Course Descriptions


Filter the courses by subject area

  • CC100 - Fundamentals of Speech Communication (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic concepts, theories, and principles of oral communication applied to speaking situations. Develops competence in oral communication through performance and critical analysis of student skills in a variety of speaking formats. Audience analysis, content discovery, communication strategies, arrangement of ideas, use of evidence and reasoning to support claims, language and style, voice and other delivery skills and ethical considerations are covered.
  • CC150 - Radio Programming & Operations (4 Credits)
    An in-depth exploration into the art and science of programming terrestrial, internet, and satellite radio entities, in both the commercial and public sectors. This course focuses on the evolution of broadcasting an audio product for entertainment and informational purposes. It examines the effects of cultural, governmental, technological, and market forces on the radio industry as a whole as well as on individual radio stations throughout North America.
  • CC160 - Interpersonal Communication Skills (4 Credits)
    Introduces the practices and principles of interpersonal communication. Focuses on perception, creative/critical listening, nonverbal communication, emotions, power, and self-disclosure. Issues of ethics, technology, and culture are woven throughout class content and discussions. Stages of relationships are explored as well as the influence of communication within and between those stages. Numerous applications to a variety of situations, including those in the family, workplace, and romantic context are undertaken as students draw from their own experiences.
  • CC201 - Evolution of Expression (4 Credits)
    Covers the development of human communication from orality to literacy to "electracy," or electronic orality, as a foundation for the exploration of issues and problems in contemporary culture concerning effective participation in society. Students learn how such development continues to revolutionize human consciousness, communication, and culture. They consider central concepts of voice and expression in forms ranging from embodied speech to dialogue to new media and technologies.
  • CC203 - Intercultural Communication (4 Credits)
    Analyzes readings in intercultural communication focusing on verbal and nonverbal customs of various cultures as information from both cultural and language perspectives. Each semester focuses on specific topics or cultures. Background in other cultures is helpful but not essential.
  • CC220 - Public Discourse in U.S. (4 Credits)
    Examines how Americans in the United States talk about important public issues including race, class, work, and foreigners. Applies theories of discourse to case studies of political communication.
  • CC221 - Global Political Communication (4 Credits)
    Provides students with a critical understanding of the role of communication in national politics in non-Western contexts as well as the increasingly important role of mediated communication in contemporary international relations and public diplomacy.
  • CC262 - Professional Communication (4 Credits)
    Study and practice of rhetorical argument, proof, ethics, style, and delivery in performance and analysis of speeches. Projects include use of professional communication situations and video/audio aids and new technology to enhance rhetorical effectiveness in message preparation, development, and delivery.
  • CC263 - Argument and Advocacy (4 Credits)
    Studies the art of advocacy. Students develop logical, organizational, and research skills that debate and other forms of oral and written advocacy require. They participate in debates about current political and legal controversies and learn how critical thinking skills are used as tools both for advocates and audiences.
  • CC264 - Oral Presentation of Literature (4 Credits)
    Oral performance of literature (poetry, prose, and drama) is used as the art of understanding and communicating a text's meaning to an audience. Explores the aesthetic dimensions of literature and its performance. Students develop critical skills interpreting texts and evaluating performed literature.
  • CC265 - Professional Voice and Speech (4 Credits)
    Trains voice to develop wide range of controls in pitch, volume, and quality to meet voice and speech needs of journalism, public speaking, and interpretation. International students are encouraged to enroll if interested in accent reduction.
  • CC266 - Conflict and Negotiation (4 Credits)
    Studies conflict theory and principles and practices of dispute resolution. Includes everyday conflict, negotiation, mediation, arbitration, and alternative dispute resolution systems. Emphasizes interpersonal skills development.
  • CC280 - Communication Theory (4 Credits)
    Investigates classical and contemporary theories of political communication with an emphasis on utility of theory in mass- and multi-mediated communication contexts. Discusses application of theory to these domains, including examination of how conceptions of the citizen, democracy, aesthetics, morality, and culture are established and maintained vis-a-vis different modes of communication.
  • CC303 - Politics, Advocacy, and Public Opinion (4 Credits)
    Studies the research process from problem definition to survey design, sampling, data analysis, and interpretation of results. Students develop skills in reading and interpreting social scientific research and conducting forms of research pertinent to public and political communication needs.
  • CC304 - Communicative Informatics (4 Credits)
    Studies social-shaping communication technologies. Explores central role of communication in creating and sustaining social communities online and examines web-based technology and use by people in building social networks and organizational structures. Analyzes optimal use of information technology to create social presence and cohesion in multiple contexts. Individual and/or team projects explore human communication and intersection of information technologies.
  • CC305 - Communication Research Methods (4 Credits)
    Teaches the use of social scientific methods of empirical research to investigate communication phenomena. Students learn how to become critical consumers of research and how to conduct empirical communication research. This course fuses basic research principles with theory and practice.
  • CC310 - Campaign Management (4 Credits)
    Focuses primarily on electoral campaigns with attention to persuasive campaigns in general. Includes political advertising.
  • CC330 - Management and Communication (4 Credits)
    Introduces fundamental principles of management in profit, nonprofit, and government settings. Special emphasis is placed on humanistic and systems approaches, communication skills and theory, and national and global trends. Sample topics include planning, organizing, staffing, decision making, and leading. Case method is applied.
  • CC344 - Rhetoric of Social Movements (4 Credits)
    Critically examines prominent rhetorical texts and events that shaped political processes and relationships. Applies insights to contemporary contexts and issues.
  • CC345 - Public Affairs Matrix: Media, Politics, and Advocacy (4 Credits)
    Advanced study of interplay of media, politics, policy, and advocacy. Through historical and contemporary case studies and research, students examine a variety of constituencies affecting politics and public policy and the role the media play in political, public policy, and advocacy debates. Propaganda is defined and its role in affecting public opinion is discussed. Studies the relationship between communicator, media, and key constituencies with a focus on ethical, effective use of public affairs.
  • CC350 - Media Broadcast Vocal Presentation (4 Credits)
    Course is designed to complement CC 265, Professional Voice and Speech by focusing on voice training for broadcast media specifically, including microphone technique and practice and understanding of audio and video technology.
  • CC356 - Crisis Communication (4 Credits)
    Details the importance of managing communication in crisis situations. Topics include definitions, types, classifications, phases, planning, publics, contingency events, time estimating, crisis teams, control centers, working with media, training, and follow-through. Crisis scenarios cover profit, nonprofit, and government organizations at the local, regional, national, and/or global level. Case examples are employed.
  • CC357 - Leadership (4 Credits)
    Analyzes theory and practice of effective ethical leadership in contemporary political and organizational settings; theories for organizing and motivating people; cross-cultural applications; and issues of diversity and communication skills for leadership.
  • CC361 - Public Diplomacy & Grass Roots Activism (4 Credits)
    Public diplomacy is a new paradigm in the field of international relations and the practice of diplomacy. This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to understand the promise and constraints of public diplomacy in theory as well as practice.
  • CC415 - Mediation, Facilitation, and Dialogue (4 Credits)
    Considers theory and practice of various forms of third-party-guided dispute resolution. Students learn to mediate conflicts, facilitate discussions, and promote dialogue among parties in conflict. Emphasis is on developing skills in leading groups.
  • CC471 - Top: Non-Electoral Issue Advocacy (4 Credits)
    Students gain the knowledge and skills to develop ethical, effective issue advocacy campaigns and campaigns to build identity, and enhance and protect reputation of individuals and organizations. New media developments, diverse and global stakeholder groups, and the 24/7 media environment are addressed. Issues addressed may include climate change and energy sustainability, marriage equality, gun violence and others.
  • CC471 - Top: The Politics of War (4 Credits)
    Using major 20th and 21st century conflicts as case studies, this course addresses such issues as how nations mobilize popular support for wars, how that support is maintained in the face of sacrifice and reversals, and how memories of wars are constructed and spread.
  • CC472 - Professional Sports Communication and Management (4 Credits)
    Course will explore the professional dynamics of sports communication from the perspective of management, public relations, public affairs, journalism, and sports punditry. Class will include sports professionals and journalists providing insights on how sports coverage and narratives differ in local, college and professional sports contexts. Team promotion in traditional and social media will be explored, as will case studies of sports crises, and the role of agents, owners and representatives in sports promotion. As a practical experience in sports communication, class will have the opportunity to will focus on the dynamics of running a 24 hour sports station and the interplay between advertising, professional ownership and fan base in messaging.
  • CC472 - Top: Sports as Soft Power (4 Credits)
    This course will examine sports as soft power (persuasion, influence and attraction) in the attempt to bridge communities and cultures and on the local, national and global stages. Case studies will demonstrate the attraction and effectiveness of sports as a communication strategy, utilized by local, national and international governments, NGO's and governments as part of a strategic communication plan, as well as its role in spontaneous grass roots movements.
  • CC475 - Capstone in Leadership, Politics, and Social Advocacy (4 Credits)
    Advanced theory, research, and practice in political communication. Students develop and enhance portfolios of political communication materials, including development of two communication campaigns.
  • CC476 - Capstone in Communication Studies (4 Credits)
    Advanced theory, research, and practice in communication studies. As a key feature of the course, students complete a senior thesis or project.
  • CC608 - Public Affairs (4 Credits)
    Students gain the knowledge and skills necessary to identify, analyze, and communicate with internal and external stakeholder groups for the purpose of persuasion. Rhetorical strategies are developed for ethical, effective issue advocacy campaigns and campaigns to build identity, and enhance and protect reputation of individuals and organizations. New media developments, diverse and global stakeholder groups, and the 24/7 media environment will be addressed. Students design and produce at least one original communication campaign for a client in the private or public sector.
  • CC609 - Political Communication (4 Credits)
    Political Communication explores fundamental theories, such as agenda setting, framing, and branding. The balancing of ethical implications confronting many political communication situations is discussed through case studies. Practical communication strategy is evaluated, looking at how the media works in general, including the news (hard and soft), entertainment programs, and advertising, in order to shape political perceptions, change attitudes, and effect behavior. Students are introduced to the latest in grassroots activism and mobilization efforts, including mobile and online communication techniques, to better shape civic life, elections, and policy decisions.
  • CC610 - ELL Seminar in Pronunciation, Basic Public Speaking and American Culture (2 Credits)
    Students develop, learn and practice correct American English pronunciation skills while learning basic presentation techniques and American culture.
  • CC611 - Group Dynamics for International Professionals (2 Credits)
    Develops confidence in public speaking through leading class dialogs on current events, conducting a speech, and working in groups to create broadcast news stories. The class will offer practical and theoretical approaches to evaluate and improve English language use.
  • CC612 - Academic Writing for International Students (2 Credits)
    Covers the structure, organization, and goals of academic English writing assignments. Through two main writing projects students concentrate on creating outlines; drafting; use and citation of sources; peer review, and revision.
  • CC613 - ELL Seminar in Leadership and Business English (2 Credits)
    Students learn and practice advanced business and academic language skills most commonly used in the United States Emphasis is on improving presentation and discussion facilitation skills
  • CC623 - Public Diplomacy (4 Credits)
    Public diplomacy is an instrument used by states and non-state actors to understand others' cultures, attitudes, and behavior; build and manage relationships; and influence thoughts and actions to advance their interests and values. Drawing on the experiences of diplomats - both state and public, and a growing academic literature, this seminar-style course will explain how public diplomacy's changing actors, techniques and practice affects the issues, methods, and mediated environments of diplomacy in the 21st centure. Case studies will highlight the strengths and challenges of this type of soft power influence.
  • CC626 - Crisis Communication (4 Credits)
    Students learn about the development of organizational and marketing communication strategies in crisis situations. Using case studies and fieldwork, students focus on the importance of internal communication and media relations during a crisis. Students also investigate preventive strategies that organizations should employ to avoid crises.
  • CC643 - Global Communication (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the management of communication with stakeholders in a world defined by globalization. Case studies, role-play workshops, and ethnographic inquiry are employed to enhance and update the student's knowledge and awareness of best-practices in contemporary business negotiations and transactions, public diplomacy initiatives, and cross-sector partnerships. Examples from small business to multinationals and from local nonprofits to global NGOs are used.
  • CC645 - Public Opinion Research and Practice (4 Credits)
    Students engage in applied research in communication management. Students develop skills in assessing and formulating problems; designing research; gathering, synthesizing, analyzing, and interpreting data; and applying the results to comprehensive communication strategies. Students learn to apply the most appropriate quantitative and qualitative research methods to particular research problems in an effort to effectively address stakeholder audiences, oversee information management systems, and cultivate and manage intellectual capital. Students gain experience in surveys, polling, focus groups, interviews, communication audits, and learn how to optimize research conducted through the Internet-based research.
  • CC648 - Public Relations (4 Credits)
    Addresses in-depth the development of stakeholder relations and communication in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Topics covered include corporate relations, reputation management grassroots organizing, public policy and the media, political communication, social advocacy campaigns, and public diplomacy. Case studies of communication campaigns at the local, state, regional, national, and international levels are used. Students produce and present at least one communication campaign to affect behavior in diverse stakeholder groups.
  • CC652 - Emerging Communication Technologies (4 Credits)
    Surveys the political and social trends of the effects and uses of web-based communication, especially social media, and the shaping and reshaping of institutions. Students develop knowledge and skills in assessing and developing communication strategies for how to best reach multiple stakeholders and audiences with an emphasis on online communication. Through readings, exercises, and projects such as social media audits, students engage in strategic communication planning to best develop every aspect of an institution's communication management - from the narrowest internal communcation to the broadest public communication campaigns.
  • CC692 - Capstone Course in Communication Management (4 Credits)
    Students synthesize prior coursework and new learnings to address an important need in public or organizational life. Calling upon competencies in strategic communication planning and design, students produce and present a final professional-level project as the culmination of their course of study. Readings, case studies, and in-class activities support continued inquiry into the most current theoretical dimensions of the discipline.
  • CC695 - Sem: Prof Oral Communication (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the development of effective, professional oral communication techniques and practices. Emphasis is on delivery (verbal and nonverbal), purposeful message creation, use of technology, organization and audience analysis. All discussions, individual and group presentations will be applicable to academic and career goals.
  • CD153 - Images of the Disabled (4 Credits)
    Studies how the disabled are portrayed in film, theatre, and literature in contrast with the realities of society. Examines the issue of disability as a culture.
  • CD162 - American Sign Language 1 (4 Credits)
    Introduces American Sign Language and American deaf culture. Students learn commonly used signs and basic rules of grammar. The course also explores information related to the deaf community, interaction between deaf and hearing people, and deaf education.
  • CD193 - Introduction to Communication Disorders (4 Credits)
    Provides an overview of the variety of communication disorders affecting children and adults from clinical, education, social, and political perspectives. Students learn to use professional terminology to describe clinical sessions during in-class guided observations. Guest speakers include speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and related filed who describe their work experience.
  • CD201 - Language Acquisition (4 Credits)
    Explores the theoretical and practical aspects of the language learning process and its relation to other aspects of cognitive and social development. Includes discussion of the development of speech and language skills throughout the life span, from birth to adulthood.
  • CD208 - American Sign Language 2 (4 Credits)
    Continues to expand on receptive and expressive skills in ASL with emphasis on developing use of classifiers and the role of spatial relationships.
  • CD233 - Phonetics (4 Credits)
    Studies the various aspects of speech sounds and their production with a focus on articulatory, acoustic, and linguistic bases. Students learn to discriminate, analyze, and transcribe speech sounds using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). The relevance of course content to clinical and other applications is discussed as students learn to use the IPA to transcribe the speech of individuals with communicative impairments and different social dialects and accents. This course may be of special interest to students interested in acting, radio, and/or television broadcasting.
  • CD234 - Speech and Hearing Anatomy and Physiology (4 Credits)
    Studies the structure of the biological systems that underlie speech, language, and hearing with an emphasis on the processes and neural control of respiration, phonation, resonance, and articulation. Clinical disorders are used to elucidate dysfunction of these normal processes as substrates for human communication.
  • CD309 - American Sign Language 3 (4 Credits)
    A continuation of American Sign Language II. Students continue to expand different grammatical features of time signs and some different forms of inflecting verbs. In addition, students continue to develop conversational strategies in asking for clarification, agreeing, disagreeing, and hedging.
  • CD312 - Survey of Speech Disorders (4 Credits)
    Provides students with a basic understanding of speech disorders including articulation and phonology, voice, fluency, neurogenic disorders, and dysphagia. Issues related to assessment and intervention are addressed. Integration of information from the literature into class discussion and written assignments is expected. Students observe diagnostic and therapy sessions toward completion of the 25 hours required by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. They become familiar with clinical terminology and its use in written assignments.
  • CD313 - Survey of Language Disorders (4 Credits)
    Provides students with a basic understanding of disorders of human communication associated with developmental and acquired language disorders in children and adults. Assessment and intervention are addressed. Students observe diagnostic and therapy sessions toward completion of the 25 hours required by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. This is a writing-intensive course in which students write a major term paper with revisions and learn to use the APA writing conventions.
  • CD400 - Clinical Foundations (4 Credits)
    Introduces the clinical process and methodology that underlie observation, assessment, and treatment of communication disorders in children and adults. Students learn to plan and execute a therapy session with a selected client. Clinical writing skills are developed through a variety of written assignments such as treatment plans, data collection and analysis, and progress notes.
  • CD403 - Speech Science (4 Credits)
    Examines the physiological, acoustic, and perceptual processes involved in speech production and perception. Students get exposure to instrumentation for the display and acoustic analysis of speech sounds. This course may be of special interest to students in radio and television broadcasting who want to better understand properties of speech.
  • CD409 - American Sign Language 4 (4 Credits)
    A continuation of American Sign Language III. Students continue to expand knowledge and use of advanced grammatical features and further develop conversational abilities.
  • CD467 - Introductory Audiology (4 Credits)
    Includes detailed anatomy of the ear with an overview of the physics of sound and current medical and audiologic management of hearing loss. Covers pure tone and speech audiometry, site-of-lesion testing, and audiogram interpretation.
  • CD468 - Aural Rehabilitation (4 Credits)
    Examines theories underlying habilitation and rehabilitation procedures for deaf and hard-of-hearing children and adults. Covers the effects of hearing loss on an individual and family, education of children with hearing loss, use of sensory aids, and design of aural rehabilitation programs for various populations.
  • CD497 - Topics in Communication Disorders (4 Credits)
    Focus on topics in the field such as current theoretical perspectives, particular pathologies, clinical methodologies or interdisciplinary issues between communication disorders and other fields.
  • CD600 - Intro to Clinical Methods (1 Credit)
    Required for graduate students from undergraduate fields other than communication disorders and introduces them to clinical practice. Through class discussion, required observation of clinical work, and community screenings, students begin to understand the dynamic interactions between clients and clinicians.
  • CD601 - Clinical Methods I (1 Credit)
    Following the completion of prerequisite coursework and observation hours, students are taught assessment procedures, treatment strategies, and clinical writing skills. The course covers policies and procedures required for on-campus clinical performance as part of pediatric group treatment experiences and/or individual treatment for persons of all ages. This course must be passed prior to enrolling in CD 602.
  • CD602 - Clinical Methods II (1 Credit)
    Focuses on assessment, intervention, documentation, and legislation related to work with school-aged children. This course must be passed prior to enrolling in CD 603.
  • CD603 - Clinical Methods III (1 Credit)
    Students learn about the role of the speech-language pathologist in clinical work with adults and issues pertinent to conducting effective assessment and treatment sessions with various communication disorders in this population. Additional topics include health care reimbursement and regulation, health literacy, and the role of other team members in adult settings. This course must be passed before enrolling in CD 604.
  • CD604 - Clinical Methods IV (1 Credit)
    Focuses on professional issues and the transition into professional practice.
  • CD605 - Clinical Practicum (1 Credit)
    As students progress through the program, they will be assigned to a variety of clinical opportunities both on and off campus. Students enroll in CD 605 for a minimum of five semesters.
  • CD609 - Research Methods and Measurements (3 Credits)
    Teaches students how to use various pieces of research (potentially complex or even contradictory) to guide evidence-based clinical practice. Students learn how to formulate relevant clinical research questions, what prior research is appropriate to answer those questions, and how to find and interpret the relevant literature. Finally, students become proficient in identifying applications and limitations of that literature for clinical decision-making. An emphasis is placed on critical thinking, synthesis of information, and clear written and oral expression.
  • CD623 - Fluency Disorders (3 Credits)
    Explores the nature of stuttering from theoretical and empirical perspectives. Cluttering and neurogenic and psychogenic stuttering are also examined. Procedures for evaluating and treating/managing stuttering among children and adults are emphasized.
  • CD635 - Speech Sound Disorders (3 Credits)
    Presents normative and theoretical perspectives on speech sound development as well as assessment and treatment of the disorders of articulation and phonology. General treatment strategies and specific treatment programs are emphasized. Research in evidence-based practice is highlighted.
  • CD641 - Dysphagia (3 Credits)
    Addresses feeding and swallowing mechanisms and processes, as well as current assessment procedures and management options that occur from infancy through adulthood.
  • CD645 - Language and Literacy Disabilities (3 Credits)
    Focuses on the relationship between spoken and written language and its role in language-based learning disabilities in school-age students. It addresses the characteristics of language, reading, and spelling impairments; the subtypes of these disorders; and the different intervention approaches used with them. Various models of language and reading development and their disorders are reviewed.
  • CD650 - Motor Speech Disorders (3 Credits)
    Students learn the etiology, assessment, diagnosis, and principles of rehabilitation of speech production disorders in individuals with acquired neuropathologies. Information is presented in the context of speech production theory and (where appropriate) of the neurological disease of which the speech disorder is a symptom.
  • CD677 - Voice Disorders (3 Credits)
    Addresses the characteristics, etiology, evaluation, and clinical management of voice disorders and associated pathological conditions in both children and adults. Neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of voice and speech production are reviewed.
  • CD680 - Neurologic Bases of Communication (3 Credits)
    Outlines the anatomy and functional neurophysiology of human communication and provides an overview of neurodevelopment and its processes and disorders. Although the organization of the human nervous system is presented, emphasis is placed on the relationship of this organization to the components of the various communicative, cognitive, linguistic, sensory, and motor processes that are central to human communication and to the treatment of its disorders.
  • CD684 - Augmentative and Alternative Communication (3 Credits)
    Provides an overview of augmentative and alternative communication systems (AAC) and the process of selecting and implementing these systems for children and adults. The first section of the course concerns the basic processes of AAC: messages, symbols, alternative access, assessment and intervention planning. The second section describes issues related to people with developmental disabilities who require AAC services. The third section focuses on AAC for people with acquired communication disabilities.
  • CD686 - Preschool Language Disorders (3 Credits)
    Examines current perspectives in defining, assessing, and intervening with children with language disturbances from infancy through the preschool years. In addition, issues surrounding older individuals with language functioning in the preschool developmental age range are described. Particular attention is given to assessment and intervention techniques for children and individuals at pre-linguistic, emerging language, and conversational language levels. Additional considerations include multicultural issues, working with caregivers and peers, non-speech communication alternatives, and the diverse roles played by speech-language pathologists.
  • CD689 - Audiology in Speech-Language Pathology (3 Credits)
    Provides students with audiological information relevant to the scope of practice for speech-language pathologists. Basic testing and screening techniques, interpretation of audiometric results, and habilitative and rehabilitative methods are discussed with reference to the current literature.
  • CD690 - Aphasia (3 Credits)
    Pathophysiology, epidemiology, and prevention of aphasia, its nature, assessment, and diagnostic procedures, and approaches to intervention are presented. Issues surrounding recovery and prognosis, and treatment efficacy and outcome are also included. All areas are presented with reference to the current literature in the field and to its clinical application.
  • CD692 - Cognitive Communicative Disorders (3 Credits)
    Communication disorders consequent to dementing processes, closed head injury, and damage to the right cerebral hemisphere are covered. Pathology, assessment, differential diagnosis, and treatment are addressed with reference to the current literature.
  • DA203 - Perspectives in World Dance (4 Credits)
    Focuses on learning to "see" and "hear" the form and music of the art of dance across world cultures. Students focus on specific dance ethnographies to understand cultural difference through a study of dance and human movement and to explore contemporary anthropological concerns about representation, globalization, history, and identity. Throughout their study, students focus on various theoretical models in anthropology for studying dance/performance. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective and the General Education Global Diversity requirements.
  • DA231 - Dance Composition I: Improvisation (4 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
  • DA231 - Dance Composition I: Improvisation (4 Credits)
    Permission of the Dance Coordinator required.
  • DA233 - Ballet I (2 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
  • DA233 - Ballet I (2 Credits)
    Permission of the Dance Coordinator required.
  • DA234 - Modern Dance I (2 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
  • DA234 - Modern Dance I (2 Credits)
    Permission of the Dance Coordinator required.
  • DA235 - Tap Dance I (2 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
  • DA237 - Jazz Dance I (2 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
  • DA237 - Jazz Dance I (2 Credits)
    Permission of the Dance Coordinator required.
  • DA333 - Ballet II (2 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
  • DA333 - Ballet II (2 Credits)
    Permission of the Dance Coordinator required.
  • DA335 - Tap Dance II (2 Credits)
    Students at the intermediate level concentrate on exploring more sophisticated levels of technique, style, and rhythmic structure of tap dancing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of the Dance faculty.
  • DA337 - Jazz Dance II (2 Credits)
    Dance Coordinator Permission required for registration
  • DA337 - Jazz Dance II (2 Credits)
    Permission of the Dance Coordinator required.
  • EC203 - Principles of Economics (4 Credits)
    Introduces and focuses on the essential concepts and principles of microeconomics. Studies the allocation of resources under scarcity through decisions made by individual consumers, firms, and business. Students will examine, understand, and prioritize decisions and behaviors that affect many resources, whether financial, environmental, or human.
  • GM601 - Marketing Management in a Global Environment (4 Credits)
    Introduces the economically integrated global marketplace that addresses the global economic environment, social and cultural environments, legal and regulatory considerations, foreign exchange and financial decision-making, marketing research, strategic alternatives for global market entry and expansion, and cooperative global strategies and strategic partnerships. Emphasizes differences between domestic and global strategies when applied to product development, pricing, and distribution, and focuses on the unique role of promotion within a global marketing framework.
  • GM603 - Behavioral Economics in a Global Environment (4 Credits)
    Grounded in theories of behavioral economics, this course examines human and consumer behavior within cultures, how members of diverse cultures differ, and the criteria upon which cultural members can and cannot be compared. Cultural value systems are highlighted as they provide insight into the impact of cultural differences on individual and group processes such as decision-making, verbal and nonverbal communication styles, and organizational structure. Models of decision-making and information processing are also explored.
  • GM604 - Research Methods for Global Marketing Communication and Advertising (4 Credits)
    Provides students with an in-depth understanding of the research process, including formulation of research questions and determination of research design including data collection methods, sampling, data analysis, and interpretation. Introduces students to the world of networked information as well as the application of information technology to decision-making in a global business context.
  • GM605 - Financial and Strategic Context of Global Market Planning (4 Credits)
    Examines the financial environment surrounding marketing decisions in global enterprises. Financial and strategic tools essential in planning and evaluating marketing activities are examined in an overview of financial aspects of marketing decision-making such as forecasting, budgeting, optimizing, valuing, evaluating, and auditing results. Students apply these tools to marketing and communication decisions in strategic planning that addresses challenges of designing and implementing plans across a global enterprise.
  • GM606 - Global Marketing Communication Planning (4 Credits)
    Introduces disciplines within marketing communication and the concept and practice of integrated marketing communication planning. Describes fundamental theory and practice within advertising, public relations, sales promotion, direct marketing, e-commerce, event planning, and sponsorships. Reviews global issues and institutions in the practice of these disciplines in multinational organizations.
  • GM612 - Global Public Relations (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the role of public relations in a global setting, application of market research to public relations, the benefits and limitations of analytical frameworks applied to strategy development, and models of roles and ethical responsibilities of corporations engaged in public relations. Attention is given to the evolution and practice of public relations in major global markets.
  • GM614 - Global Advertising (4 Credits)
    Examines organizational and external environments surrounding global advertising decisions. The impact of business trends, regulatory environment, media management, agencies, and advertisers in global communication planning are discussed. Challenges such as standardizing communication strategy, choosing an agency, allocating decision responsibilities, localizing creative executions, assessing foreign buyers and media audiences, and media planning in multiple markets are examined.
  • GM620 - Global Brand Management (4 Credits)
    Examines the challenge of branding in a worldwide context and provides a systematic approach to all aspects of creating and managing brands. Students are given a comprehensive framework regarding branding alternatives, issues for segmentation and brand research, communicating brand and corporate identities, managing the mix, and organizational and legal issues. Students explore the opportunities offered through line and brand extensions using case studies.
  • GM630 - Interactive and eCommunication in Global Environments (4 Credits)
    Students learn how organizations use the Internet and other interactive technologies to communicate with consumers and the public in global environments, and to examine the differences between traditional media vehicles and the Internet within the context of strategic communication. Students explore how communication has changed given media and delivery system convergence as well as market democratization. Ethical and legal parameters of technology-based communication are also covered.
  • GM636 - Creative Thinking and Problem Solving in a Global Environment (4 Credits)
    The abundance of choices available to consumers for products and services, coupled with messages about them, necessitates that companies differentiate themselves creatively in global markets. Creativity and innovation are becoming cornerstones of business--qualities managers seek in employees and skills graduates must have to excel. This course explores the nature of creativity, creative thinking, and problem solving in a global environment. Interactive exercises, case analyses, discussions, and projects foster and enhance creativity.
  • HC200 - Principles and Practices of Health Communication (4 Credits)
    Introduces the study and application of principles and practices of health communication. This is a foundation for students in exploring what we know about our health due to the different components of communicating about health. Specifically, topics cover doctor-patient communication, the role of culture, social support, family health history, varied communication channels, technology, health campaigns, risk communication, and government policies. Case studies of health practices are used to illustrate these different topics.
  • HC250 - Top: Polio, Prohibition, and Pot Legalization: Public Health Then and Now (4 Credits)
    What do condoms, seat belts, and sunblock have in common? They are just a few of the public health prevention interventions that have dramatically increased life expectancy worldwide. This class provides students with an overview of the public health framework and reviews a number of major milestones in public health. Historical achievements such as vaccines, environmental health, car safety, and medical advancements will be discussed. Current hot topics such as medical marijuana, gun control, and climate change will also be covered.
  • HC400 - Health Communication Campaigns (4 Credits)
    "Just Say No." "This is your brain on drugs." "Live Strong." "Race for the Cure." Health campaigns have influenced our perception of issues related to health and health behaviors for decades. Students learn the process of health campaigns to obtain the skills to develop, implement, and evaluate their own health campaign for a community effort. The course also discusses the role of public health, perceptions of health, and the variety of communication channels available when creating these campaigns. Cross-listed with CC 420.
  • HC601 - Applications of Communication Theory for Health Communication (4 Credits)
    Explores the role of theory, research, and practice in health communication. Investigates provider-patient interaction, social support networks, medical ethics, mass media, and health promotion and disease prevention. Covers the role of communication in health, including the role it plays in individuals' social and cultural expectations and beliefs about health, how such information influences people to think about health and effect behavioral change, and how communication may be used to redefine and change public health policy. Includes readings, projects, exams, and class interaction.
  • HC602 - Media Strategies for the Health Professional (4 Credits)
    Students develop an understanding of the strategic use of the media by health communicators in message development and communication strategy execution. Students also explore the ethical concerns of healthcare professionals who utilize the media. Students learn how to develop effective health communication campaigns that bring about behavioral change among target audiences and influence health policy issues at the local, state, national, and international level. In addition, students learn how to develop evaluation techniques for health communication strategies.
  • HC603 - Research Methods (4 Credits)
    This course is organized around the research process in which students learn how to formulate a research question and define a research problem, decide upon a research design, assess data collection methods, define a sampling frame, determine types of data analyses, interpret data appropriately, and prepare a research report. Topics in both qualitative and quantitative research methods are included. Further, students gain an understanding of the importance of research in the development of health communication strategies.
  • HC605 - Special Topics in Health Communication (4 Credits)
    The study of persuasion and social influence addresses the question of how messages can be used to change beliefs, attitudes, and health behaviors. In this course, students will examine how features of the sender, the message, and the receiver influence persuasive message effects. This course will provide an understanding of when persuasive health messages work, at what time, with what audience. Both classic and contemporary persuasion theory and research will be covered.
  • HC605 - Special Topics in Health Communication (4 Credits)
    Occasionally, courses are offered that capitalize on trends in health communication or which address topics not covered in other courses in the program. May be repeated when topics vary.
  • HC610 - Applied Learning Experience (4 Credits)
    A capstone experience for students completing the Health Communication program. Students conduct research and develop and implement a communication plan to address the needs of a health-related organization in the Boston area. Projects may include the creation of training modules for health professionals, patient education, health information dissemination, policy advocacy, and the like. Students produce a final report.
  • HI102 - Western Civilization and Culture (4 Credits)
    Studies the rise of civilization from its beginnings in the Neolithic Revolution through the classical empires, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the hegemony of European and American civilization throughout the world. Explores in greater detail the influence of Judaism and Christianity in this process.
  • HI201 - Non-Western World History (4 Credits)
    Examines history in a variety of non-Western contexts. The content will vary based upon the non-Western context selected for the semester. Students will focus upon historical events and the impact of these events for civilization in Asian, African, or Middle Eastern contexts.
  • HI203 - Social Movements in the U.S. (4 Credits)
    Examines political movements of industrial and agricultural workers, the unemployed, and the poor to gain power and economic rights since the Great Depression. Chronicles movements that shaped the policies of the New Deal and the Great Society, and analyzes the ways in which these movements fostered a conservative response late in the century. Explores history in the context of the ideals of democratic liberalism, the emerging power of corporate capitalism, and the modern conservative political coalition. Students study historical texts and a variety of cultural sources (literature, films, photographs, songs, and museum exhibitions).
