.
  • VM428 - Feature Writing Workshop (4 Credits)
    Working from detailed outlines developed in VM 221 or 320 Writing the Feature Film, students complete a first draft of a feature-length screenplay. Students read each other's work, write a critical analysis of each segment, and engage in discussion of aesthetics, craft, and form.
    Instructor: Weiko Lin
  • VM429 - Comedy Writer's Room (4 Credits)
    Emulates a Hollywood comedy writing room. Students collectively create and write an original pilot script for a TV comedy. Students write character sketches, a comprehensive story outline, the first draft of the script and all subsequent drafts, and participate in an extensive punch-up. Participants gain a keen understanding of how a Hollywood comedy writers' room works, how to write under deadline, how to pitch jokes, and how to write comedy as a team.
  • VM440 - Advanced Studio Production: Fiction (4 Credits)
    Provides the opportunity for specialized work in fiction television genres that include a studio component, such as drama series, soap operas, and situation comedies. Students create projects and produce, direct, light, and crew them.
    Instructor: Bavand Karim
  • VM441 - Advanced Studio Production: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Provides the opportunity for specialized work in nonfiction multi-camera television genres, including talk shows, live performance, and public affairs programming. Emphasis is on designing, producing, directing, lighting, and studio crewing.
    Instructor: Eric Handler
  • VM450 - Advanced Sound Design (4 Credits)
    Advanced studies in audio post-production, with emphasis on expanding students' conceptual framework and refining creative audio post-production skills in surround sound mixing and applications in film, video, and digital media.
    Instructor: Elizabeth Fausak
  • VM452 - Art of Noise (4 Credits)
    Explores the concept of the "avant-garde" not as a fading modernist construct, but as a creative tool in contemporary sound art practice. Through examination and modeling of both familiar and obscure works, students cultivate novel strains in their creative voices. Investigates issues related to process (indeterminacy, defamiliarization, stochastic methods, and phase shift) as well as the social aspects of outsider art, subversion, and provocation.
    Instructor: Maurice Methot
  • VM465 - Documentary Photography (4 Credits)
    Provides the foundation for an intense photographic investigation of an issue-cultural, political, ideological, or personal. Develops greater competence in negative making and black-and-white printing, with emphasis on strongly informative images. Assignments require the student to discover narrative possibilities while creating strong individual images. The course's technical components are supplemented by considerations of the history of documentary photography.
    Instructor: Lauren Shaw
  • VM470 - Advanced New Media Projects (4 Credits)
    Permission of Instructor required, email john_craig_freemen@emerson.edu
    Instructor: John Craig Freeman
  • VM471 - Topics in Documentary: Personal Documentary (4 Credits)
    This production course studies the innovative genre of personal, or autobiographical, documentary. Students will explore their own lives, experiences and perspectives, and develop creative ways of presenting their stories on video. The course will examine how personal documentary is different from third-person documentary and what makes a personal story compelling, absorbing, and one that connects to others. The class will also watch and discuss notable personal documentaries.
    Instructor: Laurel Greenberg
  • VM475 - Creative Producing for Film (4 Credits)
    Emphasizes the role of the producer as a key creative force behind a film. Students explore the fundamental cornerstones of that role: identifying and nurturing material, acquiring business skills, developing the ability to form creative collaborations, and understanding financial and distribution opportunities. The course examines the ways in which a creative producer engages with a project from conception through completion with a focus on the development process. Students discuss original ideas; source material (books, stories); pitching; creating log lines; script coverage; the notes process; and assembling the creative team. Customary business affairs are covered, including chain-of-title and talent and option/purchase agreements as well as key concepts for financing, marketing, and distribution.
    Instructor: Linda Reisman
  • VM476 - Editing for Advanced Film and Video (4 Credits)
    This advanced-level post-production course is designed to assist in the editing and completion of students? advanced-level projects. Technical procedures as well as aesthetic and conceptual issues endemic to post-production are examined with an eye to their practical application to students? work on their projects.
