Registrar

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

Student

Student educational records are considered confidential and may not be released without the written consent of the student.


About FERPA

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. They are:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records.
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records to ensure that they are not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy or other right.
  3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.
  4. The right to file with the U.S. Department of Education a complaint concerning alleged failures by Emerson College to comply with the requirements of FERPA.
  5. The right to obtain a copy of Emerson College’s student records policy. You can obtain a copy of the policy from the Registrar’s Office.

To read more about FERPA, consult the Course Catalogue.


Directory Information

Emerson College has designated the following information as Directory Information: name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance, degrees earned, dates of degrees, awards/honors/scholarships, major, sports and activities, height and weight of members of athletic teams, photographs or recorded images, advisor, concentrations, and computer user name.

The College may disclose any of those items without prior written consent unless notified in writing to the contrary. Students wishing to withhold the disclosure of any aspects of the above-mentioned Directory Information must file a Request to Prevent Disclosure of Directory Information Form, available at the Registrar’s Office.


FERPA Annual Notice to Reflect Possible Federal and State Data Collection and Use

As of January 3, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education’s FERPA regulations expand the circumstances under which student education records and personally identifiable information (PII) contained in such records — including the student’s Social Security Number, grades, or other private information — may be accessed without the student’s consent.

First, the U.S. Comptroller General, the U.S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or state and local education authorities ("Federal and State Authorities") may allow access to a student’s records and PII without the student’s consent to any third party designated by a Federal or State Authority to evaluate a federal- or state-supported education program. The evaluation may relate to any program that is "principally engaged in the provision of education," such as early childhood education and job training, as well as any program that is administered by an education agency or institution.

Second, Federal and State Authorities may allow access to a student’s education records and PII without the student’s consent to researchers performing certain types of studies, in certain cases even when we object to or do not request such research. Federal and State Authorities must obtain certain use-restriction and data security promises from the entities that they authorize to receive a student’s PII, but the Authorities need not maintain direct control over such entities.

In addition, in connection with Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems, State Authorities may collect, compile, permanently retain, and share without the student’s consent PII from the student’s education records, and they may track the student’s participation in education and other programs by linking such PII to other personal information about the student that they obtain from other Federal or State data sources, including workforce development, unemployment insurance, child welfare, juvenile justice, military service, and migrant student records systems.


FERPA Tutorial