  • HI204 - Islam in the World (4 Credits)
    Pursues an interdisciplinary study of the origins of Islam and the role of Mohammed, the global expansion of the faith, the theology and thought of the Koran and Moslem traditions, and forms of art and architecture generated by the teachings of the prophet. Explores the impact of the renewal of Islam and its increasing role in the modern world.
  • HI208 - The World Since 1914 (4 Credits)
    Explores and develops an understanding of modern history by focusing on an examination of the Russian Revolution, Nazi Germany, Fascist Italy, the origins and events of World War II, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War.
  • HI211 - African-American History (4 Credits)
    Survey sub-Saharan history of the pre-colonial era, and the history of African Americans from the slave trade through the Civil War to the present.
  • HI235 - History of the United States (4 Credits)
    Studies the history of the United States from its colonial beginnings to the present, focusing on the Civil War and its consequences.
  • HS101 - First-Year Honors Seminar 1 (4 Credits)
    Introduces the interdisciplinary study of literature and cultural theory, addressing issues of power and ideology in various multicultural contexts.
  • HS102 - First-Year Honors Seminar 2 (4 Credits)
    Introduces the interdisciplinary study of literature and cultural theory, addressing issues of power and ideology in various multicultural contexts.
  • HS103 - Honors Writing Symposium (4 Credits)
    Taken in conjunction with HS 102, develops skills in research, critical thinking, and writing. Stresses revision, relies on frequent workshops of student writing, and aims to sharpen ability to research, evaluate, and use evidence in a reasonable and convincing way. Write an extended research paper on a topic related to HS 102.
  • HS201 - Sophomore Honors Seminar 3 (4 Credits)
    Engages critical thinking and research about philosophical, cultural, and scientific methods of generating knowledge and their ethical implications. Different areas of inquiry are examined each year. Recent topics include environmental ethics, evolution, astronomy, and epistemology.
  • HS202 - Sophomore Honors Seminar 4 (4 Credits)
    Engages critical thinking and research about philosophical, cultural, and scientific methods of generating knowledge and their ethical implications. Different areas of inquiry are examined each year. Recent topics include environmental ethics, evolution, astronomy, and epistemology.
  • HS301 - Junior Honors Colloquium 1 (0 Credit)
    A one-credit series of workshops and special events that provide mentorship while students develop proposals for Honors theses.
  • HS302 - Junior Honors Colloquium 2 (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
  • HS401 - Senior Honors Colloquium 1 (0 Credit)
    A one-credit series of workshops and special events that provide mentorship while students complete Senior Honors Theses/Projects. In both terms, students share their works-in-progress with the Honors Program Director and other Honors Program students.
  • HS402 - Senior Honors Colloquium 2 (0 Credit)
    A one-credit series of workshops and special events that provide mentorship while students complete Senior Honors Theses/Projects. In both terms, students share their works-in-progress with the Honors Program Director and other Honors Program students.
  • HS490 - Honors Thesis (4 Credits)
    At the end of junior year or after completing the Junior Honors Seminar, students file an Honors Thesis Proposal with the Honors Program director. The proposal includes a description of the overall topic in terms of the general issue or project, the specific question or questions formulated, and the general ways in which the student will address the question(s) and accomplish the project. After a successful defense of their proposal, Honor students produce an Honors thesis in their senior year. Students work independently, but consult regularly with the thesis faculty advisor to evaluate and revise the work in progress. The final thesis represents the student's abilities and a commitment to serious intellectual work. At the time the student writes the thesis, he/she will be enrolled in and have previously taken the Honors Program Colloquia.
  • IN107 - Forbidden Knowledge (4 Credits)
    Addresses basic philosophical questions posed by Western civilization accustomed to unshakable faith in power of knowledge to provide solutions to fundamental challenges facing humanity. Addresses problem equating knowledge with power from its origins in Greek Judeo-Christian cultures to the quintessential modern story of Frankenstein. Sources drawn from poetry (Goethe and Shelley), drama (Aeschylus), literature (Mary Shelley and Voltaire), and philosophy (Descartes and Rousseau) provide an introduction to the heritage of textual and visual material for contemplating the meaning of knowledge for human existence.
  • IN108 - Love and Eroticism in Western Culture (4 Credits)
    Love and eroticism were once the epicenter of philosophy. Yet, since the 19th century, love and eroticism have been secondary to "desire," which suggests more of a structure than an individuated experience. Many theorists repeatedly state that one cannot know desire. Course explores the relationship between this alienating structure and the ego-validating interpersonal encounters we call love so as to rethink the roles that love, desire, and eroticism play in our lived experiences.
  • IN111 - The City (4 Credits)
    Explores the development of the modern city and the impact of urbanization on politics, perception, and spiritual dimension of human life. Examines conceptions of the postmodern city that emerged in the late 20th century and collapse of modernist ideals of architecture and urban life. Primary texts from sociology, urban planning, and architecture are explored.
  • IN117 - Women Artists in Cultural Contexts (4 Credits)
    How has the cultural construction of gender difference placed women at the margins of artistic practice? To what extent have philosophies of art and aesthetics sustained the paradox by which women are simultaneously doubted as artists and represented as muses? Occupying a position inside and outside the domain of artistic practice, the woman artist compels us to challenge both the meaning of gender and the nature of creativity. By engaging text drawn from feminist theory, literature, philosophy, cultural studies, memoir, and visual media, we will explore how women artists register, protest, and subvert the tension arising from pairing "women" and "artist."
  • IN123 - Top: Communication Revolutions (4 Credits)
    Class provides students a broad understanding of critical current issues in media policy. Engaging in political science, economic, and cultural studies literatures, we will explore the intensely political historical foundations of American broadcast media and the Internet. We will probe the current logics of its operation, applying what we have learned to current pressing debates that should concern anyone seeking to be a mediamaker. Why do some issues get discussed extensively in our media and others not? What are the implications of current debates on the future of our media system-and for our democracy itself?
  • IN123 - Top: Communication revolutions: Shaping your media future (4 Credits)
    Class provides students a broad understanding of critical current issues in media policy. Engaging in political science, economic, and cultural studies literatures, we will explore the intensely political historical foundations of American broadcast media and the Internet. We will probe the current logics of its operation, applying what we have learned to current pressing debates that should concern anyone seeking to be a mediamaker. Why do some issues get discussed extensively in our media and others not? What are the implications of current debates on the future of our media system-and for our democracy itself?
  • IN123 - Top: Blood Rites - Explorations in Religion and Violence (4 Credits)
    Conflict between Muslims and Jews in the Middle East or Catholics and Protestants in Ireland; religious nationalism in Africa or fundamentalism in South Asia; the din of explosions in nightclubs, marketplaces, and abortion clinics: almost daily, media stories spotlight the vital link between religion and violence. And yet, this linkage often invites confusion, in part due to the common perception of religion as a force for social peace and harmony. In fact, violence may be found at the very center of spiritual life. Drawing together theoretical perspectives from a range of disciplines, this course explores such sacred phenomena as sacrifice, martyrdom, punishment, ritual performance, xenophobia, fundamentalism, and genocide.
  • IN123 - Top: Ethics & Communication (4 Credits)
    Contemporary ethical issues in professional communication including but not limited to privacy, deception, plagiarism, the First Amendment, human subjects protection, source reliability, gender and race representation, accountability, copyright, pornography, conflict of interest, accuracy, poetic license, and obscenity, are examined in the context of major classical and modern theories of ethics and moral philosophy (such as by Aristotle, Kant, Mill, Rawls, Noddings, Nietzsche, and Potter) from Western philosophy. Intended to introduce students to primary ethical issues in their Emerson College majors and intended careers, as well as to interdisciplinary thinking.
  • IN123 - Top: Coming of Age (4 Credits)
    In this interdisciplinary First Year Seminar students will explore the theme of "Coming of Age" by engaging with concepts of memory, community and education. What part does memory play in the construction of the self? How does community shape us both as individuals and as part of a collective? How does education influence who we become and what we believe? We will take a multidisciplinary approach to these questions, introducing a broad range of ideas and perspectives and honing skills in critical thinking, analytic writing and creative expression.
  • IN123 - Top: Behind the Scenes: Media Makers and Media Making (4 Credits)
    Many courses at Emerson focus on issues of representation and identity in media and the arts. This course turns its attention to media makers: as professionals, as agents of political or social change, as branded digital celebrities. We will explore how the behind-the-scenes culture of media-making affects what is finally presented on screens, billboards, and live on stages. Questions of identity will be central as we study how social, political, and economic conditions of production impact stories, characters, art, and culture.
  • IN123 - Top: Culture, Art & Soc Change (4 Credits)
    Popular culture and the arts are often regarded as sources of entertainment and escapism. Historically, however, they have also served as important vehicles for raising awareness and promoting social, political and cultural change. This interdisciplinary course will explore how literature, cinema, music, and visual arts have been used in a variety of historical and national contexts to facilitate reflection and social transformation.
  • IN123 - Top: American Popular Culture (4 Credits)
    Popular culture is all around us, influencing how we think, how we feel, how we vote, and how we live our lives. This course will address critical issues and approaches to the study of recent American popular culture, including media, visual and material culture, sports, politics, and social life, from McDonald's to Hip Hop. We will be using our own expertise as consumers of popular culture as a starting point for exploring the various roles that it plays in our lives.
  • IN123 - Top: Americn Popular Culture (4 Credits)
    Popular culture is all around us, influencing how we think, how we feel, how we vote, and how we live our lives. This course will address critical issues and approaches to the study of recent American popular culture, including media, visual and material culture, sports, politics, and social life, from McDonald's to Hip Hop. We will be using our own expertise as consumers of popular culture as a starting point for exploring the various roles that it plays in our lives.
  • IN123 - Top: American Popular Culture (4 Credits)
    Popular culture is all around us, influencing how we think, how we feel, how we vote, and how we live our lives. This course will address critical issues and approaches to the study of recent American popular culture, including media, visual and material culture, sports, politics, and social life, from McDonald¨s to Hip Hop. We will be using our own expertise as consumers of popular culture as a starting point for exploring the various roles that it plays in our lives.
  • IN123 - Top: Sci & Psych of Survival (4 Credits)
    The Science and Psychology of Survival What does it take to survive a life-threatening situation? This course explores the theme of survival as a gateway to understanding the complex nature of the human body and mind. Whether stranded in the high Andes, cast adrift at sea, or imprisoned in a Nazi concentration camp, human beings possess an extraordinary capacity for self-preservation. This course combines powerful narratives of survival with biology, anthropology, and psychology to discover why some people overcome dire circumstances and others perish. Do ancient instincts rooted in evolutionary biology help -- or perhaps hinder -- survival in the modern world?
  • IN123 - Top: Literature of Photography (4 Credits)
    This course explores literature and theory in response to photography; works of fiction, memoir, and poetry with photography as their subject; and the interaction/interplay between literature and photography since the advent of modern photography. We will examine the way in which aesthetic movements and themes-surrealism, postmodernism, autobiography-manifest in both media. Projects and papers will be both academic and creative in nature, and will include literary analyses, photographic essays, and independent projects incorporating both image and language.
  • IN123 - Top: Civic Media in Action (4 Credits)
    Topics address the expertise of visiting scholars-in-residence in the Institute. These topics are offered on a rotating basis. Past topics include: American Popular Culture, Blook Rites, Ethics and Communication, and Shakespearean Exclusion.
  • IN126 - Literature of Extreme Situations (4 Credits)
    How are human identities shaped, transformed, distorted, and annihilated, or transformed by extreme personal and social experiences? How and why do people make meaning of such experiences through the creation of art, film, and literature? Reading/viewings include tales of obsession, addiction, and adventure, as told through memoir and fiction. Historic and journalistic accounts of genocide, natural disasters, cults, and other mass experiences are also explored. Primary thematic emphasis is on the integrity of the individual and the continuity of the community. Perspectives from the disciplines of psychology, sociology, and philosophy provide the conceptual framework for discussion.
  • IN127 - The Politics of the Past: History, Memory, and the Arts (4 Credits)
    Moving from the micro-history of the family to the global history of war, this course examines multiple ways societies remember the past. While public memorials and monuments may tell national stories about Civil War battles, the trauma of the Holocaust, or Vietnam, students also study how personal memoirs, graphic novels, or poetry create counter-memories. Students approach these and other questions using the rich historical resources of Boston, looking for material history. Explores emergent new technologies of memory, asking how they may shape a future archive. Students produce their own creative historical projects at the end of the course
  • IN130 - Exoticism in Literature and Art (4 Credits)
    Explores the history of exoticism, the "charm of the unfamiliar" in literature and art, the specific relationship between the artist or author, the subject, and the intended audience that creates the essence of the "Other" and the fascination with the foreign. Explores colonial fascination with the exotic -- foreign landscapes, customs, cultures -- in 18th- and 19th-century fiction, nonfiction, painting; contemporary representations of exoticism, including photography and auto exoticism. Students discuss film, television, pornography, and performance art through interdisciplinary written and visual media (literature, painting, photography, advertising).
  • IN135 - Ways of Seeing (4 Credits)
    Investigates how we see and how to look. The aim of the course is to provide an interdisciplinary platform for exploring and examining visual language and visual culture. Explores the techniques used by the artist/producer to communicate meaning through visual means and the way images are received by the spectator in various cultural contexts. Focuses on how we apprehend and process visual information from our interior and exterior experience, from images as they appear in our dreams and through the lens of memory, to the kinds of images we are confronted with every day, from graffiti to photography, fine art to advertising. Students are encouraged to think critically about what makes up their visual world through mindful looking, reading, writing, and creative projects.
  • IN138 - Staging American Women: The Culture of Burlesque (4 Credits)
    Investigates and traces roles and images of women in vaudeville and burlesque of the late 19th and early 20th centuries and their offshoots. Cultural contexts, performance contents, ideas about gender performed in burlesque genre and powerful role they played in shaping dominant ideologies. Parodies, gender roles and relationships, and the highly controlled social and cultural power of the female form and demeanor forecasted a range of interwoven performative and visual arts designed to elaborate, explore, and exploit American ideologies of sex and gender. Ziegfeld girls, pin-up art of Alberto Vargas, early sexploitation films of Sonney and Freidman.
  • IN146 - Making Monsters (4 Credits)
    From origins of Western literature to contemporary blockbuster films, the monster has been a cross-genre mainstay of storytelling. Monsters represent culturally specific fears in forms from prehistoric beasts running rampant in the modern world to the terrifying results of scientific experiments gone wrong. Through a broad sampling of fiction, poetry, academic writing in anthropology, history, cultural studies, and narrative and ethnographic films, students develop the understanding that monsters do not emerge from thin air, but are manifestations of racial, sexual, and scientific anxieties. Discusses cultural and historical roots of monsters from Beowulf to Frankenstein.
  • IN150 - Creativity in Context (4 Credits)
    Why do people create? Literature, film, art, and psychology provide the conceptual framework for solving the mystery of the creative impulse. What are the hallmarks of the creative personality? Is there a causal relationship between mental illness and artistry? How does the larger community of artists -- muses, collaborators, and competitors -- inspire an individual creator? Must artists be motivated by a sense of duty to society? Orwell's Why I Write, Hemingway's A Movable Feast, Plath's journals, and interviews with artists from the Beatles to Joan Didion to Francis Ford Coppola further illuminate the inspirations, motives, and processes of great artists.
  • IN152 - Cultural Constructions of Identity (4 Credits)
    Explores the complex relations among different modalities of identity, focusing on race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, religion, and nationality. Many individual groups assert their identities without articulating convincing arguments. Indeed, it is often assumed that such individuals need not defend their rights; that one's own identity is a private matter that does not tolerate any intrusion. Bases of belief systems are examined through a variety of interdisciplinary texts that span the fields of literature, cinema, history, sociology, philosophy, and popular culture.
  • IN154 - Power and Privilege (4 Credits)
    What forms does privilege take, and what is its relation to power and oppression? How can we identify the ways that we may benefit from privilege? What responsibility do people in positions of privilege bear with regard to the benefits they enjoy? Why might people in positions of privilege want to work against it, and what can they do? This course provides students with the tools and resources to identify and address questions of privilege and power as they arise in relation to social categories such as race, class, gender, sexuality, and physical ability.
  • IN155 - Post-racial America (4 Credits)
    With so much talk about post-racial society in the United States, re-thinking conceptions of race and ethnicity has never been more important. This course examines the sociocultural construction of "race" and the historical legacy of institutional racism in the United States. It introduces students to contemporary debates about racial identities in popular culture and the media. Students discuss the complex meanings of "whiteness" and explore the critical concepts of "white privilege" and "colorblind racism." Finally, the course provides an in-depth analysis of the prison industrial complex and its impact on African Americans as well as investigates the politics of immigration on Latinos.
  • IN200 - Introduction to Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies (4 Credits)
    Introduces the interdisciplinary field of women's and gender studies. Topics include "common differences" uniting and dividing women and men; how womanhood has been represented in myth, literature, and media; how gender inequalities have been both explained and critiqued; how gender acquires meaning when connected to race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality; and how to address feminism's historical role in promoting gender studies. Explores central paradox of contemporary thinking: the necessity to make gender both matter and not matter.
  • IN203 - Post-Colonial Cultures (4 Credits)
    Investigates the historical, socioeconomic, and ideological contexts within which 20th-century post-colonial cultures have been produced and are negotiated. Providing geographical coverage and theoretical frameworks, it examines cultural production from formerly colonized nations. Analyzes primary material and critical contexts within which these materials can be read and understood.
  • IN206 - Introduction to Digital Media and Culture (4 Credits)
    Helps students develop an informed and critical understanding of how interactive media shape and influence society and communication. Student are exposed to ideas around participatory technologies, collaborative media, social networks, mobile platforms and digital culture. The course looks at the evolution of communication and media industries in the interactive age and explore how the future of digital culture will influence daily civic life, national agendas, and global ideas.
  • IN208 - Rainbow Nation? Race, Class & Culture in South Africa (4 Credits)
    With the end of apartheid and the inauguration of Nelson Mandela as president, South Africa became known as a "rainbow nation." While this "new" South Africa became a symbol of hope for the possibilities of racial reconciliation around the world, more than 15 years after the first multiracial election inequality remains a stark reality. This course examines the intersection of economic, political, social, and cultural forces shaping contemporary South African society. Through engagement of a variety of texts (including literature, memoir, and film), students explore topics such as apartheid and Afrikaner cultural identity; black intellectual, cultural and political resistance movements; the Truth and Reconciliation Commission; and, hope and disillusionment in post-apartheid South Africa.
  • IN210 - Top: Living (with) Borders and Borderlines (4 Credits)
    Many of today's most pressing problems are embedded in globalization's web and demand interdisciplinary tools to solve them. Political, historical, economic, and cultural context for issues such as globalization, development, and human rights allow for understanding not just the problems themselves, but their origins and the reasons why such problems have become entrenched. Through case studies that connect theory to past and current events at local, national, and regional levels, this course will empower students to take on global issues in their own lives.
  • IN210 - Top: Living (with) Borders and Borderlines (4 Credits)
    This course is about political and cultural borders and borderlines in contemporary Europe. Beginning with the proliferation of national borders at the onset of 20th Century and finishing with the vision of a borderless European Union at the end of the Century, we will trace the political and cultural history of borders, identities, ideas, and transformations in Europe during the last century. We will pay particular attention to personal stories, through which we will see how national borders in Europe have shaped, from generation to generation, the personal narratives and identity discourses of the people close to them. Interdisciplinary in nature, this course will draw its reading from such disciplines as border studies, history, literature, ethnology, philosophy, sociology, geography, and visual and media arts.
  • IN212 - Top: Emotions & Everyday Life (4 Credits)
    This course looks at the pretty and not-so-pretty emotions we experience in everyday life. Sudden gratitude for the stranger who holds a door, rage at the car that cuts us off on the freeway, envy for the friend who gets the promotion, love for a spouse on a birthday, disgust for the sandwich at the next table, all tell stories about modern society and its contradictions, as well as the complex individuals who inhabit it. Combining readings in sociology, history, philosophy and psychology as well as literature, poetry and film, the course takes in an emotional spectrum that includes hate, sadness, spite, anxiety, shame, pride, happiness and humor.
  • IN212 - Top: Psychoanalysis & the Arts (4 Credits)
    This course will study relations between art and psychoanalytic psychology from the late 1800's to the present. The first part of the course will introduce psychological concepts and their history, and will include key essays on the psychology of literature and art. We will then consider examples of psychoanalytic interpretations of literature, film, drama, painting, photography and sculpture. Along the way, we will create some interpretative writing of our own, beginning with our dreams. No previous knowledge of psychoanalysis is required, but a capacity for dreaming and imaginative play will be welcomed.
  • IN216 - Top:Digital Media &Culture Lab (4 Credits)
    How have emergent technologies affected politics, citizenship, our economy and governance -- and vice versa? We examine evolving relationships between digital media and culture holistically from theoretical, practical and evaluative standpoints. Students work with faculty to craft research and applied projects in contexts ranging from the local to the global, applying interdisciplinary perspectives from visual arts, journalism, communication studies, political economy, and cultural studies. Areas of exploration include neoliberalism, access, identity, serious gaming, social change, political engagement and social justice.
  • IN223 - Blacks, Whites, and Blues (4 Credits)
    Looks at U.S. social history, race relations, and blues culture as a reflection of social change. Explores historical and literary materials relevant to African American social and economic development and white American cultural and oral-expressive nature of African American culture, relationship to social experience, and influence on mainstream American culture. Topics include American social/musical culture, the plantation South, migration, urban adaptation, experience of women, New Deal and 1960s counterculture politics, and influence of blues culture internationally.
  • IN235 - The Arab Uprisings (4 Credits)
    What are the origins of the spectacular Arab uprisings that millions of Americans followed closely, and which led to the toppling of authoritarian regimes in several countries? Are we witnessing real revolutions or simple regime change? What are the implications of these revolts on the Western world, U.S. foreign policy, and representative liberal democracy? This course explores the modern history of the Arab world to investigate the origins and significance of the recent uprisings. It examines the interplay of culture, political economy, and history to help us contextualize the ongoing Arab revolts. Drawing on interdisciplinary fields, it engages with debates and controversies about the changing contours of the Middle East and North Africa in a world fraught with an economic crisis.
  • IN319 - Feminist Cultural Theory (4 Credits)
    Considers feminist theoretical engagements with culture. Addresses issues that have become central to feminist theorizing, including "the body," "identity and difference," "technoscience," and "the gaze." Through close readings of key texts paired with uses in further theoretical work of these texts, students become familiar with feminist cultural theoretical work, learning how to read and understand it, as well as how to make use of its interdisciplinary and diverse offerings. The reading, discussion, and writing practices incorporated into the course provide students with a feminist theoretical "toolkit" for engaging with different aspects of culture -- from popular culture to technoscience to everyday life.
  • IN324 - Documenting Visual Culture (4 Credits)
    Examines art, performance, films, and television produced by minority and under-represented peoples from local and international contexts through the lens of anthropological and social theory to see how these acts of visual communication are also sites of cultural and social reproduction. Students are also encouraged to take ethnographic methodology, specifically participant observation and field writing, and incorporate it into their research practices and artistic production in their major.
  • IN326 - The Dammed Shawsheen: Blending Ecology and Economics in the Real World (4 Credits)
    Examines how to integrate ecological and economic perspectives to inform public decision-making related to natural resource management. Focuses on a proposed dam removal project on the Shawsheen River in northeastern Massachusetts. Students study the project background in the context of the history of New England, visit the current dams, and hear from different stakeholders. The course concludes with student mastery of a cost-benefit analysis that assesses the project from ecological, social-welfare, economic, and historical perspectives.
  • IN331 - Key Contempory Thinkers: Marx (4 Credits)
    This course is about Marx's theory through the writings of Karl Marx, introducing students to Marx's thought through close readings and discussions of Marx's texts. The course engages key concepts in Marx's thought, such as alienation, ideology, class struggle as well as his critique of capitalism.
  • IN332 - Key Contemporary Thinkers: DuBois (4 Credits)
    Course is crosslisted with LI304-02.
  • IN333 - Civic Media (4 Credits)
    This course not only explores the various goals that campaigns are using digital tools to meet, but also focuses on what type of citizen these tools are enabling and encouraging people to become. Students look at academic research surrounding citizenship and engagement in a digital era and cover research into many genres of civic media, from citizen journalism to hackathons. Additionally, it focuses on questions of design: How best can we, as media creators, encourage certain behaviors? What type of citizens are we building when we make design choices?
  • IN370 - Adv Top: Gender, Sexuality and the Middle East (4 Credits)
    The course introduces students to some of the important theoretical and political debates about gender and sexuality in the Middle East by discussing important questions such as: Is the veil a sign of women oppression in the Arab world? Have women disappeared from public sphere? Do Muslim women need saving? Is the social construction of masculinity in the Arab world atypical? This course explores the politics of gender in the Middle East by examining the stories and everyday lives of women and men. While the focus of the course is on the Middle East, discussions will also focus on Western views and representations of Muslim and Arab women.
  • IN374 - Top: Ghosts of the Past, Specters of the Present (4 Credits)
    Considered "remnants of the past" in Western Europe's post-war politics, radical right movements and parties made an impressive comeback after the 1990s. Their recent electoral achievements have transformed them from fringe parties to contemporary major political forces. How did this transformation take place what motivates it? Do radical right parties represent a revival of the pre-war variety linked to the legacy of fascism or do they constitute a new type of post-modern extreme right politics? Can the rise of right-wing extremism in Europe call into question the European integration or challenge the legitimacy of the continent's democratic order itself?
  • IN374 - Top: Neither Angels Nor Demons (4 Credits)
    This course examines the most fundamental of moral distinctions: the distinction between good and evil. To the extent that humans are morally indeterminate creatures, neither angels nor demons, the distinction between good and evil is always risky and problematic. The goal of the course is to reflect on how thinkers from various disciplines account for the origin, meaning, and scope of these fundamental moral values, as well as the remedies they propose to tackle with the inscrutable mystery of human freedom, from which those values arise.
  • IN374 - Top: Gender, Sexuality and the American Media Industry (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the music, film, and television/cable industries in exploring critical issues in contemporary gender and sexuality studies. The course uses relevant theory about these industries, and multimedia productions from these industries, to examine these issues from production, reception, and critical perspectives. Students will learn how popular culture is produced, marketed, and consumed.
  • IN402 - Living Art in Real Space: Multidisciplinary Art and the Collaborative Process (4 Credits)
    Examines the development and language of multidisciplinary art from the early 20th century to the present day, with reference to specific artists, trends, and movements. Lectures, slide and video presentations, museum visits, student research, reading, writing, and in-depth experiential processes address how different artistic disciplines inform one another and come together in visual art performance and installations. Culminates in final presentations of multidisciplinary work by student groups documenting and mapping the sources, methods, and process of their collaborations.
  • IN403 - The Shock of the Old: Representations and Renaissance Culture (4 Credits)
    Themes of identity and difference, meaning and paradox, and accommodation and strife are traced through Renaissance drama, poetry, painting, music, other visual media, and the speculative essay. Explores "period" attempts within these media to formulate vocabularies of representation and affect. Relates one's own interpretive practices and assumptions to the thematics of Renaissance representation through written and oral exercises and examination of modern critical and artistic representations and (re)interpretations of Renaissance texts.
  • IN406 - Queer Dreams: Politics, Culture and Difference (4 Credits)
    Who or what is queer? How is the term being used to identify ways of living, political goals, social practices and cultural productions? Is queer a new identity, or does it question the terms of identity itself? How do questions of difference - of race, class, gender, sexuality, embodiment, and geo-cultural location - shift or inflect the meaning of this term, and the ways it is mobilized politically and culturally? Just as the term "queer" has been reclaimed from its negative usage, it has also been taken up and revised in a variety of ways that both extend and transform its meanings. Taking up of theory as a way of dreaming, this course focuses on theoretical work in queer studies, offering students the opportunity to explore new possibilities for thinking and living "queer."
  • JR101 - Discovering Journalism (4 Credits)
    Explains how journalism has changed America and the world. Considers the role of journalism as a public service in a democratic society. Students read, view, and listen to the finest and most influential stories. They chart the news in U.S. history, from the American Revolution to today's digital revolution. Students analyze how print, broadcast, and online news have evolved and examine media from other parts of the world. They also explore ethical issues confronting the contemporary journalist and develop knowledge of the First Amendment principles.
  • JR102 - Foundations of Journalism (4 Credits)
    Prerequisite or Corequisite: JR101.
  • JR102 - Foundations of Journalism (4 Credits)
    Students appraise and apply the fundamentals of reporting, writing, and producing news. They cover stories in the Greater Boston community and learn how to develop story ideas, define the focus, and identify and evaluate sources. Students also examine and implement reporting strategies for print, broadcast, and online news stories. They incorporate journalistic standards and practices in all newsgathering and news story presentation. Students write and organize basic news stories with skill, accuracy, and clarity and develop a disciplined use of form and style in news writing.
  • JR103 - The Digital Journalist (4 Credits)
    Covers the use of audio and visual media to tell news stories. Examines modern media, analyzes still and moving images, sound, and best web practices. Students learn how to use photography, videography, and audio to tell compelling stories. They develop and report multimedia stories in and around Boston. Image and sound manipulation and other ethical challenges in the digital age are discussed.
  • JR202 - Beat Reporting Across Media (4 Credits)
    Students learn to cover a geographic or community beat, developing and producing stories in text, audio, and video about a community in Boston. Lectures emphasize the role and function of major institutions in public life, from courts to city hall to Congress; basic public records and research; interviewing; and story origination. Students are assigned to a neighborhood beat and must develop stories in specific areas of civic life, from public safety to demographics change and its impact on community.
  • JR216 - Advanced Audio-Video Journalism (4 Credits)
    Provides intense writing for visual and audio news. Students continue to develop news judgment as it relates to video and audio. They produce and write radio newscasts and reporter packages, as well as organize a video news brief and reporter packages. Students shoot, write, and edit video and audio voiceovers and soundbites for storytelling.
  • JR220 - Interactive News (4 Credits)
    Introduces the history and theory of the news media on the Internet and web and to the reporting, writing, and designing of online news. In the first half of the semester, students analyze best practices of online news publications and write their own blogs. In the second half, they report, write, and design a multimedia website.
  • JR221 - Photojournalism (4 Credits)
    Explores photography as a journalistic storytelling medium by teaching how to communicate news visually in a variety of situations. Develops skills such as shooting pictures on deadline, writing concise and compelling cutlines, and editing for impact. Through historical and contemporary examples, students learn about the power of photojournalism to document, inform, entertain, persuade, and provoke emotion. Examines the ethical and legal challenges of photojournalism.
  • JR240 - Sports Reporting (4 Credits)
    Provides real-world basis for sports coverage in print, broadcast, and online media. Students produce a range of stories in each media, learn the basics of sports beat reporting, learn the necessity of research and reporting for sports stories, deepen knowledge of sports as it appeals to media consumers, and learn how to compete for positions in the job market.
  • JR241 - Radio Journalism (4 Credits)
    Students learn how to write, report, and produce radio news including international, national, and local news. They learn the process of developing story ideas and gathering and organizing information in a way acceptable for broadcast. Students learn how different types of news stories are reported on radio in short form, breaking news, long form, and podcasting. They identify newsmakers and develop further understanding of the broadcast news field. Professionalism, integrity, and accuracy are practiced at all times.
  • JR261 - Feature Writing (4 Credits)
    Students learn to research, organize, and write feature articles for newspapers, magazines, and online media. They develop techniques for finding and focusing stories, interviewing in-depth, improving observation, structure writing, and storytelling. Students understand the variety of feature writing approaches.
  • JR292 - Public Affairs Reporting (4 Credits)
    Introduces the structure and functions of state, local, and federal government from a journalist's perspective. Students report and write in-depth stories on proposed legislation, campaign finance, and current issues in government. Students also become familiar with and make use of public records and open meeting laws, learn advanced reporting skills through readings and class lectures, and review and critique each other's stories.
  • JR318 - TV News Producing (4 Credits)
    Students experience deadline-driven television newsroom operations by producing newscasts and rotating through newsroom jobs such as tape editor, writer, producer, anchor, reporter, and videographer. They write news scripts, edit video to tell a news story, organize and produce a newscast, coordinate video elements for a newscast, and work together as a broadcast news team.
  • JR320 - Environmental Journalism (4 Credits)
    Hands-on course in which students prepare multiple stories on environmental issues, learning the topic and the skills. It is both a discussion course and a working course, embracing science and doing reporting. The course has a special focus on the story of the century: the climate change that will affect every aspect of our society. But it examines a wide range of environmental topics, from local to national to global. Discussion touches on the history of environmental reporting from Rachel Carson to the current fireworks between those who dispute global warming and journalists who report on it. Students learn how to recognize and find good stories, how to approach environmental issues; how to deal with scientists; and how to research, report, write and produce from the field. Multimedia reporting is expected.
  • JR346 - The Berkeley Beacon Lab (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • JR346 - The Berkeley Beacon Lab (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
  • JR347 - WEBN (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • JR347 - WEBN (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
  • JR354 - News Editing and Design (4 Credits)
    Students develop and practice the craft of editing: refining news copy and choosing how and where it will run in a newspaper or on a website. They learn to edit stories for content, structure, word usage, and story flow. Students write headlines and learn appropriate software needed to design pages. Explores issues of style, bias, stereotyping, fairness, and taste.
  • JR364 - Top: Alternative Press (4 Credits)
    A survey course on the role of non-mainstream newspapers in modern U.S. society. The course will explore major events and trends between the 1890s and the 1980s through the coverage in special interest newspapers. The publications used to examine topics in social history will include the race and ethnic press, religious press, trade union press, and press of the political left, among others. Students will study both scholarly and primary source writings, consider the use of the alternative press in the historical method, and write research papers that draw on newspapers as sources of history.
