Events


  • Ritual and Human Flourishing

    Sep2820166:00 pm - 8:00 pm

    Little Building
    Charles Beard Room

    Sponsored by Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies with Academic Affairs, School of the Arts, School of Communication

    For more information please contact:
    David Kishik


    Join Michael Puett of Harvard University for a lecture on this fascinating topic as a part of the Adventures in Ethics Series, "On Religion."

    On Religion is the 2016–2017 theme of Adventures in Ethics. It is the third iteration of a multi–year lecture series co-directed by Pablo Muchnik and David Kishik, with Thomas Cooper as an advising partner. It is made possible by the generous support of Patti Wheeler Hindery and the academic leadership at Emerson College.
     

  • The Complex Life and Death of Ken Saro-Wiwa: Nigerian Artist and Activist

    Sep29201610:00 am - 12:00 pm

    Little Building
    Cabaret

    This event is not open to the public.

    Sponsored by Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies

    For more information please contact:
    Institute Events


    Professor Toyin Falola, Department of History, University of Texas at Austin

    This lecture celebrates the biography of Ken Saro-Wiwa published this year by Dr. Toyin Falola and Dr. Roy Doron. The biography marks the 21st anniversary of Saro-Wiwa's death at the hands of Nigeria's last military dictatorship. His biography has many important lessons that are still relevant today with regard to environmental activism, ethnic politics, nationalism, and African history. These themes are threaded throughout Sara-Wiwa's various careers in administration and the arts, television production, writing, and electoral politics.
     

  • Out in the Periphery: Latin America's Gay Rights Revolution

    Sep2920164:00 pm - 5:45 pm

    Walker Building
    210

    This event is not open to the public.

    Sponsored by Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies

    For more information please contact:
    Institute Events


    Omar G. Encarnación, Professor of Political Studies, Bard College

    Known around the world as a bastion of Catholicism and machismo, Latin America has emerged in recent years as the undisputed gay rights leader of the Global South. Even more surprising is that several Latin American nations have surpassed many developed nations, including the United States, in legislating equality for the LGBT community. So how did this dramatic and unexpected expansion of gay rights come about? And why are Latin American nations diverging in their embrace of gay rights, a point highlighted by the paradoxical experiences of Argentina and Brazil?

     

  • Did the Bible's Creators Actually Have Ethical Teachings?

    Oct420164:00 pm - 6:00 pm

    Little Building
    Charles Beard Room

    Sponsored by Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies with Academic Affairs, School of the Arts, School of Communication

    For more information please contact:
    David Kishik


    Join Seth Sanders, University of California Davis, for a lecture on this fascinating topic as a part of the Adventures in Ethics Series, "On Religion."

    On Religion is the 2016–2017 theme of Adventures in Ethics. It is the third iteration of a multi–year lecture series co-directed by Pablo Muchnik and David Kishik, with Thomas Cooper as an advising partner. It is made possible by the generous support of Patti Wheeler Hindery and the academic leadership at Emerson College.

  • Democratization and Memories of Violence: Ethnic minority rights movements in Mexico, Turkey, and El Salvador

    Oct1320166:00 pm - 7:30 pm

    Walker Building
    Iwasaki Library (Co-Lab)

    Sponsored by Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies

    For more information please contact:
    Institute Events


    Book Celebration with Author and Professor Mneesha Gellman

    Democratization and Memories of Violence: Ethnic minority rights movements in Mexico, Turkey, and El Salvador examines how ethnic minority communities use memories of state and paramilitary violence to shame states into cooperating with minority cultural agendas such as the right to mother tongue education. Shaming and claiming is a social movement tactic that binds historic violence to contemporary citizenship. Combining theory with empirics, the book accounts for how democratization shapes citizen experiences of interest representation and how memorialization processes challenge state regimes of forgetting at local, state, and international levels. Democratization and Memories of Violence draws on six case studies in Mexico, Turkey, and El Salvador to show how memory-based narratives serve as emotionally salient leverage for marginalized communities to facilitate state consideration of minority rights agendas.

