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Center for Innovation in Teaching and Learning

2011-2012 Ethics Data

Research in Progress
(based upon data from 2010–11 course catalogs and faculty communication)

  Number Percent
1. Emerson Listed Courses 802 100
2. Emerson Ethics Courses (Lines 3+4) 80 10
3. Courses with Ethics in the Title 12 2
4. Courses with Ethics Explicit Content in Course Descriptions 68 8
5. Total Number of Academic Units (Department/Institute) 8 100
6. Number of Units Offering Courses with Ethics in the Title 4 50
7. Number of Units Offering Courses with Ethics Content in Course Description 8 100
8. Number of Units with ≥ 10% of Courses with Ethics in the Title 1 13
9. Number of Units with ≥ 5% of Courses with Ethics in the Title
2 25
10. Number of Units with ≥ 2% of Courses with Ethics in the Title
4 50
11. Number of Units with ≥ 10% of Courses with Explicit Ethics Content in the Course Description
4 50
12. Number of Units with ≥ 5% of Courses with Explicit Ethics Content in the Course Description
6 75
Total Courses (Undergraduate) Number Percent
1. Undergraduate courses listed 573 100
2. Courses with "ethics" in the title 9 2
3. Courses with explicit ethics content
(in course or faculty description)
54 9
4. Total "ethics" courses (Lines 2+3) 63 11
Total Courses (Graduate)
1. Graduate courses listed* 229 100
2. Courses with "ethics" in title 3 1
2a. Courses with "ethics" in title (if 500 level courses included) 3 1
3. Courses with explicit ethics* content
(in course or faculty description)
19 8
3a. Courses with explicit ethics* content
(if 500 level courses included)
23 10
4. Total "ethics courses" (Lines 2+3)* 22 10
4a. Total "ethics courses" if 500 level courses are included
(Lines 2a+3a)
26 11

*Not including 500 level courses already counted as undergraduate courses.


Departmental and School Undergraduate Ethics Offerings 2010–11

School of the Arts

Department Total School and Dept. Catalog Courses Number (Percent) of Emerson Ethics Title Courses Number (Percent) of Emerson Ethics Description Courses
Performing Arts
144 0 (0%)
1 (1%)
      Undergraduate 118 0 (0%) 1 (1%)
      Graduate 26 0 (0%) 0 (0%)
Visual & Media Arts
151 3 (25%)
19 (25%)
      Undergraduate 121 2 (17%) 15 (20%)
      Graduate 30 1 (8%) 4 (5%)
Writing, Literature & Publishing
111
1 (8%)
4 (5%)
      Undergraduate 65 0 (0%) 0 (0%)
      Graduate 46 1 (8%) 4 (5%)
School of the Arts (Subtotal)
406 4 (34%)
24 (31%)
      Undergraduate 304 2 (17%) 16 (21%)
      Graduate 102 2 (17%) 8 (10%)


School of Communication

Department Total School and Dept. Catalog Courses Number (Percent) of Emerson Ethics Title Courses Number (Percent) of Emerson Ethics Description Courses
Communication Science & Disorders
97 0 (0%)
4 (5%)
      Undergraduate 54 0 (0%) 3 (4%)
      Graduate 43 0 (0%) 1 (1%)
Communication Studies
78 6 (50%)
22 (29%)
      Undergraduate 55 6 (50%) 17 (22%)
      Graduate 23 0 (0%) 5 (7%)
Journalism
90
2 (16%)
12 (16%)
      Undergraduate 61 1 (8%) 7 (9%)
      Graduate 29 1 (8%) 5 (7%)
Marketing Communication
73 0 (0%)
9 (12%)
      Undergraduate 41 0 (0%) 5 (7%)
      Graduate 32 0 (0%) 4 (5%)
School of Communication (Subtotal)
338 8 (66%)
47 (61%)
      Undergraduate 211 7 (58%) 32 (42%)
      Graduate 127 1 (8%) 15 (19%)


Department
Total School and Dept Catalog Courses Number (Percent) of Emerson Ethics Title Courses Number (Percent) of Emerson Ethics Description Courses
Institute 59 0 (0%)
6 (8%)
      Undergraduate 59 0 (0%) 6 (8%)
      Graduate 0 0 (0%) 0 (0%)

General Education

There are nine undergraduate courses which count as ethics and values perspectives courses as one of Emerson College’s general education requirements. Eight of these (89%) are taught within the Communication Studies department, seven (78%) of which are listed as PH (philosophy) courses and one (11%) as PO (political communication). One (11%) ethics and values perspective course is taught as an Honors course within the Institute. Thus, with the exception of the one Honors course, all Ethics and Values Perspectives courses are currently taught within the School of Communication.

NOTE ON METHODS: All data above is based upon the current undergraduate and graduate catalogs as well as input about courses by participating faculty. This is draft data and most numbers (other than percentages) are likely to be lower than the actual number of ethics courses being taught since some faculty have not participated and, of these, some may be teaching ethics modules or segments within their classes without so indicating within their course descriptions. Courses which are in development and being piloted are not included. Data regarding “free standing” courses with the word “ethics “ in their title should reveal a high degree of accuracy. The data does not take into account class size, student level (e.g. sophomore or junior), nor the number of sections per course.

(Data compiled by Dr. Tom Cooper and VMA graduate student Qinshu Zuo, September 2011 – February, 2012)