  • JR364 - Top: The Journalist as Entrepreneur (4 Credits)
    This course examines the landscape where journalism and literature meet. We will be reading the finest examples of literary journalism across a spectrum of genres, including complex features, profiles, travel writing, topical sketches and reported essays. Students will then use those writings as templates for their own writing projects. We will explore in-depth reporting, interview technique, detail in service to theme, scene-setting, the elasticity of time, story structure and narrative arc.
  • JR364 - Top: The Journalist as Entrepreneur (4 Credits)
    This course will explore the breakdown of traditional news industry business models and study successful and unsuccessful attempts to create new ones. Student teams will develop business plans and create prototype products, with an emphasis on workable ventures that can be funded, launched and sustainably operated in the real world.
  • JR365 - Top: Music Journalism (4 Credits)
    An intensive writing course covering the classic 1960s rock explosion and its aftershocks. Drawing on the music of the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan, class explores the four main themes of rock style: race, class, demography and gender. Two major papers required: one on the Beatles, and one open subject. Each paper goes through outlines and revisions typical of the publishing process. Additional assignments include story pitching a major music publication and interviewing a band for a color story to hone skills in description, point-of-view, historical context, and political attitudes. The central text, Greil Marcus's Mystery Train, anchors incidental essays by major rock critics of the era, with special attention to style, voice, tone, and best practice examples of New Journalism and rock criticism.
  • JR365 - Top: Women in the Media (4 Credits)
    History is replete with accounts of courageous women who took risks and endangered their lives to have their voices heard and their ideas considered. Yet many women still face substantial gender bias, pay inequity, and barriers of advancement, as a wealth of recent research has shown." This course also examines the portrayals of women in media ranging from dunderheaded housewives to half-naked sex kittens.
  • JR365 - Top: Covering Immigration (4 Credits)
    This course is designed to give journalism majors an understanding of the complexities of covering immigration as a beat. Students enrolled in this seminar-style course will analyze immigration coverage in the U.S. and how it has evolved since the founding of the country. Students will gain a working knowledge of the many institutions involved in creating immigration policy.
  • JR366 - Top:Health & Medical Reporting (4 Credits)
    Coverage of health and medicine is one of the media's most important areas. Students learn how to find news value in medical reports, to research and write medical and health news stories for popular media, and to translate jargon into simple and useful language for audiences.
  • JR368 - Top: Data Visualization (4 Credits)
    Students will learn how to understand and use data to enhance their multimedia storytelling options. They will learn how to find, organize and analyze information from existing databases and their own data collection to develop story ideas and to tell stories that help audiences understand their world with depth. Students will create visuals (such as maps, timelines, infographics, illustrations) using various software applications and basic programming code to show connections, proportions and trends.
  • JR368 - Top: Data Visualization (4 Credits)
    This course introduces concepts, methods and practices of data visualization and data storytelling for journalism majors. Data journalism is an emerging field of practice that ranges from the dazzling interactive graphics of the New York Times to the consistent, watchful reporting of sites like Homicide Watch. In this course, students learn to adopt a "data-mindset" and reflect on how telling stories with data can help advance (and occasionally obscure) public understanding. Students will learn how to find and create data sets for their stories, how to analyze data (including some basic scripting and coding) and how to present data in a variety of ways. Some experience with HTML is helpful but not required.
  • JR419 - ENG/TV News Reporting (4 Credits)
    Students work in the field to research, shoot, write, and edit video news stories. They develop reporting and interviewing skills, visual acuity, writing for the eye and ear, and general TV performance abilities. Students also learn and utilize the technical aspects of video shooting and editing.
  • JR485 - Top: Investigative Consumer Reporting Project (4 Credits)
    This course is being offering in partnership with The New England Center for Investigative Reporting (NECIR), a nonprofit investigative reporting newsroom, and is designed to offer a select group of stgudents hands-on investigative, consumer reporting experience with a goal of producing stories to be run in local and regional news outlets. The stories are intended to benefit, inform and, if need be, warn, consumers. Students will have the opportunity to do one major, in-depth investigative story on a consumer protection issue -- ie. food safety, clean water, prescription drugs, etc -- under the guidance of two award-winning investigative journalists. Students will utilize all reporting techniques including computer-assisted reporting. The story is expected to appear in several Massachusetts newspapers and on TV stations in Boston and in western Massachusetts, with an audience and readership of one million. Students will meet in the NECIR newsroom at BU at least twice weekly and will be expected to demonstrate real commitment to their investigative projects. Course meets Monday and Friday 10-11:45 (be sure to factor in travel time) in the NECIR newsroom at Boston University, 640 Commonwealth Ave, Boston.
  • JR485 - Top: Covering Entertainment (4 Credits)
    This course will examine and analyze many elements of the Entertainment Industry including ownership, partnerships, ethics in reporting, and the role of journalists. Students will be doing multimedia work, research, and practical experience.
  • JR485 - Top: Travel Writing (4 Credits)
    This course will focus on the craft and business of travel writing. Students will identify, pitch and regularly post on targeted blogs (combining text & gallery or slideshow) about some aspect of travel in Boston or New England. These will be published on a class website. We'll also work on more traditional pieces in the medium or media of your choosing. Road trips are optional.
  • JR490 - Online Publishing Capstone (4 Credits)
    Students create a series of multimedia stories for a personal portfolio of online journalistic work. They use advanced tools for creating interactive stories to produce immersive journalistic stories. Text, video, audio, and photos are used to produce journalistic stories that are difficult to tell in print or broadcast alone.
  • JR491 - Broadcast Jour Capstone (4 Credits)
    Refines and further develops ENG or producing skills at an advanced level with the goal of putting together a professional portfolio by semester's end. In addition to completing a body of work, students are expected to engage in in-depth research and critical analysis.
  • JR492 - Deep Reporting Capstone (4 Credits)
    In this project-based course, students pitch, research, report, write, and revise a single long-form story or a series. Work might range from long-form narrative magazine articles or mini-documentaries to multiple-part series on a topic of public importance.
  • JR493 - Backpack Journalist Capstone (4 Credits)
    Students carry out a project from start to finish, learning skills of self-employment, multimedia, marketing, self-editing, and pitching stories. They learn the basics of budgets, taxes, benefit, and legal implications of freelance and sole-proprietor journalism. Students learn about the risks and benefits of practicing journalism without the shelter, and restrictions, of a newsroom. They discover how to juggle technology, reporting, and entrepreneurial skills.
  • JR555 - Reporting Issues of Diversity (4 Credits)
    Develops the knowledge and critical thinking skills needed to function and thrive as a journalist in America's culturally diverse society. Analyzes media coverage of a wide spectrum of underrepresented groups, and challenges personal and societal stereotypes. Students learn from guest speakers, readings, and videos about the realities of different groups as well as the job of journalists trying to cover them.
  • JR561 - TV News Magazine & Documentary (4 Credits)
    Takes a behind-the-scenes look at TV news magazines and documentaries with a focus on research, reporting, and production techniques. Explores how to put together longer-form stories from the initial pitch to the final product. Examines the importance of character development and dramatic storytelling. Covers effective management practices from controlling budgets to directing personnel.
  • JR595 - Multimed Journalism Practicum (4 Credits)
    Learn to produce all facets of the Journalism Students' Online News Service (JSONS). Use the city and the College as a news laboratory to write news in text form and produce audio and video news stories. Work as editors to process the news for the daily news site. Work individually and in teams, utilizing state-of-the-art Internet-ready equipment to produce journalism in a "newsroom without walls" environment. (Offered in Summer Sessions only)
  • JR602 - Critical Perspectives (4 Credits)
    Reflects on the shifting state of journalism and its ethical challenges in a historical context. Historical examples are used to show how journalists have facilitated and contributed to civic life and change. Students explore how journalists have helped build a more just society and reflect on how they might reinvent and reinvigorate journalism's role in society.
  • JR607 - Reporting and Writing (4 Credits)
    Teaches students how to think and act like a journalist, developing the mindset, skillset, and toolset. Students practice reporting and writing skills to cover and produce stories in all media. They cultivate fundamental research and interviewing skills so that their stories are focused, adequately sourced, accurate, and thorough. Students learn to report stories quickly and ethically.
  • JR609 - Visual Storytelling and Reporting (4 Credits)
    Students develop an ability to tell stories in a visual language by studying and producing multimedia stories. They start by identifying a story focus and capturing it in a photograph. They then progress to slideshows, audio, video, and interactive works. This course discusses the rights and responsibilities of visual journalists and the emerging philosophies transforming digital media. Students build their social media audience and create an e-portfolio that is developed throughout the master's program.
  • JR612 - Advanced Reporting (4 Credits)
    Students cover communities bound by geography or common interest. Emphasis is on gaining a deeper understanding of groups largely neglected by traditional media. Students report and produce stories about issues, concerns, and events important to the communities. They build relationships and gather or analyze data about their communities. A panel of community members will give feedback on the students' journalism.
  • JR620 - Online Multimedia (4 Credits)
    Extends student learning of visuals in journalistic storytelling by developing a more sophisticated use of electronic newsgathering and presentation technologies. Students collaborate to produce news for television, web, mobile devices, and other visual media. They design graphics in ways that supplement, complement, and enhance journalistic storytelling.
  • JR623 - Data Visualization (4 Credits)
    Students organize information from existing databases and their own data collection to create graphics that help citizens explore their community, nation, and world with new depth. Using graphics software and basic programming code, students create both static and animated graphics that show proportions, visualize relationships, or display trends over time.
  • JR628 - Law and Public Policy for Journalists (4 Credits)
    Enables students to find, investigate, and navigate through government and research documents, court decisions and documents, and laws and regulations. Students examine the historic reasoning and debate relating to today's laws and regulations. They develop an understanding of the impact of law and public policy in society and within specific communities to inform their journalism.
  • JR632 - Long-Form Storytelling (4 Credits)
    Students learn how to plan, report, draft, and revise a single long-form piece of text journalism, or an in-depth series designed primarily for text and based on depth or immersion reporting. This story or series is complemented with appropriate multimedia elements. The course serves as a foundation for the capstone experience and for other depth reporting classes. It emphasizes establishing long-form focus, planning, the writing process (from initial idea through revision), plotting, and executing multimedia elements and presentation, reporting for substance and story, writing and revision, and placing the story. At the end of the course, students prepare a proposal for a capstone project.
  • JR635 - Long Form Docum & Multimedia (4 Credits)
    Students produce a long-form video or multimedia story as a class. The project is visually driven, including online video, an advanced data visualization, or the implementation of a community media program. Students practice researching a topic, setting objectives, capturing visual assets, and organizing media into a cohesive design to create a professional-level piece or series of pieces. At the end of the course, students prepare a proposal for a capstone project.
  • JR637 - Editing and Web Producing (4 Credits)
    Students learn to use language with precision and economy in journalism. A variety of stories are edited for accuracy, grammar, style, organization, fairness, and legal issues. Students work as web producers, editing copy, writing headlines and summaries, and editing photos and writing captions
  • JR660 - Feature Writing (4 Credits)
    Students research, organize, write, and market feature articles for publication in newspapers and magazines. They learn techniques for finding and focusing stories, interviewing in-depth, observation, and storytelling. Students analyze and apply a variety of approaches, from the personal essay to the dramatic narrative.
  • JR664 - Top: Investigative Consumer Reporting Project (4 Credits)
    This course is being offering in partnership with The New England Center for Investigative Reporting (NECIR), a nonprofit investigative reporting newsroom, and is designed to offer a select group of stgudents hands-on investigative, consumer reporting experience with a goal of producing stories to be run in local and regional news outlets. The stories are intended to benefit, inform and, if need be, warn, consumers. Students will have the opportunity to do one major, in-depth investigative story on a consumer protection issue -- ie. food safety, clean water, prescription drugs, etc -- under the guidance of two award-winning investigative journalists. Students will utilize all reporting techniques including computer-assisted reporting. The story is expected to appear in several Massachusetts newspapers and on TV stations in Boston and in western Massachusetts, with an audience and readership of one million. Students will meet in the NECIR newsroom at BU at least twice weekly and will be expected to demonstrate real commitment to their investigative projects. Course meets Monday and Friday 10-11:45 (be sure to factor in travel time) in the NECIR newsroom at Boston University, 640 Commonwealth Ave, Boston.
  • JR688 - Capstone (4 Credits)
    The capstone experience provides master's degree students with the opportunity to demonstrate: (1) reporting, writing, and multimedia producing skills developed throughout the program; and (2) the ability to practice journalism that enables a vibrant discussion of ideas and encourages civic engagement
  • JR694 - Top: Photojournalism (4 Credits)
    Students will develop their skills in finding, framing and shooting photos and photo stories. The course also will touch on photo editing and caption writing. Over the course of the semester, students will build a portfolio of news and feature photography.
  • LF101 - Elementary French 1 (4 Credits)
    Stresses mastery of essential vocabulary and primary grammatical structures through a situational approach. Students perceive that language is "living" and they discover by the third week of the semester that they can already communicate in French. Class time is devoted to interactive practice. Conversational skills, pronunciation, and understanding are verified through regular oral exams.
  • LF102 - Elementary French 2 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of LF 101, this course also incorporates reading skills and exposes students to a wider range of cultural materials.
  • LI120 - Introduction to Literary Studies (4 Credits)
  • LI120 - Introduction to Literary Studies (4 Credits)
    Gives students intensive practice in literary analysis, critical writing, and related research. In discussing primary texts, considerable attention is given to elements of the different genres (e.g., narrative point of view, narrative structure, metrical and free verse), as well as to issues relevant across literary genres (e.g., form and content, voice, contexts, tone). Readings are chosen from the following genres: poetry, drama, narrative modes, and also include selected literary criticism.
  • LI201 - Literary Foundations (4 Credits)
    Surveys foundational works of Western literature in poetry, nonfiction, fiction, and drama in order to familiarize students with literary history as well as the history of our ideas of love, duty, the afterlife, virtue, and vice. Authors studied may include Homer, Sophocles, Plato, Virgil, Ovid, Dante, Boccaccio, the Beowulf poet, and Chaucer.
  • LI202 - American Literature (4 Credits)
    Introduces representative works of American literature in several genres from the colonial period to the modern by writers such as Bradstreet, Franklin, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Douglass, Melville, Dickinson, Whitman, Chopin, Twain, Crane, Hurston, Faulkner, Williams, and Moore.
  • LI203 - British Literature (4 Credits)
    Historical overview of several genres of British literature from the Renaissance to the 20th century, focusing on writers such as More, Spenser, Milton, Defoe, Bronte, Eliot, Joyce, and Beckett.
  • LI204 - Top: Myth, Literature, & Theory of Myth (4 Credits)
    Addresses literature of the British and American Romantic movements, the dialogue between the British and American texts, and the literary, cultural, and aesthetic influences on these texts. Additionally, it will cover topics such as the sublime wilderness, the divinity in nature, the varied Romantic responses to John Milton's Paradise Lost, as well as the often-neglected female voices of the movements. The course may include writers such as Blake, Wordsworth, Percy Shelley, Anna Barbauld, Mary Robinson, Keats, Dickinson, Bryant, Twain, Emerson, and Fuller.
  • LI204 - Top: Myth, Literature, & Theory of Myth (4 Credits)
    Explores the relationship between literature and (largely classical) mythology and seek to deepen students' understanding of both the centrality of mythology as a system of imaging humanity's and the poet's place in the cosmic order in the classical period and the ways in which modern literature has reinterpreted its developing insights into mythology as a system of cultural value and cultural critique. The first part of the course will consider literary texts from Homer, Sappho, and Pindar to Euripides, Catullus, Virgil, and Claudian in the light of work on myth from Rohde, Eliade, and Dumezil to Vernant, Loraux, and Nagy. The second part of the course will consider the use of myth in modernist and recent authors from Pound, Eliot, H.D., and Graves to Plath, Heany, Walcott, Z. Herbert, and others.
  • LI204 - Top: Major Minority Voices in Contemporary Literature (4 Credits)
    Introduces representative works of marginalized, emerging voices in the literary community, focusing primarily on the minority experience and pop-culture literature. The course will explore a study of selected works written by American writers including Roxanne Gay, Suzan-Lori Parks, Saeed Jones, and Danez Smith among others. Students will begin to understand how these writers fit within and how they are changing the future dynamics of their respective genres as well as how to efficiently do research of popular culture.
  • LI204 - Top: Food as Metaphor (4 Credits)
    So much depends on dinner, and in literature, drama takes a seat among the forks and spoons. Whether it's eating Chinese Food Naked (Mei Ng) or imagining "How to Cook A Woolf" (MFK Fisher) food in fiction, poetry, and essays serves forth a banquet for the senses. In this class, we will read a range of writers addressing food, explore symbols and metaphors, and write both creatively and analytically on the subject.
  • LI204 - Top: Graphic Literature (4 Credits)
    Students will examine the wonderful world of graphic novels and comic art, ranging from Art Spiegelman's Maus to mainstream and independent creators such as Alan Moore, Alison Bechdel and Mat Johnson. The world we're exploring is expansive and diverse, and we'll aim to be similarly democratic, with no prejudice toward category or genre. The course works toward an understanding of the ways that image and text combine to create art that moves and inspires us while telling compelling stories.Class will be discussion-oriented; assignments will be critical and creative, both individual and collaborative.
  • LI204 - Top: Myth, Literature, & Theory of Myth (4 Credits)
    Surveys Renaissance Drama in context, examining the major plays of Shakespeare and his Contemporaries, including Thomas Kyd, Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, Philip Massinger, Elizabeth Cary, Thomas Dekker, Francis Beamont, and John Fletcher, in relationship to their major prose, poetry, and additional literary works, including masques and other public or courtly entertainments. It examines the traditions of social and political comedy and tragedy in the light of issues concerning religion, politics, and economics. But it also deals with Senecan influence; the mapping and planning of London as a city; gender, sexuality, and eroticism; visual aesthetics and the literary baroque; developments in trade and commerce; and aspects of individual identity and self-fashioning.
  • LI204 - Top: Autobiography (4 Credits)
    This course is about autobiography and self-narrative in novels, dramas and nonfiction. We analyze the form not only from a literary but from a cultural and historical perspective. Autobiography, although one of the most popular literary genres, remains difficult to define. How can someone be the storyteller and at the same time, the object of his/her narrative? We will read and analyze outstanding autobiographical novels, dramas and nonfiction, from the Middle Ages to present time, exploring the relationship between fiction and autobiography, using a dual approach. First, we will examine autobiography as a form of fiction. Second, we will focus on how fictional techniques can be successfully adopted in autobiographical narratives.
  • LI204 - Top: Myth, Literature, & Theory of Myth (4 Credits)
    Through the study of the origins and transformations of fairy tales, we will explore how storytelling shapes our sense of identity. We examine the recurring motifs within these enduring tales and why and how contemporary authors have subverted these themes and lessons. Above all, we will utilize this traditional literature and its variations to explore various theoretical approaches, which define, interpret, and reflect culture.
  • LI208 - US Multicultural Literatures (4 Credits)
    Introduces poetry, fiction, and other genres produced in the multicultural U.S.A. Explores ways writers from disparate communities use various literary forms to articulate resistance, community, and citizenship. Literary texts are situated in their historical contexts and examine the writing strategies of each author. Also includes essays, journalism, and films to learn how diverse cultural texts work to represent America.
  • LI209 - Top: Harlem Renaissance (4 Credits)
    Course examines some of the major poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction (autobiography and essay) of one of the most celebrated African American and American arts movements: the Harlem Renaissance. An extension of post-slavery identity for African Americans, the Harlem Renaissance emerged from the intersection of rural and urban; traditional and modern; nationalistic and cosmopolitan; and black and white. We will pay particular attention to migration, inter- and intra-racial relations, the interplay of race, gender, class, and sexuality, and the phenomenon of passing. In addition, although our primary focus will be on written texts, we will also explore the influence of music (jazz and blues) and visual art on the literature and culture of the period.
  • LI210 - American Women Writers (4 Credits)
    Examines fiction, poetry, and other genres by 19th- and 20th-century American women such as Jacobs, Dickinson, Chopin, Kingston, Welty, Rich, and Morrison.
  • LI211 - Top: Southeastern Europe: Between the Empires (4 Credits)
    What do vampires and democracy have in common? Join us as we explore the contexts of European imperialism through the literatures of Southeastern Europe from the 18th to the 21st century. The course will map relations between empires and subjects, centers and peripheries, nation building and global movements, political repression and poetic imagination, myth and history. The focus will be equally distributed between modern Greece, its Balkan neighbors, and the last decades of the Ottoman Empire. Representative works of fiction, poetry, essay and travel writing, historiography, anthropology, ethnography, and journalism will be included.
  • LI212 - Black Revolutionary Thought (4 Credits)
    Traces the protest tradition and radical thinking in African American literature. Using landmark essays by W.E.B Du Bois and Alain Locke to frame the debate and then moving from David Walker to Malcolm X and beyond, this course engages questions about the development of the Jeremiadic tradition in African American literature, the role of the black artist in promoting social change, gendered differences in protest literature, and whether politics informs and elevates art or strangles it.
  • LI214 - Latino Literature (4 Credits)
    Explores the idea of borderlands or living on the hyphen by American writers who identify themselves as straddling two cultures. Students read poetry, essays, fiction and theater by authors in the following traditions: Chicano, Puerto Rican (Borinquen), Cuban and Dominican American.
  • LI215 - Slavery and Freedom (4 Credits)
    Looks at a wide-ranging survey of 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century poems, plays, novels, and nonfiction narratives concerning the issue of American slavery and its aftermath. Explores slave narrative conventions across historical periods as well as themes such as identity, masking, the liberating power of literacy, and masculine and feminine definitions of freedom.
  • LI216 - Literature of the Gothic (4 Credits)
    Focuses on literary and aesthetic tradition known as the Gothic, following its various manifestations from 18th century England up to present-day America. Students read novels, poetry, short stories and plays. Students interested in postmodern expressions of the Gothic, from graphic novels to film, will be invited to bring these to the table. Is Dracula really about the anxiety of empire? What is Frankenstein saying about social theory and the dangers of Romanticism? And finally, why does Gothic material retain its fascination in the 21st century, when so many aesthetic movements lie moldering in their graves?
  • LI217 - Lit, Culture & the Environment (4 Credits)
    Examines the literature, art, and culture of Native and non-Native America and consider how these two very different traditions have affected the environment. Initially, students focus on Native Creation stories and on Genesis in order to better understand the definition of "wilderness." They then study the work of 17th-, 18th-, and 19th-century authors and artists who influenced and/or responded to how the environment should be managed. As students progress to the 20th and 21st centuries, they consider the work of artists, writers, and filmmakers who acknowledge and attempt to come to terms with a drastically changed and oftentimes degraded landscape in their work.
  • LI303 - The Art of Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Examines a broad range of literary nonfiction works, present and past, paying particular attention to the craft within the nonfiction work but identifying relationships and similarities that literary nonfiction has with the novel and short story. Includes readings from such diverse forms as historical narrative, adventure travel and survival, memoir and the creative nonfiction essay, and other forms of factual writing artfully constructed.
  • LI304 - Top: Making it Strange: Fictions of Effect (4 Credits)
    "All stories today are clich‚ and obsolete." (Bela Tarr). This course will look at some works that are less interested in story and resolution than in de-familiarizing the familiar, that try to create a tone or effect, to do rather than mean - works that are not so much about things as an attempt to make them happen and bring something into being.
  • LI304 - Top: The Prose Poem (4 Credits)
    "Writing a prose poem is a bit like trying to catch a fly in a dark room."-Charles Simic. This class will focus on American masters of the form, from Gertrude Stein and William Carlos Williams to contemporary virtuosos like Charles Simic, Russell Edson, Harryette Mullen, James Tate, Matthea Harvey, and Anne Carson. We'll also sample the international poets who created and nurtured prose poetry, including Aloysius Bertrand, Charles Baudelaire, Wislawa Szymborska, and Julio Cortazt r.
  • LI305 - Modern Poetry and After (4 Credits)
    Explores modern and postmodern traditions of poetry in the works of such 20th-century poets as Eliot, Stevens, Auden, Moore, Lowell, Bishop, Plath, Larkin, Rich, Ashbery, and, in translation, Neruda, Rilke, Herbert, Kazuk, and Tsvetaeva.
  • LI306 - Literatures of Continental Europe (4 Credits)
    Explores seminal works in the European literary tradition, with a particular focus on close reading, textual and rhetorical analysis, and aesthetic criticism. The course may include works by Montaigne, Rousseau, Flaubert, Holderlin, Novalis, Heine, Flaubert, Dostoyevsky, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Proust, Rilke, Kafka, Borges, Bachmann, and Bernhard. Students write short responses to each work and discuss their ideas in class.
  • LI307 - The Art of Poetry (4 Credits)
    Through reading and discussion of poems from different historical periods, students learn the technical aspects of poetry (such as meter, rhyme, and structure) and how poets use these techniques to create meanings and effects, giving students a critical vocabulary for reading and practicing poetry. For students who want to enhance their ability to discuss and write about poetry by learning the essentials of the poet's art.
  • LI308 - The Art of Fiction (4 Credits)
    Explores a broad range of short stories and novels by American and international authors. Teaches students to look at fiction from the perspective of the writer's craft, and emphasizes such elements as structure, narrative, characterization, dialogue, and the differences between shorter and longer forms. Students gain an appreciation of the fiction writer's craft and an enhanced sense of the drama inherent in effective storytelling.
  • LI309 - Topics in Multicultural Literature (4 Credits)
    Courses focus on literature produced by historically oppressed peoples in the United States and on specific themes or topics, such as slavery and freedom, American Indian multi-genre life-stories, or border identities. All topics include the study of literature in at least three genres (selected from poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama). May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • LI313 - Novel into Film (4 Credits)
    Studies the adaptation of novels into films, and the narrative conventions that govern each medium. Texts include the works of such writers as Kesey, Burgess, Kundera, Walker, Nabokov, and Puig; films include the work of directors such as Kubrick, Forman, Spielberg, and Babenco.
  • LI323 - The American Short Story (4 Credits)
    Acquaints students with the changing thematic and stylistic concerns of the American short story and develops students' critical writing and reading skills. May include authors such as Chopin, Poe, Parker, Hemingway, Faulkner, Stafford, Bambara, Paley, Ford, Oates, and Updike.
  • LI339 - British Novel 1 (4 Credits)
    Engages in social and cultural analysis of the "rise" of the novel in England with representative works from the Restoration (1660) through the end of the 19th century. May include authors such as Behn, Defoe, Sterne, Richardson, Austen, Bronte, Shelley, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy.
  • LI340 - British Novel 2 (4 Credits)
    Studies representative works of 20th-century British fiction. May cover Modernist authors from the first half of the century such as Forster, Joyce, Ford, Lawrence, Woolf, Waugh, O'Brien, Durrell, Greene, Beckett, Lessing, Murdoch, Golding, and Fowles as well as more contemporary writers from England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland such as McEwan, Barnes, Amis, Crace, Kelman, and Carter.
  • LI361 - Native American Literature (4 Credits)
    Studies works in several genres, including consideration of how traditional myth, story, and ritual contribute to contemporary fiction and poetry, and how the literature reflects and responds to historical and contemporary conditions. May include such authors as Silko, Momaday, Ortiz, Harjo, and Erdrich.
  • LI371 - Shakespearean Tragedy (4 Credits)
    Carefully examines selected tragedies from Romeo and Juliet to Antony and Cleopatra, emphasizing the development of the tragic form.
  • LI372 - Shakespearean Comedy (4 Credits)
    Detailed study of selected comedies from A Midsummer Night's Dream to The Winter's Tale, emphasizing Shakespeare's development of the comic form.
  • LI382 - African-American Literature (4 Credits)
    Surveys African American literature (prose, poetry, and drama) from Olaudah Equiano through Toni Morrison and examines African American literature as part of the field of Diaspora studies. Also explores connections between African American and Caribbean American literatures conceived as literatures of the African Diaspora.
  • LI393 - American Novel 1 (4 Credits)
    Studies representative American novels written before the 20th century, including works by such authors as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Twain, Chopin, Wharton, and James
  • LI396 - International Women Writers (4 Credits)
    Explores works by contemporary international women writers within their social and political contexts. Readings include work by such writers as Nadine Gordimer, Jamaica Kincaid, Michelle Cliff, Mawal El Saadawi, Bessie Head, Luisa Valenzuela, and others.
  • LI413 - The Forms of Poetry: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)
    Students study forms of poetry as used by historical and contemporary poets, and then write original poems in those forms (such as the sonnet, villanelle, haiku, sestina, syllabic, and renga), and genre forms (such as Surrealist, Expressionist, Anti-poem, Open Field, and Language poetry).
  • LI414 - After the Disaster: Post-War European Literature (4 Credits)
    Explores post-war European literary works that are marked by a profound sense of loss, disorientation, and pessimism, with a particular focus on the practices of close reading, textual analysis, and theoretically oriented criticism. Explores how the events of the war- most notably the Holocaust -affected the literature of Europe in their wake. Authors to be read include Primo Levi, Ruth Kluger, Marguerite Duras, Maurice Blanchot, Michel Houellebecq, and W.G. Sebald.
  • LI415 - Travel Literature (4 Credits)
    Home and away, placement and displacement, location and dislocation are all themes that abound not only in contemporary literature in all its forms (fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama) but also in contemporary literary and cultural criticism. This course explores the theme of travel in literature across its historical terrain in order to understand not only the evolution of its forms but also its role in the construction of identities, familiar and foreign.
  • LI421 - Top: Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman (4 Credits)
    Dickinson and Whitman are not only the two most important poets writing in the U.S. in the 19th century; their radical departures from the conventions of their time make their work powerful and inspiring for contemporary readers and writers. While their poetic forms could hardly be more different, thematically (e.g., sexuality, war, power, and spirituality) their interests often overlap, even when their responses, like their styles, diverge. Through intensive study of their poetry and selected prose, we will examine the techniques and voices, and some of the thematic concerns, of these two revolutionary poets. Study of changes made in drafts or successive editions of the poetry will allow us to speculate about their writing processes and about the development of their poetics.
  • LI421 - Top: 20th Century American Women Writers and the American Dream (4 Credits)
    In the 19th century American writers created a distinct literature that articulated a national rhetoric of Western expansion, unfettered class mobility, domestic harmony, and a homogenous ideal of "Americanness." In the 20th century writers began to critique these ideals. Using a diverse and multicultural range of writers, this course examines how American women writers enter and often amplify this critique by depicting the limitations (and failures) of both nationalism and domesticity. Course explores the American Dream of unfettered class mobility and individual liberty as a formation of what critic Lauren Berlant calls "national fantasy," a utopian national idea regarded as universally accessible and made forever unattainable by differences of gender, race, and sexuality. Course also considers how American women writers mark the distance between this national fantasy and historical and lived reality and record the social, psychic, and emotional costs of adhering to a national ideal.
  • LI423 - Top: Utopian, Dystopian, and Apocalyptic Fictions (4 Credits)
    "That's great, it starts with an earthquake" -R.E.M. This course takes early modern, romantic, and victorian visions of utopian worlds, 20th century dystopian visions, and some contemporary apocalyptic fictions. After dispensing some of the obvious allegorical questions about the function of these visions of "Brave New Worlds," we consider some of the more complex contours of utopian projects in opposition to dystopian and apocalyptic refutations and whether they are refutations at all. In particular we consider the idea of progress and futurity in the context of Marxist, postmodern, and poststructural theory. Possible texts may include More's 'Utopia', Cavendish's 'The Blazing World', Shelley's 'The Last Man', Orwell's '1984', Lawrence's 'Apocalypse', Atwood's 'The Handmaid's Tale', Ishiguro's 'Never Let Me Go', MacCarthy's 'The Road', selections of Kirkman's 'The Walking Dead', Mitchell's 'Cloud Atlas'.
  • LI423 - Top: Latin American Short Fiction (4 Credits)
    Explores this history of translation and offers the means through which students can learn the transnational literacy that is necessary for translating cultures today. Through reading a series of texts on and in translation, the class illustrates the jagged relationship between condition and effect of knowing, that is, the difference between the way a text conveys its truth to its particular cultural context and the knowledge conveyed to the reader at large. The aim of this class is to offer students tools through which they can act in an ethical way, a political way, when it comes to cultural translations in a global cultural context.
  • LI423 - Top: Latin American Short Fiction (4 Credits)
    Latin American Short Fiction considers short fiction written since the 1940s. It concentrates on major figures of the twentieth century beginning with Jorge Luis Borges who set the parameters of postmodern fiction in Latin American letters. The course centers on authors who "problematize both the nature of the referent and its relation to the real, historical world by its paradoxical combination of metafictional self-reflexivity with historical subject matter" (Linda Hutcheon, A Poetics of Postmodernism). The course will also consider how writers reach out to a global audience by engaging popular literary forms such as detective fiction, the fantastic, melodrama, new journalism and magical realism.
  • LI423 - Top: Colonization and Diaspora: in the Light of Indian, Caribbean and African Novels (4 Credits)
    This course will address the topics of colonization and its aftermath diaspora. We will start journey through the reading of the Indian novelist Amitav Ghosh's Sea of Poppies where Indians were deported to Mauritius as indentured laborers. Along that line, we will also study the Caribbean novelist Jamaica Kincaid's At the Bottom of the River to study the sad history of colonization in Caribbean Islands. This will take us to the next phase of our journey where we will read Indian female novelists like JhumpaLahiri and Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni to experience lives of immigrants, their struggle and success stories in the USA. Finally, we will take into consideration the bleak truth of African diaspora through Toni Morrison's Beloved. Students will also read articles and books chapters as well as watch a film to guide them into theoretical and critical contexts of colonization, and diaspora. Class will be conducted as a seminar primarily based on discussion and presentations.