  • VM478 - Advanced Cinematography and Videography (4 Credits)
    Offers advanced-level exploration of aesthetics, technology, and craft of cinematography and videography. Students gain a working knowledge of the advanced level of cameras in the department and are expected to develop complex lighting and shot designs. Emphasis is on aesthetic use of the technical elements of motion picture acquisition. Includes significant collaboration with other courses in the curriculum including BFA and BA Production Workshop.
  • VM481 - Advanced Production Design (4 Credits)
    Places students in the role of production designer, the creative individual responsible for the ?look? of a production, as well as the role of art director and set decorator. Students develop and draw design concepts based on scripts, and implement them in class projects and in production. Designing Emerson productions is required. Drawing and drafting skills are most valuable in presenting ideas for weekly critique.
    Instructor: Charles E. McCarry
  • VM490 - BFA Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Note: Registration for this course requires completion of one specialization-level production course and approval by the faculty BFA committee based on application.
  • VM491 - BA Capstone Project (4 Credits)
    Students are admitted by application to produce portfolio work as a Capstone Project. Applications must include a detailed description of the proposal for consideration by a faculty panel. The proposal can be for either a creative project based in any area of the program, including film, TV, animation, sound design, or digital art and games; or a significant research project in media studies. Provides an opportunity to produce a significant piece of creative or scholarly work.
  • VM492 - Photo Practicum (4 Credits)
    Designed to integrate, enrich, and solidify a student's photographic skills building on past productions. Emphasis is placed on developing a portfolio representative of a personal vision.
    Instructor: Lauren Shaw
  • VM499 - Internship (4 Credits)
    Students work in organizations such as a film and video production company, sound lab, broadcast station, or in educational or corporate media under the direct supervision of an approved full-time employee and an assigned faculty member. No more than 8 credits of any combination of directed projects (VM 497), directed studies (VM 498), and internship (VM 499) may be counted toward the major. No more than 4 credits of internship may be counted toward the major. Prerequisites: junior standing, completion of appropriate 200-level production course(s), a grade point average of 2.7 or above, and permission of instructor. A 4-credit internship requires 16 hours a week over a 12-week period and an 8-credit internship requires 32 hours over a 12-week period. No more than 8 credits of internship and no more than 12 credits of any combination of internship, directed project, and directed study may be applied to the total graduation requirements. Students must participate in the Internship Experience Workshop offered through Career Services prior to the start of the internship and should consult the Academic Calendar for registration deadlines. Students who wish to participate in an internship in the Los Angeles, California, area must be enrolled in the Emerson Los Angeles Program.
    Instructor: Vinicius Navarro
  • VM600 - Business of Modern Media (4 Credits)
    Focuses on strategic thinking and implementation of media projects from conception (pre-production) through release/distribution/exhibition. Material covered includes business plans; grant resources, writing, and package preparation; acquiring rights associated with production; preparing for feature production (optioning literary property, pitching ideas, offerings, prospectus); legal issues (rights, copyright, and intellectual property); insurance considerations; advertising; and marketing. Students are required to conduct database web research on the industry and festivals in addition to following current trends in global markets, financing, advertising, and marketing.
  • VM602 - Media Production Ethics and Cultural Diversity (4 Credits)
    Ethical and diversity issues, including deception, privacy, pornography, racism, discrimination, defamation of character, sexism, stereotyping, piracy, censorship, obscenity, ethnocentricity, confidentiality, fairness, and hate speech are investigated as they apply to the production process of film, video, new media, audio, and photography.
