• 2 Credits

    SW611 Residency I - Storytelling and Writing Short Scripts

    The initial residency is comprised of an orientation and welcome, master classes, seminars, intensive workshops, one-on-one advisory meetings, screenings and lectures on various craft, history and theory topics related to creating story and writing short scripts and webisodes. During the residency, students meet daily with online faculty and their advisors to form the work plan for the semester following the residency.

    Instructors
  • 2 Credits

    SW612 Residency II - Series Television Writing

    Areas of study for the second residency include drama and comedy writing, scripting for existing shows, and childrens and reality television. The residency consists of master classes, workshops, screenings, and lectures on various craft, history, and theory topics related to writing television series. During the residency, students meet with online faculty and advisors to form the work plan for the semester. The residency in Los Angeles also offers field trips site visits pending availability to various television industry studios and show sets.

    Instructors
  • 2 Credits

    SW613 Residency III - Long-Form Writing

    Features, cable movies, and miniseries are the focus of the third residency, with emphasis on story progression and sustainability. The residency consists of master classes, workshops, screenings, and lectures on various craft, history, and theory topics related to writing long-form. During the residency, students meet with online faculty and advisors to form the work plan for the semester.

    Instructors
  • 2 Credits

    SW614 Residency IV - The Business of Screenwriting

    The final residency focuses on the business side of screenwriting, including rewriting and script coverage. The residency comprises master classes, workshops, screenings, lectures, and advising group workshops, screenings, and lectures on various craft, history, and theory topics related to writing long-form. During the residency, students meet with online faculty and advisors to form the work plan for the semester. Students may have the opportunity pending availability to take group field trips to industry sites.

    Instructors
  • 4 Credits

    SW621 Film Genres

    This course is designed to provide an introduction to the historical study of film through the lens of genre. We will highlight popular Hollywood media and endeavor to raise questions of film and media history while acknowledging that American genres have connections to other national media outputs. Genre study is one entry point into a discussion about film and media and how it has been written, produced, directed and consumed through time and in place. We acknowledge that there are many other ways to study media but for the purposes of this course, and also hopefully for the use value of students studying writing for the media, genre will be the organizing principle.

    Instructors James Lane
  • 4 Credits

    SW622 The Writer's Room

    Congratulations, you have just become the showrunner of """"Luther, Season 0.1"""" In your new role, you are now responsible for putting together a plan for this season's story arc, character arc and episodic arc. You will also need to hire a new writing staff and utilize The Writers Room to lead your staff through the creation of story ideas, beat sheets, outlines, script drafts and multiple revisions. At the same time, you'll be responsible for budgets, schedules, hiring, firing, casting, pre-production, production, and post production. Oh, and writing and rewriting.

    Instructors
  • 4 Credits

    SW624 Writers in Development

    Closely examines our ability as writers to effectively communicate and describe our own writing within industry standards, as well as to evaluate work by other writers. Students create log lines and premise paragraphs for projects, examine screenplays and write script coverage, and engage in the notes process akin to what would transpire between producers and writers, and directors and writers.

    Instructors Linda Reisman
  • 4 Credits

    SW631 Writing for Short-Form Media

    The short script is an art form of its own, often dominating film and video festivals. Short scripts also often present in-roads to a career in television or film. In this dynamic workshop course, students progress through writing a series of short scripts of varying lengths and following the parameters laid out by the instructor. Webisodes are included. This workshop emphasizes the role of story and the narrative and visual world with minimal dialogue. Students explore aesthetic theory as discussed in the online course modules. Pacing, tension, and timelines are also explored. This course has three components: independent writing and reading, asynchronous and synchronous group workshops, and individual meetings with the workshop instructor.

    Instructors Nicole Shaw, Jong Ougie Pak
  • 4 Credits

    SW632 Writing Series Television

    With the quantity of TV programming exploding over multiple platformsnetwork stations, cable stations, and streaming video servicesthe demand for TV content has never been higher. In this workshop, students learn writing original TV pilots and spec scripts for existing cablestreamingtelevision showsand decide which to pursue and complete from outline to final draft. They learn how to best position themselves in this expanding, but still extremely competitive market. Each student completes two drafts of a script with the final draft worthy of submitting to script competitions, national television writing workshops, and a growing number of television festivals. This workshop has three components: independent writing and reading, advisory meetings, and asynchronous and synchronous group workshops with peer critiques.

    Instructors
  • 4 Credits

    SW633 Feature Film Screenwriting

    The advent of online video streaming production companies, along with the regeneration of cable movies and miniseries, have opened up exciting new avenues for long-form writing. Working from step outlines developed in Residency III, students write the first draft of a feature-length screenplay. They are also responsible for writing critical analyses of each others work and engaging in discussion of genre, aesthetics, craft, and form. Students are expected to understand potential markets and venues for their work. This workshop has three components: independent writing and reading, asynchronous and synchronous group workshops and peer critiques, and advisory meetings.

    Instructors Weiko Lin