  • LI436 - Cultural Criticism (4 Credits)
    Surveys the dominant theoretical approaches to the study of culture. The course traces their main arguments and helps students develop a sense of what it means to be a producer and a consumer of culture today.
  • LI481 - Top: Afrofuturism (4 Credits)
    This course examines several genres of black speculative fiction, studying their historical trajectories and future projections, moving from W.E.B. Du Bois to digital diasporas. We will analyze how speculative fiction enables a writer and a reader to imagine new possibilities about race and society. Studying the principles of Afrofuturism, we will read novels, short fiction, and critical theory. At the end of this course you will be able to articulate and defend a working definition of Afrofuturism, drawing on a range of readings from critical analyses to short stories, to cultural theory, to canonical novels.
  • LI482 - Top: Modern Grotesque (4 Credits)
    Explores the unnerving, freakish, horrifying, and comic world of the modern grotesque. Readings will include short stories and novels by writers such as Franz Kafka, Amos Tutuola, Flannery O'Connor, Stona Fitch, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Nathanael West. We'll also touch upon visual representations of the grotesque, looking at works by artists and filmmakers such as Diane Arbus, Joel-Peter Witkin, Jan Svankmajer, Alejandro Jodorowski, and Werner Herzog. An appreciation of modern grotesque literature and art requires a sense of humor, a willingness to consider the bizarre, and, on occasion, a steady nerve. Concerned with what critic Philip Thomson calls "the unresolved clash of incompatibles," the modern grotesque offers an unflinchingly look at the essential dislocation of our world.
  • LI482 - Top: The Great Books (4 Credits)
    There are some great books everyone should have a chance to read and talk about. Two of them, both by Joyce, are Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Ulysses. This is an upper-level literature course with a small-group seminar format that will explore the previously listed two texts together with critical essays on Portrait, and the companion gloss of Ulysses by Kenner. Discussion will be organized largely around student presentations, with some specific topics for group discussion.
  • LI612 - Top: Poet, Daemon & Craftsman (4 Credits)
    "Wild thing, you make my heart sing." (Chip Taylor, The Troggs). Why has too much workshop poetry gone the way of primness and propriety? Why the over-emphasis on form and technique? This course seeks to restore the balance between wildness and craft by exploring the intersection between Dionysius and Apollo in the works of modern and contemporary masters. Readings will include works by Apollinaire, Dickinson, Neruda, Storni, Corso, Huidobro, Parra, Zagajewski, Amichai, Lleshanaku, and others. Weekly annotations on the readings and one literary essay.
  • LI612 - Top: Modern and Contemporary Poetry in Translation (4 Credits)
    Course focuses on translations of poems by modern and contemporary writers who areconcerned with the way the art of poetry can help us think more deeply and wisely about what it means to live in a complex and difficult modern world.This became especially relevant in the modern time period when poets started using forms, themes, and poetic language that were more closely tied to their political and social experience and found it irresistible and difficult to reconcile the issues of aesthetics and politics. The poets we'll examine offer new literary traditions and distinct poetic voices to the English-speaking audience; their poetry also, in Seamus Heaney's words, "link[s] the new literary experience to a modern martyrology, a record of courage and sacrifice which elicits our.admiration."
  • LI615 - Top: Literature of Evil (4 Credits)
    An exploration of European literary works that are haunted by a sense of `evil,¨ as defined by Georges Bataille (whose Literature and Evil provides something of a framework for the course), with a particular focus on the practices of close reading, textual analysis and theoretically oriented criticism. Works include Emily Bront‰'s Wuthering Heights, Baudelaire's Flowers of Evil, Duras' Malady of Death, Houellebecq's Elementary Particles, and Sebald's Rings of Saturn.
  • LI615 - Top: Travel Literature (4 Credits)
    Home and away, placement and displacement, location and dislocation are all themes that abound not only in contemporary literature in all its forms (fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama) but also in contemporary literary and cultural criticism. This class explores the theme of travel in literature across its historical terrain in order to understand not only the evolution of its forms but also its role in the construction of identities, familiar and foreign.
  • LI615 - Top: Translation Seminar (4 Credits)
    This seminar will explore a number of issues inherent in translation, among them the translator's responsibility to the source text; the translatability of culture, music, and dialect; the ethics of translation, and others. The course will also function as a workshop where student translations will be discussed and critiqued. Students will be asked to write short 2-page weekly annotations on readings assigned. In addition, students will be asked to complete a translation project in poetry (10 pages, no more than one poem per page) or fiction (15 pages), with an introduction explaining the approach they used. A working knowledge of a second language is helpful but not essential.
  • LI625 - Top: Latin American Short Fiction (4 Credits)
    Latin American Short Fiction considers short fiction written since the 1940s. It concentrates on major figures of the twentieth century beginning with Jorge Luis Borges who set the parameters of postmodern fiction in Latin American letters. The course centers on authors who "problematize both the nature of the referent and its relation to the real, historical world by its paradoxical combination of metafictional self-reflexivity with historical subject matter" (Linda Hutcheon, A Poetics of Postmodernism). The course will also consider how writers reach out to a global audience by engaging popular literary forms such as detective fiction, the fantastic, melodrama, new journalism and magical realism.
  • LI625 - Top: Craft and the Contemporary Short Story (4 Credits)
    This is a literature class for the serious writing student. The course will operate on a simple premise: in order to learn the craft of writing, one must read and study literature with rigor and care. We'll immerse ourselves in the works of nine acknowledged masters of the short story, form among them Flannery O'Connor, Raymond Carver, Denis Johnson, Alice Munro and Sherman Alexie so that we can focus on how they tell stories, create characters, use language, and employ fiction techniques.
  • LI650 - Seminar in the Novel (4 Credits)
    Examines particular narrative strategies in storytelling. Students examine such practices as multiple points of view, chronology, indirect discourse, focalization, etc., as well as historical and cultural contexts. Reading might include works by Nabokov, Proust, Woolf, Faulkner, Sterne, Bernhard, Bowles, among others.
  • LI651 - Seminar in Poetry (4 Credits)
    Analytical and critical study of a variety of poets and/or schools of poetry, modern and contemporary, that explores their approaches to craft, form, and theme, as well as their aesthetic, cultural, and historical assumptions for and about the art.
  • LI652 - Seminar in Short Fiction (4 Credits)
    Analytical and critical study of a variety of recent American short stories, mostly modern and contemporary, exploring their approaches to form, theme, and technique.
  • LI653 - Seminar in Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the nonfiction narrative, including memoir, personal essay, biography, travel writing, nature writing, and other nonfiction writing from various periods, with particular attention paid to issues of craft and structure, as well as historical and cultural contexts.
  • LI687 - Top: 20th Century 1st Person (4 Credits)
    This course will examine the twentieth century, its upheavals, dislocations, and diasporas, through the study of ten memoirs from around the world. These memoirs will be explored as instances of witness to events that continue to shape the world we live in.
  • LS101 - Elementary Spanish 1 (4 Credits)
    Stresses mastery of the essential vocabulary and primary grammatical structures through a situational approach. Students perceive that language is "living" and they discover by the third week of the semester that they can already communicate in Spanish. Class time is devoted to interactive practice. Conversational skills, pronunciation, and understanding are verified through regular oral exams.
  • LS102 - Elementary Spanish 2 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of LS 101, this course also incorporates reading skills and exposes students to a wider range of cultural materials.
  • MB200 - Principles of Business (4 Credits)
    Analyzes information related to business trends, strategies, opportunities, and operations and critically assess alternatives. Through lecture, discussion, case videos, and in-class assignments, students consider external and internal factors driving contemporary business decisions. Topics include: pricing, supply and demand, the management of people, processes, resources, and organization; the globalization of business; the use of information systems to support business efforts; and basic concepts of marketing, sales, business ethics, law, accounting, and finance.
  • MB300 - Managing Business Operations (4 Credits)
    Explores the operational structure of business, theory, the practices of effective resource management and activities that produce or deliver the goods and services of a business: the management of personnel, materials, equipment, and informational resources that a business needs to produce and deliver its good and services. The course examines how businesses are organized, and how the various departments within a business such as Marketing, Sales, Production, Finance, and Human Resources work together.
  • MB310 - Finance and Accounting (4 Credits)
    Students become familiar with the language of accounting and learn to create, interpret, analyze, and evaluate financial statements (e.g., balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement). Armed with this knowledge, students then use case studies and in-class exercises to analyze how managers use data presented on financial statements to make decisions about budgeting, cost allocation, and overall company performance.
  • MB320 - The Business of Broadcasting (4 Credits)
    Examines radio from a business perspective and covers: the history of radio, networks, radio station operations, media buying, ratings, revenue streams, important legislation, and issues facing radio as an industry. Ownership regulations and the process of buying and selling radio stations are all examined.
  • MB371 - Top: Building an Arts-Based Business (4 Credits)
    Examines a strategic approach to decision making and problem solving when growing and scaling an arts-based business. Each student will be part of small, multidisciplinary teams that work hands-on through challenges that will vary from product innovation to larger issues facing humanity. Each student will walk away with knowledge in creative leadership, agile management and the ability to execute this methodology within any organization or group.
  • MB371 - Top: Building Arts-Based Businesses (4 Credits)
    Explores the particular challenges related to theatre, music, and dance organizations as well as those involved in presenting performances and in management of performing arts venues. Topics will include ethical issues, board governance, the pros and cons of facility expansion, fundraising strategies and audience development, media communication, managing controversy and change, the organization's role as educator, and collaborative ventures. Organizational needs are considered from various points of view (staff, artists, board, patrons, funders, etc.).
  • MB400 - Business Policy & Strategy (4 Credits)
    Serves as the Business minor's capstone course by introducing new levels of complexity to broad concepts learned in previous classes. Uses case studies, trade articles, and time-honored academic frameworks, as well as in-class lectures, group exercises, and discussions to challenge students to apply how legal frameworks, business and government regulations, organizational structures, diverse workforces, and customer and stakeholder expectations influence the way contemporary companies conduct business.
  • MB400 - Business Policy and Strategy (4 Credits)
    Serves as the Business minor's capstone course by introducing new levels of complexity to broad concepts learned in previous classes. Uses case studies, trade articles, and time-honored academic frameworks, as well as in-class lectures, group exercises, and discussions to challenge students to apply how legal frameworks, business and government regulations, organizational structures, diverse workforces, and customer and stakeholder expectations influence the way contemporary companies conduct business.
  • MB472 - Entrepreneurship I (8 Credits)
    Introduces and immerses students in the process of creating and launching a new venture. Students learn the history and process of entrepreneurship as they explore creative problem solving, innovative thinking, and ethics. Relevant marketing and public relations strategies are presented in addition to basic financial, business, and human resource issues. Experts in the business world provide additional mentoring and practical knowledge.
  • MB473 - Entrepreneurship II (8 Credits)
    Provides an advanced immersion in the process of creating and launching a new venture. Students learn about business planning, marketing research, sales and marketing, legal issues, negotiation practices, and business conduct and further develop public speaking and interpersonal communication skills relevant to starting and managing a business. Students prepare for the business competition at the annual E3 Exposition. Students have the opportunity to learn from experts in the business world.
  • MK120 - Communication, Media, and Society (4 Credits)
    Introduces communication theory and the fundamental relationships that exist between communication systems and society. Emphasis is placed on the social, political, and economic context in which marketing communication emerged and evolved, and the role it plays in maintaining, expanding, and articulating our way of life. Majors are required to complete this in the first year.
  • MK121 - Marketing and Marketing Communication (4 Credits)
    Explores the key types and core functions of contemporary organizations and the multiple roles marketing plays among them. Marketing's 4Ps and the "marketing mix" are examined in depth so as to understand the context in which marketing communication is practiced. Cases are introduced to acquaint students with the notion and essential elements of "strategy."
  • MK220 - Understanding Consumers (4 Credits)
    Examines people in the context of their role as contemporary consumers. Surveys theories of consumer decisionmaking and behavior and the dominant approaches used to understand consumers today. Emphasis is placed on the role and application of understanding consumers in marketing communications campaign strategy, planning and management.
  • MK221 - Messages, Media & Channels (4 Credits)
    Provides a comprehensive overview of modern media and how they are utilized for messaging in marketing communications. Media are treated at the channel (newspaper, radio, TV, magazine, web, FacebookW-O-M, www, etc.) and practice area (non-paid PR, mass paid advertising, direct marketing, and digitalmarketing) levels. Attention is also devoted to how the various media aggregate audiences and finance themselves, as well as recent changes in the ways they are purchased for use by marketing communicators.
  • MK222 - Brands, Organizations and Strategies (4 Credits)
    Establishes the notion of the brand and brand platform as the central organizing principle of contemporary marketing communications. Examines how the brand platform operates at the corporate and product, agency and campaign, and customer journey levels. Introduces the different types and dimensions of strategies used by the various players in marketing communications to link targets, media and messages in service to the brand.
  • MK230 - Marketing, Sales, and Promotion for Radio (4 Credits)
    Explores the concepts, strategies, and goals of marketing, sales, and promotion for radio, including the planning, coordination, and implementation of successful promotional campaigns. Students also become familiar with audience ratings and market research, identification of target markets, and the integration of promotional elements to promote radio stations and other audio media.
  • MK332 - Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods (4 Credits)
    Introduces the scientific method and the processes of primary quantitative and qualitative research in marketing communications. Marketing problems are identified, research objectives formulated, research design determined, questionnaires developed, sampling methods designed, data analyzed and interpreted. The various uses of research in targeting, positioning, product decision-making, messaging, and media utilization are demonstrated.
  • MK333 - Ethnographic Methods & Cult An (4 Credits)
    Explores the tools and techniques of ethnography and their uses in defining and solving marketing research problems. Drawing from the traditions of participant observation in the fields of anthropology, sociology, psychology, and market research, the course applies ethnographic methods to the analysis of subcultures and behavioral minorities as well as transnational marketing communication. The focus throughout is on how to fathom the cultural differences that inform and impact consumer decision-making and marketing communication campaigns.
  • MK334 - Online Behavior & Web Analytics (4 Credits)
    Introduces the proliferating services and tools available to capture, measure and assess online behavior, information-gathering, decision-making, shopping patterns, and social groupings. Among these, emphasis will be placed on developing the skillful use of Google Analytics as it can be applied to optimize digital marketing communications efforts and initiatives.
  • MK342 - Breakthrough Thinking and Marketing Communications (4 Credits)
    Explores the nature of creative and critical thinking, as well as the increasing importance of creative problem solving in the context of organizations, product development, and marketing communications. Students practice critical thinking skills with written and visual communication materials. Creative thinking skills, methods, and processes are then used to think differently about original and innovative solutions to various organizational, product, and communication challenges.
  • MK343 - Global Brand Strategies and Portfolio Management (4 Credits)
    Examines how the notion of the brand can be taken to scale. Explores the uses of different types of brand architectures by different types of organizations as they grow and expand internationally. Considers the values of the brand to the conglomerate organization as it manages its portfolios of companies, products, and customer segments. Use is made of case analysis.
  • MK344 - Marketing and Sales, Distribution and Service Relationships (4 Credits)
    Analyzes and addresses how to advance the critical customer-facing relationships within an organization between marketing and the sales force, distribution networks, and customer service. Discusses the different types of arrangements that prevail among these functions in b-b and b-c organizations, and in large and small organizations. Special attention is devoted to customer service policies and to the provision of teleservices.
  • MK345 - Organizations & Brands Online (4 Credits)
    Examines the enduring elements of online presence required of companies and brands today: website(s), search profile, e-commerce capabilities, and e-crm. How are these driven by bricks-and-mortar identities established previously; what opportunities and requirements do they generate; how do they function to establish frameworks for digital marketing communications campaign activities?
  • MK346 - The Corporate Communications Function and Social Responsibility (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the scope and tasks of the communications function in large organizations. These include the intersection with sales, establishing and maintaining the corporate identity, customer intelligence and advocacy, executive coaching, and constituency relations -- carrying, or supporting, all the outward-facing activities of the organization. Often, the chief communications officer also works to align the organization with broader social trends. The leading contemporary example of this is the Social Responsibility movement, which will be analyzed in detail.
  • MK352 - Creative Concepts and Storytelling (4 Credits)
    Focuses on "the message" in marketing communications, as both the distinctive idea conveyed in a campaign and the many forms in which it is expressed. Advertising copywriting for broadcast and print is practiced, as is writing for blogs and long-form digital formats. Developing and growing stories, and provoking user-generated content to engage consumers across media platforms, is considered as well.
  • MK353 - Visual Literacy (4 Credits)
    Explores the importance and meaning of visuals in business and marketing communications, from the choice of typeface and layout to the use of images, color, symbols, style, and art direction. The application of these and related elements in logos, print, broadcast, and digital media campaigns are considered. Also discusses the mechanisms companies use to maintain consistent visual identities in their persuasive messaging, and the resources available when they consider changing their visual portrayals.
  • MK354 - Writing for PR (4 Credits)
    A survey and workshop that takes up the many forms of writing practiced in public relations. These include news releases and media kits, editorials and newsletters, brochures, white papers, stockholder and employee communications. The notions of voice and personality as well as consistency and style are emphasized.
  • MK355 - Sales Promotion and Events Management (4 Credits)
    Addresses the uses, value, and mechanics of special offers and non-recurring events in commercial and nonprofit marketing communication. Trade promotions like price and volume discounting, feature and coop advertising, and in-store displays are covered, as are consumer tactics like coupons, memberships, giveaways, and value-added offers. So too are trade shows and placed-based gatherings. Considers both business-to-business and business-to-consumer applications.
  • MK356 - Media Relations (4 Credits)
    Exposes students to a broad range of media management concepts and practices including basic marketing and management communication documents, sources, interviews, spin, crisis communication, ethics, international media relations, interactive media strategies, and analyses of current media-related issues.
  • MK357 - Media Planning and the Customer Journey (4 Credits)
    Focuses on how channels are used in marketing communications to connect audiences with messages. The tools of media research and audience analysis are explained to inform construction of media plans, as are the skills of buying and negotiation that guide implementation of plans. The concept of "customer journeys" is introduced; it is coming to be used by the large media firms created by marketing services holding companies to guide the integrated media plans they provide.
  • MK358 - Social Media: Connectivity, Interactivity, Buzz (4 Credits)
    Social media have captured the imagination of the millennial generation, marketers, Hollywood, and now Wall Street since they emerged several years ago. This course focuses on the strategic uses of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and the Next New Thing. It also considers how the connectivity and interactivity social media represent alter traditional concepts like "companies," "customers," "shopping, buying, and selling," what effect this has had on the strategic marcomm landscape, and why revolutions in communication often turn out to be evolutionary instead.
  • MK358 - Social Media: Connectivity, Interactivity, Buzz (4 Credits)
    This new course was previously offered as a topic class under MK471. Students who took Social Media and Marketing under MK471 are not allowed to also take this class.
  • MK443 - Sector Application: Entertainment Marketing (4 Credits)
    Contemporary entertainment industries present special circumstances and opportunities for marketers because they are organized around "properties" that provide differential returns-on-investment for various "media expressions" across orchestrated channels over extended periods of time. This course covers recent developments in major arenas like movies, cable, games, theater, and sports, taking up issues that cut across all of them, like intellectual property, licensing, personal branding, and the life cycle of blockbusters.
  • MK471 - Top: The Internet Transformation (4 Credits)
    Examines how key public institutions and practices have been transformed by the Internet: In what ways have some changed, and why have others resisted? What does this tell us about what the Internet is, and who we are? Topics include: marketing, journalism, politics, governance, education, the networking of knowledge, libraries, and games. This ideas-driven course will require active student participation in discussions. Open to seniors in all majors
  • MK471 - Top: Non-Profit Marketing (4 Credits)
    Examines how nonprofit organizations develop marketing plans to pursue their missions. Students learn how to identify marketing problems by analyzing nonprofit missions, programs and services, advocacy activities, fundraising initiatives, messaging, outcomes, and impact - all in the context of managing a consistent nonprofit brand. Students develop consultative skills and recommend marketing strategy and communications solutions. A variety of cases in the nonprofit sector will be analyzed. This class is only open to seniors.
  • MK471 - Top: Ed Tech Times: Content Development and Web Design for an Online Information Hub (4 Credits)
    Explores the basics of design, from its history, influence and important designers; to the use of typography, color, "white space", shape and layout principles; to the funda-mentals of Adobe PhotoShop and InDesign. Concept sketching will be required as part of the process of developing ideas and learning the principles of good design, working toward the goal of crafting and recognizing design products that are appealing, strategic and meaningful.
  • MK471 - Top: Ed Tech Times: Content Development and Web Design for an Online Information Hub (4 Credits)
    Focused on a project with EdTech Times (ETT), a start-up that publishes news dedicated to the education technology industry, located in the offices of Learn Launch, an education technology incubator in Boston. The course seeks students across a variety of disciplines to help ETT with repositioning for greater audience engagement by redesigning their website and exploring new content forms (including original written content, video, data visualizations, and info-graphics, etc). The course will immerse students in an experiential learning environment that will require them to develop content through creative inquiry across multiple disciplines, collaboration with ETT, and iterative experimentation among teams. Students will learn the process for developing web pages from inititial design to development and best practices in writing for the web. This class is only open to seniors.
  • MK480 - Capstone: The Integrated Marketing Communications Campaign (4 Credits)
    Provides a culminating, integrative experience for majors. Students are organized into teams and challenged to develop and execute a complete integrated marketing communications strategy and campaign plan for an existing client, organization, and/or brand. The work is presented both live and in writing, as it would be in a commercial context. The spring semester course is designed around the annual competition of the American Advertising Federation, in which a team of Emerson majors has traditionally played a significant role.
  • MK480 - Capstone: The Integrated Marketing Communications Campaign (4 Credits)
    Provides a culminating, integrative experience for majors. Students are organized into teams and challenged to develop and execute a complete integrated marketing communications strategy and campaign plan for an existing client, organization, and/or brand. The work is presented both live and in writing, as it would be in a commercial context. The spring semester course is designed around the annual competition of the American Advertising Federation, in which a team of Emerson majors has traditionally played a significant role.
  • MK604 - Introduction to Research Methods (4 Credits)
    This course is organized around the research process in which students learn how to formulate a research question, define a research problem, generate a research design, establish data collection methods, define a sampling frame, determine data analyses, interpret data appropriately, and prepare a research report. Topics in both qualitative and quantitative research methods are included. Students gain an understanding of the importance of research in the development of communication strategies.
  • MK610 - Marketing Management (4 Credits)
    Introduces the marketing management process of making decisions about products, brands, price, distribution channels, and communications plans to deliver value to consumers. Marketing concepts include research methods, consumer behavior, business marketing, customer analysis, competitive strategy, market segmentation and targeting, and product development. Students use analyses to justify managerial recommendations. Integration is emphasized - developing marketing strategies that are consistent from conception through execution. Case studies from a variety of industries are used in class.
  • MK617 - Consumer Behavior (4 Credits)
    Students investigate comprehensive multidisciplinary, theoretical views of consumer behavior, and apply them to marketing communication contexts. Integrated marketing communication plans require sophisticated consumer behavior analyses that facilitate segmentation, targeting, and positioning efforts. Students learn about the determinants of consumer behavior through the application of theories from disciplines such as communication, marketing, cultural anthropology, economics, sociology, and psychology. Case studies, exercises, and research help students to understand the complexity of consumer behavior given intrapersonal, interpersonal, and situational influences.
  • MK618 - Marketing Communication Integration Strategies (4 Credits)
    Integrated marketing communication (IMC) is a cross-functional process for creating profitable relationships with customers and publics by strategically controlling all messages sent to groups and encouraging dialogue. Students learn to integrate marketing communication elements (e.g., advertising, public relations, publicity, sales promotion, event marketing, direct marketing, e-communication, and selling) to advance an organization's success and brand equity. Case studies and exercises help students learn how to develop effective IMC plans.
  • MK618 - Marketing Communication Integration Strategys (4 Credits)
    Integrated marketing communication (IMC) is a cross-functional process for creating profitable relationships with customers and publics by strategically controlling all messages sent to groups and encouraging dialogue. Students learn to integrate marketing communication elements (e.g., advertising, public relations, publicity, sales promotion, event marketing, direct marketing, e-communication, and selling) to advance an organization's success and brand equity. Case studies and exercises help students learn how to develop effective IMC plans.
  • MK620 - Public Relations Management (4 Credits)
    1 seat is available for Non-IMC students on a first come/first serve basis. Please email the department assistant in the Marketing department for information on how to register.
  • MK621 - Writing for Marketing Communication (4 Credits)
    1 seat is available for Non-IMC students on a first come/first serve basis. Please email the department assistant in the Marketing department for information on how to register.
  • MK627 - Integrated Communication Strategy in Digital Culture (4 Credits)
    Students learn how organizations use the Internet to communicate with consumers and the public, and to examine the differences between traditional media and digital media within the context vehicles and the Internet within the context of strategic marketing communication. Explores the dynamic ways that digital communication influences human behavior and the impact of new mobile and digital media platforms on consumption, participation, marketing strategy, and audience engagement.
  • MK630 - Advertising, Sales Promotion, and Publicity Management (4 Credits)
    Explores the roles of advertising, sales promotion, and publicity in IMC. Students learn to develop, manage, and evaluate advertising campaigns. In addition, they investigate how to use sales promotion to bring about behavioral change in the contexts of consumer and trade promotion. Further, they learn how to generate and manage publicity. Students evaluate the legal and ethical issues surrounding these marketing communication efforts.
  • MK636 - Creative Thinking and Problem Solving (4 Credits)
    One seat is available for Non-IMC students on a first come/first serve basis. Please email the department assistant Marketing department for information on how to register.
  • MK639 - Strategic Brand Management (4 Credits)
    One seat is available for Non-IMC students on a first come/first serve basis. Please email the department assistant Marketing department for information on how to register.
  • MK639 - Strategic Brand Management (4 Credits)
    Stresses the importance of the role of the brand in IMC strategies. Students learn why brands are important, what they represent to consumers, and what should be done by organizations to manage them properly. Students learn how brand equity can be created, how to measure brand equity, and how to use brand equity to expand global business opportunities. Brand simulations, readings, and discussions facilitate learning.
  • MK648 - Media Management Strategies (4 Credits)
    Offers an introduction to strategic decision making in advertising media planning. Provides an understanding of the challenges involved in making media decisions and executing media plans. Students are introduced to media planning tools and study the impact of changing media trends.
  • MK649 - Measuring and Communicating Investments in Marketing (4 Credits)
    An important function of the IMC manager is to optimize investments across different aspects of the marketing and communication mix. This course reviews fundamental tools of analysis used by managers, such as budgeting, forecasting demand, market and segmentation analysis, return-on-investment valuations, media expenditure planning, and evaluation of marketing communication efforts. Exercises, cases, and readings are used to provide students with exposure to the concepts and practice in applying them.
  • MK653 - Web Page Development and Management (4 Credits)
    Presents the website as an important venue for communicating with various publics and organizations, and as an integrated part of a strategic communication plan. Topics such as principles of web design, evaluation of website effectiveness, tracking user perceptions, and consolidating web page information into overall database management are covered. Topics are organized around website development, maintenance, and assessment.
  • MK695 - Top: Entertainment Marketing (4 Credits)
  • MK695 - Top: Non-Profit Marketing (4 Credits)
    Examines how nonprofit organizations develop marketing plans to pursue their missions. Students learn how to identify marketing problems by analyzing nonprofit missions, programs and services, advocacy activities, fundraising initiatives, messaging, outcomes, and impact - all in the context of managing a consistent nonprofit brand. Students develop consultative skills and recommend marketing strategy and communications solutions. A variety of cases in the nonprofit sector will be analyzed.
  • MK695 - Top: Ed Tech Times: Content Development and Web Design for an Online Information Hub (4 Credits)
    Focused on a project with EdTech Times (ETT), a start-up that publishes news dedicated to the education technology industry, located in the offices of Learn Launch, an education technology incubator in Boston. The course seeks students across a variety of disciplines to help ETT with repositioning for greater audience engagement by redesigning their website and exploring new content forms (including original written content, video, data visualizations, and info-graphics, etc). The course will immerse students in an experiential learning environment that will require them to develop content through creative inquiry across multiple disciplines, collaboration with ETT, and iterative experimentation among teams. Students will learn the process for developing web pages from inititial design to development and best practices in writing for the web.
  • MT102 - Introduction to Quantitative Reasoning (4 Credits)
    Covers various topics that encourage students to develop interpreation, analysis, and evaluation skills from a quantitative perspective. A stronger emphasis is placed on reasoning than computation. Primary topics include set theory (studying collections of objects) and logic (simple and compound statements, conditionals, symbolic language, truth tables). Additional topics may be chosed from the areas of elementary discrete mathematics, number theory, and graph theory.
  • MT106 - Business Mathematics (4 Credits)
    Applies mathematics to daily business experience and develops an intuitive and quantitative sense of business through a variety of topics. The theory of simple and compund interest, present/future values, and elementary annuities is emphasized.
  • MT207 - Statistics (4 Credits)
    This class will use SPSS to conduct statistical analyses.
  • MT207 - Statistics (4 Credits)
    Prepares students to use, understand, and evaluate basic statistical techniques. Introduces the most common topics and procedures in descriptive and inferential data analysis, such as measures of central tendency and variability, shapes of distributions, correlation and simple linear regression, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, effect size, statistical power, t-tests, and chi-square.
  • MU137 - Listening to Music (4 Credits)
    Intended for students with little or no experience in music who want to develop their listening skills and musical understanding. Emphasis is on a non-theoretical study of the elements and compositional principles of music, and careful listening to selected works of master composers in the context of a brief survey of classical music in its historical and social context. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
  • MU139 - History of Jazz (4 Credits)
    A study of the evolution of jazz, a continuously evolving form synthesizing many different music styles. Attention is given to its African American origins, historical identifications, antisocial tendencies, political aspects, and subjective effects that have effected cultural change. Emphasis is placed on listening to the works of Armstrong, Ellington, Davis, Gillespie, Parker, Monk, Coltrane, and Mingus. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective and the General Education U.S. Diversity requirements.
  • MU202 - History of Music: American (4 Credits)
  • MU202 - History of Music: American (4 Credits)
    A survey of American music from the first American settlers to the present including the development of such forms as folk, regional, religious, ethnic, jazz, musical theater, and various popular styles. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
  • MU203 - Perspectives in World Music (4 Credits)
    Investigates music-making within a variety of cultures, including societies from Africa, the Caribbean, India, the Far East, and Native Americans. Musical experience is examined from both the sonic and social perspectives, including musical form, instruments, and style, as well as music's role as a vehicle for defining and representing social values. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective and the General Education Global Diversity requirements.
  • MU204 - Music Analysis I (2 Credits)
    An introduction to the analysis of music, especially as it appears in musical theatre. Topics include song structure, dance forms, and identification of the features in various genres and historical styles. Required for BFA Musical Theatre majors.
  • MU205 - Music Analysis II (2 Credits)
    A continuation of Music Analysis I, this course focuses on the music and lyrics of songs and shows in the musical theatre repertoire. The focus moves from basic terminology to a more detailed connection between analysis and performance. Other topics include the structure of entire shows, detailed analysis of duets and other ensemble pieces, and an increased focus on recent musical theatre repertoire. Required for BFA Musical Theatre majors.
  • MU253 - Applied Music: Voice (0 Credit)
    Permission of Department required to register
  • MU253 - Applied Music: Voice (0 Credit)
    Studio course consists of ten 60-minute lessons with a private instructor. Students may pursue this course on a non-credit basis by payment of a course fee. Available for BFA Musical Theatre majors only.
  • MU254 - Applied Music: Piano (0 Credit)
    Permission of Department required to register
  • MU254 - Applied Music: Piano (0 Credit)
    Studio course consists of ten 60-minute lessons with a private instructor. Students may pursue this course on a non-credit basis by payment of a course fee.
  • MU353 - Applied Music: Voice (2 Credits)
    Advanced work in vocal technique and development of a repertoire, consisting of ten weekly 60-minute lessons with a private instructor. Required for BFA Musical Theatre majors. No more than 8 credits of Applied Music: Voice may be counted toward credits required for graduation.
  • MU353 - Applied Music: Voice (2 Credits)
    Permission of Department required to register
  • MU354 - Applied Music: Piano (2 Credits)
    For students for whom the study of piano is relevant to their professional goals. Students have a weekly 60-minute individual lesson. No more than 8 credits of Applied Music: Piano may be counted toward credits required for graduation.
  • MU354 - Applied Music: Piano (2 Credits)
    Permission of Department required to register
  • PA101 - Languages of the Stage (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to the various means of expression available to the art of the stage. In addition to an exploration of the techniques of the written script, students are introduced to the visual forms of artistic communication, their history, and the conventions of all theatrical forms. (Performing Arts students only)
  • PA472 - Production Projects (2 Credits)
    Contract Required - See Department for Information
  • PA472 - Prod Proj: Acting (2 Credits)
    Students with senior standing may define project work in acting, directing, design technology, stage and production management, arts and business management, musical theatre, theatre education, dance or dramaturgy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.
  • PA472 - Prod Proj: Design Technology (2 Credits)
    Students with senior standing may define project work in acting, directing, design technology, stage and production management, arts and business management, musical theatre, theatre education, dance or dramaturgy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.
  • PA472 - Prod Proj: Design/Technology (2 Credits)
    Students with senior standing may define project work in acting, directing, design technology, stage and production management, arts and business management, musical theatre, theatre education, dance or dramaturgy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.
  • PA472 - Prod Proj: Directing (2 Credits)
    Students with senior standing may define project work in acting, directing, design technology, stage and production management, arts and business management, musical theatre, theatre education, dance or dramaturgy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.
  • PA472 - Prod Proj: Dramaturgy (2 Credits)
    Students with senior standing may define project work in acting, directing, design technology, stage and production management, arts and business management, musical theatre, theatre education, dance or dramaturgy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.