    Instructor: Thomas Cooper
  • VM604 - Topics in Media Production: Advanced New Media Projects (4 Credits)
    Provides an opportunity for students working in computer animation, interactive media, motion graphics, digital photography, networked performance, audio, or other forms of new media to create advanced portfolio work. Projects, both collaborative and individual, are developed in the context of peer-based critique and analysis. The focus is on using new technologies for creative self-expression. Students complete the course with an original portfolio-ready project. May be repeated once for credit if projects differ. Special Registration permission required from Graduate Program Director, e-mail l_marc_fields@emerson.edu
    Instructor: John Craig Freeman
  • VM604 - Topics in Media Production: Way's of Seeing (4 Credits)
    The aim of this course is to provide a solid foundation in the defining characteristics of the still image. The class is designed to explore creative possibilities inherent in different photographic formats and materials. The focus is to understand the single frame and how that influences other time-based media, and builds on constructing the image through: frame, time, palette, point of view, scale, and sequence. Use of both b/w and color will be explored as well as analog and digital capture. This course will also include the study of photographic theory as it relates to the practice of photography today. Class field trips to museum collections, galleries, and lectures will serve as an integral part of this course.
    Instructor: Lauren Shaw
  • VM604 - Topics in Media Production: Advanced New Media Projects (4 Credits)
    Provides an opportunity for senior VMA students working in computer animation, interactive media, motion graphics, digital photography, networked performance, audio, or other forms of new media to create advanced portfolio work. Projects, both collaborative and individual, are developed in the context of peer-based critique and analysis. The focus is on using new technologies for creative self-expression. Students complete the course with an original portfolio-ready project. Special permission needed from the Graduate Program Director, limited seats available for graduate students. Contact L_Marc_Fields@emerson.edu
    Instructor: John Craig Freeman
  • VM604 - Topics in Media Production: Advanced Cinematography (4 Credits)
    This class gives graduate students, with a specific interest in cinematography, the opportunity to advance the technical and aesthetic skills learned in Graduate Cinematography. This class will build a new level of confidence in the student as they refine and extend their knowledge of lighting, grip and camera technologies. There is also an emphasis on developing the cinematographer's pre-visualization and brainstorming skills that are critical during pre-production.
    Instructor: Harlan Bosmajian
  • VM604 - Topics in Media Production: Writing the Screen Play (4 Credits)
    This class begins with creating a story concept and developing that idea into a feature-length screenplay with an emphasis on developing the artistic voice. Storytelling methods and techniques for both classic three-act structure and non-linear structure will be examined. Students will learn script analysis, pacing, momentum, character development, conflict and dialogue. Coursework includes completion of a treatment, a detailed outline and a minimum of 60 pages (students will be encouraged to finish the screenplay). All scripts will be suitable for theatrical release, or cable, or streaming platforms.
    Instructor: Jean Stawarz
  • VM604 - Topics in Media Production: Fundamentals of Fiction Film Directing (4 Credits)
    This class provides an overview of the role of the fiction film director from script development through post-production. It will examine each phase of the director's process with emphasis on the methodologies necessary to realize the dramatic possibilities of a cinematic story. Students will create several short exercises and analyze the works of master directors.
  • VM604 - Topics in Media Production: Advanced Producing for Film (4 Credits)
    This course emphasizes the role of the producer as a key creative force behind a film. We will explore the fundamental cornerstones of that role: identifying and nurturing material, acquiring business skills, developing the ability to form creative collaborations and understanding financial and distribution opportunities. The course will examine the ways in which a creative producer engages with a project from conception through completion with a focus on the development process and assembling the creative team. We will cover customary business affairs including chain-of-title, talent and option/purchase agreements as well as key concepts for financing, marketing and distribution. Students will be required to have a script for a short film (not necessarily that he/she will have written) that will be used for various exercises and research.
    Instructor: Linda Reisman
  • VM604 - Topics in Media Production: Graduate Writing for TV (4 Credits)
    The course examines how to create a television series. This includes developing an original premise and writing convincing, multi-dimensional characters and intriguing, character-specific dialogue. Students will write a television pilot script to be work-shopped in class, along with a pilot package that includes a logline, a series synopsis and a six-week episode guide with character descriptions and story arcs. Students will also be introduced to writing scripts for existing TV sitcoms and dramas.
