• LF101 Elementary French 1

    4 Credits

    Stresses mastery of essential vocabulary and primary grammatical structures through a situational approach. Students perceive that language is ""living"" and they discover by the third week of the semester that they can already communicate in French. Class time is devoted to interactive practice. Conversational skills, pronunciation, and understanding are verified through regular oral exams.

    Instructors Pierre Hurel, Michaele Gauduchon
  • LF102 Elementary French 2

    4 Credits

    Continuation of LF 101, this course also incorporates reading skills and exposes students to a wider range of cultural materials.

    Instructors Pierre Hurel
  • LI120 Introduction to Literary Studies

    4 Credits

    Gives students intensive practice in literary analysis, critical writing, and related research. In discussing primary texts, considerable attention is given to elements of the different genres (e.g., narrative point of view, narrative structure, metrical and free verse), as well as to issues relevant across literary genres (e.g., form and content, voice, contexts, tone). Readings are chosen from the following genres: poetry, drama, and narrative modes. Readings also include selected literary theory and criticism.

    Instructors William Donoghue, Daniela Kukrechtova, Alexander Ruggeri, George Baroud, Kelvin Goh, Douglas Ishii, Katerina Seligmann, Steven Ambrose, Shannon Derby
  • LI201 Literary Foundations

    4 Credits

    Surveys foundational works of literature spanning a wide range of periods, genres, and regions in order to familiarize students with broad principles in literary and cultural history. Works studied may include ancient Greek and other premodern epic, lyric, and drama along with cognate and contrasting traditions.

    Instructors Joseph Pomp, George Baroud, Brian Cronin, Robert Dulgarian, Alexander Ruggeri
  • LI202 U.S./American Literatures

    4 Credits

    Introduces students to the literary history of the United States from the colonial period to the modern by surveying a wide range of texts, including canonical and non-canonical authors in several genres. The course examines questions such as: How is the narrative of Americanness constructed? How have authors employed the literary craft to explore the construction of the self in relation to transcendentalism, abolitionism, feminism, class consciousness, and national belonging? This course focuses on writers such as Whatley, Apress, Melville, Douglass, Whitman, Stowe, Rowlandson, Hurston, Steinbeck, and Paredes.

    Instructors Adam Spry, Charles Redmond, Brian Cronin
  • LI203 Literatures in English

    4 Credits

    A historical overview of several genres of non-U.S. literatures written in English from Renaissance through the 21st century. This course focuses on writers such as More, Defoe, Bronte, Shakespeare, Brontë, Joyce, Achebe, Rhys, Coetzee, and Walcott.

    Instructors Catherine Long, Robert Dulgarian, Shannon Derby
  • LI204 Top: Dystopian/Utopian Outlook

    4 Credits

    Courses focus on specific themes or topics, such as literature of the city, artists in literature, or coming of age. Topics differ each semester; all topics include literature in at least three genres (selected from poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama).

    Instructors Lindsay Janssen
  • LI204 Topic: Literature of Queer

    4 Credits

    Courses focus on specific themes or topics, such as literature of the city, artists in literature, or coming of age. Topics differ each semester; all topics include literature in at least three genres (selected from poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama).

    Instructors Steven Ambrose
  • LI204 Topics in Literature: Contemporary Fairy Tales

    4 Credits

    Courses focus on specific themes or topics, such as literature of the city, artists in literature, or coming of age. Topics differ each semester; all topics include literature in at least three genres (selected from poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama).

    Instructors Peter Shippy
  • LI204 Topics in Literature: Dancing About Architecture—Ekphrastic Literature

    4 Credits

    In this course we’ll enter into an old conversation concerning the special relationship between literature and art, lively in Sophocles’ Greece and China, during the Tang Dynasty, renewed in Renaissance Europe, collaged by Dada and surrealist writers in Paris, Africa, and South America and Americanized in 1950s New York, by the poets of the Beat and New York Schools. We’ll study contemporary poetry, prose, and plays to see how they conjure and examine music, film, cartoons, as well as traditional visual arts. Writers may include Kevin Young, Maggie Nelson, Anne Carson, Don DeLillo, and Evie Shockley, among others.

    Instructors Peter Shippy