  • PA472 - Prod Proj: Stage/Prod Mgmt (2 Credits)
    Students with senior standing may define project work in acting, directing, design technology, stage and production management, arts and business management, musical theatre, theatre education, dance or dramaturgy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and department chair.
  • PB207 - Introduction to Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces writing for commercial markets. Students develop, research, and write nonfiction articles and learn where to market them. May be repeated once for credit and may be substituted for one 200-level WR (writing) workshop.
  • PB302 - Copyediting (4 Credits)
    Practical course about the process of editing and preparing manuscripts for publication. Together with hands-on assignments, the course considers the relation of editor to author, the nature of copyediting in various publishing environments, and other topics.
  • PB307 - Intermediate Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Requires students to research and write an article or magazine feature. Students learn terms, concepts, and techniques to improve both writing and critical thinking. May be repeated once for credit and may be substituted for one 300-level WR (writing) workshop.
  • PB380 - Magazine Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Provides an understanding of the magazine field from the perspective of writers and editors. Looks at the similarities and differences between general interest magazines and more focused magazines, and how magazines compete with each other and with other media for audiences and revenues. Topics include how magazines carve out niches, the relationship between the business and editorial departments, and the editorial operations of magazines. The course also looks at the history of the magazine industry.
  • PB383 - Book Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Examines the acquisition and editing of a manuscript, its progress into design and production, and the final strategies of promotion and distribution of a finished book.
  • PB395 - Applications for Print Publishing (4 Credits)
    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the publishing industry. Students also learn related computer-based skills, such as type and image sourcing, image acquisition, including scanning, and copyright issues. Although some design issues are addressed, the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes students have basic Macintosh skills.
  • PB402 - Book Editing (4 Credits)
    Book editing, or substantive editing, is a highly subjective, visceral skill informed by flexibility, judgment, life experience, grammatical grace, signposts, caution lights, road maps, respect for the author, and subtle diplomacy in the author/editor relationship, all directed toward helping the writer to the intended creative goal. In other words, book editing is an art, not a science. However, an exploration of the foundations of constructive shaping, development, organization, and line-editing may release the inner shepherd/wrangler in you.
  • PB481 - Book Design and Production (4 Credits)
    Covers book and book jacket design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. This is not a software instruction course.
  • PB491 - Top: Ed Tech Times: Content Development and Web Design for an Online Information Hub (4 Credits)
    Focused on a project with EdTech Times (ETT), a start-up that publishes news dedicated to the education technology industry, located in the offices of Learn Launch, an education technology incubator in Boston. The course seeks students across a variety of disciplines to help ETT with repositioning for greater audience engagement by redesigning their website and exploring new content forms (including original written content, video, data visualizations, and info-graphics, etc). The course will immerse students in an experiential learning environment that will require them to develop content through creative inquiry across multiple disciplines, collaboration with ETT, and iterative experimentation among teams. Students will learn the process for developing web pages from inititial design to development and best practices in writing for the web.
  • PB491 - Top: Writing about Subcultures (4 Credits)
    In this an advanced writing and publishing class, students will immerse themselves for the semester in a subculture of their choosing and write an 8,000- to 10,000-word magazine piece. In addition, students will read the work of a wide variety of leading nonfiction and magazine writers-including Ted Conover, Susan Orlean, and Hunter S. Thompson-who have chronicled hidden, misunderstood, or stigmatized groups and communities. Many of the writers will speak to class via Skype.
  • PB491 - Top: Ed Tech Times: Content Development and Web Design for an Online Information Hub (4 Credits)
    Students will learn how to write about other people--whether famous, ordinary, overlooked, or controversial. We will read the work of the best magazine profile writers writing today, and many of those writers will speak to the class via Skype. Students will write several profiles, including a long magazine-length final project. We will workshop the profiles in class. This class is designed for students interested in magazine writing, biography, journalism feature writing, and nonfiction writing that focuses on the lives of other people. This is an advanced course, and it is highly advised that students have already taken a 300-level writing workshop, magazine writing course, or journalism class.
  • PB491 - Top: Music Writing (4 Credits)
    This course will concern writing about popular music. Students will write and workshop concert and album reviews, musician or band profiles, and columns. They will also read and discuss the work of professional music writers. Most of this latter reading will be come from two course textbooks, Lost Highway, by Peter Guralnick, and The Best American Music Writing 2011, edited by Alex Ross and Daphne Carr. There will be visits from professional music writers and editors (possibly to include Guralnick himself), and the class will attend one or two free Wednesday-night concerts together, which they will review as a class assignment.
  • PB491 - Top: Advanced Applications for Print Publishing (4 Credits)
    Using the software, design, and production skills learned in Applications for Print Publishing as a foundation, students learn advanced techniques in InDesign and Photoshop, as well as the basics of Illustrator. The class will focus on a number of design projects with several rounds of critiques. Through these projects, as well as occasional lectures, readings, and exercises, students continue to grow the software and design skills needed to create print publications while developing projects to show in their portfolios. Conceptual thinking, problem solving skills, and technical skill will all be stressed.
  • PB675 - Principles of Management for Publishing (4 Credits)
    This course will provide students with a basic overview and knowledge of how different publishing enterprises are organized and managed. Helps students develop a firm understanding of the organizational and financial skills required for a career in publishing.
  • PB676 - Magazine Writing (4 Credits)
    Gives students experience in developing magazine feature stories. Students brainstorm, report, and write their own magazine-style stories, with emphasis on the shaping and editing stage. They also read and discuss published work by professionals. Class is conducted as a writing workshop in a style that mimics a magazine atmosphere. This course may count for 1 workshop credit for nonfiction students.
  • PB678 - Magazine Editing (4 Credits)
    Course about the magazine editing process. Covers topics ranging from focus, direction, topicality, structure, sense of audience, and voice, and explores the practical application of editing skills as well as historic examples of editors and their magazines.
  • PB679 - The Editor/Writer Relationship (4 Credits)
    Examines the magazine writing and editing process, and covers topics ranging from idea generation and story selection to the mechanics of editing and how the editorial process works.
  • PB680 - Magazine Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Examines the magazine field from the perspective of writers and editors, and covers the editorial and business operations of magazines, the editorial mix, and magazine geography.
  • PB680 - Magazine Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    MA Students only.
  • PB682 - Magazine Design and Prod. (4 Credits)
    Covers magazine design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. Students produce sample magazines through a workshop process of presentations and revisions. Course assumes students have necessary computer skills.
  • PB683 - Book Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Introduction to the book publishing industry, including a detailed examination of the editorial, marketing, and design and production stages of the book publishing process. Course also looks at important developments and issues within the field, such as online publishing, and at various jobs in book publishing.
  • PB683 - Book Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    MA Students only.
  • PB685 - Book Editing (4 Credits)
    Considers book editing skills, tasks, and responsibilities from initial review and acquisition of a book manuscript through project development. Emphasizes trade book editing, but also considers editorial work at scholarly and professional presses.
  • PB686 - Book Design and Prod. (4 Credits)
    Covers book and book jacket design fundamentals: design, typography, image research and assignment, and prepress and manufacturing. Students design a book through a workshop process of presentations and revisions. Course assumes students have necessary computer skills.
  • PB687 - Column Writing (4 Credits)
    Magazine publishing course explores the process of researching, writing, and revising magazine columns, and examines the importance of audience. This course may count for one workshop requirement for nonfiction students.
  • PB688 - Copyediting (4 Credits)
    Covers the process of editing and preparing manuscripts for publication. Together with hands-on assignments, the course considers the relation of editor to author, the nature of copyediting in various publishing environments, and other topics.
  • PB689 - Book Publicity (4 Credits)
    Familiarizes students with trade book promotion to the media. Begins with an overview of book publicity and then covers the publicity process, the type of freelance help available, crafting press material, the author/publicist dynamic, how to secure and promote bookstore events, the art of the interview, and the art of the pitch. All assignments and classroom activities are based on real-world publishing tasks so that students leave the class thoroughly prepared to promote their book or someone else's.
  • PB691 - Applications for Print Publish (4 Credits)
    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the print publishing industry. Some design issues are addressed, but the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes the student has basic Macintosh skills.
  • PB691 - Applications for Print Publishing (4 Credits)
    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the print publishing industry. Some design issues are addressed, but the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes the student has basic Macintosh skills.
  • PB692 - Electronic Publishing Overview (4 Credits)
    Introduces electronic and new media publishing formats, including but not limited to the web, online publishing, CD-ROM, and DVD. Course assumes the student has basic computer skills.
  • PB693 - Book Marketing & Sales (4 Credits)
    Course is designed as an extension of the Book Publishing Overview course for students who want to further explore the sales and marketing sides of business - where marketing and sales fit into the life of a book, the differences between the two areas, and the distinct effect that each, done well or badly, has on a book's success. It then tracks the marketing and sales process through a book's publication with specific assignments at each stage based on real-world publications tasks from sales forecasting to planning (and budgeting for) marketing campaigns to sales calls and the retailers' buying processes.
  • PB694 - Top: Ed Tech Times: Content Development and Web Design for an Online Information Hub (4 Credits)
    Focused on a project with EdTech Times (ETT), a start-up that publishes news dedicated to the education technology industry, located in the offices of Learn Launch, an education technology incubator in Boston. The course seeks students across a variety of disciplines to help ETT with repositioning for greater audience engagement by redesigning their website and exploring new content forms (including original written content, video, data visualizations, and info-graphics, etc). The course will immerse students in an experiential learning environment that will require them to develop content through creative inquiry across multiple disciplines, collaboration with ETT, and iterative experimentation among teams. Students will learn the process for developing web pages from inititial design to development and best practices in writing for the web.
  • PB694 - Top: Advanced e-books (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the creation and design of interactive texts in the EPUB format. Students will explore the rationale behind adding media and interactivity to e-books and think about what this change means for how we interact with text. The course covers the current trends and tools of the industry and will cover how create fixed-layout ebooks for art and children's titles, adding video and audio to an e-book, and using javascript to create interactivity.
  • PB694 - Top: Online Writing (4 Credits)
    Online Writing & Editing will focus on how to craft engaging content for online media. We will explore issues including how writing differs in online media vs. traditional print format; how online writing fits into the realms of journalism, literature, politics, and business; and how online writing can be used within various professions. The class will draw on discussions of assigned readings and students own writing. Assignments will include writing articles, pitch letters, blog entries, and other short forms, as well as editing an online publication.
  • PB694 - Top: Educational Publishing (4 Credits)
    Presents an overview of publishing in the following areas: elementary, and secondary schools (K-12 Education), colleges and universities (Higher Education), and scholarly and professional (Ongoing Adult Education). Students are expected to gain an understanding of the structure of these areas of the industry, who the publishers are, what they produce (from books to software to material delivered via the Internet), how--and why--they produce their products, who constitutes the market in the various areas, and how the publishers reach those markets.
  • PB694 - Top: Magazine Marketing (4 Credits)
    Provides students with an understanding of how publications market themselves to readers and make business decisions based on the market. Building upon a foundation of core marketing concepts, students will get hands-on experience applying those concepts to magazines. Topics covered include strategic planning, consumer behavior and audience research, social media strategy, circulation tactics, content marketing, positioning, digital channels, measurement, advertising, business models, and applying marketing methods to create a personal professional brand.
  • PB694 - Top: Innovation in Publishing: Trade & Literary Entrepreneurship (4 Credits)
    The last ten years have seen a sea change in publishing. The advent of the ebook, apps for mobile devices, an explosion in the numbers of small independent publishers, the rise of self-publishing and greater consolidation of the major trade publishers have had far-reaching effects on how publishers do business. While many organizations are resisting change, many companies have sprung up in the last decade that have embraced change. We will examine these companies and their business models to determine which models might turn out to be the most successful in the marketplace, what practices might be replicable and where openings for further innovation exist. In addition, we will explore how to create such an entrepreneurial organization and discuss the particular concerns of start-ups and how best to find and mine market opportunities.
  • PB695 - Creating Electronic Publications for the Web and E-Readers (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the creation and design of complete texts in a variety of e-formats. Students will produce complete texts using the extensible Markup Language (XML) and .epub formats. The course covers the current trends and tools of the industry and explores how e-texts are created for e-readers and tablets.
  • PB696 - Web Development for Electronic Publishing (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the design and format of text and images for the computer and mobile phone screen. Students create sites using HTML and CSS. Topics covered include: content evaluation, usability standards, design aesthetics, user experience, JavaScript, and hosting solutions.
  • PH105 - Introduction to Ethics (4 Credits)
    Introduces important theories on nature of the good in human conduct. Theories belong to Western philosophical tradition and include works of Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Mill, and others.
  • PH110 - Ethics and Justice (4 Credits)
    Considers ethical theories and theories of justice, especially those related to questions of economic, criminal, political, and social justice.
  • PH112 - Religion in Eastern Cultures (4 Credits)
    Studies the origin and development of Hinduism in India; Buddhism in India, China, and Japan; Taoism and Confucianism in China; and Shintoism in Japan. Students read original texts; development of doctrine in each religious tradition; and literary, artistic, and cultural impact of each religion on Eastern civilizations.
  • PH115 - Islamic Ways of Life (4 Credits)
    Religious faith has been, and continues to be, a powerful force in human life. The Middle East gave birth to three monotheistic belief systems-Judaism, Christianity, and Islam-which have had profound effect on fundamental ideas that eventually spread throughout the world. Course examines the historical contexts that gave birth to the Islam, playing particular attention to the philosophical underpinnings of Islam. Students are introduced to the ways in which each faith shapes moral, political, and aesthetic values.
  • PH116 - Christian Ways of Life (4 Credits)
    Religious faith has been, and continues to be, a powerful force in human life. The Middle East gave birth to three monotheistic belief systems-Judaism, Christianity, and Islam-which have had profound effect on fundamental ideas that eventually spread throughout the world. Course examines the historical contexts that gave birth to the Christianity, playing particular attention to the philosophical underpinnings of Christianity. Students are introduced to the ways in which each faith shapes moral, political, and aesthetic values.
  • PH117 - Jewish Ways of Life (4 Credits)
    Religious faith has been, and continues to be, a powerful force in human life. The Middle East gave birth to three monotheistic belief systems-Judaism, Christianity, and Islam-which have had profound effect on fundamental ideas that eventually spread throughout the world. Course examines the historical contexts that gave birth to the Judaism, playing particular attention to the philosophical underpinnings of Judaism. Students are introduced to the ways in which each faith shapes moral, political, and aesthetic values.
  • PH200 - Contemporary Ethics (4 Credits)
    Examines contemporary ethical issues of abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, and affirmative action in light of major theories of ethics and morals from the history of Western philosophy.
  • PH203 - Top:The Ethics of Everday Life (4 Credits)
    Ethics permeates our entire existence: from the classroom to the boardroom, from the bedroom to the situation room. It is not limited to extreme life-and-death questions, such as abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, or torture. In this class we will see how the food that goes into our mouth, the words that come out of it, the movies we watch, the songs we sing along to, the jokes we laugh at, the friends we have, our history, gestures, desires, demons: everything in our everyday life has an ethical dimension.
  • PH203 - Top: Free Will, Responsibility, and Agency (4 Credits)
    This course examines a variety of theories of free will and moral and legal responsibility. Students will examine our society's evolving views on free will against the backdrop of current scientific findings across numerous fields, findings that put into question our traditional ideas concerning moral and legal responsibility. We will also examine the role of moral luck in our assessments of agent-based views of autonomy and moral and legal agency.
  • PH204 - Environmental Ethics (4 Credits)
    Considers philosophical ethics in relation to environmental issues. Topics include: religious beliefs as a foundation for environmental commitments, duties, and obligations toward other species; "deep ecology"; ecofeminism; economic imperatives versus environmental concerns; and disproportionate burden of environmental problems borne by certain groups.
  • PH205 - Virtues, Vices & Temptations (4 Credits)
    A key assumption in traditional moral philosophy is that the acquisition of a virtuous character is necessary for a good life. Experimental results in social psychology, however, indicate that situational pressures may be more reliable predictors of human behavior than presence of stable character traits. This course surveys key concepts in the history of moral philosophy and examines criticism of those concepts arising from the situationist literature and our possible responses to them.
  • PH210 - Narrative Ethics (4 Credits)
    Provides overview of classical and modern approaches to ethical theory using examples from fiction and film to show how ethical theories can be applied. Connects abstract theory with "real life" through storytelling and story analysis to understand and evaluate moral issues.
  • PH300 - Top: Genesis (4 Credits)
    The most influential text ever written had such a profound impact on our culture for the past two millennia that we rarely even bother to read the actual words underneath the layers of assumptions about their meaning. In this class we will not only examine the Genesis narrative rather closely but also encounter some of the pivotal works where its cosmic, apocalyptic, moral, sexual, and violent themes resonate most beautifully: from religion to philosophy, from poetry to literature, from science to art, from theater to film.
  • PH303 - Citizenship as Civic Engagement (4 Credits)
    What does it mean to be or become a citizen? Readings and discussions will include what it means to be a citizen in a local community, a national community, and, perhaps, a world community. What are the responsibilities involved in being an engaged citizen? This is a philosophy course, and we will be examining these issues on a theoretical and on a practical level. All students will be placed n a local non-profit for approximately 2-3 hours a week.
  • PH304 - Political Philosophy (4 Credits)
    Examines basic themes in the tradition of political philosophy and their implication for our contemporary understanding of freedom, rights, citizenship, justice, legitimacy, the public sphere, and the public good.
  • PL220 - International Politics (4 Credits)
    Explores the nature, techniques, and problems of interaction among states. Students understand the development of the modern state system;, the evolution of alliances and collective security; and the role of law, morality, and international organizations. They also analyze in depth the history of America's involvement in 20th century the international relations.
  • PL225 - U.S. Government and Politics (4 Credits)
    Develops knowledge and understanding about the American political system including national, state, and local government. Examines constitutional foundations, citizenship, civil liberties, public opinion, political parties, the electoral system, and the legislative process as well as the judicial history of these issues.
  • PL240 - Communication, Politics, & Law (4 Credits)
    Develops an interdisciplinary understanding of the political-legal communication field with emphasis on the U.S. Constitution and the legal system as well as constructing and communicating political-legal arguments.
  • PL328 - Political Thought (4 Credits)
    Analyzes the evolution of political theory from early Greece to the present. Studies the formation of the Western political tradition and the relationship of political theory to the development of absolutism, constitutional monarchy, liberal democracy, and socialism. Looks at the issues of idealism and realism in political thought, individual rights versus the needs of the collective, and the relation of these considerations to the emergence of totalitarian political ideologies.
  • PL332 - Civil Rights (4 Credits)
    Reviews and develops an understanding of the U.S. Constitution, congressional legislation, and Supreme Court cases affecting and controlling minority rights from 1776 to the present.
  • PL333 - The First Amendment (4 Credits)
    Engages in in-depth study of the U.S. Constitution and federal laws as they relate to communication. Develops an understanding of the First Amendment, the Federal Communication Commission, and political speech.
  • PS101 - Introductory Psychology (4 Credits)
    Presents topics across the range of sub-disciplines that make up the field, including the history of psychology, research methods, attention and consciousness, learning, memory, language, motivation, emotion, social perception and interaction, child and adult development, and mental illness. Students engage in discussions, presentations, and demonstrations centered on key ideas in the field.
  • PS200 - Social Psychology (4 Credits)
    Introduces the discipline of social psychology. Examines how the behavior of individuals is influenced by their social environment. Topics include impression formation, persuasion, conformity, interpersonal attraction, helping behavior, aggression, and prejudice.
  • PS201 - Abnormal Psychology (4 Credits)
    Provides an introduction to the nature, etiology, and classification of abnormal behaviors and therapeutic methods used to treat them. An explanation of the relation between mental disorder and the social and cultural setting is also provided.
  • PS202 - Developmental Psychology (4 Credits)
    Explores the stage/age-related physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development of individuals. Topics include physical maturation and sensory-motor development; thinking, reasoning, and language processes; personality growth; social cognition; and interpersonal interaction. Attention is also given to the discussion of contemporary issues in developmental psychology.
  • PS203 - Cognitive Psychology (4 Credits)
    Studies the mental mechanisms and processes involved with perception, learning, memory, and thinking. Topics may include perception, attention, memory, language, problem solving, decision-making, mental representation and knowledge, reasoning, creativity, and intelligence. Highlights the close relationship between modern cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience that ties cognitive processes to brain systems.
  • PS301 - Personal Growth and Adjustment (4 Credits)
    Reviews the recent shift in psychology from the classic disease or medical-model perspective to a "strengths-based" model emphasizing well-being and adjustment. Examines this theoretical development, but also explores the proposed conditions that enhance well-being, support resilience, and allow individuals and communities to thrive. Topics include intention and mindfulness, self-efficacy, self-regulation, creativity and flow, and attachment and love.
  • PS306 - Psychology of Prejudice (4 Credits)
    Explores the psychological causes and consequences of stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination through an analysis of psychological theory and empirical research. By focusing on the experiences of a wide range of groups, the course examines themes such as group identity and intergroup conflict; the nature of categorization; why stereotypes persist; the personal and societal impact of prejudice; and how prejudice might be overcome.
  • PS380 - Top: Psych of Relationships (4 Credits)
    Explores the psychology of close relationships using social and developmental perspectives. Examines main ideas, theories, and applications of close relationships research. Topics include attraction, relationship initiation, love, attachment, interpersonal conflict, and relationship quality.
  • SC210 - Human Health and Disease (4 Credits)
    How is our human body designed and maintained and how is the intricate balance of this system disrupted in illness? This course explores the structure, function, and interrelationship between several body systems through the study of human disease. Several major non-infectious diseases are selected (for example, diabetes, Alzheimer's, heart disease, and lung cancer) as a platform for discussing the chemistry and anatomy of the body. Study of these diseases informs discussion on mechanisms of drug action, the nature of disease risk factors, ethics and politics of healthcare, and the role of mind-body relationships in health and disease.
  • SC211 - Food and Nutrition (4 Credits)
    Introduces food systems, diet, and nutrition. Helps students become informed consumers of food by discussing what we eat, why we eat, where our food comes from, how it is processed, and how it affects our health. Students learn principles of nutrition, including the function of nutrients, food composition and diet analysis, the workings of the digestive system, and the nutritional roots of disease. The environmental, sociological, and psychological implications of food are discussed, and emphasis is placed on dispelling common myths about food and on questioning information presented in the media.
  • SC213 - The Brain and Behavior (4 Credits)
    Discusses the general structure of the human brain and perceptual, cognitive, and neurologic functions and disorders tied to various brain systems. Covers neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, basic sensory functions, brain development, mechanisms of drugs and hormones, sleep, consciousness, and investigative methods used to study the brain. Higher neurocognitive functions, including language and memory and a range of neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders are also explored.
  • SC214 - Plagues and Pandemics (4 Credits)
    Infectious diseases are a leading worldwide cause of human death. This course describes and discusses the role, origins, spread, and impact of infectious diseases. By examining how the human immune system guards against infectious disease, students gain an understanding of the complex interaction between host and pathogen. This foundation is a launching point for discussion of topics such as the rise of drug-resistant microbes, advances in diagnostic and vaccine development, the socioeconomic and political factors involved in disease progression, food preservation and safety, and the use of microbes and microbial products in bioterrorism.
  • SC215 - Personal Genetics & Identity (4 Credits)
    As it becomes increasingly possible to obtain personalized versions of our individual human genomes, it behooves us to consider how much weight this information carries in generating our physical uniqueness and individual identity. This course introduces the biological basis of inheritance and human variation while considering the personal and public implications of accessibility to one's genetic information. In particular, students explore what our DNA can and can't tell us about appearance, disease, ancestry, and behavior. Students consider the marketing of genetic tests, the use of DNA databases in forensic science, regulation of the personal genomics industry, and genetic privacy.
  • SC216 - DNA and Society (4 Credits)
    Explores the structure and function of DNA and the role of the genetic code in shaping the basic cellular units of life. Covers the molecular biology necessary to understand science developments that have garnered the attention of the media and the scientific community, including those relating to biotechnology, stem cells, and genetic engineering. Students discuss this science at its intersection with art, policy, marketing, medicine, and human experience. They gain an appreciation of how molecular biology impacts our society and obtain the tools necessary to make informed decisions about the science we encounter.
  • SC220 - Energy and Sustainability (4 Credits)
    Energy has emerged as one of the most important issues facing our society, as it is increasingly clear that our current patterns of energy use are not sustainable. The course examines the ways in which we use energy, as individuals and as a society, and discusses available and future energy technologies in terms of their environmental impact and technical, economic, and political viability. Students explore various energy sources, beginning with traditional fossil fuel-based technologies, then focusing on emerging technologies, such as hydropower, wind, biomass, solar, geothermal, oceanic, fuel cell, and nuclear.
  • SC221 - Meteorology (4 Credits)
    Introduces the basic concepts involved in the analysis of weather phenomena and climate patterns at global and local scales. Major topics of discussion include: atmospheric composition and dynamics; solar radiation; temperature, moisture, and condensation; optical phenomena in the atmosphere; weather patterns; severe weather; and weather forecasting techniques.
  • SC223 - Climate Change (4 Credits)
    Climate change is a complex topic of enormous scientific interest, societal importance, and political debate. This course introduces the science of climate change and global warming, focusing in particular on: past environmental change, including abrupt changes and past intervals of warmth; the response of physical and biological systems to recent and ongoing changes in climate; future climate scenarios, forecasting uncertainties, and public-policy options; and critical evaluation of media coverage of climate-change issues.
  • SC225 - Science and Politics of Water (4 Credits)
    Explores the confluence of fundamental ecological, hydrological, and other environmental processes with policy and law at the watershed scale. Emphasis is placed on how natural pathways of the flow of water support vital freshwater ecosystem services such as clean drinking water and healthy fish populations. Students also seek insight toward improved management by weighing the trade-offs required for other valued uses such as recreation, agriculture, hydropower, and industrial uses.
  • SC290 - Top: Physics in Everday Life (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to physics by investigating objects and phenomena encountered in everyday life. Covers topics such as sound, light, electricity, and basic mechanics.
  • SC290 - Top: Physics of Everyday Life (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to physics by investigating objects and phenomena encountered in everyday life. Covers topics such as sound, light, electricity, and basic mechanics.
  • SC310 - Science in Translation: Health and Genetics (4 Credits)
    Refines and broadens students' ability to interpret scientific language and communicate critical scientific content to others. This course examines popular representations of molecular biology in various outlets such as film, fiction, and journalism. Conversation about any scientific inaccuracies provides motivation for delving deeper into the science, and discussion of creative intent provides a mechanism for discussing ethical, social, and political impact of related research. Students then apply such interpretative understandings to their own craft as they put scientific translation and communication into practice in select scenarios.
  • SC312 - Visual & Spatial Preception (4 Credits)
    Examines visual and spatial processes and the sensory, cognitive, and neurophysiologic aspects of vision and spatial perception. Reviews the anatomy and physiology of the eye and the visual system, including the brain systems responsible for processing and making sense of visual input. Focus is then given to perception of size, form, color, motion, and three-dimensional space, followed by perceptual and neurological disorders in the visuospatial realm. The course is relevant to students interested in the workings of the visual system, as well as to students in visual media or marketing interested in applied principles of visual perception.
  • SC320 - Science in Translation: Environmental Science (4 Credits)
    Refines and broadens students' ability to interpret scientific language and communicate critical scientific content to others. This course examines popular representations of environmental issues in various outlets such as film, fiction, and journalism. Conversation about any scientific inaccuracies provides motivation for delving deeper into the science, and discussion of creative intent provides a mechanism for discussing ethical, social, and political impact of related research. Students then apply such interpretative understandings to their own craft as they put scientific translation and communication into practice in select scenarios.
  • SO150 - Principles of Sociology (4 Credits)
    Introduces key sociological concepts, methodologies that provide pivotal tools for critical analysis of structures, agents of power focusing on roles shaping relationships, and institutions in local and global communities. Explores historical biographies that shape worldviews. Brings history to bear on present to identify and shape sociological imagination. Hands-on approaches extend learning beyond classroom, ensuring theory linked to practice. Students learn and live sociology as an integral aspect of individual and community identities.
  • SO200 - Communities and Race Relations (4 Credits)
    Studies the history and sociology of racial and ethnic groups in United States, including consideration of group tensions and aggressions. Gives overview of social experiences of major ethnic groups that entered the United States and selected Native American societies. Modern issues of inter-group relations are examined.
  • SO206 - Gender in a Global Perspective (4 Credits)
    Examines gender in a comparative and global context framed by interdisciplinary perspectives from sociology, anthropology, psychology, and cultural studies. Studies social construction of gender across cultures and globalization as a web of complex forces shaping gender-construction activities and institutions. Students compare experiences with other cultures and analyze work, play, and intimacy and institutional structures, including religion, politics, military, media, and the economy.
  • SO208 - Visual Society (4 Credits)
    Social theories of economic cultural change describe increasing significance of visual images and decline of texts, oral communication, and face-to-face interactions. The visualization of culture is considered in connection to economic globalization and the shift from production to consumption economies examined in television, websites, billboards, clothing, and window displays. Visual-ethnographic studies explore effects of visual culture (electronic and digital images, video, film, photography, magazine images) on identity, race, sexuality, politics, opportunity, community, and tradition.
  • SO222 - Humor and Society (4 Credits)
    Explores humor as a window into key sociological questions. What do jokes, gags, clowns, comedians, pranks and cartoons have to do with social order, conflict, inequality, identity and interactions? How does the comedy, as a sociological perspective, illuminate the humor of social organizations and of our subjective states? Students study key sociological arguments and relate them to the humor they observe in their own lives and in the social world around them.
  • SO310 - Top: Religion & Globalization (4 Credits)
    We live in an era of global encounters from digital world tourism to corporate financial takeovers. How should we live our lives in this world? This course is a comparative anthropological inquiry into modes that various religions adopt as they encounter and engage globalization forces. Students will be encouraged to reflect on how the themes and readings covered in the course challenge their own thinking and assumptions about the ethical and the global.
  • SO310 - Top: Religions & Globalization (4 Credits)
    We live in an era of global encounters from digital world tourism to corporate financial takeovers. How should we live our lives in this world? This course is a comparative anthropological inquiry into modes that various religions adopt as they encounter and engage globalization forces. Students will be encouraged to reflect on how the themes and readings covered in the course challenge their own thinking and assumptions about the ethical and the global.
  • SO360 - Deviance and Social Control (4 Credits)
    Examines various forms of social control, the use of power constructing normative boundaries that differentiate normal and deviant perspectives. Media roles within popular culture, and overviews of differing academic perspectives include specific grand theories evidenced through sociological imagination; varieties of violent forms; sexual configurations; mental disorders; substance usages; white-collar dysfunctions; governmental-economic forms. Ethical dimensions of choice change through personal self-critique or examination of career roles in chosen media specialties.
  • TH121 - Intro to Acting 1 (4 Credits)
    Introduces the acting process to the non-performance major. Group and individual exercise work develops a relaxed instrument able to respond freely, in the body and the voice, to emotional and external stimuli. The course moves from fundamental explorations through improvisation to work on scripted material.
  • TH121 - Introduction to Acting 1 (4 Credits)
    Introduces the acting process to the non-performance major. Group and individual exercise work develops a relaxed instrument able to respond freely, in the body and the voice, to emotional and external stimuli. The course moves from fundamental explorations through improvisation to work on scripted material.
  • TH122 - Introduction to Acting 2 (4 Credits)
    Building on the work of TH 121, this course proceeds to careful study of acting craft through the vocabulary of intentions, actions, obstacles, subtext, and objectives.
  • TH123 - Acting 1: Movement (4 Credits)
    An intensive exploration of movement and improvisation. A variety of improvisatory approaches are employed to tap into individual creativity and to discover the power of group creation. Physical demands increase as the body is emphasized as the instrument of communication. The work includes exploration of space, energy, dynamics, rhythm, and sensory response. Actors learn to channel their physical and emotional energy into dramatic action. Prerequisite: by audition only.
  • TH124 - Acting 2: Voice and Text (4 Credits)
    Bases the actor's work in the experience of voice and language. The goal is a free voice in a free body and the ability to express thought and emotion with openness and truth. The course guides students through awareness of and release from habitual tensions and into body alignment, breathing, resonators, sound and movement, group interaction, and the exploration of individual and group creativity. Students use both scripted and improvised material as they discover the two to three octaves of the speaking voice and its connection with thoughts and words. Prerequisite: by audition only.
  • TH130 - Improvisation I (2 Credits)
    Introduces performance majors to improvisation, developing listening skills, spontaneous playing, and the art of presence. Required for all students enrolled in the Actor Training Program. Prerequisite: by audition only.
  • TH131 - Acting Fundamentals (2 Credits)
    Introductory course intended to provide the acting foundation necessary for more advanced scene study. Students apply fundamental concepts explored in first-year voice, movement, and improvisation into written scenes. The emphases are on experiential exercises: improvisations, open scenes, and basic contemporary scene work.
  • TH140 - Rendering (2 Credits)
    Structured to develop fundamental skills in observation, drawing, painting, and modeling, with an emphasis on the application of these skills to the theatrical design process. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. This is the first course required of students in the Design/Technology concentration.
  • TH140 - Rendering II (2 Credits)
    Structured to develop fundamental skills in observation, drawing, painting, and modeling, with an emphasis on the application of these skills to the theatrical design process. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. This is the first course required of students in the Design/Technology concentration.
  • TH142 - Stagecraft: Electrics (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
  • TH143 - Stagecraft: Properties Construction (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
  • TH146 - Stagecraft: Scene Painting (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
  • TH147 - Stagecraft: Crafts (2 Credits)
    Offers experience in standard technical craft practices for the theatre. Students study fundamental techniques in selected technical/craft areas including, but not limited to, scenic construction and handling, scene painting, sculpture for the stage, costume and properties construction, make-up prosthetics, masks, electrics, and lighting. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed. Students may complete different Stagecraft units to a total of 8 credits. The Performing Arts core curriculum requires completion of two laboratory units, or 4 credits.