    Instructor: James Macak
  • VM604 - Topics in Media Production: Advanced Cinematography and Video (4 Credits)
    Offers advanced-level exploration of aesthetics, technology, and craft of cinematography and videography. Students gain a working knowledge of the advanced level of cameras in the department and are expected to develop complex lighting and shot designs. Emphasis is on aesthetic use of the technical elements of motion picture acquisition. Special permission needed from the Graduate Program Director, limited seats available for graduate students. Contact L_Marc_Fields@emerson.edu
    Instructor: Harlan Bosmajian
  • VM605 - Graduate Writing Short Subject (4 Credits)
    Introduces the three genres of short form--nonfiction, experimental, and fiction. Students learn the differences and components of each genre and acquire an understanding of the art, craft, and discipline of each process from a writer's point of view. Emphasis is on developing the writer-s individual personal vision.
    Instructors: Hassan Ildari, Marc Fields
  • VM606 - Writing for Interactive Media (4 Credits)
    Explores the fundamentals of writing for the interactive screen. Examines narrative, non-text, web, and multi-user game contexts as the student works from the ideation phase through completed works made ready for production.
    Instructor: Sarah Zaidan
  • VM611 - Principles of Sound Production (4 Credits)
    An introductory course in audio physics, sound principles, and the theory and practice of audio recording and mixing. Emphasis is also placed on concept development within sound production concurrent to the study of signal routing and the mixer console, analog and digital audio recording and editing techniques.
    Instructor: Pierre Archambault
  • VM612 - Graduate Sound Design (4 Credits)
    An introductory course on the art of the sound designer and the processes and theories applied to composing and editing sound tracks for visual media such as film, video, computer animation, and websites. Areas of focus are in audio postproduction techniques and in the roles of the supervising sound editor and the sound designer. Postproduction techniques include dialog correction and automated dialog replacement (ADR), Foley session recording, sound effects acquisition and editing, and the mixing and localization theories and practices for stereo and surround-sound. The theoretical focus of the course is on the voice in film and visual media, as speech, as song, and everything that remains afterward with an ongoing theoretic investigation into the relationship between sound and image.
    Instructor: Pierre Archambault
  • VM613 - Foundations of Image and Sound Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces the aesthetics and practice of image and sound production. Topics include visual composition, preproduction skills, lighting, basic directing, camera operation, lens theory, and editing. Students create projects using digital still photography and video.
  • VM621 - Documentary Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Introduces the practice of documentary video production. Emphasizes documentary strategies, research, budgeting, production, and postproduction. Students produce a documentary short.
    Instructor: Marc Fields
  • VM624 - Graduate Directing Actors for the Screen (4 Credits)
    This is a workshop-style class that focuses on the director-actor interaction. John Cassavetes said that acting is the essential discipline for moviemakers, and in this intensive course, students learn the language of acting and the techniques of directing actors in dramatic productions.
    Instructor: Tom Kingdon
  • VM628 - Experimental Media Production (4 Credits)
    This is a project-based course for students who are interested in experimental analog and digital media. Along with project assignments open to a wide range of processes in various media, students examine ways that audiovisual media can be used to question mainstream genres, either through the invention of new forms or by subverting and hybridizing those forms. Students also look at how alternative venues and audiences shift the meaning and orientation of production. Technical topics include innovative uses of film, video, audio, and software, for example, direct animation or contact recording. Other topics include: the medium as metaphor, alternative representations of politicized subject matters, ordering systems other than the narrative, non-camera-based visual production, installation art and media as object, media's use of performance and anti-performance, image appropriation, the macro and the miniature within the frame, the long take, repetition and feedback loops, and other generative strategies for media makers.
    Instructor: Robert Todd
  • VM631 - Graduate Cinematography (4 Credits)
    Introduces the art of cinematography on both an aesthetic and technical level. Students learn how to shoot on both film and digital formats. They also learn fundamental lighting skills using an array of professional lighting units. Emphasizes the learning of creative techniques for visualizing narrative scripts and exploring the emotional subtext of the cinematic image.
  • VM632 - Advanced Editing (4 Credits)
    Provides a framework for advanced digital editing skills like large-scale media management, off-beat and innovative cutting techniques, emerging individual editing styles, and cutting long-form projects.
