• LF101 Elementary French 1

    4 Credits

    Stresses mastery of essential vocabulary and primary grammatical structures through a situational approach. Students perceive that language is ""living"" and they discover by the third week of the semester that they can already communicate in French. Class time is devoted to interactive practice. Conversational skills, pronunciation, and understanding are verified through regular oral exams.

    Instructors Pierre Hurel
  • LI120 Introduction to Literary Studies

    4 Credits

    Gives students intensive practice in literary analysis, critical writing, and related research. In discussing primary texts, considerable attention is given to elements of the different genres (e.g., narrative point of view, narrative structure, metrical and free verse), as well as to issues relevant across literary genres (e.g., form and content, voice, contexts, tone). Readings are chosen from the following genres: poetry, drama, and narrative modes. Readings also include selected literary theory and criticism.

    Instructors Adam Spry, Alexander Ruggeri, George Baroud, George Vahamikos, Katerina Seligmann, Matthew Messer, Rosario Swanson, Steven Ambrose
  • LI201 Literary Foundations

    4 Credits

    Surveys foundational works of literature spanning a wide range of periods, genres, and regions in order to familiarize students with broad principles in literary and cultural history. Works studied may include ancient Greek and other premodern epic, lyric, and drama along with cognate and contrasting traditions.

    Instructors George Baroud, Robert Dulgarian
  • LI202 U.S./American Literatures

    4 Credits

    Introduces students to the literary history of the United States from the colonial period to the modern by surveying a wide range of texts, including canonical and non-canonical authors in several genres. The course examines questions such as: How is the narrative of Americanness constructed? How have authors employed the literary craft to explore the construction of the self in relation to transcendentalism, abolitionism, feminism, class consciousness, and national belonging? This course focuses on writers such as Whatley, Apress, Melville, Douglass, Whitman, Stowe, Rowlandson, Hurston, Steinbeck, and Paredes.

    Instructors Jared Pence, Matthew Schratz, William Donoghue
  • LI203 Literatures in English

    4 Credits

    A historical overview of several genres of non-U.S. literatures written in English from Renaissance through the 21st century. This course focuses on writers such as More, Defoe, Bronte, Shakespeare, Brontë, Joyce, Achebe, Rhys, Coetzee, and Walcott.

    Instructors Rituparna Mitra, Robert Dulgarian
  • LI204 Topics in Literature: Contemporary Fairy Tales

    4 Credits

    Through the study of the origins and development of fairy tales, myths, and folk stories, we’ll explore how storytelling shapes our sense of identity. We’ll examine the recurring motifs within these enduring tales and study why and how contemporary authors subvert those themes and lessons. The contemporary tale does not promise false happiness but enlightens us about the distorted manner in which our world has been transformed.

    Instructors Peter Shippy
  • LI204 Topics in Literature: Democracy and American Literature

    4 Credits

    In contemporary U.S. politics and media representations, “democracy” is a term used so widely that it seems to have lost all definition, other than signifying something vaguely good (most of the time) or (in other contexts) vaguely bad. To understand contemporary political issues, this course traces democracy’s genealogy in the U.S. American political discourses frequently represent democracy as a utopian drive, as a project to be completed, yet critics have persistently emphasized the violence of this vision of democracy and rejected the utopian undercurrent of the American democratic project. Democracy promises inclusion yet depends on exclusions grounded in gender, sexuality, race, nationality, and class differences. In this class, our discussions will be informed by political theories of democracy from a range of thinkers, but we will focus on how literature has served as a space to test political ideas of democracy. We will consider both challenges to democracy and alternative traditions of democratic thought. In other words, we will encounter many contradictory faces of democracy, and a guiding question of this course will be, does such contradiction—or disagreement—constitute democracy, or does democracy strive for resolution, or consensus? Authors may include Walt Whitman, Harriet Jacobs, Toni Morrison, and Chang Rae-Lee.

    Instructors Matthew Scully
  • LI204 Topics in Literature: Literature of the British Empire: Gender, Race, and (Post)Colonialism

    4 Credits

    This course will focus on narratives of and about empire as well as representations of gender, race, and (post)colonialism in a variety of genres, including novels, poems, and plays. We will focus on the literature of the British Empire – both English and Anglophone writers – from the 19th and 20th centuries and explore the movements that occur across geography and culture. The course will address modernist anxieties over empire as well as renegotiations of national and cultural identity after the independence of former colonies such as Ireland, India, and Jamaica to name a few. What role does literature play in shaping our understanding of history? What is the language of empire and how is it deployed? What does it mean to explore issues of empire within our contemporary moment as well as within the context of history? Authors may include E.M. Forster, Jean Rhys, George Lamming, and Andrea Levy as well as supplemental materials that engage with postcolonial and anticolonial theory and discourse.

    Instructors Shannon Derby
  • LI204 Topics in Literature: Literature, Theory, and International Anti-Colonial Struggles

    4 Credits

    What is the role of literature and literary theory in activist work? In November of 1982, authors from different Caribbean nation states came together to answer precisely this question. At the Caribbean Conference of Intellectual Workers, a watershed moment in both activism and literature, authors such as George Lamming, Merle Collins, Merle Hodge, and Earl Lovelace worked together to form an international coalition to fight against colonialism, income inequity, and racial injustice. We will examine the work of these authors, both fiction and non-fiction, as well as the work of authors writing anti-colonial texts in different cultures, countries, and contexts. We will read the work of Ama Ata Aidoo, Alex La Guma, Kamau Brathwaite, and Toni Morrison. In our collective effort to demystify the important question of literature and theory’s role in revolutionary struggles, both historic and current, we will also examine theoretical writing from authors such as Frantz Fanon, Sylvia Wynter, Hortense Spillers, and Joan Copjec.

    Instructors Miguel Rivera
  • LI208 Race and Resistance in U.S. Literature

    4 Credits

    Explores ways writers from disparate communities in the U.S. use various literary forms to articulate resistance, community, and citizenship. Literary texts from several genres are situated in their historical contexts and the writing strategies of each author is examined. Also includes essays, journalism, and films to learn how diverse cultural texts work to represent America.

    Instructors Miguel Rivera, Steven Ambrose