• SW621 Film Genres

    4 Credits

    This course is designed to provide an introduction to the historical study of film through the lens of genre. We will highlight popular Hollywood media and endeavor to raise questions of film and media history while acknowledging that American genres have connections to other national media outputs. Genre study is one entry point into a discussion about film and media and how it has been written, produced, directed and consumed through time and in place. We acknowledge that there are many other ways to study media but for the purposes of this course, and also hopefully for the use value of students studying writing for the media, genre will be the organizing principle.

    Instructors James Lane
  • SW624 Writers in Development

    4 Credits

    Closely examines our ability as writers to effectively communicate and describe our own writing within industry standards, as well as to evaluate work by other writers. Students create log lines and premise paragraphs for projects, examine screenplays and write script coverage, and engage in the “notes process” akin to what would transpire between producers and writers, and directors and writers.

    Instructors Linda Reisman
  • SW631 Writing for Short-Form Media

    4 Credits

    The short script is an art form of its own, often dominating film and video festivals. Short scripts also often present in-roads to a career in television or film. In this dynamic workshop course, students progress through writing a series of short scripts of varying lengths and following the parameters laid out by the instructor. Webisodes are included. This workshop emphasizes the role of story and the narrative and visual world with minimal dialogue. Students explore aesthetic theory as discussed in the online course modules. Pacing, tension, and timelines are also explored. This course has three components: independent writing and reading, asynchronous and synchronous group workshops, and individual meetings with the workshop instructor.

    Instructors Jong Ougie Pak, Nicole Shaw
  • SW633 Feature Film Screenwriting

    4 Credits

    The advent of online video streaming production companies, along with the regeneration of cable movies and miniseries, have opened up exciting new avenues for long-form writing. Working from step outlines developed in Residency III, students write the first draft of a feature-length screenplay. They are also responsible for writing critical analyses of each other’s work and engaging in discussion of genre, aesthetics, craft, and form. Students are expected to understand potential markets and venues for their work. This workshop has three components: independent writing and reading, asynchronous and synchronous group workshops and peer critiques, and advisory meetings.

    Instructors Weiko Lin
  • VM100 History of Media Arts I

    4 Credits

    This is the first of a two-semester course that explores the historical development of the media arts, including the film, broadcasting, and sound recording industries until 1965. Investigates the relationships between economics, industrial history, and social and political systems, and the styles and techniques of specific films and broadcast programs. Special attention is given to the diversity of styles of presentation in the media.

    Instructors Andre Puca, Aysehan Julide Etem, Barry Marshall, Christopher McKenzie, Cindy Vincent, Joaquín Serpe, Jun Okada, Leonard Cortana, Martin Roberts, Matthew Noferi, Paulina MacNeil, Ulya Aviral, William Rogan
  • VM101 History of Media Arts II

    4 Credits

    This is the second of a two-semester course that explores the historical development of the media arts, focusing on the continuing development of the film, broadcasting, and sound recording industries after 1965, as well as the development of video and digital technologies. Investigates the relationships between economics, industrial history, and social and political systems, and the styles and techniques of specific films and videos, broadcast programs, and digital media products.

    Instructors Vinicius Navarro
  • VM105 Introduction to Visual Arts

    4 Credits

    Investigates the visual language of communication shared among all of the visual arts, emphasizing visual analysis, understanding of materials, the history of style and techniques, and the functions and meanings of art in its varied manifestations. Provides a foundation for subsequent studies in the visual and media arts.

    Instructors Cheryl Knight, Felicity Ratté, Mary Salzman, Sarahh Scher
  • VM120 Foundations in Visual and Media Arts Production

    4 Credits

    A combination of lectures and hands-on workshops examines the relationships among photography, graphics, audio, film, video, and digital media within the context of cross-media concepts, theories, and applications. Traces the creative process from conception and writing through production and post-production. Students proceed through a series of exercises that lead to completion of a final project, establishing a foundation for advanced production coursework. Additional Course Costs: $150 to $250

    Instructors Daniel Callahan, David Kelleher, Geoffry Tarulli, Jean-Paul DiSciscio, Nikoletta Kanakis
  • VM200 Media Criticism and Theory

    4 Credits

    Explores theoretical and critical approaches to the study of photography, film, television and video, audio, and digital culture. Theories and methods examine issues relating to production and authorship in the media arts, audience reception and effects, political ideology, ethics, aesthetics, cultural diversity, and schools of thought within the liberal arts. Extensive critical writing and reading in media criticism and theory.

    Instructors Alexander Svensson, Donald Fry, Jayson Baker, Joseph Valle, Maria Corrigan, Maria San Filippo, Shujen Wang-de Somer
  • VM201 Media, Arts, and Culture

    4 Credits

    Introduces students to key subjects and concepts in media studies, drawing on a wide range of contemporary and historical examples. The course examines a variety of media, including cinema, television, and video games. It also looks at different institutions and practices, from media industries to grassroots organizations, and from commercial cinema to experimental video within a multicultural context. In addition to gaining general knowledge of the field, students develop the critical skills needed to become active, alert, and engaged media users. Not open to VMA majors.

    Instructors Cindy Vincent