    Instructor: Allyson Sherlock
  • VM637 - Space, Place, Image, Sound (4 Credits)
    Examines the development of image-and-sound- based installation art from the late 20th century through the contemporary period. Multimedia installation?expressed in site-specific public works, artist films, single and multichannel video, sculpture and performance, and new media and interactive forms?has become a vital art form in the 21st century. Students produce multimedia installed works of their own design and are introduced to the unique properties and parameters of the form. The culmination of the course is a collaborative multi-site presentation of the work created in class, staged as a 21st-century ?Happening.?
    Instructor: Paul Turano
  • VM640 - MFA Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    This is an intensive workshop for second-year MFA students to concentrate on the main body of their artistic output. Students present their own work and critique the work of others, as well as work on their current projects. Centered on the self-directed production schedule and the collaborative nature of critique in an MFA program, this course prepares students to become lifelong artists. Course to be repeated three times during matriculation.
  • VM651 - Studies in Narrative and Media History (4 Credits)
    Offers a historical survey of media art from the perspective of narrative studies. Exposes students to a wide array of narrative structures historically evident in media art, including conventional and unconventional fictional narrative forms, as well as varying types of narrative evident in documentary and experimental media works. In addition, students are introduced to the role of visual images in media narratives, as well as the impact of digital technologies on narrative forms. Students are expected to develop an understanding of the role of narrative structure in effecting emotion and in communicating ideas.
  • VM652 - Theories of Integrated Media (4 Credits)
    Media are no longer discreet forms of expression. Digital technology has created an integrated environment where even analog media are most often produced and/or viewed in a digital context or with digital tools. This course is an intensive introduction to theories of producing and consuming film, video, photography, and sound, both in isolation and couched within digital technologies. Students are given a background in traditional approaches to media criticism and encouraged to question how the new digital context has altered those approaches and changed the conditions under which the creative expression and consumption of media takes place.
    Instructor: Eric Gordon
  • VM655 - Topics in Media Studies: Civic Media Theory and Methods II (4 Credits)
    Special offerings in the area of Media Studies.
    Instructor: Paul Mihailidis
  • VM655 - Topics in Media Studies: Latin American Cinema (4 Credits)
    This course explores different filmmaking traditions from Latin America, while also looking at the socio-cultural contexts that gave birth to those traditions. Best known for the innovative film movements of the 1960s, Latin American cinema has a history that goes back to the silent era and continues today in the hands of a new generation of filmmakers. The course highlights some key moments in this history and discusses the contribution of Latin American filmmaking to contemporary world cinema. In addition to looking at Latin American films, students should expect to examine concepts such as cultural hegemony, imperialism, postcolonialism, transnationalism, and globalization.
    Instructor: Vinicius Navarro
  • VM655 - Topics in Media Studies: New Media History (4 Credits)
    From Postwar Art & Technology to Contemporary Digital Art, this course will survey the development of new media art in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will begin with an introduction to new technology artwork in the early twentieth century, then focus on the post-World War II period through to contemporary multimedia and digital visual art. This course will be divided into two parts. During the first half we will learn about historical new media art from the early twentieth century through the post-World War II period, the so-called Art & Technology movement. Then, the second half will be an extended research project on contemporary new media and digital art.
    Instructor: Joseph Ketner
  • VM655 - Topics in Media Studies: Civic Media Theory and Methods I (4 Credits)
    Instructor: Eric Gordon
  • VM666 - Continuing Student Status (1 Credit)
  • VM687 - Comprehensive Exams (0 Credit)
    Comprehensive Exams
  • WR101 - Intro to College Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces college writing, focusing on cultural analysis that appears in academic work and in the public intellectual sphere. Emphasizes how writers work with texts (including images, film, music, and other media) to develop writing projects. Through four main writing projects that concentrate on drafting, peer review, and revision, students learn to be constructive readers of each other's writing and to understand the rhetoric of intellectual inquiry.