  • TH150 - History of Fashion & Décor: Design Research (4 Credits)
    Explores the development of styles of Western architecture, furniture, and clothing as a demonstration of the human need to express the social, cultural, and psychological ideals of the period in which it occurs. From the Greeks to the 17th century, the period is presented within its historical-sociological context. The period visual elements are examined according to shape, style, construction, function, and evolution of appearance.
  • TH203 - Perspectives in World Theatre (4 Credits)
    Looks at theatre and performance as an essential component and expression of culture. Surveys material in select time periods and global settings to demonstrate how the various elements of theatre work to reflect and shape culture on issues such as nationality, ethnicity, race, religion, gender, sexuality, class, and age. In order to do so, this course examines the roles and practices of directors, designers, dramaturges, and playwrights throughout the world from the classical to the postmodern period, and of varying theatrical styles. Readings include plays and historical material, as well as dramatic theory and criticism. Students attend lectures, participate in group work, view theatrical performances and videos, and talk to professionals in the field. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements. Performing Arts majors are not permitted to ernoll in this course.
  • TH204 - Theatre into Film (4 Credits)
    Explores the artistic languages of theatre and film. Dramatic material written for the stage is read and analyzed and the process of adaptation of that material is explored. Texts include the works of such playwrights as Shakespeare, Strindberg, Williams, and Albee. Film texts include the work of directors such as Lumet, Cukor, Solberg, and Nichols. Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
  • TH205 - Dress Codes: American Clothes in the Twentieth Century (4 Credits)
    Examines American clothes and fashion in the 20th century, with a primary focus on the visual elements of everyday dress. Six distinct periods are studied according to the silhouette and decorative details of each. Further, each fashion period is studied within the context of its indirect influences (social, cultural, historical, technological, economical). Particular focus is given to concepts of masculinity and feminity, and gender ambiguity; challenges to gendered clothes (such as trousers on women, long hair on men); and anti-fashion (zoot suits, beatniks, hippies, punk, goth). Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
  • TH205 - Dress Codes: American Clothes in the Twentieth Century (4 Credits)
    Examines American clothes and fashion in the 20th century, with a primary focus on the visual elements of everyday dress. Six distinct periods are studied according to the silhouette and decorative details of each. Further, each fashion period is studied within the context of its indirect influences (social, cultural, historical, technological, economical). Particular focus is given to concepts of masculinity and feminity, and gender ambiguity; challenges to gendered clothes (such as trousers on women, long hair on men); and anti-fashion (zoot suits, beatniks, hippies, punk, goth). Fulfills the Aesthetic Perspective of the General Education requirements.
  • TH215 - World Drama in Its Context 1 (4 Credits)
    Surveys theatre and drama from the Greeks through the Restoration, with a focus on the major periods of Western theatre and dramatic literature: the Greeks, Roman theatre and drama, Medieval theatre, Elizabethan drama, Italian Commedia Dell'arte, Spanish Golden Age, French Neo-Classicism, and Restoration. In addition, students survey Eastern classical theatre and drama with a particular emphasis on the Sanskrit theatre, the Chinese drama and the Peking Opera, and the classical theatre of Japan, including Kabuki, No, and the puppet theatre. There are selected readings of plays in their historical context with particular attention paid to theatrical styles of plays and production.
  • TH216 - World Drama in Its Context 2 (4 Credits)
    Surveys theatre and drama from the late 17th century to the present. The major periods of world theatre and drama, Romanticism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism are studied with particular emphasis on 20th-century theatre and drama throughout the world, including Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Attention is given to the work of both women and men. Theatrical conventions, innovations, and techniques developed in the Western and non-Western theatres are explored.
  • TH221 - Musical Theatre Scene Study 1 (4 Credits)
    This intensive acting class builds on the first-year acting courses to ensure a personal commitment in the way students approach and experience scene work and acting technique. Through exercises and improvisations, students increase awareness, strengthen the ability to talk and listen, and practice recognizing and experiencing moment-to-moment acting. They then apply these skills to dramatic scripts. Students learn how to read a play from the actor's perspective and how to break down and explore a scene in terms of given circumstances, relationships, and character needs.
  • TH221 - Musical Theatre Scene Study I (4 Credits)
    This intensive acting class builds on the first-year acting courses to ensure a personal commitment in the way students approach and experience scene work and acting technique. Through exercises and improvisations, students increase awareness, strengthen the ability to talk and listen, and practice recognizing and experiencing moment-to-moment acting. They then apply these skills to dramatic scripts. Students learn how to read a play from the actor's perspective and how to break down and explore a scene in terms of given circumstances, relationships, and character needs.
  • TH221 - Scene Study I (4 Credits)
    This intensive acting class builds on the first-year acting courses to ensure a personal commitment in the way students approach and experience scene work and acting technique. Through exercises and improvisations, students increase awareness, strengthen the ability to talk and listen, and practice recognizing and experiencing moment-to-moment acting. They then apply these skills to dramatic scripts. Students learn how to read a play from the actor's perspective and how to break down and explore a scene in terms of given circumstances, relationships, and character needs.
  • TH222 - Scene Study II (4 Credits)
    Strengthens and deepens the work begun in TH 221. Students are now ready to codify their experience into a meaningful acting vocabulary. Terms such as action, objective, super-objective, obstacle, and subtext are layered into scene work from American and British realism. Students begin to use imagery in order to more fully encounter and receive the imaginary world of the play.
  • TH222 - Scene Study II-Mus Theatre (4 Credits)
    Strengthens and deepens the work begun in TH 221. Students are now ready to codify their experience into a meaningful acting vocabulary. Terms such as action, objective, super-objective, obstacle, and subtext are layered into scene work from American and British realism. Students begin to use imagery in order to more fully encounter and receive the imaginary world of the play.
  • TH240 - Drafting (2 Credits)
    Through weekly projects, students learn graphic techniques in drafting for theatrical production. The focus is on conventional symbolization, development of ground plans, sections, elevations, orthographics, isometrics, and construction drawings. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH240 - Drafting II (2 Credits)
    Through weekly projects, students learn graphic techniques in drafting for theatrical production. The focus is on conventional symbolization, development of ground plans, sections, elevations, orthographics, isometrics, and construction drawings. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH242 - Lighting Design I (4 Credits)
    Basic principles of stage lighting design are introduced, including the mechanics and optics of lighting instruments, electrical theory and practices, control systems, basic design concepts, and color theory. Controllable qualities of light are investigated and demonstrated through students' participation on a lighting crew for a department production. Design techniques are developed through a complete lighting design project. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH242 - Lighting Design I (4 Credits)
    Permission of Instructor required.
  • TH243 - Sound Design (4 Credits)
    Introduces the basic principles of theatrical sound design and the practices and skills required to develop a production's sound design and supportive technical documentation. Students are introduced to script analysis, system layout, effects development, source researching, and organization. The combined hands-on presentations and class assignments allow students to develop a working knowledge of the sound designer's responsibilities and skills. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH244 - Costume Construction (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic costume patterning and construction methods. Students not only study draping, drafting, and flat-patterning, but also learn terminology, equipment usage, and the skills necessary to the entire costuming process. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH245 - Scene Design 1 (4 Credits)
    Introduces the fundamental principles of design. Students learn how proficiency in a core set of design skills can lead to effective performance in a variety of theatrical and commercial production situations. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH248 - Costume Design 1 (4 Credits)
    Students develop an understanding of the basic principles of costume design, character analysis, and costume design presentation. Lectures and class discussions prepare students to confront specific problems in design projects. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH250 - Design Essentials (4 Credits)
    Introduces the theatrical design process and personnel within the regional theatre model. Emphasis is placed on the interconnection between the various design areas and their function in the process of making theatre. Students explore script analysis from the designer's point of view, review various production styles and venues, and experience current production design approaches. This course exposes students to some of the basic skills and processes employed by theatrical designers. Students are expected to supply appropriate materials as needed and attend selected theatrical productions.
  • TH252 - Master Electrician (4 Credits)
    Studies the tools of lighting, principles of electricity, and the technical electrical skills required to become safe and proficient as a theatrical electrician as well as the process of creating paperwork, budgeting shows, and leading crews as a master electrician.
  • TH265 - Foundations of Education (4 Credits)
    Examines the basis of public education and the teaching process from a theoretical and methodological viewpoint. Multiple perspectives are employed to investigate these issues, including, but not limited to, the philosophical, historical, sociological, psychological, economic, and political. Required course for initial licensure as a Teacher of Theatre.
  • TH275 - Arts Management I (4 Credits)
    Explores the theory and practice of arts management, with particular focus on theatre management. Extensive readings in arts management provide a foundation for further work in the field.
  • TH277 - Stage Management I (4 Credits)
    The fundamentals of stage management explored through readings, discussion, written exercises, and appropriate hands-on experience.
  • TH313 - African-American Theatre and Culture (4 Credits)
    African-American drama and theater in Africa and America are studied from their origins in African ritual and in early 19th-century America to the present. Lectures and discussions focus on traditional and modern drama and theater, as well as significant periods of dramatic activity such as the Harlem Renaissance, the Federal Theatre Project, and the Black Arts Movement, and on representative works by major contemporary African and African-American dramatists. Fulfills the General Education U.S. Diversity requirement.
  • TH315 - Top: Contemp American Theatre (4 Credits)
    Various topics in the aesthetics of contemporary U.S. theatre with particular focus on the history, theory, and criticism of selected dramatists, directors, designers, and theatre companies such as the Open Theatre, Teatro Campesino, and the Tectonic Theatre Project. This course will also focus on current productions and presentations in and around Boston. Attendance at selected events is mandatory.
  • TH320 - Stage Com:Close Quarter Combat (4 Credits)
    Unarmed theatrical combat techniques suitable for both stage and screen are taught, including: shared-weight illusions and grappling, contact and non-contact strikes, and falls and rolls. Another unit focuses on incorporating combat props such as knives and found objects. Scene work ranges from classical to modern to self-scripted. This is an acting class using physical lines of dialogue; students bring all of their acting, voice, and movement skills to bear on this work.
  • TH322 - Acting for the Camera (4 Credits)
    Prepares acting students for work on camera. Students explore the actor's relationship both to the camera and to the medium. Coursework includes improvisation, monologue, and scene work. A portion of the course is devoted to "the business of acting" with special attention to film and television auditioning. Technical skill for film and television performance and an introduction to the element of film production (script/story structure, editing, lighting, and cinematography) are components of the course.
  • TH324 - Dialects (4 Credits)
    Continues the actor's work of experiencing voice and language in a free body as a means to develop versatile and intelligible speech. Using specific Linklater Sound and Movement exercises as a bridge to text and as a physical connection to phonetics, students explore and expand the actor's range, stamina, and expressive ability. Students use these tools, along with Paul Meier's textbook, Accents and Dialects for Stage and Screen, to acquire British Standard (RP), Cockney, Irish, German, Russian, New York, and American Southern dialects as well as other specialty dialects as time allows. The goal of the class is to expand the actor's choices of speech and vocal expression and to acquaint her/him with the resources necessary to learn dialects.
  • TH325 - BFA Acting Studio 1 (4 Credits)
    Intensive discovery of acting technique that builds on the first two years of voice and movement/improvisation work to ensure a personal commitment in the way a student studies and experiences scene work through the vocabulary of intentions, actions, obstacles, subtext, and objectives. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: BFA Acting majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 326.
  • TH326 - BFA Acting Studio 2 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 325 students in the BFA program in Acting. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: BFA Acting majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 325.
  • TH327 - Advanced Musical Theatre Technique I (4 Credits)
    Intensive technique work in acting and musical theatre repertoire. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class. Semester includes specific instruction in "clean singing." Prerequisite: BFA Musical Theatre majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 329 or TH 429.
  • TH328 - Advanced Mus Th Technique II (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 327 for students in the BFA program in Musical Theatre. Scenes from musical theatre and plays as well as advanced musical solo work are considered. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class. Semester includes specific work in dialects. Prerequisite: TH 327. Co-requisite: TH 329 or TH 429.
  • TH329 - Musical Theatre Dance Repertoire I (2 Credits)
    Students are assigned to class by skill level as determined by musical theatre and dance faculty. Students explore various styles of musical theatre dance and hone their audition and performance skills. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: BFA Musical Theatre majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 327, TH 328, TH 427, or TH 428.
  • TH330 - Auditions and Monologues (4 Credits)
    Helps students develop skills in choosing, analyzing, and performing monologues for their portfolio. Addresses acting issues and staging possibilities. Students learn how to comport themselves in audition interviews both before and after their presentations.
  • TH340 - AutoCAD (4 Credits)
    Students learn to use the technology of computer assisted drafting (CAD) to communicate common graphical information required in theatre design and technology. This includes the creation of ground plans, elevations, section views, orthographic views, technical details, and light plots. Students produce both electronic files and printed documents that conform to accepted theatre graphics standards. The techniques of 3D modeling and rendering are also introduced.
  • TH342 - Lighting Design II (4 Credits)
    Presents approaches to lighting design and poses specific design problems for students to solve. Attention is also given to color, composition, cueing, and production through presentations and discussions in class. Students participate in department productions as assistant designers and electricians. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH345 - Scene Design 2 (4 Credits)
    Builds on the experience of fundamental level coursework. Students develop methods for solving the practical and aesthetic problems that a professional designer, working in theatre and allied fields, will encounter. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH348 - Costume Design 2 (4 Credits)
    Explores advanced design principles and processes in all areas of costume design. Students experience the complete process of designing costumes for a given project, including (a) creating and presenting the design concept; (b) developing appropriate paperwork for counting, building, and running costumes; and (c) budgeting specs and rendering final sketches. Students produce a portfolio of work and learn to communicate professionally with other members of the theatrical production team. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH375 - Arts Management II (4 Credits)
    A detailed exploration of the theory and practice of arts management using current case studies from within the field. Exploration will include extensive readings, guest speakers, research, group discussions and writing exercises.
  • TH376 - Production Management (4 Credits)
    Explores professional production management in theatre, ranging from commercial and nonprofit regional theatre models to touring and special events management.
  • TH377 - Stage Management II (4 Credits)
    Addresses the students' needs for comprehensive intermediate instruction, primarily focusing on the position of the assistant stage manager and how he or she functions not only within the stage management team but also as a collaborator/facilitator on plays and musicals.
  • TH381 - Directing I: Fundamentals of Directing (4 Credits)
    Major principles of play directing are studied. Through comprehensive script analysis, students become familiar with the structure of a play as a basis on which the various elements of theatre can be organized to achieve dramatic unity. Laboratory application of directing practices introduces students to the techniques employed by a director to communicate with actors and audience, including principles of composition, movement, stage business, and rhythm.
  • TH388 - Playwriting I (4 Credits)
    Working from the reading and analysis of contemporary plays, from discussions of contemporary theatrical techniques, and from exercises through which the student writer gains access to personal material, the major focus of the semester is the writing and revision of several drafts of at least 1 one-act play suitable for production on stage. Pieces, scenes, and whole plays are read in class and active participation in the workshop process is a required component of the course.
  • TH402 - Living Art in Real Space: Multidisciplinary Art and the Collaborative Process (4 Credits)
    Examines the development and language of multidisciplinary art from the 20th century to the present day, with reference to specific artists, trends, and movements. Lectures, slide and video presentations, museum visits, student research, reading, writing, and in-depth experiential processes address how different artistic disciplines inform one another and come together in visual art performance and installations. Culminates in final presentations of multidisciplinary work by student groups documenting and mapping sources, methods, and process of their collaborations.
  • TH410 - Principles of Dramaturgy (4 Credits)
    Provides theoretical and critical background to the profession of dramaturgy. Explores the history of dramaturgy as well as different professional venues and the variety of tasks that dramaturges perform within a particular venue. Introduces students to the areas of dramatic criticism (theatre critics and scholars, translators, script analysts, and editors), literary office dramaturgy (new script analysis, season planning, literary management of the theatre, etc.), and production dramaturgy (working with the director, audience outreach, new play development, etc.).
  • TH411 - Top: Dramaturgy of the Multiimedia Theatre and Performance (4 Credits)
    Dramaturgy of the Multimedia Theatre and Performance is a workshop-style course in which students will explore new dramaturgical ways of developing narratives that move across different genres, including film, new media and live performance. The students will learn about newest technology such as virtual stage, video, make-up and sound mapping, and how to do dramaturgy in the context of transmedia performances and peer-based interactive theatre. The students will design their own multimedia shows based on found multimedia, classic texts and their own writing.
  • TH412 - Play Analysis (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to the art and skill of play analysis, with an eye toward production and cultural significance. Students learn building blocks of dramatic structure and analyze how structure contributes to the understanding of a play. They study plays, critical essays, and performances spanning 25 centuries of Western theatrical practice. Part of the class time is devoted to mapping the structures of the plays and analyzing how these structures may be used to create textually supported interpretations both on stage and in writing. Students explore the material through lecture, discussion, videos, and group activities.
  • TH420 - Stage Combat: Historical Weaponry (4 Credits)
    Introduces three weapons commonly found in plays and films: broadsword (for example, from Richard III or The Lord of the Rings); quarterstaff (such as in Robin Hood or Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon); and rapier and dagger (think Romeo and Juliet or The Three Musketeers). Students explore the fundamentals of creating safe illusions of violence using footwork, distance, targeting, blocks, strikes, and simulated wounds and kills. Scene work focuses on classical material. This is an acting class using physical lines of dialogue; students bring all of their acting, voice, and movement skills to bear on this work.
  • TH421 - Advanced Acting: Shakespeare (4 Credits)
    This advanced acting course is intended to provide the tools to bring Shakespeare¨s language to life on the stage. We will build on and vigorously apply your training in movement, voice, improvisation and scene study; examine and apply tools to approach heightened text including structure of the verse and first folio clues. Students will work on at least one monologue and scene from Shakespeare's canon.
  • TH421 - AdvAct: Adv Improvisation (4 Credits)
    This course builds on the fundamentals of improvisation- listening skills, saying "yes", taking risks, spontaneity, narrative, status- and explores advanced styles and forms of improvisational theatre. From Keith Johnstone's Theatresports and comedy club style improv to Mask, Story Theatre and dramatic improvisation. The course will culminate with in-house and outside performances at a public venue.
  • TH421 - Top: Dialects (4 Credits)
    This course continues the actor's work of experiencing voice and language in a free body as a means to develop versatile and intelligible speech. Using specific Linklater Sound and Movement exercises as a bridge to text and as a physical connection to phonetics, we will explore and expand the actor's range, stamina, and expressive ability. The student will use these tools, along with the textbook, Paul Meier's ACCENTS AND DIALECTS FOR STAGE AND SCREEN, to acquire British Standard (RP), Cockney, Irish, German, Russian, New York, and American Southern dialects as well as other specialty dialects as time allows. The goal of the class is to expand the actor's choices of speech and vocal expression and to acquaint her/him with the resources necessary to learn dialects.
  • TH421 - Top: Advanced Voice & Text (4 Credits)
    This course is an in-depth exploration of the voice work of Kristin Linklater and her progression of exercises designed to free the natural voice. Complimentary voice exercises, such as Kristin Linklater's Sound & Movement sequence, will also be introduced to encourage the actor's ability to speak with her/his whole body and to open up all the communication channels for breath, voice, and listening. The goal of the voice work is a free voice in a free body that is able to respond to a full range of emotional and imaginative demands with openness and truth. The goal of this course is to reinforce the actor's confidence in bringing Linklater Voice work to the exploration of text.
  • TH423 - Action Theater (4 Credits)
    Action TheaterT is a training system in physical theater improvisation that integrates vocal, physical, and verbal skills while connecting to the agility of the imagination. Exercises isolate the components of action -time, space, shape, and energy- so they can be examined, experienced, and altered in order to expand the expressive range and palette. The work provides tools to examine one's perceptive and responsive process, and address habits that limit one's ability to remain embodied, engaged, and in the moment. Students apply these skills to structured solo and ensemble improvisational performance.
  • TH425 - BFA Acting Studio 3 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 325 and TH 326 for students in the BFA program in Acting. Scene study problems move toward issues of style, including a range of aesthetic and acting style issues. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, stage combat (including unarmed and Elizabethan rapier), and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. Co-requisite: TH 426.
  • TH426 - BFA Acting Studio 4 (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 425 for students in the BFA program in Acting. Beyond continued scene work, significant attention is paid to audition technique and to a thorough orientation to the profession and the business of acting. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. Co-requisite: TH 425.
  • TH426 - BFA Acting Studio 4: Showcase (4 Credits)
    Continuation of the intensive studio training work of TH 425 for students in the BFA program in Acting. Beyond continued scene work, significant attention is paid to audition technique and to a thorough orientation to the profession and the business of acting. This studio course integrates experiences in voice, movement, and acting work through team teaching. Significant personal and group preparation is required outside of class time. At least four additional hours per week are protected in the schedule of all students to facilitate this important work. Co-requisite: TH 425.
  • TH427 - Musical Theatre Styles I (4 Credits)
    An intensive investigation of pop-rock styles, both in pure pop repertoire and contemporary musical theatre repertoire, in solo work and scenes. The semester culminates in individual cabaret performances, created by the students themselves. Co-requisite: TH 329 or TH 429.
  • TH428 - Musical Theatre Styles II (4 Credits)
    Senior-level BFA Musical Theatre majors continue the exploration of musical theatre genres and styles as they spend the semester working strictly on works by emerging composers. The composers are invited to visit and participate in classes, creating opportunities for networking and connecting with the artists who are creating new works of musical theatre. In addition, one class per week is devoted to preparations for the Senior Showcase, which is performed for students, families, and industry professionals during commencement weekend. Co-requisite: TH 329 or TH 429.
  • TH429 - Musical Theatre Dance Repertoire II (2 Credits)
    Students are assigned to class by skill level, as determined by musical theatre and dance faculty. Students explore various styles of musical theatre dance and hone their audition and performance skills. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: BFA Musical Theatre majors only who have successfully completed a faculty review, audition, and TH 222. Co-requisite: TH 327, TH 328, TH 427, or TH 428.
  • TH431 - Shakespeare Performance (4 Credits)
    Explores Shakespeare's poetry through the body and voice as a way not only of avoiding intellectual pitfalls but also as a path to nurture and experience this poetry through embodied vibration, sensation and image. Rhetorical structure and devices are explored as well in the manner, via the body rather than the brain.
  • TH441 - Topics in Technical Design (4 Credits)
    Permission of Instructor Required
  • TH460 - Drama as Education I (4 Credits)
    Examines the philosophy behind the teaching of theatre and the use of drama as an educational tool in classroom, workshop, and production settings. Students learn to assess the learning needs of their students, develop appropriate educational goals, and design and implement teaching strategies. There are 40 hours of pre-practicum work, including observations of area theatre and drama classes from grades pre-K through 12. Course is open to any Performing Arts major and others with permission of instructor. It is required for Theatre Education majors seeking initial licensure as a Teacher of Theatre.
  • TH461 - Drama as Education 2 (4 Credits)
    Students delve more deeply into the philosophy and practice of teaching through drama and theatre. Forty hours of pre-practicum work with students from grades pre-K through 12 is required. Course is required for Theatre Education majors seeking initial licensure as a Teacher of Theatre.
  • TH463 - Student Teaching Seminar (2 Credits)
    Students concurrently enrolled in TH 465, Student Teaching Practicum, also attend this weekly seminar to explore issues, resources, questions, problems, and solutions to the teaching/learning challenges they are facing in their practicum experience. Topics pertinent to beginning teachers, including classroom management strategies and curriculum and lesson plan development are explored. Students reflect on their teaching experiences and critically examine their current and future roles as classroom instructors. Students will understand the need for a community of teachers and gain a sense of confidence about their teaching skills. Co-requisite: TH465.
  • TH465 - Student Teaching Practicum (2 Credits)
    An 8- to 14-week practicum providing supervised student teaching activities at either the elementary, middle, or high school level. Students practice teaching in a school system, which permits them to interact with students and teachers in their area of concentration. Working closely with the on-site supervising practitioner, students develop instructional units and must be engaged in 300 hours of teaching. The practicum is open only to students who have completed their education program sequence. Co-requisite: TH463.
  • TH465 - Student Teaching Practicum (2 Credits)
    Instructor Permission required.
  • TH468 - Multicultural Education (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to a variety of perspectives and approaches to multicultural education. Includes an exploration of the range of issues involved in this complex topic, such as curricular and teaching issues, social and behavioral issues, bilingual education, testing systems, tacking, and unequal power dynamics. Also focuses on the ways in which drama and theater can facilitate change in these areas.
  • TH470 - Design in Practice Topics (4 Credits)
    In this advanced course of study, students develop the required practical skills necessary for the design and execution of a theatrical production design. Students further develop the ability to analyze a script, song, or score and translate the ideas therein into visual images. They learn to move a design from concept to completion under the actual "in theatre" conditions, while still maintaining a safe, constructive learning environment. They put into actual practice the equipment, methods, procedures, and skills necessary to implement a successful design. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.
  • TH475 - Topics in Arts Management (4 Credits)
    This course will focus on developing and producing for the commercial and nonprofit theater. Both verticals bring their own unique sets of challenges. Throughout the semester, you will explore how to bring an idea from page to stage, all while juggling acquiring the rights, putting together a team of creatives, raising money, planning your marketing and advertising campaign, presenting a reading and finding co-producers and partners that will help you realize your theatrical show. The course will provide each student with both theoretical and practical knowledge and guidelines to pursue a successful career developing theater. From what to do in the first 10 years out of college, to how to set yourself up for success for the next 10 years in the theater industry.
  • TH477 - Stage Management III (4 Credits)
    Provides students with the additional tools, techniques, and information to build the bridge from practicing stage management in an educational environment to the professional theatre or MFA program through in-depth study of the Actor's Equity Rules, creation of complex repertory rehearsal schedules of multiple productions, and hands-on training exercises of calling musical show cues with lighting, automation, and fly to music with cue lights.
  • TH479 - Top:Business of Theatre:Acting (4 Credits)
    This course will teach students how to make the transition from the academic world to the semi-professional and professional world of show business. In a hands-on, experiential setting, students will learn how show business works and what they can do to design their own career path towards becoming a working actor. This course will encourage a healthy mind-set for the journey ahead as well as introduce students to practical tips on self-management, marketing, networking, acquiring an agent, and exploring other helpful resources. In addition, guest lectures by outside professionals will help students learn how the industry works from the inside.
  • TH479 - Topics in Business of Theatre: Design Entrepreneur (4 Credits)
    Various topics related to the business of theatre for future working professionals are explored. Different sections approach issues relevant to specific career paths, i.e., acting, design, stage management, etc., such as: the finding of appropriate audition material, and audition and casting process in theatre, film, and television; the requirements for admission to professional trade unions, AEA, and exploration of service organizations; issues of titles, licenses, and/or permits; preparing a professional resume and/or portfolio, job strategies using online sources for entry-level work; entrepreneurial opportunities and interaction with allied businesses and fundraising for nonprofit companies; and other topics as appropriate to individual sections.
  • TH482 - Directing II: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)
    Extending the experiences of Directing I, this course emphasizes the application and unification of stage directing techniques and theories leading to a concept for production. Through selected scenes and projects for class presentation, students continue the exploration of materials and methods of communicating the dramatic content of a script to an audience.
  • TH488 - Playwriting II (4 Credits)
    Includes, but is not limited to, the study of dramaturgical elements in the work of contemporary and classic playwrights, as well as continued study of story development, structure, and the use of dialogue. Students present a variety of work in class, their own and the work of others, looking at plays from the perspective of the actor, director, designer and, most importantly, the audience. By the end of the semester, students complete the first draft of a newly conceived full-length play or the third draft of the one-act play begun in Playwriting I.
  • TH514 - Sem: Voices of the Theatre (4 Credits)
    Covers contemporary works of theatre with an emphasis on exploring intersections between social identities like race, ethnicity, gender and gender identity, sexuality, and class. The coursework includes selected readings of plays in their sociopolitical context with a focus on analyzing artists' aesthetic choices and innovations. Students will also engage in conversations with playwrights about their process.
  • TH514 - Sem: Human Rights (4 Credits)
    This course will examine how theatre can be used as a tool to address human rights issues and violations. Students will analyze how theatre in performance, both as an aesthetic product and as a creative process, has the potential to engage both audiences and production members in critical dialogues regarding human rights. We will critically examine dramatic literature, as text and through scene work, in an effort to develop an interdisciplinary vocabulary across human rights & theatre. Students will also have the opportunity to explore curriculum design and development in which dramatic activities are used to address diverse topics in human rights education. We will read both theoretical texts and plays to inform our study of the intersection between human rights and theatre.
  • TH521 - Top: Directing and Acting the New Play (4 Credits)
    This course will focus on the skills needed to act and direct an unpublished, work-in-progress script. We will focus on acting choices, text analysis, directorial conventions, stage directions, and all aspects of new play work. The class will involve working with contemporary playwrights and unpublished texts. We will do a number of in-class readings, stage readings, and mock workshops. Permission of Instructor required.
  • TH562 - Theatre for Young Audiences (4 Credits)
    Introduces the scope, purposes, and history of theatre experiences for children and adolescents. Topics include play reading and analysis, the examination of formal and participatory theatre, and theatre-in-education techniques.
  • TH567 - Playwriting for and with Youth (4 Credits)
    Introduces a variety of schemes and stimuli to use in writing scripts for child or youth audiences or to use in helping young people write their own plays. Attention is given to freeing and stretching the imagination, issues of structure, and methods of play development, culminating in readings of new work. Class work includes writing, improvising, reading aloud, critiquing, and discussing work for and with youth.
  • TH584 - Directing the Musical (4 Credits)
    Permission of the Instructor Required.
  • TH614 - Sem: Elma Lewis Center: Theatre and Community Conversations (4 Credits)
    Class meets Tuesday 4-5:45 and additional class/work hours are scheduled with the instructor. Building on the work of Performance: Theatre and Community, students will apply their explorations of community-based theatre practices and possibilities in collaboration with a local community organization and the Elma Lewis Center to develop and facilitate a theatre performance/process. Participation in these laboratory community sessions is required. The class will explore the issues, questions, and discoveries that arise throughout the experience.
  • TH614 - Sem: Qualitative Research (4 Credits)
    This course will introduce students to the various approaches used in designing and conducting arts-based qualitative research projects in educational settings. Students will gain hands-on experience in various qualitative methods, analysis techniques, and writing exercises, while formulating a research project related to their areas of interest. The focus of the course is on the identification and creation of hypothetical research questions, the development of designs, data collection methods, and analysis procedures to address those questions.
  • TH621 - Top: Voice (4 Credits)
    Special Topics in Voice bases the actor-teacher's work in a fully embodied experience of voice and language. The goal of the course is to cultivate a free voice in a free body, and to learn how to express every subtly and nuance of thought and feeling with clarity, ease, and truth. The course guides students through an awareness of and release from habitual tensions into a more effective and economical use of the body as an instrument for human communication and expression. Additional focus will be on self-awareness, breathing, resonance, sound and movement, ensemble-building skills, and the actor-audience relationship. Classroom discussions will deal with the importance of voice training in theater education, as well as the challenges and pedagogical issues that arise when teaching the material.
  • TH621 - Top: Improvisation (4 Credits)
    The goal of this course is to supply the actor-teacher with a strong, core improvisation training, and explore how improvisation can be used in the classroom, actor training, and rehearsals. Students will learn about improvisation as a performance technique as well as a teaching tool. The course guides students through the basics of short form improv, starting with storytelling, then into movement, space, emotion, status, and eventually character. Students will build upon these basics and learn how to expand their improvisations from single scenes into long performances. The focus will then shift into how these improvisational skills can be used as teaching artists in theater classes, rehearsals, and actor coaching for the stage and screen.
  • TH621 - Top: Boal (4 Credits)
    This course is primarily a hands-on exploration of the theatrical techniques inspired by the revolutionary work of Augusto Boal (Theater of the Oppressed). We will experience acting as an essential social art, a tool for democratic education, a channel for personal transformation, and a means of artistic liberation. Exploring the connections between the theater practitioner's life and one's role within the larger community as an A.C.T.O.R. --artist, creator, teacher, organizer and researcher, we re-discover what it is to be human. Bring with you a desire to play, learn and grow with others. We must all do theater-- to find out who we are, and to discover who we could become.-- Augusto Boal
  • TH625 - Performance: Theatre and Community (4 Credits)
    Examines the relationships between theatre and culture, where culture is understood as a process of knowing the other, of looking and listening, of creating and maintaining connection in a community. An examination of theoretical texts in economics, history, sociology, cultural studies, politics, and performance provides a foundation for exploring and experiencing various techniques of making theatre in community.
  • TH650 - Design in Production (4 Credits)
    This course is a comprehensive survey of scene, lighting, and costume design as they relate to the work of the non-design specialist. Emphasis is placed on the interconnection among the various design areas and their function in the process of making theatre. Students are expected to supply appropriate materials.
  • TH660 - Drama as Education I (4 Credits)
    Students examine the philosophical foundations of theatre, speech, and the use of drama as an educational tool. They explore the uses of creative drama/improvisation in both formal and informal learning environments. Students learn to assess needs, develop appropriate educational goals and objectives, and design and implement teaching strategies using drama. This course is required for students seeking the Initial License in Massachusetts as a Teacher of Theatre (pre-K through grade 12). Readings, class participation, and participation in laboratory teaching sessions are required.
  • TH661 - Drama as Education II (4 Credits)
    Students explore the principles of educational drama and the teaching of drama and speech. A survey of various educational resources available to drama and speech teachers is included. The role of drama and speech within the wider context of the arts in education is discussed. This course is required for students seeking the Initial License in Massachusetts as a Teacher of Theatre (pre-K through grade 12).
