• BC110 Introduction to the Creative Economy

    4 Credits

    An immersive examination of the history of the creative economy, the sharing economy, contemporary creative enterprise models, and their impact within the global economy today. This course explores core themes such as authorship, production and labor, ethics, globalization, community, culture, politics, business practices, and innovation in the arts and communication. The course also examines cultural diversity and the extent to which different cultures are currently represented in various aspects of the creative economy. Student work includes a series of short media presentations and papers on creative economy businesses, organizations, and individuals that produce and distribute goods and services in the realms of marketing, design, film and media, video game and software, music and performing arts, and publishing.

    Instructors Antoine Hardy, Bhamati Viswanathan, Brenna McCormick, Sanjay Pothen, Wesley Jackson
  • BC111 Creative Collaboration Seminar

    4 Credits

    Students explore the theory and practice of creativity with respect to specific types of group collaboration and roles within the creative enterprise. This includes the businesses, organizations, and individuals that produce and distribute goods and services in the realms of marketing, design, film and media, video game and software, music and performing arts, and publishing. Through selected readings, meetings with guest artists, and hands-on exercises that foster both personal creativity and the creative output of teams, this practical course offers students skills and techniques to increase personal creativity and promote group creativity. The course also examines cultural diversity and the extent to which different cultures are currently represented in various aspects of the creative economy. Students investigate and practice various models of creative collaboration and work collaboratively throughout the semester to create a series of events/works/projects to be presented in class and included in individual portfolios.

    Instructors John Rodzvilla, Kimberly Lorusso, Sanjay Pothen, Stacey Gallaway, Ulya Aviral
  • BC205 Business Fundamentals for the Creative Enterprises

    4 Credits

    Analyzes information related to business trends, strategies, opportunities, and operations in creative enterprises. Through lecture, discussion, case videos, and in-class assignments, students consider external and internal factors driving contemporary business decisions with a focus on arts and communication. Topics include: pricing; supply and demand; the management of people, processes, resources, and organization; the globalization of business; the use of information systems to support business efforts; and basic concepts of marketing, sales, business ethics, law, accounting, and finance.

    Instructors Bhamati Viswanathan, Mark Dockser, Robert Lyons, Stanley Miller
  • BC210 Develop Aesthetic Sensibility

    4 Credits

    Explores the theroy and practice of creativity with respect to specific types of group collaboration and roles within creative enterprises such as marketing, film and media, music and performing arts, and publishing. Through readings, meetings with guest artists, and hands-on exercises, this practical course offers students skills and techniques to increase personal and group creativity. The course also examines cultural diversity and the extent to which different cultures are currently represented in various aspects of the creative economy. Students examine and practice various models of creative collaboration and work collaboratively throughout the semester to create a series of events, works, and projects to be presented in class and included in individual portfolios. Prerequisites: Business of Creative Enterprise majors only.

    Instructors P Carl, Wesley Jackson
  • BC310 Mark the Creative Enterprise

    4 Credits

    Instructors Brenna McCormick
  • BC311 Strategic Management

    4 Credits

    Instructors Robert Lyons, Stanley Miller
  • BC320 Topics in Business Enterprise Studies

    4 Credits

    Summer Session 1 Summer Session Online Course This course is offered entirely online with asynchronous elements conducted via Canvas and live sessions conducted via Zoom. You should reserve the meeting times listed here for class meetings and office hours, but there will also be work to complete on your own outside these hours. If no meeting times are listed here, your course will be primarily asynchronous. Students are responsible for checking with their faculty about the exact schedule, managing their time and completing the course requirements by the scheduled weekly due dates. Catalogue Description: Various topics offer opportunities to examine contemporary business enterprise issues and trends.

    Instructors Ioana Jucan
  • BC320 Topics in Business Enterprises Studies: Hip-Hop, Legacy of Culture, Disruption, and Communication

    4 Credits

    Winter Term Online Course This course is offered entirely online with asynchronous elements conducted via Canvas and live sessions conducted via Zoom. You should reserve the meeting times listed here for class meetings and office hours, but there will also be work to complete on your own outside these hours. If no meeting times are listed here, your course will be primarily asynchronous. Students are responsible for checking with their faculty about the exact schedule, managing their time and completing the course requirements by the scheduled weekly due dates. Course Description: Hip-Hop as a culture is the documentation and practice of liberation. The voice of the forgotten, ignored, and persecuted that now roars with an unavoidable din. This class will explore the origins of the movement that has galvanized millions, earned billions, and changed the way the world communicates. We will trace the origins of the Culture to the South Bronx in the 70s. How did Nixon’s War on Drugs and Reagan era austerity plant the seeds of this new landscape? Why is Robert Moses as important to Hip-Hop as Grandmaster Flash and Jay-Z? By studying the core four elements - MCing, DJing, B-Boy/B-Girling (aka breakdancing), and Graffiti we will see how Hip-Hop influenced marketing, advertising, fashion, politics, sports and of course the music business.

    Instructors Wesley Jackson
  • BC320 Topics in Business Enterprises: Creative Thinking & Problem Solving for the Creative Economy

    4 Credits

    This course is designed to explore the nature of creativity, creative thinking and creative problem solving (CPS) as the core driver of the Creative Economy; in which creativity and ideas are integral strategic components of successful businesses. We will investigate how creativity drives business and influences industries. In this hands-on, skill-building course, you will learn and practice methods, tools, and techniques that will help you to develop more flexible thinking and effectively communicate ideas. Looking to creativity theory, “capital C” creatives, and creative enterprises around the world, we will explore how the influence and principles of creative thinking and CPS can be used as a means of self-expression, and create breakthrough ideas.

    Instructors Brenna McCormick
  • BC320 Topics in Business Enterprises: Hip-Hop, Legacy of Culture, Disruption, and Communication

    4 Credits

    Crosslisted with MB 371-X01 and MK 371-X01. Hip-Hop as a culture is the documentation and practice of liberation. The voice of the forgotten, ignored, and persecuted that now roars with an unavoidable din. This class will explore the origins of the movement that has galvanized millions, earned billions, and changed the way the world communicates. We will trace the origins of the Culture to the South Bronx in the 70s. How did Nixon’s War on Drugs and Reagan era austerity plant the seeds of this new landscape? Why is Robert Moses as important to Hip-Hop as Grandmaster Flash and Jay-Z? What do Widen + Kenedy and Mark Zuckerburg owe the TATS CRU? How did RUN DMC create modern day sneaker culture? Why do we consider Allen Iverson and Barack Obama Hip-Hop artists? How did Marley Marl give the Macbook the edge over the PC? Why do we consider Crazy Legs as the most successful post-Cold War American diplomat? By studying the core four elements - MCing, DJing, B-Boy/B-Girling (aka breakdancing), and Graffiti we will see how Hip-Hop influenced marketing, advertising, fashion, politics, sports and of course the music business. While Hip-Hop is, “Big business like Con Edison” to quote Talib Kweli, it is still the sound and movement of the outlaw. It is the rebel and the status quo simultaneously. Our analysis will discuss how Hip-Hop may have the gameplan for a post-COVID global marketplace. Who better to teach how to manage disruption than artists, executives, entrepreneurs, and thinkers who were born from it and thrive in it? Via lectures, guest speakers, readings (Jeff Chang, Paul Butler, Dan Charnas, and others), and discussion we will gain a deeper understanding of Hip-Hop and how we can use it to understand our space better.

    Instructors Antoine Hardy