FACE Lab technology viewed by community

Ruth Grossman

Assistant Professor Ruth Grossman explains how lab technology is used.

Students, faculty, and staff on April 28 attended the open house for Emerson’s new Facial Affective Communicative Expression (FACE) Lab, which is dedicated to autism research and overseen by Assistant Professor Ruth Grossman of the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department. (Photos by Dan O’Brien)



May 01, 2014

The Emerson community on April 28 got an up-close look at the College’s new Facial Affective and Communicative Expressions (FACE) Lab for autism research that was launched this semester with the help of a $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

Overseen by Assistant Professor Ruth Grossman of the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department, the FACE Lab has state-of-the-art equipment that tracks eye gaze and facial movements with astounding precision. The equipment will be used primarily on adolescents on the autism spectrum during research studies.

Among the technology are six infrared motion-capture cameras that measure a subject’s facial movements at 515 frames per second. An infrared eye-tracker takes up to 500 snapshots per second of a person’s eye movement.

Learn more about the FACE Lab.

FACE Lab

For the purposes of a photo demonstration, a 12-year-old girl (who is not a patient) is outfitted with reflective markers that help autism researchers in Emerson's new FACE lab examine facial expressions. (Photo by Kelsey Davis '14)

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