    Instructors: Andrew Dugan, Anna Sims, Arige Shrouf, Ashley Wells, Breauna Roach, Cathryn Title, Christopher Poole, Colleen Fullin, Daniel DiPaolo, Douglas Koziol, Elizabeth Parfitt, Eric Marshall, Erin Jones, John Taylor, Jordan Escobar, Katherine Faigen, Kayleigh Shoen, Kit Haggard, Lauren Clairmont, Lindsey Haber, Matthew Zazzarino, Michael R. Schrimper, Michelle Betters, Noah Grabeel, Nora Caplan-Bricker, Oscar Mancinas, Pamela DeGregorio, Paul Haney, Peter Medeiros, Raquel Kaplan, Regina Tavani, Ricky Davis, Sarah Burnette, Sarah Cadorette, Stephen Shane, Steve Himmer, Tamera Marko, Wiliam Tierney, Zyanya Dickey
  • WR121 - Research Writing (4 Credits)
    Research-based writing course that explores how rhetorical situations call on writers to do research and how writers draw on various types of writing to present the results of their research. Through four main writing projects, students develop an understanding of the purposes and methods of research and a rhetorical awareness of how research-based writing tasks ask them to consider their relation to the issues they are researching and to their audiences.
    Instructors: Andrew Dugan, Anna Sims, Arige Shrouf, Ashley Wells, Breauna Roach, Cathryn Title, Christopher Poole, Colleen Fullin, Daniel DiPaolo, Donald Vincent, Douglas Koziol, Elizabeth Parfitt, Eric Marshall, Erin Jones, John Taylor, Jordan Escobar, Katherine Faigen, Kayleigh Shoen, Kit Haggard, Lauren Clairmont, Lindsey Haber, Matthew Zazzarino, Michael R. Schrimper, Michelle Betters, Noah Grabeel, Nora Caplan-Bricker, Oscar Mancinas, Pamela DeGregorio, Paul Haney, Peter Medeiros, Raquel Kaplan, Regina Tavani, Ricky Davis, Sarah Burnette, Sarah Cadorette, Stephen Shane, Steve Himmer, Tamera Marko, Wiliam Tierney, Zyanya Dickey
  • WR211 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Fiction and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR212 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Poetry and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR216 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Nonfiction and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR311 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction (4 Credits)
    Original Fiction is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR312 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Poetry (4 Credits)
    Original Poetry is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: Nicole Dutton
  • WR313 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Drama (4 Credits)
    Original Drama is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: William Orem
  • WR315 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Sketch Troup Writing (4 Credits)
    This course will allow the student to explore many different aspects of comedy writing, including sketch comedy, and improvisation. In addition there will be class discussions on the ethics of comedy, brainstorming sessions and discussions of current industry events and trends. The class will act as a comedy sketch troupe. They will write, produce and perform a full sketch show.
    Instructor: Michael Bent
  • WR315 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Comedy (4 Credits)
    This course will allow the student to explore many different aspects of stand-up comedy writing, including generating material, character development, improvisation, and performance technique. In addition there will be class discussions on the ethics of comedy, brainstorming sessions and discussions of current industry events and trends. Each student will write a stand-up comedy routine, which will be revised, and presented at a comedy club.
    Instructor: Michael Bent
  • WR316 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Original Nonfiction is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
    Instructors: Jerald Walker, Natalie Dykstra
  • WR317 - Topics in Creative Writing: Hybrid Forms Workshop (4 Credits)
    In this genre busting workshop students will write prose poems, brief essays, flash fiction, playlets, unfilmable films, fables, lyric essays, epistles, ear plays, and a few forms that you?ll create. Students will explore the uses, abuses and meanings of genre and form labels in past and in current literary practice and their impacts on literature for us as writers and readers, and on writing audiences and will read and discuss literature that pushes the boundaries of genre and/or form categories, or that may propose their own categories.
