Lindsey A. Beck

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

INSTITUTE FOR LIBERAL ARTS & INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

On Leave

B.A. Dartmouth College
M.S. Yale University
M.Phil. Yale University
Ph.D. Yale University

http://beck.socialpsychology.org

Contact Information

Office: Walker 414E
Phone: 3508
E-Mail »

Dr. Lindsey A. Beck is a social psychologist who studies how people initiate, develop, and maintain close relationships, including friendships and romantic relationships. For example, she examines how people react to signs of initial interest in a relationship, how partners ask for and offer support as they develop relationships, and how couples respond to stressful situations in ongoing relationships. She uses diverse methodologies to investigate these topics, including developmental approaches, biological methods, field studies, experimental designs, and longitudinal and daily-report studies.

She has published her work in several peer-reviewed journals, including Psychological Science, Psychoneuroendocrinology, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, and Journal of Family Theory and Review. She teaches courses in the psychology of close relationships, social psychology, and introduction to psychology.


Publications

  • 2009
  • Beck, L. A., & Clark, M. S. (2009). Offering more support than we seek. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 45, 267-270.

  • 2009
  • Beck, L. A., & Clark, M. S. (2009). Choosing to enter or avoid diagnostic social situations. Psychological Science, 20(9), 1175-1181.

  • 2010
  • Clark, M. S., & Beck, L. A. (2010). Initiating and evaluating close relationships: A task central to emerging adults. In F. D. Fincham & M. Cui (Eds.), Romantic relationships in emerging adulthood (pp. 190-212). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

  • 2010
  • Beck, L. A., & Clark, M. S. (2010). What constitutes a healthy communal marriage and why relationship stage matters. Journal of Family Theory & Review, 2(4), 299-315.

  • 2010
  • Beck, L. A., & Clark, M. S. (2010). Looking a gift horse in the mouth as a defense against increasing intimacy. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 46, 676-679.

  • 2013
  • Beck, L. A., Pietromonaco, P. R., DeBuse, C. J., Powers, S. I., & Sayer, A. G. (2013). Spouses’ attachment pairings predict neuroendocrine, behavioral, and psychological responses to marital conflict. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 105(3), 388-424.

  • 2014
  • Beck, L. A., Pietromonaco, P. R., DeVito, C. C., Powers, S. I., & Boyle, A. M. (2014). Congruence between spouses’ perceptions and observers’ ratings of responsiveness: The role of attachment avoidance. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 40(2), 164-174.

  • 2015
  • Pietromonaco, P. R., & Beck, L. A. (2015). Attachment processes in adult romantic relationships. In M. Mikulincer, P. R. Shaver, J. A. Simpson, & J. F. Dovidio (Eds.), APA handbook of personality and social psychology (Vol. 3): Interpersonal relations (pp. 33-64). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

  • 2016
  • Beck, L. A., Clark, M. S., & Olson, K. R. (2016). When do we offer more support than we seek? A behavioral replication and developmental extension. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. Advance online publication.

  • 2017
  • Ketay, S., & Beck, L. A. (2017). Attachment predicts cortisol response and closeness in dyadic social interaction. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 80, 114-121.

  • 2017
  • Clark, M. S., Beck, L. A., & Aragón, O. R. (in press). Relationship initiation: Bridging the gap between initial attraction and well-functioning communal relationships. In B. Fiese, K. Deater-Deckard, M. Celano, E. Jouriles, & M. Whisman (Eds.), APA handbook of contemporary family psychology (Vol. 1): Foundations, methods, and changing forms. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.


Expertise

Behavioral Science
Mathematics and Statistics
Psychology
Research Methodology