Political strategist Loge '87 selected for 2011 Littlefield Award

Bridgit Brown
March 17, 2011

Peter Loge ’87, a Washington, D.C.-based communications and political strategist, received the 2011 Walter Littlefield Distinguished Speaker in Rhetoric and Communication Award on March 16. The award, inspired by the career of former longtime Emerson faculty member Walter “Walt” Littlefield, honors alumni who have made a positive difference in the lives of others.

Professor and Communication Studies Chair Rich West with Peter Loge as he accepts the Walter Littlefield Distinguished Speaker in Rhetoric and Communication Award. 

“I’m here not because of me,” Loge said in his acceptance speech in the Bright Family Screening Room, “but because of everything that came before me and because of what I learned at EIV, the EVVYs, on the soccer team, and from my brothers in Phi Alpha Tau.”

Since earning a BA in Communication, Politics, and Law at Emerson in 1987, Loge continued his education, attaining a master’s degree in speech from Syracuse University in 1989 and receiving a second master’s degree in political science from Arizona State University in 1992. Then he worked as Deputy to Chief of Staff for Senator Edward Kennedy, as state director of the Jerry Brown for President Campaign; and as Chief of Staff and Press Secretary for U.S. Congressman Brad Sherman. Loge recalled his active student life. He was a “forensicator,” having won more than 100 trophies for excellence in speech and debate. He was one of the participants in the inaugural semester of the Los Angeles Program, and the national student president of Delta Sigma Ro and Tau Kappa Alpha. He also interned at the Massachusetts Democratic Party, Gold & Associates Political Consulting, and for the Tom Bradley for California Governor Campaign.

Today, Loge directs Milo Public Affairs, a Washington, D.C.-based firm that provides strategic advice and best practices to candidates, elected officials, and advocacy groups and organizations. Among his clients are Oxfam America; The Caucus for Producers, Writers & Directors; Free the Slaves; The Innocence Project; and others. He is also an adjunct faculty member at George Washington University, where he teaches courses on political language and theory.

Peter Loge delivers his acceptance speech to an audience of students, staff, fellow contemporaries, and former professors. 

But it is not just the work Loge has done since graduating that brings him back to Emerson. It is the fact that he never let go of that special “connection” he forged while at Emerson more than 20 years ago, he said.

“Peter has a golden touch,” said Communication Studies Chair Rich West in his introductory speech. “He helped to establish the D.C. Semester, an internship program that has won great reviews by the dozens of students who have been a part of it. He served as an instructor in that program, introducing students to the hands-on world of D.C.,” West continued.

West also called Loge “student centered,” adding that although his office is hundreds of miles away, he is a consistent and thoughtful supporter of the School of Communication, its students, and the campus overall. 

“As citizens within a democracy, we have an obligation to engage. As Emerson students and alumni, you have a responsibility to do so wisely and justly.”

The Walt Littlefield Distinguished Speaker in Social Awareness event was one of the many activities of the second annual Emerson College Communication Week: Bridging Interest With Inspiration. 

Photo Credits: Aja Neahring

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