• BC420 Advanced Topics in Business Enterprises: Music for the Creative Industries

    4 Credits

    From musical accompaniment in silent movie houses to modern day use in video games and beyond, the course will examine music's connection to the media around it. From the points of view of producers, directors, and other creatives, students will learn the importance and mechanics of music supervision, music editing, and the licensing and composing of music. This course will detail the 'language of music' for a more successful collaboration between creatives and composers. We will look at the varied ways to creatively use music, and the dramatic, psychological effects of the score on the viewer and will explore the technical, creative, and economic decisions that lay behind every musical choice. This course will take an in-depth look at the budgetary, legal and contractual obligations of the composer and the production, the income flow generated by music and how this affects the production as a whole. Students will be assessed through hands-on exercises that combine music and visual media.

    Instructors Alan Miller, Daniel Viafore
  • BC420 Advanced Topics in Business Enterprises: The Independent: Operations

    4 Credits

    Crosslisted with 17979 JR 480-X02 Top: The Independent. This class will focus on the operations of The Independent Magazine, the famed film publication recently acquired by the College. Work over the semester will give students real-life experience managing budgets, monetizing the magazine's catalog (they have a rich photo and editorial archive) developing strategy and producing events. The class will be co-listed with WLP, VMA, and Journalism. Students will work closely with these students to publish this highly regarded industry online publication.

    Instructors John Rodzvilla, Tim Riley
  • BC450 Senior Residency I

    4 Credits

    Instructors Ioana Jucan, Stacey Gallaway, Wesley Jackson
  • BC451 Senior Residency II

    4 Credits

    The continuation of the Senior Residence I capstone experience. Students will work in groups and spend the majority of course time gaining hands on experience working with Residency Partners observing and shadowing leaders across the Creative Industries.

    Instructors Stacey Gallaway
  • CA100 Why Did the Chicken? Fundamentals in Comedic Storytelling

    4 Credits

    Analyzes the subjective nature of comedy. What makes something funny? Why do some people laugh when others don’t? How does American comedy differ from comedy from other countries? Through a series of lectures, readings, screenings, and discussions, students boil down the common denominators of universal comedy. They utilize this newfound knowledge to explore and discover their own unique comedic voices through improvisation and sketch writing.

    Instructors Michael Bent
  • CA102 Evolution of Comedy I

    4 Credits

    Tracks the history of comedy, beginning in Greece and Rome, through the Italian renaissance (Commedia erudite and Commedia dell’arte), Elizabethan England, 17th-century France, the English Restoration, to Hollywood comedy of the 1930s and 1940s. Chief topics include the growth of the comic theatrical tradition and conventions; techniques and themes of comic plots (trickster, parody, farce, caricature); and the role of comedy in society: is it disruptive or unifying? Insightful or malicious? When is censorship necessary?

    Instructors Matthew McMahan
  • CA200 Modes of Comedy Production

    4 Credits

    An introduction to production for potential comedy writers, producers, directors, and performers. This course familiarizes students with the basic techniques of single-camera field production and multi-camera studio production, allowing them to appreciate when either approach might be employed.

    Instructors Eric Handler
  • CA300 Theories of Humor and Laughter

    4 Credits

    Investigates theories of comedy, including theories of humor and laughter. Drawing on philosophy, ethics, cognitive science, psychology, anthropology, linguistics, and social sciences, students learn the social, economic, and political theories of comedy, and how they relate to the physiological and psychological condition for humor and laughter. Students write a research paper on the topic of their choice and conduct observatory and experiential research.

    Instructors Kenneth Feil
  • CA333 Elements of Sitcom Production

    4 Credits

    Students further develop their comedy production skills in the television studio and in the field in relation to sitcom production. Emphasis is placed on planning a show and coordinating a crew, as well as analyzing different styles of sitcom productions.

    Instructors Heerak Shah
  • CA410 Craft and Contemporary Comedic Literature

    4 Credits

    This course will delve into the works of nine masters of comedic writing— novelists, memoirists, essayists, short story writers and playwrights such as Oscar Wilde, Lorrie Moore, David Sedaris, Amy Hempel, and Junot Díaz. We’ll examine the structure of these writers’ stories while also scrutinizing their works on a sentence level. To practice their craft and expand their range, students will write and workshop three “inserts,” one- page imitations of a text. The final paper will be a comedic story or a paper analyzing one or more texts studied over the semester.

    Instructors Machiko Yoshikawa