  • TH663 - Student Teaching Seminar (2 Credits)
    Students concurrently enrolled in TH 665, Student Teaching Practicum, also attend this weekly seminar to explore issues, resources, questions, problems, and solutions to the teaching/learning challenges they are facing in their practicum experience. Topics pertinent to beginning teachers, including classroom management strategies and curriculum and lesson plan development are explored. Students reflect on their teaching experiences and critically examine their current and future roles as classroom instructors. Students will understand the need for a community of teachers and gain a sense of confidence about their teaching skills. Prerequisite: Permission of the Theatre Education Program Director. Co-requisite: TH665.
  • TH665 - Student Teaching Practicum (2 Credits)
    Instructor Permission Required
  • TH665 - Student Teaching Practicum (2 Credits)
    Permission of Graduate Program Director required.
  • TH665 - Student Teaching Practicum (2 Credits)
    This 8- to 14-week practicum provides supervised teaching activities at either the elementary, middle, or high school level. Students practice teaching in a school system that permits them to interact with students and teachers in their area of concentration. Working closely with the on-site supervising practitioner, students develop instructional units and must be engaged in 300 hours of teaching. The practicum is open only to students who have completed their program sequence. Requirements and prerequisites may be obtained from the Theatre Education program director. Co-requisite: TH 663.
  • TH667 - Special Topics in Theatre Education (4 Credits)
    This course explores the theory and practice of directing young actors and will include a consideration of appropriate dramatic literature for child and adolescent actors, the coaching of young actors in a developmental context, and strategies for directing in school and community contexts.
  • TH669 - Contemporary Issues in Education (4 Credits)
    Students examine the critical, philosophical, historical, and sociological issues facing education in general, and communication and performing arts education in particular. Students will also evaluate current research in communication and performing arts education and apply it to practice.
  • TH680 - Directing: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)
    The directorial process is examined, beginning with textual analysis of dramatic action, and covering such areas as ground plans, pictorial composition, movement, and stage action. The relationship of the director and other theater artists is also studied. Student work includes selected scenes and projects prepared for class presentation.
  • VM100 - History of Media Arts I (4 Credits)
    This is the first of a two-semester course that explores the historical development of the media arts, including the film, broadcasting, and sound recording industries until 1965. Investigates the relationships between economics, industrial history, and social and political systems, and the styles and techniques of specific films and broadcast programs. Special attention is given to the diversity of styles of presentation in the media.
  • VM101 - History of Media Arts II (4 Credits)
    This is the second of a two-semester course that explores the historical development of the media arts, focusing on the continuing development of the film, broadcasting, and sound recording industries after 1965, as well as the development of video and digital technologies. Investigates the relationships between economics, industrial history, and social and political systems, and the styles and techniques of specific films and videos, broadcast programs, and digital media products.
  • VM105 - Introduction to Visual Arts (4 Credits)
    Investigates the visual language of communication shared among all of the visual arts, emphasizing visual analysis, understanding of materials, the history of style and techniques, and the functions and meanings of art in its varied manifestations. Provides a foundation for subsequent studies in the visual and media arts.
  • VM110 - Production Safety Workshop (0 Credit)
    A one-time lecture that empowers students to safely navigate student productions and more fully understand production safety procedures. Course is pass/fail and a passing grade is required to enroll in all 200-level production courses.
  • VM120 - Foundations in Visual and Media Arts Production (4 Credits)
    Seats held for new students
  • VM120 - Foundations in Visual and Media Arts Production (4 Credits)
    A combination of lectures and hands-on workshops examines the relationships among photography, graphics, audio, film, video, and digital media within the context of cross-media concepts, theories, and applications. Traces the creative process from conception and writing through production and post-production. Students proceed through a series of exercises that lead to completion of a final project, establishing a foundation for advanced production coursework.
  • VM200 - Media Criticism and Theory (4 Credits)
    Explores theoretical and critical approaches to the study of photography, film, television and video, audio, and digital culture. Theories and methods examine issues relating to production and authorship in the media arts, audience reception and effects, political ideology, ethics, aesthetics, cultural diversity, and schools of thought within the liberal arts. Extensive critical writing and reading in media criticism and theory.
  • VM202 - Critical Listening (4 Credits)
    Provides a study of the psycho-acoustic perception and analysis of classical and contemporary use of sound in the media. Students identify and define acoustic variables, comparing past and present recordings in all media.
  • VM203 - History of Photography: 19th Century to the 1970's (4 Credits)
    Surveys the aesthetic and technical development of photography from its invention to the 1970's with emphasis on the 20th century. A critical analysis of the medium develops an understanding of the influence and appropriation of photography today.
  • VM204 - Top: Introduction to Gaming (4 Credits)
    An introduction to game creation that explores the fundamental elements of games, emphasizing non-digital methodologies and rapid prototyping in a hands-on environment. Students engage with and make games as entertainment and communication tools, developing an understanding of play and how to induce it in others.
  • VM204 - Top: Intro to Documentary Prod (4 Credits)
    Introduces the art and technology of nonfiction storytelling through a series of workshops, screenings and hands-on production projects. Emphasizes content development, storytelling strategies and production skills in the context of relevant ethical, aesthetic and social issues.
  • VM204 - Top: Intro to Narrative Fict (4 Credits)
    This course introduces students to the crew and the techniques of single camera narrative fiction production. Emphasis will be placed on organization and the translation of the script into a visual narrative. Students will have the opportunity to hone their production skills on a variety of creative projects. The class is intended to prepare students for advanced-level course work in narrative fiction.
  • VM204 - Top:Intro to Narrative Fiction (4 Credits)
    This course introduces students to the crew and the techniques of single camera narrative fiction production. Emphasis will be placed on organization and the translation of the script into a visual narrative. Students will have the opportunity to hone their production skills on a variety of creative projects. The class is intended to prepare students for advanced-level course work in narrative fiction.
  • VM204 - Top: Intro to Video Production for Non-VMA Majors only (4 Credits)
    This course is not open to Visual and Media Arts Majors. Introduces students to single camera video production. Topics will include the operation of equipment, the principles underlying shooting, and online distribution. Emphasis will be placed on the traditional stages of preproduction, production and postproduction, but you will also examine how video is used in other environments (such as desktop and smartphone platforms). Students will complete several individual and group projects.
  • VM204 - Top: Intro to Video Production for Non-VMA Majors only (4 Credits)
    This course is not open to Visual and Media Arts Majors. Introduces students to single camera video production. Topics will include the operation of equipment, the principles underlying shooting, and online distribution. Emphasis will be placed on the traditional stages of preproduction, production and postproduction, but you will also examine how video is used in other environments (such as desktop and smartphone platforms). Students will complete several individual and group projects.
  • VM204 - Top: Introduction to Gaming (4 Credits)
    This course will introduce students to the fundamental principles of game design, including concept development, system design, paper prototyping, play testing and development. Students will learn about many different kinds of games, from board and card games, alternate reality games and PC games, to pervasive urban games. No previous design or computer programming experience necessary.
  • VM205 - History Of Photography: 1970's to the Present (4 Credits)
    From documentary and documents of performances to the highly constructed imagery utilized by contemporary artists, students explore diverse subjects, styles, and methods that cover portrait, object, city, memory, appropriation, landscape, and narrative. The course combines weekly slide talks with theory and criticism reading discussions, field trips to exhibitions, visiting artists, research papers, and a final production project and exhibition.
  • VM210 - History of Western Art I: Renaissance and Baroque (4 Credits)
    Explores Renaissance and Baroque art, beginning with Proto-Renaissance works in the 14th century, and concluding with the Late Baroque in the later 17th/early 18th century. Students study major works and artists characterizing these movements, and the critical treatment they received over the centuries.
  • VM212 - History of Western Art III: Modern (4 Credits)
    Examines the major styles, works, and artists of the first half of the 20th century, prior to the advent of Abstract Expressionism. Examines a wide variety of European and American modern art, investigating critical and public reactions. Among the movements studied are: Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Dada, Futurism, Surrealism, the Bauhaus, Constructivism, and De Stijl.
  • VM214 - History of Non-Western Art I: East Asian Arts (4 Credits)
    Investigates arts of the East Asian region, particularly the areas of present-day China, Korea, and Japan. Artworks are contextualized within indigenous traditions such as Confucianism and Chan/Zen and examined from a diversity of critical perspectives. Considers issues of identity, religion, politics, and modernization, as well as contemporary artworks such as installation and performance.
  • VM220 - Writing the Short Subject (4 Credits)
    Studies the writing of the short subject within the genres of fiction, nonfiction, and experimental concepts and scripts (including animation). Scripts range from 3 to 15 minutes and are suitable for production within the budget and time constraints of an Emerson College class. Students complete comprehensive revisions of their work.
  • VM222 - Writing for Television (4 Credits)
    Examines writing for television in a variety of formats, with a predominant emphasis on situation comedies and drama. The elements of each genre are analyzed, challenging students to find their own unique "voice," and new and innovative ways to write stories within established formats. Also covered are reality television and children's television, story outlining, and script formatting. Each student writes a first-draft script of an existing sitcom or drama.
  • VM230 - Introduction to Film Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces the basics of non-synchronous 16mm filmmaking, including camera operation, principles of cinematography and lighting for black-and-white film, non-sync sound recording and transfers, and picture and sound editing.
  • VM231 - Intermediate Film Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces the technical, conceptual, and procedural skills necessary to successfully complete a short double-system sync-sound 16mm film, including pre-production, production, and post-production procedures and techniques.
  • VM240 - Introduction to Video Field Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces single-camera video production. Students learn the equipment and techniques used in single-camera field production and post-production, writing, and producing a variety of projects, edited in digital non-linear mode.
  • VM241 - Introduction to Studio Television Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces studio television practice. Students learn the principles of pre-production, production, and post-production for the studio as well as control room procedures. Students prepare their own multi-camera, live-on-tape studio productions.
  • VM241 - Introduction to Studio TV Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces studio television practice. Students learn the principles of pre-production, production, and post-production for the studio as well as control room procedures. Students prepare their own multi-camera, live-on-tape studio productions.
  • VM250 - Introduction to Sound Principles and Audio Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces audio physics, sound principles,and the theory and practice of audio recording and mixing. Emphasis is on concept development for sound production, signal routing and the mixer console, analog and digital audio recording, and editing techniques.
  • VM251 - Location Sound Recording (4 Credits)
    Intensive study in the theory and practice of field/location and studio audio recording for film, video, and television. Covers techniques in the use of field/studio recorders and mixers, microphones, boom poles, and shot blocking. Also covers tape-based and hard-disk digital recorders, and time-code synchronization management.
  • VM260 - Introduction to Interactive Media (4 Credits)
    Introduces the theory and practice of interactive media. Stresses the conceptual, aesthetic, and technical concerns of interactivity. Technologies covered are HTML, CSS, and Javascript. Additional topics include semantic web design and development, graphics and imaging, interface design, user experience, project management, and the mobile web. Emphasis is on making creative works.
  • VM261 - Computer Animation (4 Credits)
    The first course of a two-course sequence, introducing students to the fundamentals of three-dimensional modeling and animation, and preparing them for the second course, VM 363 Advanced Computer Animation. Students learn to model, texture objects, compose and light scenes, animate, and add dynamics, as well as render animations into movies and compositing audio, titles, and credits in post-production.
  • VM262 - Drawing (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic techniques in drawing, exploring the use of line and image in contemporary art. The language of drawing in contemporary art and architecture will inform the practice of drawing.
  • VM263 - Drawing For Time-Based Media (4 Credits)
    Imparts key drawing skills required in pre-visualization, concept art creation, set design, storyboarding, two-dimensional media production, and post-production. Develops students' abilities to think spatially, whether constructing a plan for a set or depicting a character in action. Also focuses on anatomy, locomotion, and communication possibilities of the human form.
  • VM265 - Introduction to Photography (4 Credits)
    Hybrid section of Introduction to Photography. This course introduces the fundamentals of black-and-white photography by combining darkroom techniques with the latest digital processes. Essential comparisons between the two methods will be explored by learning camera controls, film development to darkroom printing, digital capture to print workflow, and through hybrid techniques such as making digital negatives for darkroom use. Critiques of student work will develop ¨the critical eye.¨ Students must use cameras with adjustable speed and aperture.
  • VM265 - Introduction to Photography (4 Credits)
    Introduces the fundamentals of black-and-white photography by combining darkroom techniques with the latest digital processes. Essential comparisons between the two methods are explored by learning camera controls, film development to darkroom printing, digital capture to print workflow, and through the hybrid combination of these techniques. Critiques of student work develop an aesthetic and conceptual understanding of the creative process. Students must use cameras with manually adjustable speed and aperture.
  • VM300 - Top: Portaiture in the age of art photography. 1980-present (4 Credits)
    How has portrait photography been influenced in the age of information, social media and nascent imaging technologies? Lens based practices has been informed by hybrid content; expanding our notions of portraiture. How are contemporary revisiting and influenced by cinema, painting, journalism, surveillance, revisionist archives, performance, fiction and medical imaging. We will screen artist works that are capitalizing on new strategies of representation and analysis of identity, labor, object, social and the (human) body.
  • VM300 - Top: Latin American Cinema (4 Credits)
    This course looks at films from various Latin American countries, examining both popular and artistic traditions that have developed since the early twentieth century. Best known for the innovative film movements of the 1960s, Latin American cinema has a history that goes back to the silent era and continues today in the hands of a new generation of filmmakers. This course focuses on some key moments in this history, while also exploring concepts such us colonialism and postcolonialism, cultural imperialism, Third World filmmaking, transnational cinema, and globalization.
  • VM301 - Post Colonial Cinema (4 Credits)
    An examination of the historical, socioeconomic, and ideological contexts of film production, distribution, and exhibition of post-colonial films that explore and challenge Hollywood and Western notions of identity, narrative, history, and oral traditions. Films viewed are from Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, the United Kingdom, and the United States.
  • VM303 - Studies in Digital Media and Culture (4 Credits)
    Examines the dramatic shift in meaning and processes of contemporary communication by investigating the social, artistic, economic, and political implications of using digital ways of working. Topics include the Internet and the web, cyberspace and censorship, games, digital film and video, multimedia and interactivity, virtual reality, person-machine interfaces, and globalization considerations.
  • VM304 - History of Documentary (4 Credits)
    Examines the history and theory of documentary media production, with attention to the economic, technological, ethical, and aesthetic concerns of documentarians.
  • VM305 - History of Experimental/Avant-garde (4 Credits)
    Examines the history and theory of experimental and avant-garde film, video, and other moving image practices and their connections to broader art and social movements. Through extensive reading and viewing, students investigate avant-garde and experimental cinema form, style, and content as well as historical and contemporary filmmakers' production methods and distribution networks in film communities and the art world.
  • VM308 - Cinema and Social Change (4 Credits)
    Throughout cinema's history, numerous filmmakers have sought to harness the power of the medium and to channel it in the service of political and social change. Have they made a difference and by what measure and what strategy: Surveying fiction and documentary, commercial and independent cinema, features and shorts, this course aims to offer a wide-ranging examination of the ways directors around the world have employed their art and their craft in the pursuit of fostering social justice.
  • VM315 - Top: Christo and Jeanne-Claude: Projects and Films (4 Credits)
    Examines Chinese art from the late 19th century to the present. Explores traditional and reformed idioms of brush-and-ink painting, competing modes of oil painting, printing and vernacular arts, photography, and post-modern strategies to express new concepts of nationhood, mobilize against Japanese aggression, raise political consciousness among workers and peasants, and voice political protest. Addresses issues of art education, art institutions, censorship, propaganda, cultural and national identity, commercialization and globalization. Examines competing expressions of modernism, the avant-garde, and the work of contemporary artists.
  • VM315 - Top: Christo and Jeanne-Claude: Projects and Films (4 Credits)
    This Topics course focuses on the works of Christo and Jeanne-Claude, who produced some of the worlds most notable and spectacular publi art installations including The Gates in Central Park. Foundational concepts such as space, time and community will be examined in relation to particular projects. The class will also consider subjects such as funding and site specific art. Documentaries chronicling the conception and creation of Christo and Jeanne-Claude's pieces will be screened in conjunction with our study of the respective projects. The students will have an opportunity to work on their own site-specific proposals, and interact with local organizations such as Friends of the Public Garden.
  • VM315 - Top: Andy Warhol: Media Maven (4 Credits)
    This course will examine the art and career of Andy Warhol (1928-1987). An icon of Pop Art Warhol produced silkscreened images of mass culture in America such as Campbell¨s Soup and Marilyn Monroe, and was an influential figure in the dramatic transformation that occurs in the visual arts during the 1960s. He worked in a staggering array of media, venturing from the visual arts into film, television, magazine publishing, and promoting rock music. He is among the few visual artists who is a household name. Scholars, critics, historians and other artists consider him to be one of the most important artists in the second half of the twentieth century. How does this artist evolve, in his own words, from creating "symbols of the harsh, impersonal products and brash materialistic objects on which America is built today," to being "an Art Businessman?" Through lectures, readings, and discussion the course will grapple with the complex identity of this artist who has profoundly shaped contemporary culture.
  • VM320 - Writing the Feature Film (4 Credits)
    Examines the fundamentals of writing for narrative feature-length film. Investigates structure, character, conflict, scene writing, and dialogue, taking students from ideation through to the development of a detailed outline. Students write the first 25-30 pages of a screenplay.
  • VM323 - Writing Primetime Drama (4 Credits)
    Examines writing for primetime television drama, including study of the history of television drama and the difference between plot-driven dramas and character-driven dramas, writing effective protagonists and antagonists, and writing for existing dramas and characters. Students write a script for an existing primetime television drama that will be workshopped in class.
  • VM324 - Top: Writiing the Comedy Feature Film (4 Credits)
    Some of the top films of all time are biopics because telling true stories can make for compelling cinema. Through study and analysis in this advanced screenwriting course you come to understand the biography genre and you will write an original outline and first act for a biopic feature film. You may focus your feature on a person known only to you or on a person who is world famous. The goal will be to understand the process of bringing the life/lives of people who really lived to the screen. Honing your critical skills, you will be able to engage in intelligent, analytical, and aesthetic discourse about your work, as well as the work of your classmates--the goal always being to make everyone's work the best it can be. This class will be taught from the Los Angeles Campus by Diane Lake and available to Boston via teleconferencing - 1/2 the students for the lcass will be in LA and 1/2 in Boston.
  • VM324 - Top: Writiing the Comedy Feature Film (4 Credits)
    The course objective is to help students start work on a feature comedy screenplay. By semester's end, they will have completed a detailed story outline and up to the first half of the script. Participants will study popular feature comedies and analyze the elements that make these films successful. We'll have in-class pitch sessions with each participant. After their pitch has been approved, each student will develop their outline and then proceed to write the screenplay. Students will read and critique each other's work and submit original written material on a biweekly basis.
  • VM325 - Writing the Adaptation (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the process of analyzing material from another medium (e.g., novels, plays, comic books) and translating into a screenplay. Students write one original first act of a public domain property, as well as one analytical paper.
  • VM328 - Top: Writing for Animation (4 Credits)
    Explores techniques and approaches unique to writing animation and will examine a variety of animation formats, methods, and genres in order to understand the demands, opportunities, challenges, and styles of this storytelling form. Students will write an outline, treatment, and either a television pilot or the first half of a screenplay.
  • VM329 - Top:Comedy Writ for Late Night (4 Credits)
    Examines how to write comedy for late night television, with a heavy emphasis on joke writing, monologue writing, sketch writing, current events and satire. In addition to working on individual assignments, students with also learn how to write effectively as a team. The final project will require students to collectively create and write an innovative show designed for late night television.
  • VM329 - Top: Life on Display (4 Credits)
    In this course students study reality television series, and in groups create original "unscripted" series for broadcast, from concept development, to show pitch writing, to preparation for production and production. In groups, the students will research, develop and create a number of original series with emphasis on innovative ways to expand and contribute to the reality genre in docu-soap, lifestyle, competition, or investigative formats. Each student group will write an industry standard Pilot Pitch, with Show Descriptions for 6 to 8 episodes. In addition, they will produce a 5- to 7-minute video Trailer for their original reality series.
  • VM329 - Top: Writing the Web Series (4 Credits)
    The web series is a series of original film shorts involving the same characters in each episode or different characters linked by a common theme. Students will learn about the recent explosion of web series programming primarily on the internet but also on smart phones and TV. Students will be expected to write detailed series proposals and write their own web series with either eight six-to-seven minute episodes or 15 three-to-four minute episodes.
  • VM329 - Top: Writing the Webisode (4 Credits)
    The web series of original film shorts involving the same characters in each episode or different characters linked by a common theme. Students will learn about the recent explosion of the web series programming primarily on the Internet but also on smart phones and TV. Students will be expected to write detailed series proposals and write their own web series with either eight six-to-seven minute episodes or 15 three-to-four minute episodes.
  • VM331 - Top: Production Design (4 Credits)
    Introduces students to the work of the Production Designer, the creative individual responsible for the "look" of a production. Topics will include: developing and implementing the design concept, strategies for working on location or sound stage, and collaboration with the Cinematographer, Art Director and Set Decorator. The work of notable Production Designers will be considered. Class projects and actual production work will combine theory with practice.
  • VM331 - Top:Intro to Production Design (4 Credits)
    This course introduces students to the work of the production designer, the creative individual responsible for the overall "look" of a production. Topics include: developing and implementing the design concept; developing strategies for working on location and in a studio or sound-stage; and creating or obtaining sets, props and other design elements.
  • VM331 - Top: WGBH Partnership Prod (4 Credits)
    Explores various aspects of media arts practice. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM332 - Production Management (4 Credits)
    Introduces the budgeting and logistical organization of film and television productions, reviewing the roles of Associate Producer, Production Unit Manager, First Assistant, Second Assistant Location Manager, and other members of the producer's and director's teams.
  • VM335 - Alternative Production Techniques (4 Credits)
    Intermediate-level 16mm production workshop in the use of unorthodox, non-computer driven methods and processes for developing and producing motion pictures. Provides an overview of historical methods of formal exploration of the basic materials of film as a projection medium, including camera-less filmmaking, direct animation, and loop projections, as well as alternative mechanical processes such as xerography, hand-process, and alternative-camera tools and techniques. Primary emphasis is on creative invention and exploration.
  • VM337 - The Emerson Channel (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM337 - The Emerson Channel (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
  • VM340 - SPEC (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM340 - SPEC (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
  • VM341 - Emerson Records (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM341 - Emerson Records (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
  • VM342 - Frames Per Second (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM342 - Frames Per Second (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor.
  • VM343 - WERS (FM)/WECB (AM) (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM343 - WERS (FM)/WECB (AM) (0 Credit)
    Specified assignments in the College radio stations. The instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
  • VM344 - National Broadcasting Society/AERho (0 Credit)
    National organization bridging the gap between student and professional, supporting student work in all areas of television, radio, and film. AERho is the Honors Level of NBS, available to seniors with a high grade point average. Instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
  • VM344 - National Broadcasting Society/AERho (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM345 - Film Arts Society (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM345 - Film Arts Society (0 Credit)
    Student publication Latent Image and the cinema-the-que Films from the Margin. The instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
  • VM346 - Women in Motion (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM346 - Women in Motion (0 Credit)
    Student-operated film production group with an emphasis on activities and creative work related to women. The instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
  • VM347 - Emerson Independent Video (0 Credit)
    Modeled on a professional television station, students learn all aspects of television production ranging from concept development to post-production. Instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
  • VM347 - Emerson Independent Video (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM348 - EVVYs (0 Credit)
    Preparation and staging of Emerson's annual awards show in conjunction with other end-of-year events and presentations. Instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
  • VM348 - EVVYs (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM349 - Developed Images (0 Credit)
    Registration for Non-tuition credits takes place after participation is confirmed by the Instructor
  • VM349 - Developed Images (0 Credit)
    Student-organized and -produced photography magazine. Work is submitted, reviewed, and selected by students for annual publication. Instructor awards credit after term-end evaluation. May be repeated for up to 4 credits for any combination of other 300-level non-tuition credit courses. Course is offered Pass/Fail and does not count toward the Visual and Media Arts major.
  • VM350 - Sound Design (4 Credits)
    Introduces the art of inventing sounds and composing soundtracks for visual media such as film, video, computer animation, and websites. Focus is on audio post-production and the roles of the supervising sound editor and the sound designer. Post-production techniques include sound recording, sound editing, and sound mixing in stereo and surround sound.
  • VM351 - Audio for New Media (4 Credits)
    Focuses on the creative possibilities of sound in a variety of digital media environments. Topics include MIDI control, digital sound synthesis, data compression, and real-time control of sound within applications such as Flash, MAX/MSP/Jitters, and CSound.
  • VM352 - Studio Recording (4 Credits)
    Explores the principal tools of the professional audio production studio and how they can be used for creative productions. Includes instruction in multi-track recording and sound processing equipment.
  • VM360 - Film Animation (4 Credits)
    Introduces film animation in which short animated exercises and individual sequences are located within a survey of animation as an art form and commercial product. Students employ a range of media, exploring and developing ideas and skills in producing 16mm animated sequences, culminating in a final project.
  • VM362 - Motion Graphics (4 Credits)
    Covers the practice and art of motion graphics and visual effects, including the design process, artistic concepts, and technologies. Production techniques range from title sequences for film, to compositing of real and virtual worlds and a myriad of digital time-based art forms. Students make a series of projects using post-production and compositing software.
  • VM363 - Advanced Computer Animation (4 Credits)
    The second course in the two-course computer animation sequence, introducing students to advanced three-dimensional modeling and animation techniques and preparing them for independent computer animation production work. Continues to develop skills acquired in computer animation, including modeling, texturing objects, composing and lighting scenes, animating, dynamics, rendering, and post-production compositing.
  • VM364 - 3D Computer Gaming (4 Credits)
    Provides students with the fundamentals of game design and theory. Students learn to create and import assets, develop objectives, script behaviors and action, and build game levels. Students complete the course with an original portfolio-ready single player game.
  • VM365 - Darkroom Photography (4 Credits)
    An intermediate-level course in black-and-white photography designed to explore a variety of "ways of seeing" as well as demonstrate techniques that further enhance the photographic image. Assignments build on one another (tone, time, frame, point of view, scale, and sequence). Critical viewing and seeing as well as guest artists and gallery visits are encouraged as students begin to form their personal photographic vision.
  • VM366 - Digital Photography (4 Credits)
    A hands-on production class created especially for the photography student who is interested in the digital darkroom. It is designed to give students a basic introduction to the elements of digital capture, manipulation, and output. The course addresses the digital tools within the context of the aesthetics of photography. Photoshop is used as another photographic tool.
  • VM370 - Business Concepts for Modern Media (4 Credits)
    Focuses on strategic thinking, planning, organization, and implementation of media projects from conception (pre-production) through release/distribution/exhibition (theatrical, non-theatrical, digital, web). Includes acquiring fundamental skills and a working knowledge of business math, business plans, intellectual property and copyright basics, grant writing and resources, and current trends in advertising, marketing, and press package materials.
  • VM371 - Alternative Media Production: Out of the Box (4 Credits)
    Fosters an exploratory approach to making media projects by providing unorthodox conceptual frameworks in which students conceive and execute short projects using both conventional and unconventional acquisition devices in a variety of media. Students work individually or collaboratively throughout the course to develop ideas and acquire material for assignments.
  • VM372 - Directing Image and Sound (4 Credits)
    Department Permissin Required
  • VM372 - Directing Image and Sound (4 Credits)
    Examines a director's preparation in detail, with particular emphasis on forming creative approaches to the script, as well as image and sound design. Production and postproduction strategies are also addressed.
  • VM373 - Directing Actors for the Screen (4 Credits)
    Develops skills in directing actors in dramatic performances for the screen. Students are taken step by step through the directing process with a particular emphasis on research and visualization, as they learn how to plan and direct narrative sequences. Classes will be offered in conjunction with Acting for the Camera classes in Performing Arts.
  • VM375 - Advanced Interactive Media (4 Credits)
    Continues to explore interactive media, including consideration of conceptual, aesthetic, and technical concerns. Technologies covered include interactive web elements, databases, mobile development, and an introduction to programming. Emphasis is on making creative works.
  • VM376 - Editing for Film and Video (4 Credits)
    Department Permission Required
  • VM376 - Editing for Film and Video (4 Credits)
    Furthers understanding of and ability to work with medium- to long-format post-production processes through editing assignments in film and video, along with critical examination of completed motion pictures.
  • VM377 - Documentary Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Develops skills necessary to produce documentary productions in video or film. Covers production processes from story development through all the production phases. Practical considerations of production are balanced with theoretical debates on the legal and ethical responsibilities of those who document others.
  • VM378 - Basic Cinematography and Videography (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic elements of the aesthetics, technology, and craft of cinematography and videography. Students gain a working knowledge of 16mm and digital video cameras, as well as basic lighting design and equipment, with an emphasis on crew relations and organization. Includes a comprehensive exploration of the work of significant cinematographers.
  • VM378 - Basic Cinematography and Videography (4 Credits)
    Introduces basic elements of the aesthetics, technology, and craft of cinematography and videography. Students gain a working knowledge of 16mm and digital video cameras, as well as basic lighting design and equipment, with an emphasis on crew relations and organization. Includes a comprehensive exploration of the work of significant cinematographers.
  • VM380 - Media Copyright and Content (4 Credits)
    Copyright is the legal foundation that gives value and property rights to any creative work. This includes music as well as books, films, television shows, choreographed work, architectural designs, plays, paintings, maps, photographs, video games, and computer software. Students look at the history, development, and purpose of copyright and other intellectual property law. They also explore the purpose and value of fair use and of the public domain, and alternative views of copyright such as the "Creative Commons."
  • VM400 - Top: The Hollywood Renaissance (4 Credits)
    Amid the death of the sunny idealism of the 1960s counterculture and the decline of the studio system, a new age of Hollywood filmmakers led an awakening of cinema culture. Artists assaulted the genres that formed the bedrock of Hollywood's economic and aesthetic success. This course will explore this "Hollywood Renaissance" through filmmakers like Penn, Coppola, Scorsese, and many others, and how the radical ideas of this era became mainstreamed into American life and culture.
  • VM400 - Top: Cyberactivisim: Crashing the System (4 Credits)
    Digital technology has not only allowed for the unprecedented global dissemination of information within the last decades, new media have become a powerful tool for social and political activists everywhere. From the MoveOn.org movement to the events of the Arab Spring, online social networks provide an influential contemporary forum for advocating for change. This course explores "cyberactivism" both in theory and in practice, investigating the different approaches used today to transform our virtual and real worlds.
  • VM400 - Top: Surveillance in a Digial Age (4 Credits)
    Surveillance is something once reserved for spy movies and government agencies. Today, as technology weaves even further into our daily lives more questions are arising around the "who", "why", "what", and "how" of electronic surveillance. This course will explore how surveillance has evolved and how growing advancements in technology are raising it to a new level. We will cover current headlines involving surveillance and a not-too-geeky technical explanation of some common surveillance methods, as well as, dive into important questions around privacy, laws facilitating electronic surveillance, and who is behind it all?
  • VM400 - Top: Disaster Movies (4 Credits)
    This course surveys cinematic disaster: as a motif in numerous Hollywood genre movies, independent and avant-garde films; as a specific genre; and, as historically specific film cycles. Focusing on historical, theoretical, social and aesthetic issues, the course continually considers how disaster movies represent hegemonic norms related to national and social identity, gender, race/ethnicity, class, sexuality, and other social categories. Course content includes lecture, discussion, exams and papers.
  • VM402 - Sem: Sex on Screen (4 Credits)
    Explores the complex history of sexually oriented moving images in the United States from Thomas Edison's "The Kiss" to contemporary mobile media culture in forms ranging from simple loops and cheesecake films, to Hollywood narratives, to educational films, to sexploitation and pornography. Among the issues we will address are how sexuality and gender have been represented on screen, the ways in which sexuality and "power" have been historically intertwined, how sexual minorities have been portrayed, how censorship, self-regulation and politics have influenced image making, the ways in which content has created controversy and, conversely, how controversy has changed content. With a special focus on the "sexual revolution" of the 1960s and '70s, this seminar will invite students to engage with a wide range of historical, social, political and ethical issues surrounding moving images that have had a direct impact on the lives of Americans for over a century.
  • VM402 - Sem: Media Ethics and Cultural Diversity (4 Credits)
    Focuses upon ethical issues in media such as privacy, exploitation, deception, security, pornography, and issues of cultural diversity such as discrimination, racism, gender bias, homophobia, and myth-representation. As a media seminar the course includes much discussion, debate, screening, and case studies. While philosophical classical ethics forms a back-bone, emphasis is upon more contemporary applied ethical issues in all primary media including film, television, Internet, audio, and photography and in several career areas including production, entertainment, journalism, advertising, and documentary.
  • VM402 - Sem: Silent Hollywood (4 Credits)
    From the late 1910s until the coming of sound in the late 1920s, the Hollywood film industry reached unprecedented commercial and artistic success. SILENT HOLLYWOOD chronicles the development of the industry during x this crucial ten-year period and examines the careers of many of its key filmmakers
  • VM402 - Sem: Media Ethics and Cultural Diversity (4 Credits)
    Many ethical issues arise in media production including the "myth representation" (cf. Misrepresentation) of people of diverse backgrounds. This seminar will explore related issues including racism, discrimination, defamation of character, stereotyping, hate speech, deception, privacy, pornography, censorship, obscenity, ethnocentricity, fairness, conflict of interest, emic vs. ethics representation, and confidentiality. Primary consideration will be given to the VMA production processes within film, video, new media, audio, and photography although related processes such as advertising and journalism will also receive attention.