    Instructor: Peter Shippy
  • WR317 - Top in Creative Writ: Sci-Fi Writing: Robots, Invincible Men, & Journeys to the Center of the Earth (4 Credits)
    A look at the best books and authors of the Science Fiction genre. From the pioneers like Jules Verne and H.G. Wells, whose work has stood the test of time, to the masters like Isaac Asimov and Ray Bradbury, to contemporary authors such as Orson Scott Card and Phillip K. Dick. One of Phillip K. Dick?s famous sayings is, ?It is sometimes an appropriate response to reality to go insane.? That quote is the mantra for the course, as we will not only look at the broad themes of Science Fiction, but also the dark and evil side that often permeates the genre. From Bradbury?s short story ?The Veldt? to Wells?s story of invaders taking over Earth, violence and doomsday scenarios are a constant sidebar students will examine and explore.
    Instructor: Scott Sanders
  • WR317 - Topics in Creative Writing: Re-visionaries (4 Credits)
    Break boundaries and explore the craft of creative writing outside the traditional classroom while amplifying the voices of others. This course allows you to share the power of poetry and creative expression with individuals at locations such as homeless shelters and addiction rehabilitation facilities. We will also examine the broader relationship between the arts and advocacy, public education, and therapy through current literature, media and guest lectures by experts in related fields. Classes will meet as a group both off site and at school each week. Those considering hybrid careers in writing or teaching along with social justice, political advocacy or the healing arts may be most interested in this experience.
    Instructor: Cheryl Buchanan
  • WR320 - Travel Writing (4 Credits)
    The best travel writing takes readers on a journey that is not only geographic, but also narrative. This intermediate course in literary travel writing introduces writers to key ways to transform their experiences in the world- be it a far-flung travel destination or one's hometown- into compelling narratives in the form of short essay or memoir. In addition to short reading and writing assignments, students complete three polished travel essays: two to be workshopped and one to hand into the instructor on the last day of class.
    Instructor: Alden Jones
  • WR405 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Poetry (4 Credits)
    Advanced writing workshop in poetry with in-class discussion of original poems by students already seriously engaged in writing poetry. The course pays special attention to getting published and students are encouraged to submit their work to magazines. May be repeated once for credit.
    Instructor: Daniel Tobin
  • WR407 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Fiction (4 Credits)
    Extensive fiction writing of short stories and/or novels coupled with in-class reading for criticism and the craft of fiction. May be repeated once for credit.
    Instructors: Daphne Kalotay, Steve Yarbrough, Lise Haines, Pamela Painter
  • WR408 - Writing the Novella (4 Credits)
    This workshop is designed to help students write novellas of at least 60 pages during the semester. There is also a significant reading component, as students discuss selected published novellas in the service of helping them plan and write their own drafts. The course is aimed at serious writing students wishing to explore a form that allows for more extended development of plot, theme and character than in the traditional short story, without making the elaborate structural demands of a full-length novel. The fantasy genre is discouraged.
    Instructor: Scott Sanders
  • WR415 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Advanced writing workshop in various nonfiction forms, such as memoir, travel writing, literary journalism, or other narrative nonfiction writing. Students will already have completed at least one nonfiction workshop, have a project in development, and be capable of discussing such techniques as characterization, point of view, and narrative structure as they appear in literary nonfiction forms.
    Instructors: Jabari Asim, Jerald Walker
  • WR490 - Senior Creative Thesis: Fiction and Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Required of all BFA majors: During the final semester of his/her senior year, each student produces an extended literary work-several short stories, a group of poems, a short novel, a nonfiction narrative, a piece of investigative journalism, a play, or a film script. Each student works independently, but consults regularly with an advisor to evaluate and revise the work-in-progress. The final manuscript measures and represents the student's abilities and his/her commitment to a serious creative endeavor. At the time a student writes their BFA thesis, they shall have previously taken, or be currently enrolled in, a WR 400 level class in the genre of their thesis.
    Instructor: Richard Hoffman
  • WR490 - Senior Creative Thesis: Fiction (4 Credits)
    Required of all BFA majors: During the final semester of his/her senior year, each student produces an extended literary work-several short stories, a group of poems, a short novel, a nonfiction narrative, a piece of investigative journalism, a play, or a film script. Each student works independently, but consults regularly with an advisor to evaluate and revise the work-in-progress. The final manuscript measures and represents the student's abilities and his/her commitment to a serious creative endeavor. At the time a student writes their BFA thesis, they shall have previously taken, or be currently enrolled in, a WR 400 level class in the genre of their thesis.
