Academics

Courses

  • CA102 Evolution of Comedy I

    4 Credits

    Tracks the history of comedy, beginning in Greece and Rome, through the Italian renaissance (Commedia erudite and Commedia dell’arte), Elizabethan England, 17th-century France, the English Restoration, to Hollywood comedy of the 1930s and 1940s. Chief topics include the growth of the comic theatrical tradition and conventions; techniques and themes of comic plots (trickster, parody, farce, caricature); and the role of comedy in society: is it disruptive or unifying? Insightful or malicious? When is censorship necessary?

    Instructors Matthew McMahan
  • CA200 Modes of Comedy Production

    4 Credits

    An introduction to production for potential comedy writers, producers, directors, and performers. This course familiarizes students with the basic techniques of single-camera field production and multi-camera studio production, allowing them to appreciate when either approach might be employed.

    Instructors Eric Handler
  • CA300 Theories of Humor and Laughter

    4 Credits

    Investigates theories of comedy, including theories of humor and laughter. Drawing on philosophy, ethics, cognitive science, psychology, anthropology, linguistics, and social sciences, students learn the social, economic, and political theories of comedy, and how they relate to the physiological and psychological condition for humor and laughter. Students write a research paper on the topic of their choice and conduct observatory and experiential research.

    Instructors Kenneth Feil
  • CA333 Elements of Sitcom Production

    4 Credits

    Students further develop their comedy production skills in the television studio and in the field in relation to sitcom production. Emphasis is placed on planning a show and coordinating a crew, as well as analyzing different styles of sitcom productions.

    Instructors Heerak Shah
  • CA410 Craft and Contemporary Comedic Literature

    4 Credits

    This course will delve into the works of nine masters of comedic writing— novelists, memoirists, essayists, short story writers and playwrights such as Oscar Wilde, Lorrie Moore, David Sedaris, Amy Hempel, and Junot Díaz. We’ll examine the structure of these writers’ stories while also scrutinizing their works on a sentence level. To practice their craft and expand their range, students will write and workshop three “inserts,” one- page imitations of a text. The final paper will be a comedic story or a paper analyzing one or more texts studied over the semester.

    Instructors Machiko Yoshikawa
  • CA420 Topics in Comedy: Advanced Sketch Comedy Writing

    4 Credits

    The aim of this workshop course is to write, rewrite, and polish a packet of single-camera and multi-camera comedy sketches. The final project will be a sketch packet that writers can use in their writing portfolio. Prerequisites: PA 325 or VM 385 OR WR 323

    Instructors Edward Lee
  • CA420 Topics in Comedy: The Art of the Pitch: Developing and Selling an Original Comedy Series

    4 Credits

    In this course, students will engage the processes of developing and pitching an original comedy series. Students will create the world, characters, and concept for a show and then will develop a treatment, series bible, pilot outline, and pitch to take out to the marketplace. The course will likewise consider the particulars of developing a pitch for various platforms (network, cable, streaming, and web).

    Instructors Andrew Miara
  • CC100 Fundamentals of Speech Communication

    4 Credits

    Introduces basic concepts, theories, and principles of oral communication applied to speaking situations. Develops competence in oral communication through performance and critical analysis of student skills in a variety of speaking formats. Audience analysis, content discovery, communication strategies, arrangement of ideas, use of evidence and reasoning to support claims, language and style, voice and other delivery skills and ethical considerations are covered.

    Instructors Beverly Conte, Elizabeth Peterson, Elizabeth Siwo, Gordon Curry, Gregory Freed, Heather May, Jane Pierce Saulnier, Jeanine Kane, Joshua Way, Karen Lauffer, Kenneth Grout, Keri Thompson, Lanita Foley, Owen Eagan, Shane Martin, Sharifa Simon-Roberts, Stephen Iandoli, Vito Silvestri
  • CC150 Radio Programming & Operations

    4 Credits

    An in-depth exploration into the art and science of programming terrestrial, internet, and satellite radio entities, in both the commercial and public sectors. This course focuses on the evolution of broadcasting an audio product for entertainment and informational purposes. It examines the effects of cultural, governmental, technological, and market forces on the radio industry as a whole as well as on individual radio stations throughout North America.

    Instructors Peter Casey
  • CC203 Intercultural Communication

    4 Credits

    Using a multidisciplinary lens we will work together to openly and critically investigate the communication processes across different cultures and sub-cultures with an emphasis on intercultural perceptions, values and social norms among different groups/global populations.

    Instructors Cathryn Edelstein, Mohamed Khalil, Sharifa Simon-Roberts