• PB203 Intro to Electronic Publishing

    4 Credits

    Explores various methods of digital publishing including e-books, digital magazines and web site creation.The course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the planning, development and management of digital content.

    Instructors Alyson Gamble, Kyanna Sutton
  • PB204 Introduction to Book and Magazine Publishing

    4 Credits

    Introduces students to the history and foundations of publishing and the role media companies have in our global culture. Topics include the methods of evaluating, editing, producing, distributing, and promoting content; the organization and management of publishers; critical issues in publishing such as diversity, the hunt for new revenue streams, and intellectual property; and the basic skills necessary for these functions.

    Instructors Alexander Danner
  • PB207 Introduction to Magazine Writing

    4 Credits

    Introduces writing for commercial markets. Students develop, research, and write nonfiction articles and learn where to market them. May be repeated once for credit and may be substituted for one 200-level WR (writing) workshop.

    Instructors Delia Cabe, Mary Baker, Rachel Raczka
  • PB302 Copyediting

    4 Credits

    Practical course about the process of editing and preparing manuscripts for publication. Together with hands-on assignments, the course considers the relation of editor to author, the nature of copyediting in various publishing environments, and other topics.

    Instructors Daniel Fitts, David Richwine
  • PB307 Intermediate Magazine Writing

    4 Credits

    Requires students to research and write an article or magazine feature. Students learn terms, concepts, and techniques to improve both writing and critical thinking. May be repeated once for credit and may be substituted for one 300-level WR (writing) workshop.

    Instructors Delia Cabe, Jacqueline Hogan
  • PB380 Magazine Publishing Overview

    4 Credits

    Provides an understanding of the magazine field from the perspective of writers and editors. Looks at the similarities and differences between general interest magazines and more focused magazines, and how magazines compete with each other and with other media for audiences and revenues. Topics include how magazines carve out niches, the relationship between the business and editorial departments, and the editorial operations of magazines. The course also looks at the history of the magazine industry.

    Instructors Benoit Denizet-Lewis
  • PB383 Book Publishing Overview

    4 Credits

    Examines the acquisition and editing of a manuscript, its progress into design and production, and the final strategies of promotion and distribution of a finished book.

    Instructors Daniel Weaver, Lissa Warren, Susan Canavan
  • PB395 Applications for Print Publishing

    4 Credits

    Students master the page layout and image creation software used in the publishing industry. Students also learn related computer-based skills, such as type and image sourcing, image acquisition, including scanning, and copyright issues. Although some design issues are addressed, the primary focus is on software skills. Course assumes students have basic Macintosh skills.

    Instructors George Restrepo, Joseph Durand
  • PB402 Book Editing

    4 Credits

    Book editing, or substantive editing, is a highly subjective, visceral skill informed by flexibility, judgment, life experience, grammatical grace, signposts, caution lights, road maps, respect for the author, and subtle diplomacy in the author/editor relationship, all directed toward helping the writer to the intended creative goal. In other words, book editing is an art, not a science. However, an exploration of the foundations of constructive shaping, development, organization, and line-editing may release the inner shepherd/wrangler in you.

    Instructors Daniel Weaver
  • PB410 Music Writing

    4 Credits

    Covers writing about popular music: writing and work-shopping concert and album reviews, musician or band profiles, and columns. Students read and discuss the work of professional music writers.

    Instructors William Beuttler