Academics

Courses

  • BC420 Advanced Topics in Business Enterprises: The Streaming Business

    4 Credits

    Various topics offer opportunities to examine contemporary and historic issues, trends, and events across the spectrum of business of creative studies.

    Instructors Robert Lyons
  • BC420 Capstone Topics in Business Enterprises: Music for the Creative Industries

    4 Credits

    Various topics offer opportunities to examine contemporary and historic issues, trends, and events across the spectrum of business of creative studies.

    Instructors Daniel Viafore
  • BC450 Senior Residency I

    4 Credits

    Instructors Wesley Jackson, Ioana Jucan
  • BC451 Senior Residency II

    4 Credits

    The continuation of the Senior Residence I capstone experience. Students will work in groups and spend the majority of course time gaining hands on experience working with Residency Partners observing and shadowing leaders across the Creative Industries.

    Instructors Ioana Jucan, Wesley Jackson
  • CA100 Why Did the Chicken? Fundamentals in Comedic Storytelling

    4 Credits

    Analyzes the subjective nature of comedy. What makes something funny? Why do some people laugh when others don’t? How does American comedy differ from comedy from other countries? Through a series of lectures, readings, screenings, and discussions, students boil down the common denominators of universal comedy. They utilize this newfound knowledge to explore and discover their own unique comedic voices through improvisation and sketch writing.

    Instructors Michael Bent, Matthew McMahan
  • CA102 Evolution of Comedy I

    4 Credits

    Tracks the history of comedy, beginning in Greece and Rome, through the Italian renaissance (Commedia erudite and Commedia dell’arte), Elizabethan England, 17th-century France, the English Restoration, to Hollywood comedy of the 1930s and 1940s. Chief topics include the growth of the comic theatrical tradition and conventions; techniques and themes of comic plots (trickster, parody, farce, caricature); and the role of comedy in society: is it disruptive or unifying? Insightful or malicious? When is censorship necessary?

    Instructors Matthew McMahan
  • CA103 Evolution of Comedy II

    4 Credits

    Provides a broad survey of comedy in film, television, and audio recording to explore the evolution of forms, styles, and meanings. The course also examines the creative agency and individuality (authorship) of particular comedy directors, television creator-producers, performers, and collaborative teams in the broader context of comedy forms and styles. Alongside exploring the poetics of mass culture comedy, the course investigates mass culture comedy’s social and political significance as a regulator of the status quo as well as a force of satire, protest, and even rebellion. In that regard, issues of social identity and diversity, as well as questions of exclusion and inclusion, permeate students’ investigations into comedy. Simply put, the course repeatedly asks: who is laughing at whom, and why? What are the social and political stakes of mass culture comedy? How are the poetics of mass culture comedy related to the social and cultural significance (and signification) of comedy?

    Instructors Maria Corrigan
  • CA200 Modes of Comedy Production

    4 Credits

    An introduction to production for potential comedy writers, producers, directors, and performers. This course familiarizes students with the basic techniques of single-camera field production and multi-camera studio production, allowing them to appreciate when either approach might be employed.

    Instructors Eric Handler
  • CA300 Theories of Humor & Laughter

    4 Credits

    Investigates theories of comedy, including theories of humor and laughter. Drawing on philosophy, ethics, cognitive science, psychology, anthropology, linguistics, and social sciences, students learn the social, economic, and political theories of comedy, and how they relate to the physiological and psychological condition for humor and laughter. Students write a research paper on the topic of their choice and conduct observatory and experiential research.

    Instructors Kenneth Feil
  • CA300 Theories of Humor and Laughter

    4 Credits

    Investigates theories of comedy, including theories of humor and laughter. Drawing on philosophy, ethics, cognitive science, psychology, anthropology, linguistics, and social sciences, students learn the social, economic, and political theories of comedy, and how they relate to the physiological and psychological condition for humor and laughter. Students write a research paper on the topic of their choice and conduct observatory and experiential research.

    Instructors Kenneth Feil