    Refreshments will be served.

  • A Revolution of Value: A Politics for Our Time

    Oct14201610:00 am - 11:00 am

    Cutler Majestic Theatre

    This event is not open to the public.

    Sponsored by Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies

    For more information please contact:
    Institute Events


    Eddie Glaude, Princeton University

    Honors Lecture/College-wide Diversity Teach-In Keynote

     If we are committed to American democracy, we have to work for transformative change. This will require a revolution of value that upends the belief that white people are valued more than others. It will require breaking the racial habits that give life to "the value gap." And it starts with changes in our social and political arrangements. A revolution of value seeks to uproot those of ways of seeing and living that allow Americans to support racial inequality and yet live in ways that suggest they believe otherwise. It is a revolution to close, once and for all, the value gap. It involves three basic components: (1) a change in how we view government; (2) a change in how we view black people; and (3) a change in how we view what ultimately matters to us as Americans.

     

  • Reading and Q&A with Clarence Major

    Oct1820161:00 pm - 3:00 pm

    Little Building
    Cabaret

    Sponsored by Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies with Writing, Literature & Publishing

    For more information please contact:
    Institute Events


    Clarence Major was a finalist for the National Book Awards (1999). He is recipient of many awards, among them, a National Council on The Arts Award (1970), a Fulbright (1981-1983), a Western States Book Award (1986) and two Pushcart prizes--one for poetry, one for fiction. Major is a contributor to many periodicals and anthologies in the USA, Europe, South America and Africa. He has served as judge for The National Book Awards, the PEN-Faulkner Award and twice for the National Endowment for The Arts. Major has lectured and read his work in dozens of U. S. universities as well as in England, France, Liberia, West Germany, Ghana, and Italy. He is currently professor of twentieth century American literature at the University of California at Davis.

    Join us October 18th for a Reading and Q&A session with Dr. Major.

     Co-sponsored by the Writing, Literature & Publishing Department

  • Between Racism and Islamophobia: Resistance and Solidarity in a Changing Europe

    Oct2020164:00 pm - 5:30 pm

    Little Building
    Cabaret

    This event is not open to the public.

    Sponsored by Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies

    For more information please contact:
    Institute Events


    Miriyam Aouragh, University of Westminster

    Miriyam Aouragh is Leverhulme Fellow and lecturer at Communication And Media Research Institute, University of Westminster London. She grew up in Amsterdam as a second generation Moroccan where she was an activist and antiracism campaigner. After completing an MA in Anthropology/non-Western sociology at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and PhD at the University of Amsterdam she moved to Oxford (UK) for her Postdoc. She studied the implications of the Internet for grassroots activists and communities in Palestine and the diaspora during the Second Intifada (Palestine Online, 2011, IB Tauris). She continued her research among activists with special interest in the impact of the cyber warfare, infrastructures and political-economy of technology, in specific in the paradoxical context of revolution and counter-revolution in Syria and Morocco.

  • Gay and Middle Eastern in Post-Orlando America

    Oct2420164:00 pm - 6:00 pm

    Max Mutchnick Campus Center
    Multipurpose Room

    This event is not open to the public.

    Sponsored by Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies

    For more information please contact:
    Institute Events


    Sa'ed Adel Atshan, Swarthmore College

    On June 12, 2016, a gunman – Omar Mateen – opened fire at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people, and injuring 53, most of whom were Latinx. This was the largest attack on U.S. soil since 9–11. How do we make sense of this tragic event? Dr. Atshan will share his personal experiences and perspective as an LGBTQ rights activist in the Middle East as well as reflect on the Orlando massacre and its global implications, especially as they pertain to the struggle against homophobia, in the U.S. and around the world.

  • Leviathan's Arms

    Nov120164:00 pm - 5:45 pm

    Little Building
    Charles Beard Room

    Sponsored by Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies with Academic Affairs, School of the Arts, School of Communication

    For more information please contact:
    David Kishik


    Join Gil Aidjar of Columbia University for a lecture on this fascinating topic as a part of the Adventures in Ethics Series, "On Religion."