  • VM402 - Sem: Sound as Fine Art (4 Credits)
    Surveys the world of auditory art from the oral tradition to contemporary art works of sound and noise/music composition. The course examines the influences of culture, society, and the arts and sciences on the movements and conceptual constructs existing within the culture of sound art. The seminar's focus is on Post World War I, Twentieth & Twenty-First Century experiments and explorations into sound, noise and radio; the avant-garde in sound & experimental music; aleatory forms of composition & performance; computer generative works; visual elements in sound performance; installation art; and the aesthetics of silence.
  • VM402 - Sem: The Western in Film & TV (4 Credits)
    The Western genre was once a staple of the American motion picture industry and the most popular programming in the first two decades of American television. The Western has all but disappeared as a predominant story type, but the impact of the genre's representation of American westward expansion, American masculinity, and race and gender continue to be felt in public discourse and in public life. This course will investigate the history of the Western in film and television, its conventional formulation, and various innovative instances of the genre. Conducted as a seminar, discussion and student presentations of material will be the format for the class.
  • VM402 - Sem: Popularity & Profits: TV Culture (4 Credits)
    This course looks at how TV makes a commodity of culture or what is known the business as a program. We examine American TV as an institution as well as a cultural producer. This knowledge involves the mapping of the intricacies of TV practice as well as an understanding the role of American culture. Although the television has gone through massive economic changes in its fifty-five years, its production process has not measurably altered. So what is the method of TV? If it is not simply mass production, what is it? Can TV be original? Where does it get its ideas? Who is the "creator" of a program. By combining the study of genres and cultural theories derived from the sociology of culture, the course will introduce students to the complex relationship of economics to culture. In the process we learn to think, argue, and write about television on a conceptually sophisticated and informed level.
  • VM402 - Sem: Queer Film & Video (4 Credits)
    This course will survey queer film and video from social-historical, aesthetic, and theoretical perspectives. Subjects include: Weimar German films (among the first lesbian and gay films); classical Hollywood and queer fandom, authorship, and stereotyping; subcultural coding and camp sensibility; the 1960s Underground cinema movement; network television and Hollywood films of the 1960s and 1970s; lesbian and gay liberation cinema of the 1970s; the AIDS activist video movement and the New Queer Cinema and Video movement of the 1980s and 1990s; LGBTQ representations on television in the 1990s and 2000s; and transgender films and television programs of the 2000s.
  • VM402 - Sem: TV Creators: Understanding the Whedonesque (4 Credits)
    This course will use the career of Joss Whedon to introduce students to the variety of positions in the entertainment industry and their potential for fulfilling and creative work. Whedon's career spans the many production lines in the American Dream Factory: TV series staff writer, script doctor, film screenwriter, TV creator in a wide variety of genres, Internet series creator, comic book writer and creator, niche genre film director, and blockbuster filmmaker. By examining his work at various stages, students will better understand auteur theory, modern industrial entertainment production, and artistic production across media. Works covered include: Roseanne, Alien: Resurrection, Buffy the Vampire Slayer as a film and TV series, Angel, Firefly and Serenity, Dollhouse, The Cabin in the Woods, The Avengers, Much Ado About Nothing, Buffy: Season Eight, and Astonishing X-Men.
  • VM402 - Sem: Queer TV After Ellen Came Out (4 Credits)
    This seminar examines LGBTQ representations in TV comedy since 1997, beginning with Ellen DeGeneres' historic sitcom Ellen. Historical, ideological and formal/aesthetic analyses explore how and why comedy has served a central means to integrate LGBTQ characters into television, in addition to how stereotyping, the closet, camp, carnivalesque sexuality and gender performativity have served as comedic devices with multiple functions and meanings. Students are expected to conduct intensive research for writing assignments, spoken presentations and class discussions.
  • VM402 - Sem: Animation Histories: From Concept to Screen (4 Credits)
    This seminar focuses on the historical, cultural, and critical analysis of animated films and Directors. The seminar will study five films produced or co-produced on the West Coast: Walt Disney's Fantasia; United Production America's Gerald McBoing Boing; Tim Burton and Henry Selick's, Nightmare Before Christmas; Pixar's Toy Story; and Hayao Miyasaki's Spirited Away. A participation-intensive, research-intensive and writing-intensive seminar to identify, study, and critically analyze the historical and cultural threads that weave the fabric of these five cinematic cartoons, the animated mode as an experimental art form, the animation industry, and the Directors who gave rise to their genesis. The seminar will also take a tertiary look at the influences of higher educational institutions that fostered a culture of innovation for the Directors being researched, discussed and critically analyzed.
  • VM402 - Sem: Animation Histories: From Concepts to Screen (4 Credits)
    This seminar will focuses on the historical, cultural, and critical analysis of animated films and their Directors. The seminar will study five films produced on the West Coast: Walt Disney's Fantasia (European Roots/1939-40/Modernism/Experimental Animation/FantaSound/Disney Strike); United Production America's Gerald McBoingBoing (WW II/UPA/House Committee on Un-American Activities/Dr. Seuss/Robert "BoBo" Cannon/1956-57); Tim Burton's film Directed by Henry Selick, Nightmare Before Christmas (Disney/1993); Pixar's Toy Story (Computer Animation Feature/John Lasseter/Walt Disney/LucasFilm/SteveJobs/Disney); and Hayao Miyasaki's Spirited Away (Ghibli Studio/Japan/Translation/John Lasseter/Walt Disney). This participation-intensive and writing-intensive seminar will identify, study, and critically analyze the historical and cultural threads that weaved the fabric of these cinematic cartoons, the animated mode, the animation industry, and the Directors who gave rise to their genesis, including a look at the influences of higher educational institutions that fostered a culture of innovation for the Directors being researched, discussed and critically analyzed.
  • VM402 - Sem: Hitchcock (4 Credits)
    explores the life, work, and legend of Alfred Hitchcock whose films remain as popular as ever with critics, film historians, and the public. We will approach his career in four phases: as a director in the beleaguered British film industry in the 1920s and '30s, as a contract director in Hollywood in the 1940s, as an independent producer/director from the late 1940s into the 1970s, and as a force in a wide range of media from the 1950s until his death in 1980. Hitchcock's ability to negotiate different modes of production while "branding" and marketing himself in the changing entertainment landscape will be assessed. His films will be considered from a formal standpoint, with emphasis on how suspense is created through cinematography, editing, and sound; they will be examined through various theories that have been brought to bear on the work. Question of authorship and biography will be explored as will Hitchcock's continuing legacy as the "Master of Suspense".
  • VM409 - Sem: Europe After the Rain: Art in Post-War Europe, 1945-1989 (4 Credits)
    During World War II, Europe suffered the destruction of its social, political and cultural fabric. Artists responded by moving away from the hand of the artist, rejecting traditional painting, and questioning the object as the centerpiece of Modern art, dismantling Modern art and creating contemporary art. This course sketches an outline of art history that has resulted in a new media, video, film, and alternative means of expression.
  • VM409 - Sem: Postwar Art & Technology to Contemporary New Media and Digital Art (4 Credits)
    This course will survey the development of new media art surveying the historical new technology art work in the early twentieth century, then focusing on the post-World War II period through to contemporary multimedia and digital visual art. This course will be divided into two parts. During the first half we will learn about historical new media art from the early twentieth century through the post-World War II period, the so-called Art & Technology movement. Then, the second half will be an extended research project on contemporary new media and digital art.
  • VM409 - Sem: Urban Public Art: Theory and Practice (4 Credits)
    This seminar investigates the design, creation, commission, patronage and placement of public art within the urban fabric. Students examine their roles as community members and participate in multiple field trips. Topics include: practical concerns and historical background; public art typologies; public art's relationships with institutions; funding; audience agency; and temporary and alternative art forms. The artworks studied range from traditional sculpture and mural painting, to less conventional and more transgressive works including interventions and ephemeral installations.
  • VM410 - Sem: Latin American Art (4 Credits)
    An exploration of modern and contemporary Latin American Art in its political, social and cultural contexts. The course is divided into four parts: 1) Reality, Politics and Culture: The Mexican Muralists; 2) The Fantastic and Beyond; 3) Archetypes: Icons, Images and Symbols in Latin American Art; and 4) Contemporary Visions and Border Crossers. Our study centers on the work of important artists who represent identity, culture, and politics as the complex and multifaceted expression of the experience of living within and between nations and cultures in an age of globalization. Through lectures, videos, slide presentations, artist talks, discussions, student research presentations and workshops, we will explore the common themes, disparate perspectives and changing visions of artists from the "other" Americas.
  • VM412 - American Film Comedy (4 Credits)
    A historical approach to the development of American film comedy explores theories of comedy and their value to the critical interpretation of comic films. Also considers the varying ways spectators are addressed, and the impact of performers and directors on various comedy styles.
  • VM418 - Transnational Asian Cinemas (4 Credits)
    Asian "national" cinemas are examined and problematized in the contexts of media and economic globalization, including: the politics of transnational film practices; issues surrounding filmic representation and diasporic identities; the construction and negotiation of national, gender, and genre differences; local-regional-global dynamics; and questions of the postcolonial in Asian contexts.
  • VM420 - Top: Directing and Producing the Narrative Motion Picture (4 Credits)
    A pre-production, production and post-production intensive class taught by two Emerson industry professionals (Director Regge Life and Cinematographer Harlan Bosmajian) resulting in a completed 20min. narrative short film. Designed for second semester juniors and seniors, This class is a chance for students to hone their specific interests in an educational environment that will be as much like a professionally run film-set as the students would encounter outside Emerson College. Regge Life's section will consist of students focused on directing, producing and Production Design. Interested students should email: Theodore_Life@emerson.edu for information and instructor approval.
  • VM420 - Top: Technical Craft of the Narrative Motion Picture (4 Credits)
    A pre-production, production and post-production intensive class taught by two Emerson industry professionals (Director Theodore Life and Cinematographer Harlan Bosmajian) resulting in a completed 20min. narrative short film. Designed for second semester juniors and seniors, this class is a chance for students to hone their specific interests in an educational environment that will be as much like a professionally run film-set as the students would encounter outside Emerson College. This section will consist of students focused on Camera, Grip/Electric, Editing/DIT/Color Correction and sound. Interested students should email: Harlan_bosmajian@emerson.edu for more information and instructor approval.
  • VM420 - Top: Ed Tech Times: Content Development and Web Design for an Online Information Hub (4 Credits)
    Focused on a project with EdTech Times (ETT), a start-up that publishes news dedicated to the education technology industry, located in the offices of Learn Launch, an education technology incubator in Boston. The course seeks students across a variety of disciplines to help ETT with repositioning for greater audience engagement by redesigning their website and exploring new content forms (including original written content, video, data visualizations, and info-graphics, etc). The course will immerse students in an experiential learning environment that will require them to develop content through creative inquiry across multiple disciplines, collaboration with ETT, and iterative experimentation among teams. Students will learn the process for developing web pages from inititial design to development and best practices in writing for the web.
  • VM420 - Top: Transmedia Development (4 Credits)
    Stories are told across film, TV, radio, Web, games, books, magazines, CDs, and live events - often simultaneously across multiple platforms. Transmedia is changing audiences' relationship with media, creating immersive, participatory experiences in rich storyworlds. And, it's blurring the lines between entertainment content and its marketing. Whether you call it story, content marketing, or a hybrid - be transmedia. In this new world order, Transmedia Development is for both media makers and media marketers. This hands-on course explores transmedia storytelling - creating media projects across multiple platforms, and transmedia marketing - promoting 21st century properties across multiple platforms. Students develop their own transmedia projects by applying the fundamentals of storytelling to an array of media platforms, and by employing best practices for marketing film, TV, games, and digital media - from branding, industry events, and media relations to trailers, advertising, and socialized screens.
  • VM420 - Top: Writing the Film Musical (4 Credits)
    The course will allow students to study the screenplays of a variety of film musicals from the beginning of the genre to the present. In addition to focusing on the writing of the musical film, the manner in which song assists in telling the story will be of particular interest. Working in teams of two, students from Emerson will complete an outline and first act of an original screenplay, and music students from Berklee will compose the songs that will help tell that story. The semester will culminate in a staged reading, with music, performed by students from both Berklee and Emerson. Prequesites: Junior standng and permission of the instructor. Students must email Diane_lake@emerson.edu a PDF version of a writing sample - play, screenplay or teleplay up to 15 pages in length for consideration. Students from every department, who are interested in writing, are invited to apply.
  • VM420 - Top: Studio Independents: Navigation the Motion Picture Industry (4 Credits)
    This course provides an in-depth examination of the mechanics of the motion picture industry and is ideally suited for students prior to taking a semester in LA.. Topics covered include exploring the organizational structures and hierarchies of studios and production companies, how executive and staff positions function and what projects are acquired, developed, created and distributed; understanding customary terminology and references; working with talent and literary agencies, management companies and entertainment attorneys; and examining the role of guilds for above-the-line talent. The course will also explore how opportunities within the industry are expanding and changing --particularly in the form of theatrical film finance--and will help to prepare students for the landscape which is continually evolving.
  • VM420 - Top: Research and Creative Production in Virtual and Agumented Reality Public Art (4 Credits)
    This course provides students with hands on experience in project based research and creative production. Students join a faculty led˙research and creative production team based on an active˙Virtual and Augmented Reality Public Art project˙at the˙Los Angles County Museum of Art, through its˙Art + Technology program. This project is inherently interdisciplinary. Student's skills and interests will be˙assessed and an appropriate role will be assigned accordingly. Co-enrolment in VM261 Computer Animation is recommended. Course is co-taught in Los Angeles. Students will be accepted to this course by application only. Please send a resume and one page statement of interest to˙John_Craig_Freeman@emerson.edu.
  • VM420 - Top: WGBH Partnership Prod (4 Credits)
    Explores various aspects of media arts practice. Course may be repeated for credit if topics differ.
  • VM423 - Writing Television Pilots (4 Credits)
    Examines how to create a television series, including developing an original premise, and writing convincing, multi-dimensional characters, and intriguing, character-specific dialogue. Students write an entire television pilot script to be workshopped in class, along with a pilot package that includes a logline, series synopsis and a 13-week episode guide with character and story arcs.
  • VM428 - Feature Writing Workshop (4 Credits)
    Working from detailed outlines developed in VM 320 Writing the Feature Film, students complete a first draft of a feature-length screenplay. Students read each other's work, write a critical analysis of each segment, and engage in discussion of aesthetics, craft, and form.
  • VM429 - Comedy Writer's Room (4 Credits)
    Emulates a Hollywood comedy writing room. Students collectively create and write an original pilot script for a TV comedy. Students write character sketches, a comprehensive story outline, the first draft of the script and all subsequent drafts, and participate in an extensive punch-up. Participants gain a keen understanding of how a Hollywood comedy writers' room works, how to write under deadline, how to pitch jokes, and how to write comedy as a team.
  • VM440 - Advanced Studio Production: Fiction (4 Credits)
    Provides the opportunity for specialized work in fiction television genres that include a studio component, such as drama series, soap operas, and situation comedies. Students create projects and produce, direct, light, and crew them.
  • VM441 - Advanced Studio Production: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Provides the opportunity for specialized work in nonfiction multi-camera television genres, including talk shows, live performance, and public affairs programming. Emphasis is on designing, producing, directing, lighting, and studio crewing.
  • VM450 - Advanced Sound Design (4 Credits)
    Advanced studies in audio post-production, with emphasis on expanding students' conceptual framework and refining creative audio post-production skills in surround sound mixing and applications in film, video, and digital media.
  • VM465 - Documentary Photography (4 Credits)
    Provides the foundation for an intense photographic investigation of an issue-cultural, political, ideological, or personal. Develops greater competence in negative making and black-and-white printing, with emphasis on strongly informative images. Assignments require the student to discover narrative possibilities while creating strong individual images. The course's technical components are supplemented by considerations of the history of documentary photography.
  • VM470 - Advanced New Media Projects (4 Credits)
    Provides an opportunity for senior VMA students working in computer animation, interactive media, motion graphics, digital photography, networked performance, audio, or other forms of new media to create advanced portfolio work. Projects, both collaborative and individual, are developed in the context of peer-based critique and analysis. The focus is on using new technologies for creative self-expression. Students complete the course with an original portfolio-ready project. May be repeated once for credit if projects differ.
  • VM471 - Top: Documentary for Social Action (4 Credits)
    Documentary for Social Action combines hands-on video production with service learning. Students produce short content-driven documentaries for multiple platforms, all framed by the goal of achieving positive change. Our class collaborates with community-based organizations representing interests in critical areas: environmental justice, science education for girls, prison reform, and others. Students gain deep insight into production and story-telling skills as well as direct experience in working with clients in a real-world process.
  • VM475 - Creative Producing for Film (4 Credits)
    Explores the ways in which a creative producer engages with a project from conception through completion with a focus on the development process. It will discuss original ideas, source material (books, stories), pitching, creating log lines, script coverage, the notes process and assembling the creative team. It will cover customary business affairs including chain-of-title, copyright, talent and option agreements. Key issues in finance, marketing and distribution will also be examined.
  • VM476 - Editing for Advanced Film and Video (4 Credits)
    This advanced-level 16mm film and video post-production workshop is designed to assist in the editing and completion of students' advanced-level projects. Technical procedures as well as aesthetic and conceptual issues endemic to post-production of motion picture projects are examined with an eye to their practical application to students' work on their projects.
  • VM478 - Advanced Cinematography and Videography (4 Credits)
    Offers advanced-level exploration of aesthetics, technology, and craft of cinematography and videography. Students gain a working knowledge of the advanced level of cameras in the department and are expected to develop complex lighting and shot designs. Emphasis is on aesthetic use of the technical elements of motion picture acquisition. Includes significant collaboration with other courses in the curriculum including BFA and BA Production Workshop.
  • VM490 - BFA Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Note: Registration for this course requires completion of one specialization-level production course and approval by the faculty BFA committee based on application.
  • VM490 - BFA Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Provides the means for students to produce portfolio work. BFA students are required to take two consecutive semesters of the workshop, 4 credits per semester. Work may be produced in teams, partnerships, or individually. Projects must be proposed in the semester preceding the semester in which the work is to be produced (see section on BFA requirements above). Students may also apply to serve as non-BFA participants for a single semester and for 4 credits only, serving as crew members or staff on another student's project. Prerequisites: Completion of one specialization-level production course, and approval by the faculty BFA committee based on application.
  • VM491 - BA Capstone Project (4 Credits)
    Students are admitted by application to produce portfolio work as a Capstone Project. Applications must include a detailed description of the proposal for consideration by a faculty panel. The proposal can be for either a creative project based in any area of the program, including film, TV, animation, sound design, or digital art and games; or a significant research project in media studies. Provides an opportunity to produce a significant piece of creative or scholarly work.
  • VM492 - Photo Practicum (4 Credits)
    Designed to integrate, enrich, and solidify a student's photographic skills building on past productions. Emphasis is placed on developing a portfolio representative of a personal vision.
  • VM600 - Business of Modern Media (4 Credits)
    Focuses on strategic thinking and implementation of media projects from conception (pre-production) through release/distribution/exhibition. Material covered includes business plans; grant resources, writing, and package preparation; acquiring rights associated with production; preparing for feature production (optioning literary property, pitching ideas, offerings, prospectus); legal issues (rights, copyright, and intellectual property); insurance considerations; advertising; and marketing. Students are required to conduct database web research on the industry and festivals in addition to following current trends in global markets, financing, advertising, and marketing.
  • VM602 - Media Production Ethics and Cultural Diversity (4 Credits)
    Ethical and diversity issues, including deception, privacy, pornography, racism, discrimination, defamation of character, sexism, stereotyping, piracy, censorship, obscenity, ethnocentricity, confidentiality, fairness, and hate speech are investigated as they apply to the production process of film, video, new media, audio, and photography.
  • VM604 - Top: Writing for Television (4 Credits)
    Examines how to create a television series, including developing an original premise, and writing convincing, multi-dimensional characters, and intriguing, character-specific dialogue. Students write an entire television pilot script to be workshopped in class, along with a pilot package that includes a logline, series synopsis and a 6-week episode guide with character and story arcs. Students will also be introduced to writing scripts for existing TV sitcoms and dramas.
  • VM604 - Top:Space, Place, Image, Sound (4 Credits)
    Examines the development of image-and-sound-based installation art from the late 20th century through the contemporary period. Multimedia installation-expressed in site-specific public works, artist films, single and multichannel video, sculpture and performance, and new media and interactive forms-has become a vital art form in the 21st century. You will have an opportunity to produce multi-media installed works of your own design and will be introduced to the unique properties and parameters of the form. The culmination of the course will be a collaborative multi-site presentation of the work created in the class, staged as a 21st-century "Happening." No prerequisites
  • VM604 - Top: Way's of Seeing (4 Credits)
    The aim of this course is to provide a solid foundation in the defining characteristics of the still image. Ways of Seeing is designed to explore creative possibilities inherent in different photographic formats and materials. The focus is to understand the single frame and how that influences other time-based media. Ways of Seeing builds on constructing the image through: frame, time, palette, point of view, scale, and sequence. Use of both b/w and color will be explored as well as analog and digital capture. This course will also include the study of photographic theory as it relates to the practice of photography today. Class field trips to museum collections, galleries, and lectures will serve as an integral part of this class.
  • VM604 - Top: Fundamentals of Fiction Film Directing (4 Credits)
    This class provides an overview of the role of the fiction film director from script development through post-production. It will examine each phase of the director's process with emphasis on the methodologies necessary to realize the dramatic possibilities of a cinematic story. Students will create several short exercises and analyze the works of master directors.
  • VM604 - Top: Writing the Feature Film (4 Credits)
    This class will take students through various stages of conceptualization for long-form film stories through to the finished feature script. Storytelling methods and techniques for both classic three-act structure and non-linear structure will be examined. Feature script analysis, pacing, momentum, character development, conflict and dialogue will be learned. The course will examine strategies for entry into the Hollywood market, as well as the independent film market. Completion of a treatment, a detailed outline, and a minimum of 60 screenplay pages will be completed (students will be encouraged to finish). To maximize class time, students may be asked to informally convey feature story ideas to the instructor over the winter break.
  • VM605 - Graduate Writing Short Subject (4 Credits)
    Introduces the three genres of short form--nonfiction, experimental, and fiction. Students learn the differences and components of each genre and acquire an understanding of the art, craft, and discipline of each process from a writer's point of view. Emphasis is on developing the writer-s individual personal vision.
  • VM611 - Principles of Sound Production (4 Credits)
    An introductory course in audio physics, sound principles, and the theory and practice of audio recording and mixing. Emphasis is also placed on concept development within sound production concurrent to the study of signal routing and the mixer console, analog and digital audio recording and editing techniques.
  • VM612 - Graduate Sound Design (4 Credits)
    An introductory course on the art of the sound designer and the processes and theories applied to composing and editing sound tracks for visual media such as film, video, computer animation, and websites. Areas of focus are in audio postproduction techniques and in the roles of the supervising sound editor and the sound designer. Postproduction techniques include dialog correction and automated dialog replacement (ADR), Foley session recording, sound effects acquisition and editing, and the mixing and localization theories and practices for stereo and surround-sound. The theoretical focus of the course is on the voice in film and visual media, as speech, as song, and everything that remains afterward with an ongoing theoretic investigation into the relationship between sound and image.
  • VM613 - Foundations of Image and Sound Production (4 Credits)
    Introduces the aesthetics and practice of image and sound production. Topics include visual composition, preproduction skills, lighting, basic directing, camera operation, lens theory, and editing. Students create projects using digital still photography and video.
  • VM614 - Graduate Studio Production (4 Credits)
    An introduction to the fundamentals of studio video production. Students produce, direct, and work crew for productions. Lectures, production analyses, and critiques of work are included.
  • VM621 - Documentary Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    Introduces the practice of documentary video production. Emphasizes documentary strategies, research, budgeting, production, and postproduction. Students produce a documentary short.
  • VM624 - Graduate Directing Actors for the Screen (4 Credits)
    This is a workshop-style class that focuses on the director-actor interaction. John Cassavetes said that acting is the essential discipline for moviemakers, and in this intensive course, students learn the language of acting and the techniques of directing actors in dramatic productions.
  • VM625 - Computer Animation 1 (4 Credits)
    This is the first course in the two-course computer animation sequence, introducing students to the fundamentals of three-dimensional modeling and animation and preparing them for the second course, Computer Animation II. Students learn to develop concepts, produce storyboards, model, texture objects, compose and light scenes, animate, and add dynamics. Finally, they learn to render their animations into movies and to composite movies, audio, titles, and credits in postproduction. In addition to these production skills, students develop their conceptual understanding as well as their critical and creative thinking about the practice of computer animation.
  • VM628 - Experimental Media Production (4 Credits)
    This is a project-based course for students who are interested in experimental analog and digital media. Along with project assignments open to a wide range of processes in various media, students examine ways that audiovisual media can be used to question mainstream genres, either through the invention of new forms or by subverting and hybridizing those forms. Students also look at how alternative venues and audiences shift the meaning and orientation of production. Technical topics include innovative uses of film, video, audio, and software, for example, direct animation or contact recording. Other topics include: the medium as metaphor, alternative representations of politicized subject matters, ordering systems other than the narrative, non-camera-based visual production, installation art and media as object, media's use of performance and anti-performance, image appropriation, the macro and the miniature within the frame, the long take, repetition and feedback loops, and other generative strategies for media makers.
  • VM631 - Graduate Cinematography (4 Credits)
    Introduces the art of cinematography on both an aesthetic and technical level. Students learn how to shoot on both film and digital formats. They also learn fundamental lighting skills using an array of professional lighting units. Emphasizes the learning of creative techniques for visualizing narrative scripts and exploring the emotional subtext of the cinematic image.
  • VM632 - Advanced Editing (4 Credits)
    Provides a framework for advanced digital editing skills like large-scale media management, off-beat and innovative cutting techniques, emerging individual editing styles, and cutting long-form projects.
  • VM640 - MFA Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    MFA students only.
  • VM640 - MFA Production Workshop (4 Credits)
    This is an intensive workshop for second-year MFA students to concentrate on the main body of their artistic output. Students present their own work and critique the work of others, as well as work on their current projects. Centered on the self-directed production schedule and the collaborative nature of critique in an MFA program, this course prepares students to become lifelong artists. Course to be repeated three times during matriculation.
  • VM651 - Studies in Narrative and Media History (4 Credits)
    Offers a historical survey of media art from the perspective of narrative studies. Exposes students to a wide array of narrative structures historically evident in media art, including conventional and unconventional fictional narrative forms, as well as varying types of narrative evident in documentary and experimental media works. In addition, students are introduced to the role of visual images in media narratives, as well as the impact of digital technologies on narrative forms. Students are expected to develop an understanding of the role of narrative structure in effecting emotion and in communicating ideas.
  • VM652 - Theories of Integrated Media (4 Credits)
    MFA students only.
  • VM652 - Theories of Integrated Media (4 Credits)
    Media are no longer discreet forms of expression. Digital technology has created an integrated environment where even analog media are most often produced and/or viewed in a digital context or with digital tools. This course is an intensive introduction to theories of producing and consuming film, video, photography, and sound, both in isolation and couched within digital technologies. Students are given a background in traditional approaches to media criticism and encouraged to question how the new digital context has altered those approaches and changed the conditions under which the creative expression and consumption of media takes place.
  • VM655 - Top: Crossing Over: Globalization and Asian Cinemas (4 Credits)
    Examines theories of globalization through the study of transnational Asian cinemas. It will in particular look at the changing dynamics of media production and circulation in a global environment and how these developments have challenged and redefined "national cinemas." The first part of the course will draw on theories of globalization and post-colonial studies, followed by in-depth understanding of key auteurs vis-a-vis the politics of global film circulation. Finally the course will explore the politics of crossover films and genres.
  • VM664 - Studies in Documentary History and Theory (4 Credits)
    A historical investigation of the theories and practice of documentary representation in film, television, video, and new media.
  • WR101 - Introduction to College Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces college writing, focusing on cultural analysis that appears in academic work and in the public intellectual sphere. Emphasizes how writers work with texts (including images, film, music, and other media) to develop writing projects. Through four main writing projects that concentrate on drafting, peer review, and revision, students learn to be constructive readers of each other's writing and to understand the rhetoric of intellectual inquiry.
  • WR101 - Introduction to College Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces college writing, focusing on cultural analysis that appears in academic work and in the public intellectual sphere. Emphasizes how writers work with texts (including images, film, music, and other media) to develop writing projects. Through four main writing projects that concentrate on drafting, peer review, and revision, students learn to be constructive readers of each other's writing and to understand the rhetoric of intellectual inquiry.
  • WR101 - Introduction to College Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces college writing, focusing on cultural analysis that appears in academic work and in the public intellectual sphere. Emphasizes how writers work with texts (including images, film, music, and other media) to develop writing projects. Through four main writing projects that concentrate on drafting, peer review, and revision, students learn to be constructive readers of each other's writing and to understand the rhetoric of intellectual inquiry.
  • WR101 - Introduction to College Writing (4 Credits)
    Introduces college writing, focusing on cultural analysis that appears in academic work and in the public intellectual sphere. Emphasizes how writers work with texts (including images, film, music, and other media) to develop writing projects. Through four main writing projects that concentrate on drafting, peer review, and revision, students learn to be constructive readers of each other's writing and to understand the rhetoric of intellectual inquiry.
  • WR121 - Research Writing (4 Credits)
    Research-based writing course that explores how rhetorical situations call on writers to do research and how writers draw on various types of writing to present the results of their research. Through four main writing projects, students develop an understanding of the purposes and methods of research and a rhetorical awareness of how research-based writing tasks ask them to consider their relation to the issues they are researching and to their audiences.
  • WR121 - Research Writing-Application (4 Credits)
    Research-based writing course that explores how rhetorical situations call on writers to do research and how writers draw on various types of writing to present the results of their research. Through four main writing projects, students develop an understanding of the purposes and methods of research and a rhetorical awareness of how research-based writing tasks ask them to consider their relation to the issues they are researching and to their audiences.
  • WR121 - Research Writing-YR (4 Credits)
    Research-based writing course that explores how rhetorical situations call on writers to do research and how writers draw on various types of writing to present the results of their research. Through four main writing projects, students develop an understanding of the purposes and methods of research and a rhetorical awareness of how research-based writing tasks ask them to consider their relation to the issues they are researching and to their audiences.
  • WR121 - Research Writing: Bilingual (4 Credits)
    Research-based writing course that explores how rhetorical situations call on writers to do research and how writers draw on various types of writing to present the results of their research. Through four main writing projects, students develop an understanding of the purposes and methods of research and a rhetorical awareness of how research-based writing tasks ask them to consider their relation to the issues they are researching and to their audiences.
  • WR121 - Research Writing:International (4 Credits)
    Research-based writing course that explores how rhetorical situations call on writers to do research and how writers draw on various types of writing to present the results of their research. Through four main writing projects, students develop an understanding of the purposes and methods of research and a rhetorical awareness of how research-based writing tasks ask them to consider their relation to the issues they are researching and to their audiences.
  • WR211 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Fiction and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR212 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Poetry and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR216 - Introduction to Creative Writing: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    This course focuses on the basic vocabulary, techniques, and traditions in Nonfiction and includes the discussion of published work. Students practice their writing craft through exercises and other assignments, many of which will be shared with the class in an introductory workshop setting. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR311 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction (4 Credits)
    Original Fiction is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR312 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Poetry (4 Credits)
    Original Poetry is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR313 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Drama (4 Credits)
    Original Drama is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR315 - Intermediate Comedy Writing; Sketch Troup Writing (4 Credits)
    This course will allow the student to explore many different aspects of comedy writing, including sketch comedy, and improvisation. In addition there will be class discussions on the ethics of comedy, brainstorming sessions and discussions of current industry events and trends. The class will act as a comedy sketch troupe and will write, produce and perform a full sketch show.
  • WR315 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Comedy (4 Credits)
    This course will allow the student to explore many different aspects of stand-up comedy writing, including generating material, character development, improvisation, and performance technique. In addition there will be class discussions on the ethics of comedy, brainstorming sessions and discussions of current industry events and trends. Each student will write a stand-up comedy routine, which will be revised, and presented at a comedy club.
  • WR315 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Sketch Troup Writing (4 Credits)
    This course will allow the student to explore many different aspects of comedy writing, including sketch comedy, and improvisation. In addition there will be class discussions on the ethics of comedy, brainstorming sessions and discussions of current industry events and trends. The class will act as a comedy sketch troupe. They will write, produce and perform a full sketch show.
  • WR316 - Intermediate Creative Writing: Nonfiction (4 Credits)
    Original Nonfiction is written and presented in class for criticism and discussion. Students will also read and discuss published work in the genre. This course may be repeated once for credit.
  • WR317 - Top: Noir Fiction (4 Credits)
    Students write noir and neo-noir fiction: dark, gritty stories in which the protagonist is not a detective but the perpetrator, the victim, the suspect; someone destined to lose, trapped in a web of lust, betrayal, and paranoia. Reading published noir and neo-noir short fiction encompassing a variety of genres (for instance, crime thrillers, Westerns, and speculative fictions) will help define the elements essential to a noir sensibility.
  • WR320 - Travel Writing (4 Credits)
    The best travel writing takes readers on a journey that is not only geographic, but also narrative. This intermediate course in literary travel writing introduces writers to key ways to transform their experiences in the world- be it a far-flung travel destination or one's hometown- into compelling narratives in the form of short essay or memoir. In addition to short reading and writing assignments, students complete three polished travel essays: two to be workshopped and one to hand into the instructor on the last day of class.
  • WR405 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Poetry (4 Credits)
    Advanced writing workshop in poetry with in-class discussion of original poems by students already seriously engaged in writing poetry. The course pays special attention to getting published and students are encouraged to submit their work to magazines. May be repeated once for credit.
  • WR407 - Advanced Seminar Workshop in Fiction (4 Credits)
    Extensive fiction writing of short stories and/or novels coupled with in-class reading for criticism and the craft of fiction. May be repeated once for credit.