    Instructor: Jessica Treadway
  • WR490 - Senior Creative Thesis: Poetry and Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Required of all BFA majors: During the final semester of his/her senior year, each student produces an extended literary work-several short stories, a group of poems, a short novel, a nonfiction narrative, a piece of investigative journalism, a play, or a film script. Each student works independently, but consults regularly with an advisor to evaluate and revise the work-in-progress. The final manuscript measures and represents the student's abilities and his/her commitment to a serious creative endeavor. At the time a student writes their BFA thesis, they shall have previously taken, or be currently enrolled in, a WR 400 level class in the genre of their thesis.
    Instructor: John Skoyles
  • WR490 - Sr. Creative Thesis-all genres (4 Credits)
    Required of all BFA majors: During the final semester of his/her senior year, each student produces an extended literary work-several short stories, a group of poems, a short novel, a nonfiction narrative, a piece of investigative journalism, a play, or a film script. Each student works independently, but consults regularly with an advisor to evaluate and revise the work-in-progress. The final manuscript measures and represents the student's abilities and his/her commitment to a serious creative endeavor. At the time a student writes their BFA thesis, they shall have previously taken, or be currently enrolled in, a WR 400 level class in the genre of their thesis.
  • WR600 - Teaching College Composition (4 Credits)
    Introduction to composition history, theory, and pedagogy that prepares students to teach college writing courses. Examines debates and practices in college composition and their conceptual foundations and introduces rhetoric as a productive art and means of analysis. In preparation to teach writing, students learn how to design writing assignments, to run writing workshops, to respond to and evaluate student writing, and to produce a syllabus for a first-year composition course. Must be in a WLP Residential program to enroll.
  • WR605 - Poetry Workshop (4 Credits)
    In-class discussions of original poems aim to help students learn strategies for generating and revising work. The workshop asks students to consider their work in light of the essential issues of the poet's craft, and to articulate their individual sensibilities as poets.
    Instructors: Daniel Tobin, John Skoyles
  • WR606 - Fiction Workshop (4 Credits)
    Uses student manuscripts as its main texts, supplemented by published stories, to illustrate the fundamental aspects of fiction, mainly in the short story form. Explores the complexities of narration, characterization, scene, dialogue, style, tone, plot, etc. Emphasis is on the generation of fictional works and on their revision.
  • WR608 - Special Topics in Fiction Workshop: The Short Short Story (4 Credits)
    The focus of this class is student work in the short-short story form?stories from 3 sentences to 100 words to 3 pages. A ?short-short? is not a condensed long story, but a story that requires this length and particular form. Students will be given a topic or form for each story due, so please note that students will be generating all new work for this workshop. (For example, one assignment might be to write a one-sentence story that has urgency and forward movement. Or write a list story. Or write a road-trip story that has two or more characters.) In addition, we?ll read and discuss short short stories by a variety of writers whose work appears in Flash Fiction, one anthology of microfiction, and various journals whose focus is the short short story.
    Instructor: Pamela Painter
  • WR613 - Nonfiction Workshop (4 Credits)
    Stresses the writing of many forms of nonfiction, such as informal essays, autobiography, profiles, travel writing, or literary journalism, coupled with reading assignments of relevant texts.
  • WR652 - Novel Workshop (4 Credits)
    A workshop in structuring and writing the opening chapters of a novel. Explores story premise, stylistic approach, point-of-view, and other structural parameters, as well as revision.
    Instructor: Pablo Medina
  • WR655 - Writing the Nonfiction Book (4 Credits)
    Workshop on the extended narrative, with discussions of organizing the research, developing an outline and devising a structure, carrying out the plan, and writing the book proposal. Students submit their own work and also examine various approaches of nonfiction books.
    Instructor: Douglas Whynott