    On Religion is the 2016–2017 theme of Adventures in Ethics. It is the third iteration of a multi–year lecture series co-directed by Pablo Muchnik and David Kishik, with Thomas Cooper as an advising partner. It is made possible by the generous support of Patti Wheeler Hindery and the academic leadership at Emerson College.

  • Hiphop's Critical Gender Politics

    Nov10201610:00 am - 11:45 am

    Walker Building
    210

    This event is not open to the public.

    Sponsored by Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies

    For more information please contact:
    Institute Events


    A Lecture with Dawn-Elissa Fischer, Harvard University

    Dr. Fischer will explore gender politics and Hiphop, in particular how Hiphop and womanism are becoming part of the solution for inequalities and issues associated with gendered identities.
     

    Coordinated through the Culture, Art & Social Change Cluster

  • Social Justice, Neutrality and Balance

    Nov1420166:00 pm - 8:00 pm

    216 Tremont
    Bill Bordy Theater

    Sponsored by Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies

    For more information please contact:
    Institute Events


    Jacey Fortin is a freelance journalist and the International Women's Media Foundation's Elizabeth Nueffer Fellow for 2016/17. For the past few years she has covered human rights, politics, economic development, and media freedoms in the Horn of Africa. She has focused on conflict as well, reporting on the civil war in South Sudan, militancy in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and violent unrest in Ethiopia. Her articles and photographs have appeared in The New York Times, Foreign Policy, The Africa Report, Agence France-Presse, Al Jazeera and others.

    Carol Simpson of the International Women's Media Foundation will be moderating.

    Cosponsored by The Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA), the Journalism Department, President Lee Pelton, the Communication Studies Department, Career Services, and the School of Communication.

  • What Could 'Ethics' Be in a Fragmented World?

    Feb720174:00 pm - 6:00 pm

    Little Building
    Charles Beard Room

    Sponsored by Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies with Academic Affairs, School of the Arts, School of Communication

    For more information please contact:
    David Kishik


    Join Stanley Hauerwas of Duke University for a lecture on this fascinating topic as a part of the Adventures in Ethics Series, "On Religion."

    On Religion is the 2016–2017 theme of Adventures in Ethics. It is the third iteration of a multi–year lecture series co-directed by Pablo Muchnik and David Kishik, with Thomas Cooper as an advising partner. It is made possible by the generous support of Patti Wheeler Hindery and the academic leadership at Emerson College.

  • Religion in Politics: A Compelling Liberal Idea

    Mar2820174:00 pm - 6:00 pm

    Little Building
    Charles Beard Room

    Sponsored by Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies with Academic Affairs, School of the Arts, School of Communication

    For more information please contact:
    David Kishik


    Join Kevin Vallier of Bowling Green State University for a lecture on this fascinating topic as a part of the Adventures in Ethics Series, "On Religion."

    On Religion is the 2016–2017 theme of Adventures in Ethics. It is the third iteration of a multi–year lecture series co-directed by Pablo Muchnik and David Kishik, with Thomas Cooper as an advising partner. It is made possible by the generous support of Patti Wheeler Hindery and the academic leadership at Emerson College.

  • Religion, Power and Politics Beyond the Nation-State

    Apr2020174:00 pm - 6:00 pm

    Little Building
    Charles Beard Room

    Sponsored by Institute for Liberal Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies with Academic Affairs, School of the Arts, School of Communication

    For more information please contact:
    David Kishik


    Join Elizabeth Hurd of Northwestern University for a lecture on this fascinating topic as a part of the Adventures in Ethics Series, "On Religion."

    On Religion is the 2016–2017 theme of Adventures in Ethics. It is the third iteration of a multi–year lecture series co-directed by Pablo Muchnik and David Kishik, with Thomas Cooper as an advising partner. It is made possible by the generous support of Patti Wheeler Hindery and the academic leadership at Emerson College.